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Eating from the Ground Up: Recipes for Simple, Perfect Vegetables: A Cookbook

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Vegetables keep secrets, and to prepare them well, we need to know how to coax those secrets out. What is the best way to eat a radish? Alana Chernila hears this sort of question all the time. Arugula, celeriac, kohlrabi, fennel, asparagus--whatever the vegetable may be, people always ask how to prepare it so that the produce really shines. Although there are countless ways Vegetables keep secrets, and to prepare them well, we need to know how to coax those secrets out. What is the best way to eat a radish? Alana Chernila hears this sort of question all the time. Arugula, celeriac, kohlrabi, fennel, asparagus--whatever the vegetable may be, people always ask how to prepare it so that the produce really shines. Although there are countless ways to eat our vegetables, there are a few perfect ways to make each vegetable sing. With more than 100 versatile recipes, Eating from the Ground Up teaches you how to showcase the unique flavor and texture of each vegetable, truly bringing out the best in every root and leaf. The answers lie in smart techniques and a light touch. Here are dishes so simple and quick that they feel more intuitive than following a typical recipe; soups for year-round that are packed with nourishment; ideas for maximizing summer produce; hearty fall and winter foods that are all about comfort; impressive dishes fit for a party; and tips like knowing there's not one vegetable that doesn't perk up with a sprinkle of salt. No matter the vegetable, the central lesson is: don't mess with a good thing.


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Vegetables keep secrets, and to prepare them well, we need to know how to coax those secrets out. What is the best way to eat a radish? Alana Chernila hears this sort of question all the time. Arugula, celeriac, kohlrabi, fennel, asparagus--whatever the vegetable may be, people always ask how to prepare it so that the produce really shines. Although there are countless ways Vegetables keep secrets, and to prepare them well, we need to know how to coax those secrets out. What is the best way to eat a radish? Alana Chernila hears this sort of question all the time. Arugula, celeriac, kohlrabi, fennel, asparagus--whatever the vegetable may be, people always ask how to prepare it so that the produce really shines. Although there are countless ways to eat our vegetables, there are a few perfect ways to make each vegetable sing. With more than 100 versatile recipes, Eating from the Ground Up teaches you how to showcase the unique flavor and texture of each vegetable, truly bringing out the best in every root and leaf. The answers lie in smart techniques and a light touch. Here are dishes so simple and quick that they feel more intuitive than following a typical recipe; soups for year-round that are packed with nourishment; ideas for maximizing summer produce; hearty fall and winter foods that are all about comfort; impressive dishes fit for a party; and tips like knowing there's not one vegetable that doesn't perk up with a sprinkle of salt. No matter the vegetable, the central lesson is: don't mess with a good thing.

30 review for Eating from the Ground Up: Recipes for Simple, Perfect Vegetables: A Cookbook

  1. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    Picked up randomly at the library and ended up reading it cover to cover twice. I asked for a copy for my birthday. The recipes aren't earth shattering as mentioned by a few reviews but they are things I'd love to memorize, make often and add to my weekly meals. Solid, quality recipes with beautiful photos! Picked up randomly at the library and ended up reading it cover to cover twice. I asked for a copy for my birthday. The recipes aren't earth shattering as mentioned by a few reviews but they are things I'd love to memorize, make often and add to my weekly meals. Solid, quality recipes with beautiful photos!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jodi Geever

    This book is good. It reminds me of a modern day Moosewood Cookbook. I most enjoyed the soup chapter. Its photographs are dazzling. However, this book is not life changing. I do not *need* to make the recipes in this volume in the same way that I *need* to make the mac n' cheese, lasagna, or roast chicken from Chernila's other book The Homemade Pantry. (That book I checked out from my library so often I was afraid I would stain it with ingredients while cooking so I ultimately bought it.) So, I This book is good. It reminds me of a modern day Moosewood Cookbook. I most enjoyed the soup chapter. Its photographs are dazzling. However, this book is not life changing. I do not *need* to make the recipes in this volume in the same way that I *need* to make the mac n' cheese, lasagna, or roast chicken from Chernila's other book The Homemade Pantry. (That book I checked out from my library so often I was afraid I would stain it with ingredients while cooking so I ultimately bought it.) So, I think 3 stars is fair.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    Beautiful vegetables done simply. Not enough pictures for me...as a novice cook I like to visualize the dish in order to get excited. But found some definite keepers and will go through this in summer for the hot weather recipes.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ginna

    I really enjoy this book, and while I haven't cooked anywhere near all the recipes, everything I've tried has turned out great. I love how she separated the book not into seasons or dished but categories of recipes. I find the 'Barely Recipes' section in particular to be very useful. So many ways to cook veg with an added twist I haven't thought of or seen before. The cabbage with butter has become a surprising favourite, as well as miso greens. Other recipes I've tried that were surprisingly de I really enjoy this book, and while I haven't cooked anywhere near all the recipes, everything I've tried has turned out great. I love how she separated the book not into seasons or dished but categories of recipes. I find the 'Barely Recipes' section in particular to be very useful. So many ways to cook veg with an added twist I haven't thought of or seen before. The cabbage with butter has become a surprising favourite, as well as miso greens. Other recipes I've tried that were surprisingly delicious were the steamed bok choy, roasted beets and balsamic, and the hot sesame celery with cabbage (although I never found hot sesame oil - I add a dash of hot sauce). The soups really surprised me - the winter borscht is delicious, and the caramelized cabbage soup is so good and simple. I would never have thought to caramelize cabbage before this. I also love her side notes and tips, particularly the one about caramelized onions. I did not know you could freeze them, and I love the dip made with them with just about anything.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    I just got this cookbook two days ago and i’m already in love! I love that it’s a hardcover and study, I love the vibrant, detailed, whole-page photos, and I absolutely love the recipes. I’m a big vegetable eater, so this is the perfect cookbook for me. I like that this cookbook isn’t explicitly vegetarian because a lot of meateaters like myself are just as obsessed with a good vegetable dish as they are with a meat dish. I can’t wait to try all of these recipes! I’ve already tabbed a few to mak I just got this cookbook two days ago and i’m already in love! I love that it’s a hardcover and study, I love the vibrant, detailed, whole-page photos, and I absolutely love the recipes. I’m a big vegetable eater, so this is the perfect cookbook for me. I like that this cookbook isn’t explicitly vegetarian because a lot of meateaters like myself are just as obsessed with a good vegetable dish as they are with a meat dish. I can’t wait to try all of these recipes! I’ve already tabbed a few to make soon! *Received from Blogging for Books.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Albright

    [Note:  This book was provided free of charge by Blogging For Books/Clarkson Potter Publishers.  All thoughts and opinions are my own.] When I requested this book, I thought that it was a vegetarian cookbook, but to my pleasure and surprise I found that it was a cookbook that focused on vegetables, but in a context that made those vegetables their best, including with meats and in soups and salads and other dishes.  I also figured, accurately, that the book would be a somewhat preachy hipster ode [Note:  This book was provided free of charge by Blogging For Books/Clarkson Potter Publishers.  All thoughts and opinions are my own.] When I requested this book, I thought that it was a vegetarian cookbook, but to my pleasure and surprise I found that it was a cookbook that focused on vegetables, but in a context that made those vegetables their best, including with meats and in soups and salads and other dishes.  I also figured, accurately, that the book would be a somewhat preachy hipster ode to elitist vegetables, but fortunately the author includes a lot of information about her personal life and family background and that makes this a more appealing book than it would otherwise be.  And it is fortunate as well that my standards for cookbooks are reasonably generous [1] in that I expect at least a few dishes I would want to eat.  This book definitely provides a few dishes I would be willing to eat, and even more if you include some substitute ingredients to what the book includes.  And that is good enough for this book to be worth appreciating as a pleasant cookbook with mostly simple recipes that sound tasty. At over 250 pages, this book is a bit larger than most contemporary cookbooks and features both gorgeous photographs as well as some intriguing recipes.  The author begins the book with an introduction and some moderately preachy comments on where to get the best veggies, how to wash, store, and preserve one's veggies, some praises of vegetables with cheese, and a discussion on the tools of the kitchen one needs.  After this the author talks about some dishes that are "barely recipes" that showcase veggies in a mode of relatively simplicity, some of which sound fantastic (roasted asparagus with yummy sauce, green beans with almonds and brown butter, roasted potatoes, cheesy broccoli, kohlrabi fries, a simple slaw that uses olive oil instead of mayo, butter-braised cabbage, and perfected roasted cauliflower, along with panfried brussels).  Count me in on a lot of these recipes.  Then the author looks at veggies that shine in soups, including some interesting ideas like nettle soup and chicken soup with lots of greens and a kale and white bean soup with rosemary oil and a cauliflower cheddar soup that sound intriguing.  A list of dishes too hot to cook includes some interesting choices like zucchini and garlic scape pasta, and swiss chard stem, fennel, and salmon fried rice, along with poblano rajas tacos that only need a bit of meat to be really tasty looking.  The author then turns her attention to warmth and comfort foods, including such dishes as a garlicky kohlrabi with dandelion and chickpeas, a polenta with all the greens, a roasted vegetable and cashew curry, as well as asparagus and (probably turkey) bacon pasta.  The book then closes with a discussion of foods to be eaten as celebration dishes, like green bean tempura nests, sweet potato latkes with roasted applesauce, and a carrot celebration cake.  The book then closes with recipes divided by vegetable as well as acknowledgements and an index. There are at least a few takeaways that even those readers who are not hipster gourmands will appreciate.  For one, a lot of our aversion to certain foods comes from the way that they were prepared and the author seeks to point out ways in which veggies can be shown at their best.  As a texture eater, there are at least a few veggies in this book that I personally dislike because of the way that they have ended up on my plate, such as slimy shiitake mushrooms or mushy beets, but I am willing to concede that there are ways that these vegetables could be tasty under the right circumstances.  With most of the vegetables discussed in this book that I am familiar with, I need no such encouragement to think highly of tasty dishes with brussels sprouts that are not boiled into oblivion or tasty asparagus spears, for example.  And for those who love vegetables, this book is certainly one that will give you all kinds of tasty ideas for future dishes with a bias towards simplicity as well as taste. [1] See, for example: https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2017... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2016... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2016... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2017... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2017... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2017... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2017... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2017...

  7. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    This book makes me want to eat all the vegetables, make all the recipes, delight in all the smells and flavours. So far I’ve made “Chicken Soup With Lots of Greens” and “Roasted Potatoes” (the best roasted potatoes I’ve had) and “Hot Sesame Celery With Ruby Cabbage”, which were all AMAZING, and “Rosted Broccoli With Lemon and Parmesan” which was not as fabulous but still really good. I just want to make ALL of them, and it makes me so excited. (Note: I actually read all of this book and all of the This book makes me want to eat all the vegetables, make all the recipes, delight in all the smells and flavours. So far I’ve made “Chicken Soup With Lots of Greens” and “Roasted Potatoes” (the best roasted potatoes I’ve had) and “Hot Sesame Celery With Ruby Cabbage”, which were all AMAZING, and “Rosted Broccoli With Lemon and Parmesan” which was not as fabulous but still really good. I just want to make ALL of them, and it makes me so excited. (Note: I actually read all of this book and all of the recipes, from beginning to end, or else I wouldn’t have counted it for my Goodreads challenge. Just more proof of how great it is!) Edit: I decided to add my thoughts on individual recipes I’ve tried, cause I personally would find that interesting. (view spoiler)[ —Caramelized Hakurei Turnips: Didn't love it (too mushy), but I feel like I may have done something wrong. The Hakurei turnips were super pretty, though, and I'm still thankful the author introduced me to them. —Roasted Asparagus With Yummy Sauce: I’ve never liked asparagus much, until this recipe. Yummy Sauce is indeed yummy, and super easy. —Creamy Spinach With Dill: Didn’t really work for me. It was interesting, but not super great. —Dilly Quick-Picklee Cucumbers: They were good enough, but not good enough for me to make again yet. —Steamed Baby Bok Choy With Sesame: I burnt the sauce, so my attempt wasn’t *super* great. I didn’t feel like non burnt sauce would have made me *love* this recipe, though, so I haven’t tried it again. —Roasted Beets, Julia-Style: I’m not a fan of beets, and this recipe wasn’t enough to change my mind. —Green Beans With Almonds and Brown Butter: Like the asparagus recipe above, this changed my view of green beans, which I’d never liked before this. Amazing recipe, though simple (imho). —Miso Greens: Better than I expected, but I really don't love miso. If I'd tried this before other miso recipes, it might have suited my taste better, but I'd already not loved miso and this recipe couldn't make up for that. —Caramelized Corn With Mint: Really great! This is my new favourite way to use frozen corn. —Roasted Potatoes: This includes a small trick for roasted potatoes (steaming first) that makes ALL the difference. Maybe this trick is already known to lots of people who cook, but it wasn’t known to me, and it really does make such a difference. —Sweet and Spicy Collard Greens: On their own, they tasted so-so to me. But with a bite of rice and chicken at the same time, it was quite good. I’d never had collard greens before this, so I can’t really compare it to any other recipes. —Roasted Broccoli With Lemon and Parmesan: Good enough, but I don’t like broccoli. This recipe wasn’t enough to change that. (But see one broccoli recipe a little further down!) —Cheesy Broccoli: Ditto the one right above this one. Plus I'm not actually a huge fan of cheese. I like it, but it doesn't make something good that I didn't like before. —A Big Bowl of Kale: Super simple, but when I made it, me and my husband devoured it so fast. I’m thinking our bodies needed whatever nutrients are in kale... —Kale Salad: Pretty good! Not mind blowing like some in this book were for me, but good. —Kohlrabi Fries: Meh. I was hoping this would make me super inspired about kohlrabi and it didn’t. —Hot Sesame Celery With Ruby Cabbage: SO good! This has become a fairly regular dish for us. It was this recipe that made me super fond of sesame seeds. —Butter-Braised Cabbage: Didn’t really work for me. I think it was too.... I dunno. Squishy? —Perfect Roasted Cauliflower: Cauliflower is my least favourite vegetable, and this wasn’t enough to change that dislike. —Simple Sweet Potatoes: Didn’t love it, but I don’t love sweet potatoes, so it wasn’t surprising. —Maple-Baked Winter Squash: It wasn’t bad, but I think I maybe did something wrong? Because even though I kept it in the oven for longer than she said to, the sauce mostly didn’t caramelize and the squashes didn’t get super tender. But I feel like if done right, this recipe could be really yummy, maybe? —Butternut Squash Purée: I only ate this as one of the ingredients of a different dish, so I’m not sure I can judge this one on its own. It was easy to make, though, and smelled nice while cooking. —Maple-Glazed Carrots and Parsnips: My husband really liked this one and wanted us to add it to our regular meals. I wasn’t quite as fond of it, but it was good enough. —Smoky Delicata Chips: Such a great and yummy snack! I’ve been using it as a work snack with great success. Delicata squash are so pretty, too. I never ate squash growing up, so it felt really cool to find a way to use one that I really liked. —Panfried Brussels: Didn’t make me like Brussell sprouts. But see another Brussell sprout recipe further down! —Roasted Tomato and Vegetable Soup: So frickin good! Also simple! Possibly a new favourite. —Hakurei Turnip Soup: It was a little plain, and I'm not a huge fan of turnips. —Chicken Soup With Lots of Greens: I quite liked it, but it was a little bland for my husband. —Shiitake Barley Soup: As the description before the recipe says, "This soup is an ideal recipe if you're not feeling well." It feels like a nourishing, healthy, well-making soup. I think my stomach wasn't used to miso though, because it actually made it feel a bit weird. (It *was* my first time using miso.) Plus my husband didn't like it, so I doubt I'll make it again. —Winter Borscht: My husband *loved* it. I’m still learning to like beets, so I was less enthused. But it was still not bad for me either! And very simple, which is great. Definitely one we’ll have again. —Posole: Great! Not mind blowing, but a really decent, good soup. (I think it would have been even better if I could have used home-roasted green chiles, instead of kind-of-slimy canned ones.) —Kale and White Bean Soup With Rosemary Oil: The rosemary oil smelt *divine*. I want to make it more often just to make my house smell like that. The soup itself felt a bit mushy and, I dunno, something else, to me though. —Butternut Red Lentil Dal: Really great! A little more difficult than the red lentil soup I normally make, since you also have to make the butternut squash purée. So I don’t think I’ll make this often. But it was still a definite success. —Carrot Ginger Soup With Curry Leaves: Great pureed soup. The addition of the curry leaves in oil on top was a lovely little touch, added a nice little something to it. This is one I think I'll make in batches every so often, and freeze for work lunches. —Zucchini and Garlic Scape Pasta: Really good! Didn't blow my socks off, but it was still quite a lovely lunch. Best savory zucchini for me (although I'm super inexperienced with zucchini since I haven't ever liked it before). It's definitely worth making if I had garlic scapes and zucchini to use up in the future. —Creamy Broccoli Salad: This made me like broccoli!!! I never thought such a thing could happen! And through this recipe I also discovered tarragon, which is AMAZING. —Shredded Brussels With Crispy Shallots and Pecans: And like the recipe above, this one made me LIKE Brussell sprouts! How unbelievable is that? Even though, as I go through this book, I realize how many of the recipes I didn’t actually love, it’s recipes like these last two that make this such a five star cookbook for me. Because I never would have imagined I could have like such a vegetable as a Brussel sprout. —Leek Carbonara: Good! Didn’t astonish me, but it’s hard to go wrong with leeks and pasta and bacon and tarragon and Parmesan. —Roasted Radishes With Feta Mint Sauce: This is such a pretty dish (there’s a reason they chose it for the cover). But I didn’t love it. Not fond of feta, and the radishes were too mushy for me. —Salty, Spicy Broccoli Raab Pasta: Good enough, but not as good as I'd hoped. This cemented the fact that I don't actually really like big globs of cheese, but that anchovies are a great umami addition. —Swiss Chard Rolls: As above, these looked really pretty, but I didn’t like them. —Scallion Crepes: I really enjoyed these, especially the ricotta cheese part. But my husband didn’t, so I had to eat them all myself, and there is a limit to how many scallion crepes you can eat and still enjoy them, turns out. —Cucumber Yogurt Pops: I didn't like them, but I also did a couple things a little weirdly while making it, so maybe the right person could make these taste good? —Zucchini Chocolate Bread: Soooo yummy and moist and chocolatey. I made a loaf for a friend too, and she demanded the recipe. —Butternut Squash Custard With Bourbon Pecans: Great! Tasted a fair bit like pumpkin pie filler. The part that *really* excited me was the bourbon pecans, as I've never made or even eaten something like that, I don't think. I bet they would go well with lots of things, though. (hide spoiler)]

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tonstant Weader

    Everyone says “Eat more vegetables,” but cookbooks that focus on vegetables can be so frustrating. Often they feature complex recipes, running with the assumption everyone knows how to roast a green bean. More often, they feature unusual vegetables and ingredients that require a trip to one or more specialty markets. Alana Chernila, the author of Eating from the Ground Up, gives us a much more prosaic, and thus more useful, cookbook. She assumes nothing, reviewing vegetable shopping and storage t Everyone says “Eat more vegetables,” but cookbooks that focus on vegetables can be so frustrating. Often they feature complex recipes, running with the assumption everyone knows how to roast a green bean. More often, they feature unusual vegetables and ingredients that require a trip to one or more specialty markets. Alana Chernila, the author of Eating from the Ground Up, gives us a much more prosaic, and thus more useful, cookbook. She assumes nothing, reviewing vegetable shopping and storage tips and the basic flavor combinations with vegetables, fat, salt, acid, and dairy, These basics are a solid introduction and lead into an opening chapter of simple, basic recipes that show respect for the ingredients. With two to five ingredients, these are the best kind of recipes with minimum fuss and maximum flavor. The recipes are clearly written and explained. If there is a complex recipe, such as one for galettes, it is broken down into components that keep it clear, simple, and never overwhelming. The photos are beautiful and drool-worthy, though not every recipe is illustrated. This is a cookbook that can be enjoyed by a novice cook as well as an experienced one. Chernila writes with a casual, friendly voice. She introduces her recipes with useful information about the featured vegetable that is honest and direct. For example, she writes that butternut squash needs our help. Boy does it ever! Another example of her directness and honesty, she tells readers they only need to plant one zucchini plant. Ain’t that the truth? There is a lot to like in Eating from the Ground Up. I love that the recipes are realistic for home cooks. There are recipes that can be cooked from what is already at hand without a shopping trip required. I like the simplicity of many of the recipes. So many vegetables are best when simply roasted with olive oil, salt, and perhaps an herb or spice and Chernila is not afraid to keep it simple, suggesting the perfect spice to bring out the fullest flavor of a simple dish. How chefs organize their recipes always fascinates me. So few organize their recipes as I would and Chernila is no different. She opens with a chapter full of simple recipes. Then she has a chapter of soup recipes. This is followed by two seasonal chapters for hot weather and cool weather. Her last chapter focuses on entertaining dishes you can eat with your hands. I prefer more structured organization, such as kind of dish (side dish, entree, salad, soup, or dessert), or type of meal (breakfast, lunch, tea, snack, dinner), or by season. I know where to look without the index. However, at the end of the book, there is an index and a very useful listing of recipes by vegetable. I received a copy of Eating from the Ground Up from Blogging for Books Eating from the Ground Up at Penguin Random House | Clarkson Potter Alana Chernila Eating From the Ground Up cooking blog https://tonstantweaderreviews.wordpre...

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sherri Smith

    This is a beautiful book. The pages, the book cover everything speaks quality. No expenses were spared. But, that doesn't always mean that once you start flipping through the pages and the recipes that it will be meant for you. This time, I'm glad to notice, it speaks my language. At the front of the book, I truly appreciate the author acknowledging that this isn't necessarily a vegan book. Yes, it contains vegetables, but it also contains cheese and other yummy ingredients that many vegans avoid This is a beautiful book. The pages, the book cover everything speaks quality. No expenses were spared. But, that doesn't always mean that once you start flipping through the pages and the recipes that it will be meant for you. This time, I'm glad to notice, it speaks my language. At the front of the book, I truly appreciate the author acknowledging that this isn't necessarily a vegan book. Yes, it contains vegetables, but it also contains cheese and other yummy ingredients that many vegans avoid for their wholesome diets.  I appreciated the front of the book that describes the ways to keep your vegetables lasting longer. For me, the one thing I'm taking away from the book is how to store my herbs. Placing them in water and then storing them in the fridge will allow these delicate flavors to last longer. The recipes are simple but yet elevate the vegetable to a level that you can enjoy and appreciate each. The recipes use ingredients that I have heard of, for the most part. Others are not often found in my smaller metropolis, but a visit to Atlanta to expand my vegetable repertoire will be welcomed. I now know a way to create a recipe.  For each recipe there is a forward, describing the recipe and describing the vegetable. Then follows the recipe ingredients and then the how-to. None of which seems to overwhelm my senses and force me to throw my hands up in frustration. There are so many recipes that are calling out my name and I look forward to creating. Two thumbs up for this book! I received this book from the publisher via blogging for books. All opinions are my own.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Shae

    I did not go through this entire cookbook, but I loved the premise. The author worked in a farmer's market and when people kept asking her how to cook the produce she started experimenting at home to find the best way to make each vegetable/fruit shine as the star in a recipe. I have adopted the recipe Miso Kale into my cooking rotation, but I had to return the book before I could experiment with any others. This would be a great reference book if you had a vegetable/fruit you didn't know what t I did not go through this entire cookbook, but I loved the premise. The author worked in a farmer's market and when people kept asking her how to cook the produce she started experimenting at home to find the best way to make each vegetable/fruit shine as the star in a recipe. I have adopted the recipe Miso Kale into my cooking rotation, but I had to return the book before I could experiment with any others. This would be a great reference book if you had a vegetable/fruit you didn't know what to do with.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Gooshe Net

    Eating from the Ground Up inspires and gives good tips on vegetable cooking. All of the recipes -for simple, perfect vegetables- are made from scratch and fresh ingredients. The book contains some useful tips and tricks too; Where to pick your vegetables, How to wash, store, and make your veggies last, Vegetables with cheese, The tools of the kitchen Barely recipes, A pot of soup, Too hot to cook, Warmth and comfort, Celebrations and other excuses to eat with your hands, Recipes by vegetable

  12. 5 out of 5

    Cassandra

    I received a complimentary copy. With beautiful photos and tasty recipes, this is more than just a great cookbook. It has so many tips from storage and usage to ingredients that I could never find at my local store. I really enjoyed reading all of the new and fresh ways to create meals using a healthier method. I think that this book would really be more helpful and healthful for anyone trying to eat cleaner.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sydney Compton

    A really beautiful cookbook. Grabbed my eye at the library with is beautiful pictures and the recipes inside do not disappoint. The recipes inside are simple enough for amateur cooks like myself, but use a variety of different flavor and vegetables to keep you more than interested. The Brussels sprouts with crispy shallots and pecans is my personal favorite.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Stacy Wempe

    A nice accompaniment to our CSA! Nice book with good pictures of the dish to get your mouth watering. I love that it has recipes for some not as common things like nettles but also common things like ginger-pickled carrots and butternut squash custard. I checked it out from the library but plan on buying it.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Levesque

    I bought this in the Maine Coastal Botanical Gardens gift shop two summers ago, two strawberry rhubarb lemonades to the wind and pollen-drunk. Best decision ever. The broccoli rabe pasta is still one of my absolute favorites - I serve it over basil and watercress and it’s to die for.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    I want to own this book; the recipes here are so simple and sweet, unfussy and celebratory of vegetables. Can’t wait to start cooking!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ginger

    Great veggie recipes. Some are really non-recipes, but with additions that I would never have thought of on my own.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Karen Stuhlfeier

    A beautiful cookbook and a good reminder that local and fresh vegetables need little preparation to be delicious.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    not vegan or vegetarian but a recipes that give vegetables centre stage. A great book to return to after or before a farmers market trip. some great ideas to learn or relearn a love of vegetables!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Onceinabluemoon

    3.5 rounding up. Enjoyed it but didn't find many new ideas, always appreciate pics! 3.5 rounding up. Enjoyed it but didn't find many new ideas, always appreciate pics!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lynn Landry

    More of a book about different ways to cook vegetables than a vegetarian cookbook. The rock star is the vegetable.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Natalie

    This book is all about vegetables. The photography is beautiful, but mostly the recipes are simple and appealing.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Nicole White

  24. 4 out of 5

    Josie

  25. 4 out of 5

    Karen Nyenhouse

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sue E. St. Clair

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rida

  28. 5 out of 5

    Christina

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jennie

  30. 4 out of 5

    Spencergus

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