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Batman/The Shadow: The Murder Geniuses

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From the incredible minds of iconic authors Scott Snyder and Steve Orlando comes the resurgence of a classic noir character. The Shadow was a major influence of the Batman himself and now appears in this incredible six issue crossover event. While investigating the murde of a Gothamite, Batman identifies his prime suspect as Lamont Cranston... but there are two problems wit From the incredible minds of iconic authors Scott Snyder and Steve Orlando comes the resurgence of a classic noir character. The Shadow was a major influence of the Batman himself and now appears in this incredible six issue crossover event. While investigating the murde of a Gothamite, Batman identifies his prime suspect as Lamont Cranston... but there are two problems with that. One, Batman is not aware Lamont's alter ego is the master detective known as the Shadow. Two, and more importantly, Cranston seems to have died over half a century ago! Collects BATMAN/THE SHADOW #1-6 and stories from BATMAN ANNUAL #1.


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From the incredible minds of iconic authors Scott Snyder and Steve Orlando comes the resurgence of a classic noir character. The Shadow was a major influence of the Batman himself and now appears in this incredible six issue crossover event. While investigating the murde of a Gothamite, Batman identifies his prime suspect as Lamont Cranston... but there are two problems wit From the incredible minds of iconic authors Scott Snyder and Steve Orlando comes the resurgence of a classic noir character. The Shadow was a major influence of the Batman himself and now appears in this incredible six issue crossover event. While investigating the murde of a Gothamite, Batman identifies his prime suspect as Lamont Cranston... but there are two problems with that. One, Batman is not aware Lamont's alter ego is the master detective known as the Shadow. Two, and more importantly, Cranston seems to have died over half a century ago! Collects BATMAN/THE SHADOW #1-6 and stories from BATMAN ANNUAL #1.

30 review for Batman/The Shadow: The Murder Geniuses

  1. 4 out of 5

    Khurram

    I really enjoyed this book. I know nothing about the Shadow so I am reviewing this as purely a Batman fan. The story is good and the art work fits the story. I was not crazy about it when I first saw it, but it fit. Gives the comic great dark atmosphere. Even if the modeled one of the villains on the incarnation of them from the terrible Suicide Squad movie, but again it worked. The story and the differences in the characters philosophies and methods really made the story better for me, also I re I really enjoyed this book. I know nothing about the Shadow so I am reviewing this as purely a Batman fan. The story is good and the art work fits the story. I was not crazy about it when I first saw it, but it fit. Gives the comic great dark atmosphere. Even if the modeled one of the villains on the incarnation of them from the terrible Suicide Squad movie, but again it worked. The story and the differences in the characters philosophies and methods really made the story better for me, also I really liked the way they managed to incorporate the Shadow into Batman lore/history. Like I said I don’t know the Shadow so I can’t comment on things from his side. A great comic crossover. Good story cleverly done. Perfect artwork for the mood of the comic. There is a cover gallery at the back with an A4 version of rack of the regular issue covers. There are a couple of covers inserted in between each chapter/issue as well. I enjoyed it all the way through and would happily read it again and again.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Donovan

    An exhilarating crossover of mystery, death, action, and far more supernaturalism than Batman is usually afforded, while also lending more depth to Batman’s already ancient history. The artwork is exquisite.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    Snyder and Orlando did a really solid job of meshing the 2 characters while bringing the Shadow to the modern day. In this version, the Shadow was actually many of Batman's trainers in disguise and was actually training Bruce Wayne to replace him one day. There's also an evil version of the Shadow floating around killing altruistic people named the Stag. When Stagg and the Joker team up, Batman and the Shadow must work together to stop Stag from ascending to Shamba La. Received an advance copy fr Snyder and Orlando did a really solid job of meshing the 2 characters while bringing the Shadow to the modern day. In this version, the Shadow was actually many of Batman's trainers in disguise and was actually training Bruce Wayne to replace him one day. There's also an evil version of the Shadow floating around killing altruistic people named the Stag. When Stagg and the Joker team up, Batman and the Shadow must work together to stop Stag from ascending to Shamba La. Received an advance copy from DC / Dynamite and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Maria

    Many thanks to DC Entertainment for this eARC copy in exchange for an honest review. I have finished this some time last year and didn't know how to review it. Unfortunately, I wasn't a big fan of it. I love Batman and have love the different iterations of his story. I thought this was a good and interesting take to his story. However, my issue really was with how his story intertwinned with the Shadow's. Might be my lack of familiarity with this specific character or the way he was written which Many thanks to DC Entertainment for this eARC copy in exchange for an honest review. I have finished this some time last year and didn't know how to review it. Unfortunately, I wasn't a big fan of it. I love Batman and have love the different iterations of his story. I thought this was a good and interesting take to his story. However, my issue really was with how his story intertwinned with the Shadow's. Might be my lack of familiarity with this specific character or the way he was written which is what made me not enjoy this character. Also, I had a little bit of a problem with the villain, The Stag. What the fuck is he doing? His purpose is unclear to me. Villains with a clear purpose and reason for doing the shit that they're doing make a compelling antagonist - this is not the case for The Stag. I could not understand why he repeats the same shit over and over again. Why? Like really? Am I the only idiot for not knowing? I love Scott Snyder. I love his Batman works, so far, except this one.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Artemy

    I wasn't expecting much from this crossover given that it's co-written by Steve Orlando, but it actually turned out to be pretty good. I don't know much about The Shadow, but he meshes well with Batman and his world, so their supernatural team-up adventure doesn't feel like a forced crossover as much as just an arc of Batman, and a pretty fun one at that. It's more action-oriented, so don't expect a deep story from this book, but the characterisation of Batman is actually on point (probably than I wasn't expecting much from this crossover given that it's co-written by Steve Orlando, but it actually turned out to be pretty good. I don't know much about The Shadow, but he meshes well with Batman and his world, so their supernatural team-up adventure doesn't feel like a forced crossover as much as just an arc of Batman, and a pretty fun one at that. It's more action-oriented, so don't expect a deep story from this book, but the characterisation of Batman is actually on point (probably thanks to co-writer Scott Snyder), and in this universe The Shadow is integrated in Batman's origin in an interesting way. Ryley Rossmo's artwork is great as always (if you're into his style), and fits the tone of the story well. All in all, a really solid and enjoyable read.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Rory Wilding

    The concept of crossovers in superhero comics is as old as the medium itself. When two publishers collaborate on a story that have two creations join forces, things get weird, such as Archie Meets the Punisher. The Dark Knight is no stranger to the crossover either, as Batman has joined forces with everyone from Spider-Man to the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. Now, with DC Comics collaborating with Dynamite Entertainment, Batman pairs up with one of his earliest influences. Please click here for m The concept of crossovers in superhero comics is as old as the medium itself. When two publishers collaborate on a story that have two creations join forces, things get weird, such as Archie Meets the Punisher. The Dark Knight is no stranger to the crossover either, as Batman has joined forces with everyone from Spider-Man to the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. Now, with DC Comics collaborating with Dynamite Entertainment, Batman pairs up with one of his earliest influences. Please click here for my full review.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Nicola Mansfield

    This is a hot mess! I was so looking forward to it! Batman is my favourite superhero and The Shadow is my favourite pulp masked hero. They are both vigilantes and both dark, brooding characters. A character match made in heaven. Instead what we get here is some weirdo, looney tune Shadow who is 'centuries!' old with paranormal powers and connections. He psychically knows the Bat's history and actually was people from his background. The art for The Shadow characters is good but the DC ones are p This is a hot mess! I was so looking forward to it! Batman is my favourite superhero and The Shadow is my favourite pulp masked hero. They are both vigilantes and both dark, brooding characters. A character match made in heaven. Instead what we get here is some weirdo, looney tune Shadow who is 'centuries!' old with paranormal powers and connections. He psychically knows the Bat's history and actually was people from his background. The art for The Shadow characters is good but the DC ones are painful. Terrible, terrible story of some ancient warrior villain's return. What a missed opportunity for a great team-up :-(

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)

    You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. What happens when a classic noir character from another publisher knows a resurgence and crosses over into the DC Universe? A whole lot of adventure. While these crossovers are not unfamiliar to DC Comics, they have tended to be of lesser quality to what fans often crave for. Occasionally, there are writers and artists who find the right mix to deliver stories that are unexpectedly a match from Heaven and those moments are what keeps fans on the You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. What happens when a classic noir character from another publisher knows a resurgence and crosses over into the DC Universe? A whole lot of adventure. While these crossovers are not unfamiliar to DC Comics, they have tended to be of lesser quality to what fans often crave for. Occasionally, there are writers and artists who find the right mix to deliver stories that are unexpectedly a match from Heaven and those moments are what keeps fans on the edge of their seats hoping that what they are about flip open will be the magical story they have never thought of wanting so much. If there’s one hero that is, however, easy to integrate with other comic book publishers, it’s Batman. From heroes from the Marvel universe, Hellboy, Judge Dredd to the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, there is no shortage of ideas that can be thoroughly explored, but there’s one mix that surprisingly goes quite well together and that might not have worked so well if it didn’t have a particular creative team on it and it’s with Batman and The Shadow. What is Batman/The Shadow: The Murder Geniuses about? Collecting issues #1-6 as well as stories from Batman Annual #1, iconic authors Scott Snyder and Steve Orlando join forces to explore an uncanny duo whose encounter will unveil a supernatural universe with deadly forces at works and who seek refuge in an ancient and powerful prophetic location that could either be the beginning or the end of everything. It is during the investigation of the murder of a Gothamite that Batman identifies Lamont Cranston as his prime suspect only to discover that he hasn’t been alive for over half a century and now usurps his way through life as the alter ego and master detective known as the Shadow. Their confrontation will, however, lead them in a clash of ideologies that will either turn them into friends or foes, but a tirade will be necessary for any one of them to realize anything about their ways of life. With a collaborated effort, Scott Snyder and Steve Orlando draw upon Batman’s and The Shadow’s most fundamental philosophies to connect their very distinctive realities together. In fact, The Shadow has always been a part of the Dark Knight’s life although Bruce Wayne has never been aware of his influence on his growth. While Batman’s rational and grounded interpretation of reality has often been put against mysticism and paranormal activities, it has often served as a wonderful moment of introspection for the Caped Crusader. In this story arc, The Shadow’s universe comes to engulf Bruce Wayne and Gotham City in an envelope of mysterious and inexplicable occurrences that blends perfectly with the exploration of the judgment of criminals. The whole story takes on Batman’s non-lethal crime-stopping methods and puts it up against The Shadow’s lethal and deadly vigilantism to have them both try and understand each other’s vision of criminality. The artwork works wonderfully with the story and is consistent from cover to cover. It is a style that reminds me of Takashi Okazaki’s character design in the animated movie Batman: Ninja, but something less strict in the contour of characters and objects. It is sometimes rough and grainy but does a great job in capturing the ideas conveyed by the writers. There’s also an underlying cartoon vibe to the story that is particularly observable in action sequences that can be sometimes bothersome in its ability to convey realism in its more fantasy-oriented ideas. The splash pages are however stunning and do wonders in delivering insanely wild moments that seems completely preposterous, but its the colours and transitions from panel-to-panel that aid readers in being immersed by the story. With an inclination towards action sequences rather than intrigue development, the mystery also permeates throughout the art and story. Batman/The Shadow: The Murder Geniuses is an exciting and mythical crossover event that leads vigilantes to reassess their respective approaches to ridding the world of crime. Yours truly, Lashaan | Blogger and Book Reviewer Official blog: https://bookidote.com/

  9. 5 out of 5

    Nathaniel Darkish

    I had a difficult time following the story on this. I will admit that much of my difficulty is probably tied to my very, very limited knowledge of The Shadow, but with how the story was set up I really felt like The Shadow being so confusing was more a failure on the part of the writers than it was on me. There was a lot of opportunity to make his power set and lore more clear than they did, especially since it constantly suggested that he either was a mentor to Batman, or that he at least regul I had a difficult time following the story on this. I will admit that much of my difficulty is probably tied to my very, very limited knowledge of The Shadow, but with how the story was set up I really felt like The Shadow being so confusing was more a failure on the part of the writers than it was on me. There was a lot of opportunity to make his power set and lore more clear than they did, especially since it constantly suggested that he either was a mentor to Batman, or that he at least regularly took the guise of important figures in Batman's life. The villain, The Stag, was largely uninteresting because its motivations were unclear. The Stag was also devoid of any personality in that it [spoiler] ended up being an entire army, [/spoiler], plus only ever said one thing over and over. The alliance with Joker was really bizarre in that any details of plans or the like seem like they'd be impossible to work out because even with the Joker the Stag just said the same line over and over. Also, it seemed very random that basically all of Batman's villains all showed up for one of the confrontations. The more I think about this story the less I like it and the less it makes sense to me. This is really a shame, because both Steve Orlando and Scott Snyder have written some very enjoyable comics. This, unfortunately, is not one of those.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    Disappointing, as - incorrectly judging a book by its cover - I thought this would be a kick-ass teaming of the two characters. The prologue was good . . . and then things went downhill from there. Admittedly I know more about Batman than the Shadow, but this story (especially with all the insistent mumbo-jumbo exposition dialogue spouted by the Shadow - he seems to know everything but is always a step behind?) left me confused, underwhelmed, and feeling that it was all a missed opportunity.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Quentin Wallace

    I have to say I was disappointed in this one. It seemed like such a can't miss with Batman teaming with The Shadow, but the story was too metaphysical and mystical and there was also some retconning going on I didn't care for. The story was also confusing which didn't help. The art wasn't bad and even with its limitations it was still cool to see the characters interacting, but the potential of this one wasn't reached at all. I have to say I was disappointed in this one. It seemed like such a can't miss with Batman teaming with The Shadow, but the story was too metaphysical and mystical and there was also some retconning going on I didn't care for. The story was also confusing which didn't help. The art wasn't bad and even with its limitations it was still cool to see the characters interacting, but the potential of this one wasn't reached at all.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    The Shadow and Batman work together on solving a great mystery amidst "funky" supernatural happenings. Bold and brilliant shades of red and black in the artwork. OVERALL GRADE: B. The Shadow and Batman work together on solving a great mystery amidst "funky" supernatural happenings. Bold and brilliant shades of red and black in the artwork. OVERALL GRADE: B.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Logan

    An Okay read. So its pretty cool that DC has been doing tons of crossovers with smaller publishers lately, brings us back to the 90s where everyone was doing crossovers! Overall the story was okay, but not the best. I liked the beginning where Batman was investigating into The Shadow, learning about him, like I was and I'm sure many readers who are unfamiliar with The Shadow. I also liked how they tied The Shadow directly into Batman's Origin which I thought was pretty clever. Were already two i An Okay read. So its pretty cool that DC has been doing tons of crossovers with smaller publishers lately, brings us back to the 90s where everyone was doing crossovers! Overall the story was okay, but not the best. I liked the beginning where Batman was investigating into The Shadow, learning about him, like I was and I'm sure many readers who are unfamiliar with The Shadow. I also liked how they tied The Shadow directly into Batman's Origin which I thought was pretty clever. Were already two issues into the sequel at the moment so it will be interesting to see where that goes. But overall, this is an okay read, I guess this is a good enough introduction to The Shadow as I'm sure it will be for many readers.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Craig

    This should have been so much better. You've got Batman meeting the character who basically inspired his creation and this is all the writers could come up with? A dull, boring story with some supposedly immortal murderer, The Stag (if I read/hear "I am an honest signal" once more, I'll throw this book across the room), teaming up with a totally charisma-free Joker? Dull, dull, dull. It really reads as little more than a cash-grab--I'm sure some editor somewhere thought this was a can't-miss ide This should have been so much better. You've got Batman meeting the character who basically inspired his creation and this is all the writers could come up with? A dull, boring story with some supposedly immortal murderer, The Stag (if I read/hear "I am an honest signal" once more, I'll throw this book across the room), teaming up with a totally charisma-free Joker? Dull, dull, dull. It really reads as little more than a cash-grab--I'm sure some editor somewhere thought this was a can't-miss idea and never really gave the story a second thought.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Boyd

    VEry nice story teaming up my two favorite detectives. Nice art makes this an above average comic. Very recommended

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ola G

    7/10 stars Started out very intriguing, the resolution was a bit lacklustre, however. I wish it did away with all that Cain mark, Shamba-la stuff and Lovecraftian overlords, as it was a bit over the top, but at least the Joker didn't disappoint! There were some Joker panels that were just superb, and the relationship between Batman and Joker was surprisingly sweet (on both sides, actually). I also appreciate the homage paid by Snyder to the character and idea of Shadow as an influence on Batman - 7/10 stars Started out very intriguing, the resolution was a bit lacklustre, however. I wish it did away with all that Cain mark, Shamba-la stuff and Lovecraftian overlords, as it was a bit over the top, but at least the Joker didn't disappoint! There were some Joker panels that were just superb, and the relationship between Batman and Joker was surprisingly sweet (on both sides, actually). I also appreciate the homage paid by Snyder to the character and idea of Shadow as an influence on Batman - neatly done! All in all, an interesting exercise with some very cool moments and a bit of well-suited creepiness, nicely enhanced by Rossmo's nervous, expressionistic art style.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Dr Rashmit Mishra

    Man this was awful . I hated almost 90% of the book. The plot was something that's been done before , the action scenes were confusing , the dialogues were messed up , the art was wierd ... I hated everything about this except the prologue Man this was awful . I hated almost 90% of the book. The plot was something that's been done before , the action scenes were confusing , the dialogues were messed up , the art was wierd ... I hated everything about this except the prologue

  18. 5 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    A crossover which in many ways gets off to exactly the right start; Batman thinks he’s on the Shadow’s trail, when all along the Shadow has been leading him by the nose, because Batman is in fact his backwards pupil. The whole master of disguise, suddenly disappear in mid-sentence bits with which Batman wows the rubes? The Shadow does likewise to him. And Rossmo draws a suitably puppyish and generally baffled Batman, constantly getting dressed down by the superior crimefighter. “The weed of crim A crossover which in many ways gets off to exactly the right start; Batman thinks he’s on the Shadow’s trail, when all along the Shadow has been leading him by the nose, because Batman is in fact his backwards pupil. The whole master of disguise, suddenly disappear in mid-sentence bits with which Batman wows the rubes? The Shadow does likewise to him. And Rossmo draws a suitably puppyish and generally baffled Batman, constantly getting dressed down by the superior crimefighter. “The weed of crime must be plucked, Batman. Your garden grows wild. I would have these creatures dead. We’d be facing two instead of twenty if not for your childish rules.” And indeed, when Batman makes yet another of his idiotic attempts to save the life of his murderous frienemy the Joker, he gets himself lethally wounded. Cool! So now the Shadow can save the day without this idiotic Poochie figure cramping his style, then? Alas, no. They somehow tape Batman up, and he makes a ridiculous deductive leap as an effort to show that his methods also bring something to the table, even though the criticisms he then adds make no sense whatsoever. The Shadow starts shooting to wound. And to be honest, he’s never been quite right – Rossmo doesn’t make his face imposing or hawkish enough, and the degree to which his coat and scarf flap around go somewhere past expressionist, and start getting reminiscent of that drawing of Cerebus as Spawn where he had distance markers along his cape. Yes, some of this sort of bullshit is fairly inevitable in an inter-company crossover (though the Doctor Who/Star Trek one managed a fairly good job of holding on to the awareness that literally everything from Who outclasses anything from Trek), but that coat is just silly, such that when I showed my wife she did the Graham-Chapman-stopping-a-sketch-for-being-too-silly voice from Monty Python. Now The Shadow/Graham Chapman - there’s a crossover I’d like to see. Still, there were some fun bits along the way, especially the Joker/Shadow laugh-off. (Netgalley ARC)

  19. 4 out of 5

    Iain

    This was such a disappointment. It *should* have been so good! But I'm left feeling like it's almost impressive how well they avoided letting it be good. It started out promising. Having Batman hitting the streets in one of his classic disguises gave the impression that we were really going to see Batman operating within The Shadow's world, and that... man, writers, hit undo, go back, and give me that story. The beginning felt like a nod to the characters' pasts and similarities from a team that This was such a disappointment. It *should* have been so good! But I'm left feeling like it's almost impressive how well they avoided letting it be good. It started out promising. Having Batman hitting the streets in one of his classic disguises gave the impression that we were really going to see Batman operating within The Shadow's world, and that... man, writers, hit undo, go back, and give me that story. The beginning felt like a nod to the characters' pasts and similarities from a team that might do well by them, but that feeling was left behind quickly, as if they were just getting it out of the way. After that, it all pretty much runs on autopilot through something pretty close to what you're expecting from a two heroes vs two villains teamup story. It felt stale. The art was ok. Some good moments, some interesting takes on things. But the main characters themselves felt like a glaring weakness. Batman is depicted in an almost Brave and the Bold cartoon style, with a cute/surprised expression, bowing legs, and a lot of bandages from how much he gets his ass handed to him throughout this. The Shadow's depiction manages to be untrue to the character, unoriginal, crazy, boring, over the top, uninteresting, and unattractive, all at once. We don't get to see much of the elegant vigilante merging with and emerging from the darkness, or any of the quiet detective sneaking through the night, scaling walls, collecting clues. Instead he's treated more like a basic gun-toting anti-hero type, jumping into battles, fully visible and visually uninteresting, spraying bullets, with cartoonishly large red eyes, and an uncovered mouth that appears about to start frothing. Such an unappealing presentation of the character. It took some brainstorming to make the character this uncool. As for the villains, Joker felt shoehorned into the story, and into a personality to fit it, while Stag was... an evil villain who doesn't really talk, who murders because you won't really care, in order to you won't really know what, and he has to be stopped before something something Shamba-la, just get this over with. And for some reason Joker thinks he's great and is stoked to get involved with this plan, though it's not clear what he gets out of it. He's just there because this couldn't be such an uninspired cliche without him. I saw a number of reviewers saying they're unfamiliar with The Shadow, but felt like this was an ok take on him. Not the case for me. I dressed up as The Shadow for Halloween nearly 25 years ago, saw the 1994 movie in the theater, have listened to some of the radio shows, loved The Shadow Strikes series of the 90s, sorta hated / sorta was entertained by the Shadow comic of the late 80s, and have been reading the 30s pulps for more than 20 years. God, I think my dad told me Shadow bedtime stories when I was kid, based on his memories of listening to the radio show as a kid in the 40s. The character's an old friend to me. The characterization of The Shadow in this story just didn't feel right at all—it felt more like someone attempting a Shadow teamup after watching the movie and reading his wiki page, not someone who had an appreciation and feel for the character. More bluntly, this felt dumb. The wild eyed, youthful, almost manga-looking Shadow with a Spawn-scarf that always trails out of frame no matter how large the scene. A Shadow who always looks unhinged instead of calm and in absolute control. He's also not wearing gloves and seems to have his pistols nearly glued in his hands. It all just starts to feel ridiculous to the point of parody. Speaking of parody, the story gets going with Batman running up stairs while ripping off his clothes to reveal his costume underneath, in classic mid-20th century superhero trope fashion. This whole story has a tongue in cheek/don't take it too seriously feel to it, and while that at first gives the impression that this could be fun, it eventually feels more like they're just taking the piss out of the characters. Not far into it, it starts to feel like the creative team has stopped laughing at their own joke, and they're left just trying to drag to the unsatisfying finish. I saw one reviewer say this felt like a cash grab. I was actually thinking while reading it that it felt a lot like one of those free comics you might get with a dvd or something, or for sending away five cereal box tops: something devoid of depth or meaning, assembled by the third string team at the request of some outside company. Remember when you bought an early 80s Superman comic that was advertised as being double-sized, but it turned out half was just an advertisement story for a personal computer? Why is Superman carrying two of this brand's computers to a school to show off their features? Why does this dust he was exposed to make it so he now needs the help of the kids, and this wonderful computer, to defeat the threat that just appeared? Why is every major Batman villain suddenly here in this tomb hideout for a big fight? Why did The Shadow, who's all about knowing, need someone else to figure out a basic fact about the villain he's been fighting for 50 years? Why are you spending time reading either of these stories? Save the postage on your box tops. So... About a third of the way through this story, I was enjoying it and hopeful it was about to get really good. Halfway through, I was lowering my expectations and getting a little bored. Two thirds through, I pretty much started flipping through it almost as fast as I could read the dialogue, which means I'm bored and getting it over with. At the end, I felt relieved to leave this behind. And looking back after finishing it, I'm coming to realize I kind of hated most of this. I guess two stars for the potential of the idea and a few good moments, and some awesome glimpses of what might have been in the alternate covers gallery at the back, but in all honesty, if I weren't emotionally invested in The Shadow and just kind of glad to see him around in something new, I'd probably have to call this a one star story.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Terry Mcginnis

    A decent, self-contained story that does not fit into current Batman continuity. That isn't always a bad thing, however, as some great Batman stories are self-contained (All-Star Batman, anyone?). The Shadow may be an interesting character to some, but here he is boring and stale. He never truly gets a chance to shine and only comes off as an ignorant killer of criminals. Maybe there is better Shadow stuff out there? Not sure. I will read the first Batman/Shadow story at some point. The villain A decent, self-contained story that does not fit into current Batman continuity. That isn't always a bad thing, however, as some great Batman stories are self-contained (All-Star Batman, anyone?). The Shadow may be an interesting character to some, but here he is boring and stale. He never truly gets a chance to shine and only comes off as an ignorant killer of criminals. Maybe there is better Shadow stuff out there? Not sure. I will read the first Batman/Shadow story at some point. The villain here leaves a lot to be desired and seems riddled with cliche. There are some interesting tidbits of backstory with Bruce and Alfred, though not enough to make this a must-read by any stretch. Recommended for Bat-fans, though maybe not so much for Shadow fans.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jimmy

    This is probably my favorite comic in 2017! I love Batman and I just found out about the Shadow this year; now the two superheroes are together in a story told by a team that include Scott Snyder, a writer who have written some of my favorite Batman stories. The prologue in the beginning was well done; I did not even know it was a prologue until the end of it said “end prologue.” Certainly it left readers with anticipation with the introduction of a new villain whose appearance is mysterious, dar This is probably my favorite comic in 2017! I love Batman and I just found out about the Shadow this year; now the two superheroes are together in a story told by a team that include Scott Snyder, a writer who have written some of my favorite Batman stories. The prologue in the beginning was well done; I did not even know it was a prologue until the end of it said “end prologue.” Certainly it left readers with anticipation with the introduction of a new villain whose appearance is mysterious, dark and intriguing. The mask this villain wears make the character impersonal and therefore more villainous. Adding to the suspense is the strange line that the villain said right before the prologue ended. I thought the prologue also drew interests not only with the ending but also on the first page in which I expected Bruce Wayne was the one that was going to be introduced in an event but it was someone else instead. What a way of making readers question their assumption and pay more careful attention to the story. It won’t be the last time there’s these kinds of moments in the story either. As the story progresses we are left to question about Batman’s relationship with the Shadow but one also is cautious with what the Shadow has to say since there’s a rather dark and sinister side to him, one that doesn’t win us nor the other characters with full confidence. In the beginning Batman erroneously assumed that the Shadow is his suspect of various murders taking place but it turns out that Batman was wrong. From the information that the Shadow and his former associates shared Batman starts to realize there are darker and more evil forces at work, one in which is darker than any of his previous villains. This villain is so dark it makes the Joker into a joke (pun intended). And the Joker does appear in this story, teaming up with the main villain but we also see other villains of Batman joining in what they perceived was the demise of the Batman. Here I thought the story gets quite epic. As that is going on we see one of the other drama going on in this story is the battle of two different worldviews of fighting evil. You have on the one hand Batman’s philosophy of not killing anyone while on the other hand you have the Shadow who comes out with his sinister laugh and guns blazing against those who are evil. Batman often thinks in terms more positive compared to the Shadow. While the Shadow knows what evils lurk in men’s heart, Batman is the guy who is willing to save the Joker and even take a bullet for him. It certainly leaves a lot for readers to think about concerning these two polar approach of fighting evil. I love the illustrations and the colors. I also enjoyed the drawing in this book. It helped set the mood for the story. Both the drawing and the colors made this story believable as far as comic books is concerned, without making it cheesy. I give this volume a five out of five and a two thumbs up. NOTE: This book was provided to me free by DC Comics and Net Galley without any obligation for a positive review. All opinions offered above are mine unless otherwise stated or implied. Christian Reflection: Joker’s lines are laden with philosophical outlook. There’s several point in which he said evil doesn’t exists and in a sense you see Joker is living out an evolutionary worldview in which evil is arbitrary and his goal is to be up on the food chain of violence; which of course is ironic given he denies the very thing that makes him think proudly of himself and superior than others. That is, Joker denies evil while also believing it. Something can be said about the incoherence of moral relativism. Yet as the story makes clear there is such thing as good which is the opposite of evil. In fact the whole book gives us the vibe that evil is very real and that there exist dark spiritual forces behind it. Another interesting theme in this book is the contrasts between the Shadow and Batman. One admit that he is not good and avenges evil while the other operates on principle. It reminds me of the truth that people sometime can commit actions that benefit others but sometimes not necessarily with the best motive. Total depravity is a reality.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Michael Emond

    I love The Shadow, but I don't always like how he is portrayed by writers. This one was a team up with Batman and written by Scott Snyder - the writer who people have lauded as a great Batman writer (but I was less than impressed). this book continues to leave me unimpressed with Scott as a writer. Overall the story that drives the book was so confusing and weak I spent most of the time mourning this lost opportunity. Great art - Shadow AND Batman - it should be fun and great adventure! Instead I love The Shadow, but I don't always like how he is portrayed by writers. This one was a team up with Batman and written by Scott Snyder - the writer who people have lauded as a great Batman writer (but I was less than impressed). this book continues to leave me unimpressed with Scott as a writer. Overall the story that drives the book was so confusing and weak I spent most of the time mourning this lost opportunity. Great art - Shadow AND Batman - it should be fun and great adventure! Instead it is an over long morality play of The Shadow's way of dealing with evil versus The Batman. Adding to the confusion - The Shadow claims he watches over the Batman and has been his teacher throughout the years in disguises and the Batman will be the Shadow one day. It really makes zero sense. The villain The Stag claims "I am an Honest Signal"...and I never understood why he repeats that over and over and has no other dialogue. The twist at the end of who the Stag really is made even less sense. Overall a muddled confusion of a book with not a lot of fun and not a lot of logic. Oh! And Scott had to throw the Joker in for no reason. But he loves the Joker so...why not? The art is great and the potential was there but Epic fail for execution.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Todd Glaeser

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I really like the Shadow and I like how Snyder handles him but I don't know if turning him into a demigod is really what I want for the future. I really like the Shadow and I like how Snyder handles him but I don't know if turning him into a demigod is really what I want for the future.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    My introduction to comics was in the early sixties and I was a DC kid. Batman and then Superman followed by the various members of the Justice League were what I was weaned on as a child. So when I see a Batman book it takes me back to those days. As a teen I became aware of old radio programs and then DC began publishing comics based on The Shadow. That introduction then progressed to books coming out at the time on the character. Like Batman he stayed in the shadows and fought the good fight ag My introduction to comics was in the early sixties and I was a DC kid. Batman and then Superman followed by the various members of the Justice League were what I was weaned on as a child. So when I see a Batman book it takes me back to those days. As a teen I became aware of old radio programs and then DC began publishing comics based on The Shadow. That introduction then progressed to books coming out at the time on the character. Like Batman he stayed in the shadows and fought the good fight against evil. It was inevitable that the two would team up. From what I could read this collection of the comic series was pretty good. Again, using Adobe Digital Editions made it difficult to read and the dialogue boxes were indecipherable in some places. But I could read enough to digest what was taking place. Once more, DC, trust us with a version that we can read better. The best citizens of Gotham are being killed off by a mysterious being. In need of help Batman returns to one of his instructors to discover that the man was part and parcel with the Shadow. Blaming the Shadow for the death of Lamont Cranston, the Shadow must use his methods and mysticism to make Batman realize he is innocent of the crime and that a much greater evil imperils the world. The Stag is the evil adversary of the Shadow, having fought against one another for years. One is the embodiment of justice, the other of destruction. Now the Stag has his eyes set on Shamba-la, the home of the teachers that instructed the Shadow all those years ago. As he and Batman eventually join forces the Shadow reveals that he has been training Batman all along from the beginning but never quite tells him why until the end. Along their path to stop their common enemy the Stag will recruit others to help him, mainly the Joker as well as several other notable rogues from Batman’s gallery. But will their teaming up be enough to stop the Stag? And what will Batman be forced to do to survive this endeavor? The collection here takes all of the comics and binds them into one set. The story is good but at the same time the various catch phrases of the Shadow seem to have lost their luster after all of these years. In a world where the lowest level so called solider in a holy war can ignite a bomb strapped to himself knowing the “evil in the hearts of men” just can’t quite put an end to that evil. At the same time the concept that the Shadow has played a part in creating the Batman from the beginning was an interesting take. And you also find yourself wondering if what he says is true or just a form of manipulation in an attempt to recruit Batman in his cause. Could Batman actually be the next intended Shadow? The artwork was not to my liking for the most part but I’m sure others are fine with this artist. For me it seemed a bit scratchy looking and not my favorite style. This is not to say it isn’t worthy of merit but just a matter of differing tastes. On the whole this is one of the better books DC has put out lately. It somewhat has its own world to deal with while not making the conscience decision to ditch any and all things we know about Batman to do so. I would recommend this book to fans of both characters. In the end the story works and that’s a plus for fans.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Scott Lee

    Remember, I try to stick to the system as it exists, which says, not "Meh," for three stars but "I liked it." Three stars is, by my definition of Goodreads' intent, a positive review. I like being able to distinguish further anyway and with only five stars, having three levels of good to parse is something I appreciate, even if, mathematically, three really should be "Meh." This reminds me very much of Batman/Punisher and Batman/Spawn books that I've read before. Batman is paired with another da Remember, I try to stick to the system as it exists, which says, not "Meh," for three stars but "I liked it." Three stars is, by my definition of Goodreads' intent, a positive review. I like being able to distinguish further anyway and with only five stars, having three levels of good to parse is something I appreciate, even if, mathematically, three really should be "Meh." This reminds me very much of Batman/Punisher and Batman/Spawn books that I've read before. Batman is paired with another dark hero/vigilante, one who is willing to dispense final justice where he is not. They fight/argue, then end up having to work together, and in the end doing things Bruce's way, which turns out to be right, or at least, right enough to resolve the case. The most fascinating thing for me here was The Shadow, about whom I knew only the name and the phrase "The Shadow knows." What a cool mythos. I would love to see more of it somewhere, somewhen. I expected that Snyder would do well with Bruce, he always does. He's demonstrated consistently that he knows the character, what makes him tick, and that he can drag consistently excellent, character driven stories out of that intersection. He does that here, although, as I said, for me it was more the novelty of The Shadow that was the real treat. That said, Batman and Snyder get top billing, but the character who has to make a change, who demonstrates growth in at least some sense is The Shadow. The book, despite The Shadow's classic status as a super hero/vigilante character, is heavy on exposition for generations like mine who have heard of but never heard The Shadow. Makes for slow going at times, and massive info-dumps. Also, the attempt to tie The Shadow into Batman's world by having him claim to be (I was left at least a bit uncertain--perhaps, admittedly because of my own resistance to the idea) Henri Ducard, and by implication many--if not most--of Bruce's other trainers. I realize they're trying to merge the worlds, but ugh. Don't like it. Bruce is just to good, too smart not to figure that, and the Shadow's insistence that Bruce would have to face the fact that there are truths he can't understand that are nevertheless true seems a weak claim given Batman's history of dealing with the unfathomable. If anyone is aware that there are things beyond their ken it's Bruce Wayne, the man who, as a superhero, as Batman, walks with Gods.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Dale

    Batman—molded by the Shadow? I will start this review with a kind “Spoiler Alert.” To really give an honest review of what I like or dislike requires a few spoilers. You have been warned. Batman and the Shadow combine forces to stop a man the Shadow has killed over and over again. The Shadow believes the man to be immortal. Batman has his own ideas, including whether or not the Shadow is on the side of justice! I am of mixed feelings about this book. On the plus side, it stars two of my favorite he Batman—molded by the Shadow? I will start this review with a kind “Spoiler Alert.” To really give an honest review of what I like or dislike requires a few spoilers. You have been warned. Batman and the Shadow combine forces to stop a man the Shadow has killed over and over again. The Shadow believes the man to be immortal. Batman has his own ideas, including whether or not the Shadow is on the side of justice! I am of mixed feelings about this book. On the plus side, it stars two of my favorite heroes—Batman and the Shadow. Two unmovable fighters for justice joined together to fight a man who always declares “I am an honest signal” should make a really great story. But there are speed bumps on the road to this adventure. Originally he was the host and narrator of the Detective Story Hour. He also ran in his own magazine for over 300 issues, starting in 1931 and the final issue in 1949. In 1937 the Shadow Radio Program debuted. Batman was created by Bob Kane and Bill Finger. He first appeared in Detective Comics#27 (1939.) This means 9 years is the longest that the Shadow would be senior over Batman. Batman hasn’t aged all that much. It is mentioned as well that the Shadow was known to be dead, yet somehow is alive, well, and in the prime of his life! Then all through the story, the Shadow keeps telling Batman that he trained Bruce to take his place as the avenger of evil and Master of Darkness. The Shadow seems to change identities totally on mind power instead of his well-known mastery of disguise. It is my opinion that in this book Batman remains pretty much the same self-reliant, on the edge character that he always has been. But the Shadow is hard to recognize for readers of the pulp magazine, listeners of the radio show, or even those who first saw the Shadow in the 1994 film. The storyline is not bad, but the Shadow depicted in this graphic novel is not the same hero I admire. There are glimpses of the original Shadow, but for the most part, the role of the Shadow just feels wrong… I like the story enough to give it three stars. I really cannot go any higher. Quoth the Raven…

  27. 4 out of 5

    Mindy

    I've long been a fan of both Batman and The Shadow so I was very excited to read this. Despite a few minor things that bothered me, I really enjoyed it. The thing that bothered me the most was that I really didn't like how some of the faces were done (specifically Batman and Alfred to name a couple). I loved most of the artwork for this series but a few faces just didn't feel right to me. The sad part about it is that some of the artwork is just beautiful and amazing but I would get involved in I've long been a fan of both Batman and The Shadow so I was very excited to read this. Despite a few minor things that bothered me, I really enjoyed it. The thing that bothered me the most was that I really didn't like how some of the faces were done (specifically Batman and Alfred to name a couple). I loved most of the artwork for this series but a few faces just didn't feel right to me. The sad part about it is that some of the artwork is just beautiful and amazing but I would get involved in it and then see one of the faces that just wasn't right to me and it would pull my attention back to that. Another, very minor, thing that bothered me was the inclusion of the Joker. The enemy that Batman and The Shadow are fighting throughout the book is a new one, invented by the series. I liked that. Then the Joker comes in and it made me feel like they put him in since he's been very popular in the past few years. I wouldn't have minded if The Shadow was fighting one of his own villains (this is a reboot after all) and that villain joined forces with the Joker but the new foe felt look he could sufficiently occupy the time of both crime fighters. All of that being said, I did really enjoy this book. Like I said, the artwork is great and the story is actually probably even better. It was very well written. The whole thing was rather well done, despite my niggling complaints. If you like either of the heroes, definitely check it out. I would like to thank the publisher, author, and Netgalley for providing me with a copy in exchange for an honest review.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Albert

    Batman/The Shadow: The Murder Geniuses by Scott Snyder is further proof that Snyder is perhaps the best Batman storyteller of our generation. Not only does he bring us The Batman, but in this series he brings to life the iconic character of comic and radio; The Shadow. In the course of investigating a murder in Gotham, the Batman identifies the killer as Lamont Cranston. The problem with this is that Cranston is actually the master detective known as the Shadow. An even larger problem to this is Batman/The Shadow: The Murder Geniuses by Scott Snyder is further proof that Snyder is perhaps the best Batman storyteller of our generation. Not only does he bring us The Batman, but in this series he brings to life the iconic character of comic and radio; The Shadow. In the course of investigating a murder in Gotham, the Batman identifies the killer as Lamont Cranston. The problem with this is that Cranston is actually the master detective known as the Shadow. An even larger problem to this is that the Shadow died over half a century ago. While investigating the murder of a Gothamite, Batman identifies his prime suspect as Lamont Cranston... but there are two problems with that. One, Batman is not aware Lamont's alter ego is the master detective known as the Shadow. Two, and more importantly, Cranston seems to have died over half a century ago! What follows is a tale of two heroes and two master villains as the Joker joins forces to help kill the spirit of the Shadow and Batman as well. Like Snyder's Batman run, this is an intricately woven tale of good and evil and the grey areas that tie the two together. The Batman is tested on his oath to not kill by not only the Joker but by the Shadow himself, who sees killing as the only option of ridding the world of the evil they battle. The clash between the two heroes is what makes this series work. Cranston and Wayne. The Shadow and the Batman. Another fun and smart tale by Scott Snyder and company. Collects BATMAN/THE SHADOW #1-6 and stories from BATMAN ANNUAL #1.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Anne Nelson

    Yes, it's flawed, but it's overall a good read. Starts with a very promising mystery and an (initially) intriguing villain. It gets unfocused pretty quickly, though, taking a lot of dead-end detours, mostly in the name of retconning an existing connection between Batman and The Shadow. That's to be expected with crossovers, but Batman and Shadow are already pursuing the same villain: that alone should suffice as their reason for coming together, right? Apparently not. Instead, the narrative expe Yes, it's flawed, but it's overall a good read. Starts with a very promising mystery and an (initially) intriguing villain. It gets unfocused pretty quickly, though, taking a lot of dead-end detours, mostly in the name of retconning an existing connection between Batman and The Shadow. That's to be expected with crossovers, but Batman and Shadow are already pursuing the same villain: that alone should suffice as their reason for coming together, right? Apparently not. Instead, the narrative expends a quite lot of effort on their backstories and establishing that supposedly-already-existing relationship. This is not awful, but it's all time that probably could have been better spent. Perhaps on making the Stag do... something else. Anything at all. At the very least he might have been provided another line to say. But a more developed origin story/motivator of his own would have been nice, too. All that said, I still have to give this a pretty good review: the pacing might not be great, but the dialogue is mostly just fine. The Joker's cameo was narratively pretty pointless but enjoyable. I loved the art. The character designs are terrific. Even the lettering is worth mentioning--particularly nice work, especially the lettering on The Shadow's dialogue. Overall, this is in fact a pretty good book, but if you are fussy about mysteries resolving in a logical way... maybe not.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn Halbert

    That was kind of confusing, not in a the plot was too complicated sort of way, but in a things were poorly communicated way. Essentially, Batman is forced to join up with The Shadow to fight a not very compelling villain named The Stag who murders good people. Since The Stag doesn't have much screen presence and for some reason only repeats the same irrelevant line over and over, he teams up with the much more watchable Joker. It is vital that the Stag be stopped from getting into some magical p That was kind of confusing, not in a the plot was too complicated sort of way, but in a things were poorly communicated way. Essentially, Batman is forced to join up with The Shadow to fight a not very compelling villain named The Stag who murders good people. Since The Stag doesn't have much screen presence and for some reason only repeats the same irrelevant line over and over, he teams up with the much more watchable Joker. It is vital that the Stag be stopped from getting into some magical place, but the writers don't do a great job of driving the importance of that home. There's a pointless fight where a bunch of Batman villains show up for no real reason, Batman's past gets retconed to include The Shadow, and The Shadow keeps contradicting himself in the subject of Batman's injury, before a final showdown and explaination that leaves me with more questions than I started with. Seriously, The Shadow is like "Let me cauterize the wound and get you home...no don't try to operate on him, Alfred, it's pointless, this wound can't be healed, he's a dead man walking...are you sure you want to go on this suicide mission Batman?" Make up your mind dude, the wound is either inevitably fatal or it isn't. I didn't really care for the art. It wasn't bad (except maybe the surplus of unnaturally rubbery looking legs) it just wasn't to my tastes.

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