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DC: La nueva frontera. Parte 2. Publicado originalmente en DC: The New Frontier núms. 4 a 6, de julio a noviembre del 2004. Superman, el Escuadrón Suicida y los Investigadores de lo Desconocido encuentran una aterradora forma de vida extraterrestre. ¿Tendrá esta horrenda criatura algo que ver con la sensación de desastre inminente que están experimentando todos los héroes? DC: La nueva frontera. Parte 2. Publicado originalmente en DC: The New Frontier núms. 4 a 6, de julio a noviembre del 2004. Superman, el Escuadrón Suicida y los Investigadores de lo Desconocido encuentran una aterradora forma de vida extraterrestre. ¿Tendrá esta horrenda criatura algo que ver con la sensación de desastre inminente que están experimentando todos los héroes? Entretanto, el Estados Unidos de la posguerra se enfrenta a una monstruosa amenaza más antigua que el tiempo mientras Hal Jordan está castigado. ¿Conseguirá este desafío unir a los héroes y a su país o terminará dividiéndolos? Showcase núm. 17 USA Publicado originalmente en diciembre de 1958. Mientras trata de huir de unos aldeanos hostiles, el arqueólogo terrícola Adam Strange recibe el impacto de un rayo zeta que lo transporta 40 billones de kilómetros a través del espacio hasta el planeta de Rann, donde se convierte en un héroe para la lejana raza alienígena que lo habita.


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DC: La nueva frontera. Parte 2. Publicado originalmente en DC: The New Frontier núms. 4 a 6, de julio a noviembre del 2004. Superman, el Escuadrón Suicida y los Investigadores de lo Desconocido encuentran una aterradora forma de vida extraterrestre. ¿Tendrá esta horrenda criatura algo que ver con la sensación de desastre inminente que están experimentando todos los héroes? DC: La nueva frontera. Parte 2. Publicado originalmente en DC: The New Frontier núms. 4 a 6, de julio a noviembre del 2004. Superman, el Escuadrón Suicida y los Investigadores de lo Desconocido encuentran una aterradora forma de vida extraterrestre. ¿Tendrá esta horrenda criatura algo que ver con la sensación de desastre inminente que están experimentando todos los héroes? Entretanto, el Estados Unidos de la posguerra se enfrenta a una monstruosa amenaza más antigua que el tiempo mientras Hal Jordan está castigado. ¿Conseguirá este desafío unir a los héroes y a su país o terminará dividiéndolos? Showcase núm. 17 USA Publicado originalmente en diciembre de 1958. Mientras trata de huir de unos aldeanos hostiles, el arqueólogo terrícola Adam Strange recibe el impacto de un rayo zeta que lo transporta 40 billones de kilómetros a través del espacio hasta el planeta de Rann, donde se convierte en un héroe para la lejana raza alienígena que lo habita.

30 review for DC: La Nueva Frontera, Parte 2

  1. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    If you get a chance to read both of these volumes at once, I think it might make for a better reading experience. DC: The New Frontier, Vol. 1 doesn't really go anywhere story-wise, and a lot of the characters are forgettable to most comic book readers. Fans of the Silver Age would probably be the exception...or so Joseph tells me. But even without an amazing plot, the art is just...lovely. Ok, in Volume 2 you see how everything is sort of pulling together into a cohesive storyline. Is it an incred If you get a chance to read both of these volumes at once, I think it might make for a better reading experience. DC: The New Frontier, Vol. 1 doesn't really go anywhere story-wise, and a lot of the characters are forgettable to most comic book readers. Fans of the Silver Age would probably be the exception...or so Joseph tells me. But even without an amazing plot, the art is just...lovely. Ok, in Volume 2 you see how everything is sort of pulling together into a cohesive storyline. Is it an incredible story? No. A rather generic monster from the center of the planet is hell-bent on destroying Earth. There's not a lot of reasoning behind the Why of it, other than it wants to go out into space and visit other planets. I think. Anyway, it doesn't really matter. The point is that it takes a threat of that sort of magnitude to bring all of the heroes (super or not) together to fight this thing. Some of them (the ones nobody knows or cares about) won't make it back. It's the defining moment for all of them, though. Superman, Wonder Woman, and Batman are all heavily overshadowed by the Marian Manhunter, Flash, and Green Lantern. Whether or not that's a bad thing will vary from person to person. I was ok with it, but I doubt that everyone is going to get excited as I do over Hal Jordan. Whatever...haters. It's a slow story, but with the beautiful art it's worth taking a look at. Get this review and more at:

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    The second and final volume in Darwyn Cooke's reimagining of DC's superheroes set against an early 1960s background is about as fairly dull as the first one was. I criticised a lack of plot in the first volume whereas we get one in this book, but it's still not a very good one. Basically an unstoppable giant alien headed towards America (of course) must be stopped - enter the group who will become known as the Justice League! It's a plot of sorts but rather than complain about the arbitrariness o The second and final volume in Darwyn Cooke's reimagining of DC's superheroes set against an early 1960s background is about as fairly dull as the first one was. I criticised a lack of plot in the first volume whereas we get one in this book, but it's still not a very good one. Basically an unstoppable giant alien headed towards America (of course) must be stopped - enter the group who will become known as the Justice League! It's a plot of sorts but rather than complain about the arbitrariness of the alien threat - which I think is deliberately so - I would say that it's a slow read because it focuses on characters I'm not particularly fond of. Hal Jordan/Green Lantern for one gets the lion's share of the book as do a number of non-superpowered characters - government agents and so forth - who I couldn't care less about. Flash gets some time in the spotlight, Martian Manhunter gets even more, while the big 3 - Batman, Superman and Wonder Woman - get short shrift, relegated to mere cameos. I appreciate Cooke is trying to shine the spotlight on some of the less usual suspects but there's a reason why Batman and Superman are more popular than Green Lantern and Flash. Let's talk about the big alien menace that makes up the plot. First off, a vague alien danger is pretty much what a lot of Silver Age comics did - horrors from space, etc. - and if New Frontier is a mash note to the comics of that era then it gets the villain right. Then again, it's not a great villain. We know nothing about it, except it wants to destroy everything and everyone, which is about as 2-dimensional as you can get. But I think this is deliberate because this isn't about having a complex nemesis, it's about giving the Justice League a reason for forming because up until now, they've basically just been random elements doing their own thing. With The Center (the big alien bad thing), they're forced to work together thus realising they should be a team and completing the story. All of which is fine even though Superman, Batman and Wonder Woman are basically left out as Green Lantern, Flash and Martian Manhunter (guess who Cooke's favourites are?) save the day. But like I said, focusing on those less interesting characters made the book harder to read and, though the alien threat is a plot point, the rest of the book drags and drags even when they finally fight it. Meanwhile some space stuff happens - Hal is denied going into space and mopes around Ferris Industries, in a sequence that just went on and on, racism is touched on - John Henry Irons gets called some racist epithets, all 60s era issues that places the comic squarely in its time, but nothing that stands out as particularly inspired. And ending the book quoting Kennedy's New Frontier speech - really? It's too on the nose. Cooke's art remains the best thing about New Frontier even though once again he has trouble distinguishing his male characters in appearance, something he really needs to do as he can't really make them stand out with his script. New Frontier has its moments but it was far too long - two volumes is too much for what little story - and though I get that Cooke wants to celebrate this era in history and comics, I still think if you wanted to experience the Silver Age you'd be better off reading the actual comics of this time than New Frontier.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sesana

    After reading the first volume of New Frontier, I was frustrated with the lack of story progression. The first half read like a lot of random things happening around the same time, with no real sense of why or even if it was all connected. The second volume is an improvement in that regard, with an actual, discernible storyline. That said, the alien intelligence with poorly defined motives doesn't make for the most compelling threat. But the threat is really beside the point, isn't it? It's abou After reading the first volume of New Frontier, I was frustrated with the lack of story progression. The first half read like a lot of random things happening around the same time, with no real sense of why or even if it was all connected. The second volume is an improvement in that regard, with an actual, discernible storyline. That said, the alien intelligence with poorly defined motives doesn't make for the most compelling threat. But the threat is really beside the point, isn't it? It's about creating the JLA. And that's fine, but I can't help but feel like a better opponent would have made for a better book. I think that if I'd read this in the combined, Absolute DC: The New Frontier edition, there's a chance I would have liked it better. Maybe I would have felt less impatient with the lack of traction so much of the book seemed to have. Who knows? At least I enjoyed the art, enough to make it worth my while.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Christopher

    For all the raves I had heard about this series, I expected good things from it. I did not expect that it would make me cry. I finished it while on the metro, closing it up and realized that my eyes were all misty and wet. This book was something magical in a way-paying homage, respect, and true love to the superheroes of old-those without all the angst and murky gray morals that can dance a fine line between dazzling and annoying. New Frontier was as Darwyn Cooke said in his afterword, (paraphr For all the raves I had heard about this series, I expected good things from it. I did not expect that it would make me cry. I finished it while on the metro, closing it up and realized that my eyes were all misty and wet. This book was something magical in a way-paying homage, respect, and true love to the superheroes of old-those without all the angst and murky gray morals that can dance a fine line between dazzling and annoying. New Frontier was as Darwyn Cooke said in his afterword, (paraphrasing here as I lent out the book to my brother) "six people, six superheros who will always do the right thing." It wasn't chest thumping patriotic machismo, there was cleverly intertwining of how real life history would have affected these Silver Age heroes as Martian Manhunter feels the paranoia of McCarthyism, Green Lantern finds his country's black and white view of war shattered when he's in the thick of it. At the end though, as all the heroes come together to fight cosmic evil, there's a wonderfully, old fashioned sense of inspiration and hope, that can only come from letting your mind wander into a world where aliens, cosmically/scientifically powered men and women, and a guy in a batsuit, make you feel like a kid again, knowing that the world is going to end up alright in the end. Closing it with a montage set to John F. Kennedy's New Frontier speech was a master stroke.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nessie McInness

    Three words: Aquaman saving Superman. Even if the rest of the book was bad (which it wasn't!) it would be enough just for that moment. I'm a big Aquaman fan, and I think all the hate he gets is uncalled for. So this was a kick ass thing to witness (as was the volume 1 of the New 52 Aquaman. Thank you Geoff Johns). Other than that, this was brilliant. Better than the first one, definitely, but you can tell Mr Cooke was building up to this. Again, I've watched the animated film before I read the bo Three words: Aquaman saving Superman. Even if the rest of the book was bad (which it wasn't!) it would be enough just for that moment. I'm a big Aquaman fan, and I think all the hate he gets is uncalled for. So this was a kick ass thing to witness (as was the volume 1 of the New 52 Aquaman. Thank you Geoff Johns). Other than that, this was brilliant. Better than the first one, definitely, but you can tell Mr Cooke was building up to this. Again, I've watched the animated film before I read the books, so there were no surprises to what was happening, but it was still very VERY good. The retro slightly cartoon-ish illustrations are absolutely perfect. The alternative covers gallery at the end made me want to buy posters of all of them, just so I can put them in my wall and drink up all that 50's inspired goodness. I think Darwyn Cooke is up there with Jeff Lemire on my list of awesome authors/illustrators (even though they have VERY different styles!) This is definitely an Absolute Edition worthy series, and I'm going to look up more of Mr Cooke's worth, Selina's Big Score looks particularly good.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    This is Darwyn cooke's re imagining of the silver age dc universe with a lovecraftian enemy. And this is considered a classic. But I think I'm not well enough versed in the dc universe to get who all these characters were, and how they are related. so I think I missed a lot of the story. I also had the feeling that part one did not really have a story, but that it were just some anecdotes and scenes to show as much dc characters off as possible. Things that save this book for me are Cooke's drawi This is Darwyn cooke's re imagining of the silver age dc universe with a lovecraftian enemy. And this is considered a classic. But I think I'm not well enough versed in the dc universe to get who all these characters were, and how they are related. so I think I missed a lot of the story. I also had the feeling that part one did not really have a story, but that it were just some anecdotes and scenes to show as much dc characters off as possible. Things that save this book for me are Cooke's drawings and the the last battle against the centre.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Milka

    The last few pages bumped this up from 4 to 5 stars.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas

    What can I say that I haven't already? Comic books just don't get much better than this. From a completely biased point of view, I wish Superman played a bigger role in all of this, but I completely agree with Cooke's focus on Hal Jordan. Jordan is in many ways a Silver Age transitionary figure. A daredevil pilot turned superhero practically begs to be identified with the 50s and 60s and the themes of space exploration, the science fiction of the period, and the hope and optimism mixed in with t What can I say that I haven't already? Comic books just don't get much better than this. From a completely biased point of view, I wish Superman played a bigger role in all of this, but I completely agree with Cooke's focus on Hal Jordan. Jordan is in many ways a Silver Age transitionary figure. A daredevil pilot turned superhero practically begs to be identified with the 50s and 60s and the themes of space exploration, the science fiction of the period, and the hope and optimism mixed in with the lingering sense of domestic maladjustment fit perfectly into this story. More philosophical and more epic than the first volume by far. Cooke seems to be able to walk that thin line between action-fest with things blowing up dramatically and deep inner monologues that push the story along and make you think. It's a difficult thing to do and he deserves every shred of credit for this accomplishment. His theme-building is also profoundly layered in the artwork, the dialogue, the structure of the story and the epigrams selected; all of it seems to cry out CHANGE in a way that is spiritual and uplifting and hopeful. (Throwing in Kennedy's New Frontier speech was a really, really nice touch. The tone was perfect and the speech is one of the best in American political history.) A stirring conclusion that returns readers of my generation to the point where we all began and the faces we were familiar with growing up. I've seldom been this satisfied after reading a comic book. Feels like the caliber of Watchmen and the heart and hope of a Superman classic. Well done.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Wreade1872

    Nooo... there are moments, brief, Brief moments when this almost works.. but overall NO. Like volume one most of the focus is on Hal Jordan, the Challengers of the Unknown (so these guys are basically the Fantastic Four but without any superpowers? who knew there could be an even duller version of the FF :P ) and other dull characters. It also tries for Watchemen-esque politics but at the same time keeps the heroes in their cheezyist golden-age incarnations, the effect if jarring. Far too many cha Nooo... there are moments, brief, Brief moments when this almost works.. but overall NO. Like volume one most of the focus is on Hal Jordan, the Challengers of the Unknown (so these guys are basically the Fantastic Four but without any superpowers? who knew there could be an even duller version of the FF :P ) and other dull characters. It also tries for Watchemen-esque politics but at the same time keeps the heroes in their cheezyist golden-age incarnations, the effect if jarring. Far too many characters, unless you love ALL of the DC pantheon this just becomes a mess and in fact some of the most important heroes for the final battle arn't even introduced before that. Side-note, green-arrow is a fighter pilot is that canon? Overall, while this is a little better than vol 1 in that it does have some over-arching plot, like vol 1 it still feels more like a pitch meeting for an entire range of comis (like Marvels Ultimate Comics line) than it does a comic in its own right. Edit: I also don't think it helped that the enemy was so similar to the one from Giant Sized X-Men #1.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Gavin

    I loved this book, the conclusion of New Frontier. The style, the feel, the personalities, and the way everyone interacts, all against a backdrop of McCarthyism Superhero hunts/Korean War/Cold War/Space Race, etc. This book strongly features Hal Jordan and John Jones, but also includes the rest of the JLA Classic lineup (Supes, WW, Bats, Green Arrow and Aquaman). The emotional investment that Cooke was able to get me to make in the storyline was amazing to me that I cared this much. Final Crisis I loved this book, the conclusion of New Frontier. The style, the feel, the personalities, and the way everyone interacts, all against a backdrop of McCarthyism Superhero hunts/Korean War/Cold War/Space Race, etc. This book strongly features Hal Jordan and John Jones, but also includes the rest of the JLA Classic lineup (Supes, WW, Bats, Green Arrow and Aquaman). The emotional investment that Cooke was able to get me to make in the storyline was amazing to me that I cared this much. Final Crisis should have strove to have me this emotionally involved. But who knows what appeals to who. Either way, loved the story, the way it was done, and look forward to checking out more of Cooke's work. Strongly recommended.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sean Kennedy

    The New Frontier closes with the formation of the Justice League, while the Cold War goes into full swing. These books are a visual delight - every page could be framed, especially when the characters are given a moment in the spotlight. One in particular has Superman rescuing a wounded Wonder Woman after she crashes her invisible jet, and is echoed later on as Aquaman emerges from the sea carrying a wounded Superman. The storyline isn't as jumbled in this volume, so it gets full marks. If I was The New Frontier closes with the formation of the Justice League, while the Cold War goes into full swing. These books are a visual delight - every page could be framed, especially when the characters are given a moment in the spotlight. One in particular has Superman rescuing a wounded Wonder Woman after she crashes her invisible jet, and is echoed later on as Aquaman emerges from the sea carrying a wounded Superman. The storyline isn't as jumbled in this volume, so it gets full marks. If I was rating the two as one volume, it would still get the five stars overall. It's a gem.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Gregory

    Volume two surpassed the first volume in story and meaning for me. It had a more focused purpose and of course the artwork and lettering are superb. Given that Cooke and I are close in age, I feel his intent behind such a piece - nostalgia and hope. Growing up in the 60's and 70's was a different time in America. Better? Yes and no. But Cooke knows what the positive forces were and that is what he mainly showcases here. Reading this isn't a bad way to spend a fourth of July in America.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Henry Blackwood

    I’m going to have to say I didn’t end up liking this very much. The story never really got any better than the first trade. Sue me but I honestly don’t find a big monster villain with no motives bigger than ‘me angry, me make big hit hit until you kill me’. It was very forgettable. I still stand by my review on the first trade, the world building and how the characters interacted with one another was very interesting. Too bad the world didn’t have anything else interesting in it.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Travis

    The grand finale to one of the best comic stories of the last couple years. A brilliant blend of cold war history and silver age comics. The heroes are big and bold, while at the same time feeling very real. An epic comic battle with lots of nice human touches and beautiful art.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Drown Hollum

    I was not totally awe-inspired by the first volume, but New Frontier has such an incredible ending and afterword that I was stolen away by this masterwork of cartooning. I don't usually spend too many words on older works like this which have already been reviewed to the end of the world and back. All I really want to say is that Darwyn Cooke was a treasure, and I hope every comics fan takes some time to appreciate his work. New Frontier is a fine place to start, if you haven't already.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Alex Bledsoe

    A strong conclusion, epic in scope and filled with vivid moments. I especially enjoyed, as a carryover from part one, the inclusion of so many non-superhero characters and teams (Lois Lane comes across especially well). The villain remains a bit faceless and personality-free, but the story is really about the heroes and their reckoning with the "future."

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    Great! Concludes the first TPB's arc, so read 'em together.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Noah Sanders

    Darwyn Cooke is a master of the nostalgic comic book. The type of 1950s throwback that manages to take the ideals of the three-colored yarns of yesteryear and modernize them for today's stone-faced, post-The Dark Knight Returns comic book fans. The New Frontier is Cooke's opus, a tale of the emergence of the DC Universe's big guns, broken down by a government scared of superheroes, but brought together and back in to the limelight by the sort of otherworldly, psychic threat, a great comic can re Darwyn Cooke is a master of the nostalgic comic book. The type of 1950s throwback that manages to take the ideals of the three-colored yarns of yesteryear and modernize them for today's stone-faced, post-The Dark Knight Returns comic book fans. The New Frontier is Cooke's opus, a tale of the emergence of the DC Universe's big guns, broken down by a government scared of superheroes, but brought together and back in to the limelight by the sort of otherworldly, psychic threat, a great comic can really make feel dangerous. They're all here - Superman, Batman, The Flash, Green Lantern, Martian Manhunter, and more - thrust in to the zippy world of big fun and big emotions Cooke has become so gifted and weaving over the years. I've always been a Marvel kid in terms of my comic book consumption. As a kid I loved the big epic storytelling that didn't seem as weighed down by the onus of its past. DC has a tendency to get hung up on the fan-boy shit, the various Earth-types, the ten different bearers of each superhero identity and so on and so forth until a new reader can barely find a foothold in their comic universe without an extensive amount of research. Cooke seems to see that here and goes about cleaning the plate, introducing us, quickly and with a aim towards the bigger story, to the big names and then intricately pushing them together. Even with Cooke's huge talent as a writer though, the first half of this series left me cold and confused, the flood of character introductions seemingly shackled by their connections to DC's past. If I had stopped at the midway point, I don't know if I could have given this series a positive review. Yes, Cooke's characters are well painted and in this series especially indicative of the 50s and 60s James Bond-type do-gooders that are as likely to be fighting space creatures as dipping a woman on the dance floor with a cig in one hand and a martini in the other. And yes, Cooke's art is amazing, simple, gorgeous and wearing the influences of all things 60s firmly on its sleeve with each page broken down in to a series of wide-shot, almost storyboard images. This is a superhero epic and Mr. Cooke has no intention of you forgetting it. Toss in the beautifully bright colors of super-colorist Dave Stewart and this book is nothing if not a work of art. And thus, you forgive the more confusing aspects of the first half and you plunge forward and you're happy you did. You're happy to see the characters that seemed, and intentionally so, shallow cut-outs, defined by their powers and not by their intentions, grow, thicken and come together in the deft hands of the writer. Where the first book is introductions, the second book is getting the band together to face off against yet another DC super-villain re-adapted, this time in the form of The Centre, a seething, living bit of psychic horror that tears at the minds of the entire world. This second book, a near perfect concoction of big action and bigger emotional moments, moves at an exceptional pace, each character getting their moments to shine and doing so in service to the greater story. This is big-budget storytelling told with the sort of style and aplomb you don't get to much on the big screen anymore. Cooke manages to create a story that embodies the good-natured, emotionally earnest vibe of The Silver Age of comic, one that rattles the long dormant cages of comic optimism but does so in a way that doesn't feel false. In the last few pages of the comic there's an image that if put in the hands of a lesser writer/artist would seem false: the super heroes of the world arms extended flying towards adventure unknown, an errant strand of a JFK quote floating over them. This could be cheesy, this could be a halfhearted attempt to ape a style gone missing, but with Cooke behind the while, this is the capper at the end of a great story, that makes your heart lift and a smile slowly creep across your face.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Hayden

    So I was right. Vol 1 of New Frontier was on slow burn, because it was building up to this hugely epic climax. The shit really hits the fan about halfway through this trade. I loved how this retold the origins of Green Lantern and Martian Manhunter, as well as the introduction of Aquaman. What really makes this story work, above all other origin stories, is how character driven it is. The entire series is centered around Hal Jordan, the future Green Lantern, which is different, since I believe mo So I was right. Vol 1 of New Frontier was on slow burn, because it was building up to this hugely epic climax. The shit really hits the fan about halfway through this trade. I loved how this retold the origins of Green Lantern and Martian Manhunter, as well as the introduction of Aquaman. What really makes this story work, above all other origin stories, is how character driven it is. The entire series is centered around Hal Jordan, the future Green Lantern, which is different, since I believe most writers would've jumped on the Batman/Superman train. But having Jordan as the lead was brilliant. We see Hal Jordan as wild and reckless, but also unsure of himself, and of the current situation the US is in. His viewpoint perfectly captures the zeitgeist of that era in our history. Cooke's artwork was once again top notch here. I'm reminded of an action-heavy scene in the climax where Hal and his air force friends are being mentally manipulated by the brain of the alien they're fighting. What follows is an insane pool of colors and shapes and whacked out trippy-ness that's bound to remind you of that scene in 2001: A Space Odyssey (I think this is like the fifth time I've referenced this movie in my book reviews, I'm a fan if you can't tell) where they're flying through the black hole. And there's also a breathtaking full page panel of Hal and Carol kissing in front of a Jet engine, which is one of the most beautiful images I've ever witnessed in a comic book. I'd love to have a print of that framed on my wall. Like I said, graphic novels like this are few and far between. Anyone who's read a Justice League comic lately could tell you that characterization has definitely taken a backseat to mindless Michael Bay explosions for quite some time. That's all fine and good, but it's nice to pick up something like this, that really gets into the minds of the seven leads, and shows just why they really believe in what they are doing. If you're reading this review and haven't read the first volume yet, I highly recommend you pick up both volumes, and read them back to back, as they're really halves of one large story. This is an absolutely fantastic look into the greatest team of superheroes to ever grace comic books. It builds and builds up to what is probably the most perfect and satisfying conclusion to a comic I've read in quite some time. 5/5

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Briggs

    Sure, there are better superhero books out there, but there aren’t many as much fun as Darwyn Cooke’s "New Frontier." I generally frown on this kind of rewriting of comix history. It muddles continuity and inspires lesser writers to try to explain things in neverending crossover "events" that serve only to muck things up further. But Cooke does a really lovely job in this concluding volume celebrating the optimism and adventure of DC's Silver Age. Over the past few decades, superheroes have gott Sure, there are better superhero books out there, but there aren’t many as much fun as Darwyn Cooke’s "New Frontier." I generally frown on this kind of rewriting of comix history. It muddles continuity and inspires lesser writers to try to explain things in neverending crossover "events" that serve only to muck things up further. But Cooke does a really lovely job in this concluding volume celebrating the optimism and adventure of DC's Silver Age. Over the past few decades, superheroes have gotten to be a pretty tortured bunch. As readers grew, characters had to change in an attempt to stay relevant, and as the world got more complicated and morally hazy, so did the stories. And that's fine. I'm not griping. I like my Batman cranky. But when Nick Fury (different company, I know) calls a waitress the C-word coz she asks him to put his cigar out, I have to think maybe gritty has been carried a bit far. Most of us who continue to read comix as adults picked up the habit as children when our parents brought us a big stack of "funny books" to keep us out of their hair for a while. Comix offered thrills, laughter, larger-than-life adventure. They kickstarted our imaginations. Cooke remembers the excitement of getting a big stack of unread comix in your lap. You realize what kind of book it's going to be when you open it to the inside cover where every hero is wearing a big grin. It's fun to fly. It's fun to run ridiculously fast. It's fun to talk with fishies. Upon reading the very first words of the story -- "Giant gorilla in the business district" -- I had a matching grin. But "New Frontier" isn't an exercise in simple nostalgia. Cooke includes the dark side of the '50s -- racial strife in the South, the rumblings of Southeast Asia, the Cold War, covert government activity, Richard Nixon -- but the darkness doesn't overpower the book, which is fundamentally hopeful. As the title suggests, this is a story about exploration, about meeting the challenges of unknown territory, about the determination to make things different, to make things better. It's like "The Right Stuff" with capes and snazzier spacecraft. "New Frontier" is pop art mythology that really POPS. Even the most cynical reader (that's me) can't help but be disarmed by giant dinosaurs and Martian Manhunters.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Bill FromPA

    The narrative does not work as successfully as the artwork; as the plot progresses to its climax Cooke’s desire to tell a nuanced story about real-world problems sits uncomfortably with the use of superhero protagonists. In the end, a comic book blow-‘em-up conclusion undoes much of the subtlety of characterization and motivation that Cooke has established. This disconnect is made even more blatant in the series’ epilogue, where the words of a JFK speech are used as captions for a series of imag The narrative does not work as successfully as the artwork; as the plot progresses to its climax Cooke’s desire to tell a nuanced story about real-world problems sits uncomfortably with the use of superhero protagonists. In the end, a comic book blow-‘em-up conclusion undoes much of the subtlety of characterization and motivation that Cooke has established. This disconnect is made even more blatant in the series’ epilogue, where the words of a JFK speech are used as captions for a series of images alternating between actual issues from the early sixties – the doomsday clock, racial segregation – with panels from comic book story-lines. I’m wrestling a bit with the ending. The final three pages, presenting the fragment of a story, show the Justice League fighting a giant flying starfish. My first reaction was that this probably unintentionally emphasized the banality of comic book escapism in the face of reality. But this ridiculous closing seems to intentionally echo an earlier scene in which the Martian Manhunter, still becoming accustomed to the ways of Earth, attends a SF film (its imagery based on Invaders from Mars) which he sees as a comedy, but is disturbed to find that no one else is laughing. If these two scenes are intentional reflections of each other I’m not sure what message the reader is supposed to take from that – it seems that rather than turning from fantasy to grapple with reality, the reader is advised to be satisfied with fantasy; for my taste a very unsatisfactory message, but one, if embraced, sure to sell more comic books. Cooke’s sincere afterword indicates that he wishes to celebrate the power of the imagination and “sensawunda” comics engage. Perhaps he sees comic book tropes as ways for the imagination to concretize abstract problems as a preliminary step in coming to terms with them. He successfully did this in many of the earlier episodes of The New Frontier, putting new wine into old bottles. But the ending was quite a letdown – shopworn tropes and imagery betraying the story’s earlier promise, seeming to flee reality rather than ultimately confronting it.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Professor

    The story is essentially a streamlining of the 1950s into 1960s comic history of DC Comics aligned with some real-world history at the same time. When superhero comics' sales crashed in the 1950s, a slew of other genres took their place-sci-fi comics, horror comics, crime comics, and war comics, for example. So the DC characters of this era-Task Force X, The Challengers of the Unknown, The Losers-get incorporated into a story that also has superheroes put out of business by McCarthyism and a sen The story is essentially a streamlining of the 1950s into 1960s comic history of DC Comics aligned with some real-world history at the same time. When superhero comics' sales crashed in the 1950s, a slew of other genres took their place-sci-fi comics, horror comics, crime comics, and war comics, for example. So the DC characters of this era-Task Force X, The Challengers of the Unknown, The Losers-get incorporated into a story that also has superheroes put out of business by McCarthyism and a sense that they are no longer needed, or their own disgust with post-World War II America. The book tells a decent story, but it does feel somewhat like I've seen it before-the re-imagining of comic history to match up better with real world events and meta accounting for the history of comics- Watchmen , anyone? Still, Cooke has his own story to tell-and he's using mainstream comic characters, rather than the stand-ins that Alan Moore used back in the 1980s. When I watched the recent Direct-to-DVD animated film based on this comic mini-series, I had a sense that there was a lot cut to compress the comic into a film. The first volume of the collected series contradicted that thought-not a whole lot of value was lost in the transition; in fact I think I enjoyed that part of the film more. In the second volume, however, the real pay off comes. Instead of just focusing on Hal Jordan, the soon-to-be-Green-Lantern, we get a wider view of the DC comics world at the time, and overall I found it much more satisfying (and a little more understandable) than the second half of the film, which was packed in very tight. Worth a look if you're already a comic fan and at least semi-familiar with the DC stable of characters.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    This review will be largely cut-and-paste, but only because a movie essay from about ten years ago felt like it could've been describing this book to a 'T.' Apologies and thanks to the Kindertauma site: " . . . it melts my heart like a summer popsicle with its 'gosh-golly' outdated optimism and unhip exuberance. Did I just hear somebody say corny? Yep, it's true . . . just chuck full of corny ideas, like the one about the disenfranchised putting aside their differences in order to topple an oppres This review will be largely cut-and-paste, but only because a movie essay from about ten years ago felt like it could've been describing this book to a 'T.' Apologies and thanks to the Kindertauma site: " . . . it melts my heart like a summer popsicle with its 'gosh-golly' outdated optimism and unhip exuberance. Did I just hear somebody say corny? Yep, it's true . . . just chuck full of corny ideas, like the one about the disenfranchised putting aside their differences in order to topple an oppressive [enemy] . . . Then there is the hokey idea that someone might sacrifice themselves for the greater good just because it's the right thing to do, and who can forget the kooky idea [of] true love? . . . old birds are given second chances, enemies are transformed into allies, and folks cheer you on from the sidelines. Silly ideas all, in this day and age . . . " Okay, enough with the theft of words (and the gushing). The two-part The New Frontier was just a wonderful mini-epic combining real-life American history (TV journalist Edward R. Murrow, the burgeoning civil rights movement, the Mercury-7 astronauts - to name just a few things from this edition) with the Justice League origin. The final chapter, epilogue, and post-script (trust me- it wasn't drawn out at all; it just works) should have fans smiling and looking skyward like the superheroes on the cover art.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Barnaby Haszard

    I want to understand why superheroes are so important, and so loved, by so many people, when they have never moved me more than a notch or two above indifference. I want to know what they offer that is so much more appealing than regular humans, who never cease to amaze me, or to sate my thirst for heroic stories. The New Frontier gave me a good insight into all that. So many superheroes -- all of them motivated by perfect goodness and faith in humanity, however dark their back stories -- are nec I want to understand why superheroes are so important, and so loved, by so many people, when they have never moved me more than a notch or two above indifference. I want to know what they offer that is so much more appealing than regular humans, who never cease to amaze me, or to sate my thirst for heroic stories. The New Frontier gave me a good insight into all that. So many superheroes -- all of them motivated by perfect goodness and faith in humanity, however dark their back stories -- are necessary because there is always an Other, and they are motivated by a self-interest that will lead them inevitably to the destruction of humanity, and they are bigger and badder than one or two superheroes could handle. I still don't really buy it. But I get it, at least a little; I get why there are reviewers on here talking about how The New Frontier moved them to tears. I was simply entertained, and will file it away as confirmation that for me, superhero fans will always be an Other. Are they out to destroy the likes of me, though? With Marvel and DC only a few years into their epic, era-defining movie franchise cycles, it's probably too soon to say.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Nick

    The New Frontier wraps up in volume 2, and while an improvement on volume 1, I still left this story feeling underwhelmed. By the second half of this volume, I had grown tired of the campy 50s era dialogue (yes I know it's intentional), and was let down at the final reveal of the Centre as nothing more than a floating island that housed reptilian/prehistoric creatures. The symmetry of the story does come together a bit better than I anticipated, but overall, nothing feels like it was given its d The New Frontier wraps up in volume 2, and while an improvement on volume 1, I still left this story feeling underwhelmed. By the second half of this volume, I had grown tired of the campy 50s era dialogue (yes I know it's intentional), and was let down at the final reveal of the Centre as nothing more than a floating island that housed reptilian/prehistoric creatures. The symmetry of the story does come together a bit better than I anticipated, but overall, nothing feels like it was given its due time. Today's market is so over saturated with crossovers and tie-ins, it's a bit curious to me that in 2004, this type of story couldn't have produced more than 6 oversize issues. If you're going to tell the story of DC's silver age, the creators will need adequate space to do so. The promise of The New Frontier must have seemed like a no-brainer on paper, but the final execution of the story didn't leave me thinking that I had read one of the better tales in the publisher's long, storied history.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Collin Henderson

    I think this story just wasn't for me. The only part of the D.C. universe I care about is the batman section, and beyond a few characters in the justice league, I honestly am not very familiar with the universe as a whole. So all these characters in this story who are given little to no introduction had no resonance with me. Additionally, it still felt incredibly disjointed, with John Henry being the prime offender. His story is given maybe five pages of time between both volumes, and it has no c I think this story just wasn't for me. The only part of the D.C. universe I care about is the batman section, and beyond a few characters in the justice league, I honestly am not very familiar with the universe as a whole. So all these characters in this story who are given little to no introduction had no resonance with me. Additionally, it still felt incredibly disjointed, with John Henry being the prime offender. His story is given maybe five pages of time between both volumes, and it has no consequence on the story as a whole. And lastly the major threat Iintroduced in this volume seemingly came out of nowhere and didn't really feel like a grand adversary. I give this series three stars as a middle of the road reaction. I can very easily see someone with a love for the whole D.C. universe thoroughly enjoying this throwback storyline. But for me, it felt too disjointed and dry to really evoke any other reaction than "eh."

  27. 4 out of 5

    The other John

    To repeat what I said about Volume 1: New Frontier was a six-issue miniseries set in the "Silver Age" of DC Comics, from the mid 1950s through the 1960s. The stories from that era were the first I had ever read, and the superheroes I enjoyed had, for the most part, been defined in that era. New Frontier is not a return to that era of storytelling, but rather an attempt to fuse the Silver Age spirit with modern, more adult storytelling. I have a love-hate relationship with modern comics. There hav To repeat what I said about Volume 1: New Frontier was a six-issue miniseries set in the "Silver Age" of DC Comics, from the mid 1950s through the 1960s. The stories from that era were the first I had ever read, and the superheroes I enjoyed had, for the most part, been defined in that era. New Frontier is not a return to that era of storytelling, but rather an attempt to fuse the Silver Age spirit with modern, more adult storytelling. I have a love-hate relationship with modern comics. There have been some great stories out there, but over all I think the attempt to be realistic drags the escapist fantasy down into the mud. Mr. Cooke, however, has done a good job of recasting those old characters into a modern mold, while retaining the old fashioned optimism of the stories of my youth. If you're a middle-aged boy like me, I'd recommend this as a book to check out.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Brandon

    New Frontier tells the story of the transition from the Golden Age of the DC Universe to the Silver Age while also representing the political upheaval the United States experienced in the aftermath of World War II through the Cold War. Cooke's art is a mix of old Charles Fleischer cartoons and Bruce Timm's DC Animated Universe, which is a nice throwback to the era the story depicts. Meanwhile, the story is nostalgia fueled while also attempting to create a cohesive timeline between the two disti New Frontier tells the story of the transition from the Golden Age of the DC Universe to the Silver Age while also representing the political upheaval the United States experienced in the aftermath of World War II through the Cold War. Cooke's art is a mix of old Charles Fleischer cartoons and Bruce Timm's DC Animated Universe, which is a nice throwback to the era the story depicts. Meanwhile, the story is nostalgia fueled while also attempting to create a cohesive timeline between the two distinct eras of comic book history, with Flash, Batman and Martian Manhunter being pretty great standouts among the large cast of characters. While pretty expensive, the Absolute Edition of the story collects the entire 12 issue run in an oversized format and is worth it for Cooke's art alone.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    Wow. Talk about rose colored glasses. Sure I thought the first volume was flawed, but overall, I found it refreshing, hip, challenging. This, however, is an utter disappointment. It went from effervescent to being a Bendis rip-off is seconds flat. YAWN. Again the Justice League presents too big a problem to overcome. You can't tell that many stories in that limited of space without sacrificing something. In this case, Cooke sacrificed the good thing he had going, letting The New Frontier become Wow. Talk about rose colored glasses. Sure I thought the first volume was flawed, but overall, I found it refreshing, hip, challenging. This, however, is an utter disappointment. It went from effervescent to being a Bendis rip-off is seconds flat. YAWN. Again the Justice League presents too big a problem to overcome. You can't tell that many stories in that limited of space without sacrificing something. In this case, Cooke sacrificed the good thing he had going, letting The New Frontier become unwieldy.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sean

    Darwyn Cooke has such a way of transporting readers to the time period he is drawing. Its pretty amazing. Here, every page is almost perfectly crafted to the 50's. My problem with this portion of the overall storyline is that at times the "Center", which is the antagonist, is too vague. The danger is real enough but I'm not sure why. Also, and this might be the fault of the letterer, but the narration boxes all looked the same so it was, at times, difficult to figure out which hero was speaking. Darwyn Cooke has such a way of transporting readers to the time period he is drawing. Its pretty amazing. Here, every page is almost perfectly crafted to the 50's. My problem with this portion of the overall storyline is that at times the "Center", which is the antagonist, is too vague. The danger is real enough but I'm not sure why. Also, and this might be the fault of the letterer, but the narration boxes all looked the same so it was, at times, difficult to figure out which hero was speaking. Overall, the book is gorgeous but the plot drug on too long.

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