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The Conan Chronicles: Volume 1

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Three classic Conan novels from the #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Wheel of Time Before Robert Jordan conquered the bestseller lists with the Wheel of Time, he revived the legendary fantasy hero Conan the Cimmerian. These widely acclaimed adventures introduced the world-famous barbarian to a whole new generation of enthusiastic readers. Here are three powerful Three classic Conan novels from the #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Wheel of Time Before Robert Jordan conquered the bestseller lists with the Wheel of Time, he revived the legendary fantasy hero Conan the Cimmerian. These widely acclaimed adventures introduced the world-famous barbarian to a whole new generation of enthusiastic readers. Here are three powerful sagas, featuring all the storytelling magic and epic splendor that have made Robert Jordan one of the most beloved fantasy authors in history. Conan the Invincible: Less than nineteen years old and new to the snares and enticements of civilization, the young Conan must join forces with a dangerously seductive female bandit to storm the palace of Amanar, a supremely evil necromancer, and confront the dreaded Eater of Souls. Conan the Defender: As revolution brews in the shadowy streets of Belverus, Conan braves the traps and treacheries of the Royal Palace of the Dragon. Pursued by the luscious and shameless Sularia, the mighty warrior challenges a magic-spawned menace that cannot die: the invincible Simulacrum of Albanus. Conan the Unconquered: Conan defies the sorcerous power of the Cult of Doom for the sake of a beautiful young woman known only as Yasbet. From the glory of fabled Aghrapur to the demon-haunted wastes of the Blasted Lands, Conan proves himself the greatest hero of a bygone era of high adventure.


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Three classic Conan novels from the #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Wheel of Time Before Robert Jordan conquered the bestseller lists with the Wheel of Time, he revived the legendary fantasy hero Conan the Cimmerian. These widely acclaimed adventures introduced the world-famous barbarian to a whole new generation of enthusiastic readers. Here are three powerful Three classic Conan novels from the #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Wheel of Time Before Robert Jordan conquered the bestseller lists with the Wheel of Time, he revived the legendary fantasy hero Conan the Cimmerian. These widely acclaimed adventures introduced the world-famous barbarian to a whole new generation of enthusiastic readers. Here are three powerful sagas, featuring all the storytelling magic and epic splendor that have made Robert Jordan one of the most beloved fantasy authors in history. Conan the Invincible: Less than nineteen years old and new to the snares and enticements of civilization, the young Conan must join forces with a dangerously seductive female bandit to storm the palace of Amanar, a supremely evil necromancer, and confront the dreaded Eater of Souls. Conan the Defender: As revolution brews in the shadowy streets of Belverus, Conan braves the traps and treacheries of the Royal Palace of the Dragon. Pursued by the luscious and shameless Sularia, the mighty warrior challenges a magic-spawned menace that cannot die: the invincible Simulacrum of Albanus. Conan the Unconquered: Conan defies the sorcerous power of the Cult of Doom for the sake of a beautiful young woman known only as Yasbet. From the glory of fabled Aghrapur to the demon-haunted wastes of the Blasted Lands, Conan proves himself the greatest hero of a bygone era of high adventure.

30 review for The Conan Chronicles: Volume 1

  1. 4 out of 5

    Hasham Rasool

    Most readers know Robert Jordan as the author of 'The Wheel of Time'. I am a huge fan of Robert Jordan. Jordan writes Conan books before 'The Wheel Of Time'. This book contains the first three novels of Conan: Conan the Invincible Conan the Defender Conan the Unconquered CONAN THE INVINCIBLE Less than nineteen years old, and new to the snares and enticement of civilization, the young Conan must join forces with Karela, a dangerously seductive female bandit, to storm the palace of the evil necromaner A Most readers know Robert Jordan as the author of 'The Wheel of Time'. I am a huge fan of Robert Jordan. Jordan writes Conan books before 'The Wheel Of Time'. This book contains the first three novels of Conan: Conan the Invincible Conan the Defender Conan the Unconquered CONAN THE INVINCIBLE Less than nineteen years old, and new to the snares and enticement of civilization, the young Conan must join forces with Karela, a dangerously seductive female bandit, to storm the palace of the evil necromaner Amaner and confront the dreaded Eater of Souls. CONAN THE DEFENDER As revolution brews in the shadowy streets of Belverus, Conan braves the traps and treacheries of the Royal Palace of the Dragon. Perused by the luscious and shameless Sularia, the mighty warrior challenges a magic-spawned menace that cannot die: the invincible Simulacrum of Albanus. CONAN THE UNCONQUERED Conan defies the sorcerous power of the Cult of Doom for the sake of a beautiful young woman known only as Yasbet. From the glory of fabled Aghrapur capital of Turan, to the demon-haunted wastes of the Blasted Lands, Conan proves himself the greatest hero of a bygone era of high adventure. I feel a bit strange to read this book because I always reading 'The Wheel of Time'. I can see some of the ideas that inspired parts of Robert Jordan's 'The Wheel of Time'. The Desert people are reminiscent of the Aiel, etc. The main character is unlikable. There is no depth storyline in this book. 'The Wheel of Time' is Robert Jordan's best piece of work. If you are 'The Wheel Of Time' fans as I advice you please don't expect this book is good as 'The Wheel Of Time' I think these people who are fans of Conan probably enjoy Jordan's Conan series more than these who are fans of 'The Wheel Of Time'. I don't really like this book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    This is what I refer to as my "dessert reading;" the kind of pulpy, high action that I resort to after a certain hour of the night when I am just to tired to deal with the subtlties in Plutarch or Shakespeare or the histories. Given my recent readings in history, I suspect that the character of Conan invented by Robert E. Howard and continued here by Robert Jordan is a much less complex sort of human being than those who actually lived in those times. But when I've just pulled a couple of forty This is what I refer to as my "dessert reading;" the kind of pulpy, high action that I resort to after a certain hour of the night when I am just to tired to deal with the subtlties in Plutarch or Shakespeare or the histories. Given my recent readings in history, I suspect that the character of Conan invented by Robert E. Howard and continued here by Robert Jordan is a much less complex sort of human being than those who actually lived in those times. But when I've just pulled a couple of forty hour shifts and it's closing on midnight, I am not in the mood for plots I have to guess at--give me a good formula with variations much like a good classical riff of Ravel's Bolero--and characters I have to work to understand. I'll save that for times when I am fresh, wide awake, and looking for some mental stimulation. I liked these three novels: they range over a wide territory, the action keeps coming, and the characters, if not deep, are quirky. There probably aren't any lessons to be learned here. After all, how could stories about courageous individuals trying their best to survive in a world full of greedy merchants, corrupt leaders, raving priests, mad cultists and servile minions possibly provide inspiration for those of us dealing with modern reality? . . . .Maybe I better sharpen that sword, just in case.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Crom! Innkeeper, hast your serving wench sunk her legs in a bog? It is I, Conan, that stands before you. Fetch me ale, man, or end this hour shorter by a head!! I just made that up. Hah hah. But these stories were great. Really excellent. (Apparently several writers have done them). Conan just rambles around what appears to be a fictional, fantastical, magical Babylon, kicks ass, takes what he wants, fights wizards, drinks, and hangs with hookers. And saves naked damsels from sacrifice to vile de Crom! Innkeeper, hast your serving wench sunk her legs in a bog? It is I, Conan, that stands before you. Fetch me ale, man, or end this hour shorter by a head!! I just made that up. Hah hah. But these stories were great. Really excellent. (Apparently several writers have done them). Conan just rambles around what appears to be a fictional, fantastical, magical Babylon, kicks ass, takes what he wants, fights wizards, drinks, and hangs with hookers. And saves naked damsels from sacrifice to vile demons sometimes. Never boring.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Carol Storm

    Robert Jordan wrote the best CONAN stories this side of Robert E. Howard. All three of the stories in this collection are pretty good, but the middle one, CONAN THE DEFENDER, is the best. Conan actually meets a bunch of Beatnik college kids and sets them straight!

  5. 5 out of 5

    H. P.

    I read this omnibus around the time it came out and was nonplussed. But I have a greater appreciation for Jordan’s Conan books now that I’ve read both The Wheel of Time and Howard’s Conan stories. I walked back in not expecting them to be either. Jordan doesn’t really get Conan. But Jordan is a very fine storyteller. He may not quite get Conan, but his Conan is charismatic and clever, not just strong. The barbarian versus civilization theme is dropped entirely, even though Jordan’s Conan is youn I read this omnibus around the time it came out and was nonplussed. But I have a greater appreciation for Jordan’s Conan books now that I’ve read both The Wheel of Time and Howard’s Conan stories. I walked back in not expecting them to be either. Jordan doesn’t really get Conan. But Jordan is a very fine storyteller. He may not quite get Conan, but his Conan is charismatic and clever, not just strong. The barbarian versus civilization theme is dropped entirely, even though Jordan’s Conan is young. I think I would probably have rather seen Jordan write an older Conan. Jordan’s Conan who doesn’t understand women is a little off. That was of course a theme Jordan would return to, and you see hints of several themes that Jordan would explore much more fully in his own epic fantasy: prophecy, the twisting of rumor, politics, a battle of the sexes. Jordan writes Conan’s feminine foils with a lot of moxie, but superficial similarities notwithstanding, they are different in kind from Howard’s. Red Nails is the closest Howard story in structure to Jordan’s as far as the women go. There are usually at least two in Jordan’s stories, and at least one of those antagonistic to Conan throughout, even if she does succumb to her carnal attraction to him. The romance is very much in the vein of the bodice ripper. This sort of thing works much better in The Wheel of Time, where it is toned way down, there are (many, many) female POV characters, and the whole battle of the sexes thing is baked right into the worldbuilding. Jordan isn’t the stylist Howard was, and he didn’t try to be. But his Conan books feature his finest prose, especially the latter books. He didn’t laden it with as much description as he later would. He gets a little overambitious with the vocabulary, but the results can be beautiful. The Conan Chronicles featuring Conan the Invincible, Conan the Defender, and Conan the Unconquered. It also includes a really beautiful map by Ellisa Mitchell based on Howard’s map. Mitchell also did the map for The Wheel of Time. Conan the Invincible This is the only mediocre original Conan story that Jordan wrote. Unfortunately, it was also his first. This isn’t by accident. Tor got the rights to Conan and wanted to put a book out very quickly thereafter to capitalize on the 1982 movie. Jordan was picked because Tor knew he could write “muscular fantasy” and write fast. They were right, but Conan the Invincible really shows as a rush job. This is Jordan’s most generic Conan and his most generic world, and it features out of place worldbuilding like the lizardmen who serve the evil sorcerer villain. I would say skip it entirely, but the one thing it is notable for is introducing the secondary characters Karela and Hordo, each of whom appear again. 3 of 5 Stars. Conan the Defender This was the only book I remember much of from reading the first omnibus back in the late 90s. It is still my favorite book from the first omnibus, and vies with Conan the Victorious for my favorite overall of the Jordan pastiches. Conan falls in with an artists’ commune (yes, really, and mostly for a girl and the free wine), starts a Free Company, and foils a coup. The obligatory evil sorcerer’s plot to seize power is genuinely clever and is one of the things I remember from my original read. I can even forgive Conan losing a fight to a soft nobleman with a magic sword. 4.5 of 5 Stars. Conan the Unconquered The Unconquered benefits from a more eastern setting (Aghrapur in Turan, with a trip across the Vilayet Sea to the Mongol-inspired Hyrkania). The cult leader who serves as the villain is a nice twist on the usual evil sorcerer, and his Khitan bodyguards were a highlight when I first read the book and a highlight now. “The air hummed as if a thousand hornets had been loosed. Arrows sliced through the space where they had stood, toward the man in black. And before Conan’s astounded gaze the man, hands darting like lightning, knocked two shafts aside, seized two more from the air, then seemed to slide between the rest and disappear.” 4 of 5 Stars. Jordan’s Conan books are fine to read in publication order, but according to his own chronology, the chronological order is: Conan the Destroyer, Conan the Magnificent, Conan the Invincible, Conan the Victorious, Conan the Unconquered, Conan the Defender, Conan the Triumphant.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Chip Hunter

    This is a collection of three Conan books by Jordan that were originally published in the early 1980's. Jordan does a fair job of representing one of the all-time-favorite sword and sorcery heroes, portraying him as the hard, no-nonsense, lover of gold and women that Robert E. Howard introduced so long ago. These stories are nothing like Jordan's later work with the epic Wheel of Time series, but they are not meant to be. The Conan Chronicles are fast-paced, exciting, simple, and predictable, a This is a collection of three Conan books by Jordan that were originally published in the early 1980's. Jordan does a fair job of representing one of the all-time-favorite sword and sorcery heroes, portraying him as the hard, no-nonsense, lover of gold and women that Robert E. Howard introduced so long ago. These stories are nothing like Jordan's later work with the epic Wheel of Time series, but they are not meant to be. The Conan Chronicles are fast-paced, exciting, simple, and predictable, a guilty pleasure for lovers of old-school fantasy. All three books involve evil wizards bent on obtaining power at the cost to the masses, and in all three Conan finds himself in a to-the-death battle with said wizards. One thing that stands out in these books is the blatant stereotypes and cliches that Jordan's characters take on. Wizards are dark and sinister, women are young and beautiful (and usually naked), men are greedy and dirty, and almost everyone is poor and desperate. Oily and unclean Iranistanis, and sneaky and deadly assassins (ninjas) from the far-east were particularly amusing to me. The first book, Conan the Invincible, tells of Conan accepting a job that turns out to be more than he expected. A strange wizard pays him to steal some jewels from the king of Zamora, but somebody beats him to it. As he tracks the thieves, he encounters a number of interesting characters that'll show up in following novels, including Hordo and Karela. Evil wizards and snake men pose quite a challenge to the young Conan, but nothing he can't handle. In Conan The Defender (Conan), our hero finds himself embroiled in a plot to overthrow the king of Nemedia. Lots of double dealing and behind-the-scene scheming make this one read almost like a mystery, with Conan playing the part of the detective. Once again, the antagonist is a dark and evil sorcerer with aims on the throne, and once again Conan cleaves through his enemies like a hot knife through butter. Hordo and Karela reappear here to aid (or hinder?) Conan in his goals. Compared to the first book, this one was more enjoyable to me, with a slightly more complex plot and with the characters becoming better developed. The third book, Conan the Unconquered (Conan), is my personal favorite. In this tale Conan finds himself traveling to distant lands to search for the means to slay a necromancer heading the 'Cult of the Doomed'. The pace is very quick and the overall plot is better developed than the first two books. The opposition to Conan and the dangers he faces seem more deadly and his new traveling companions add flavor to this one. All three books are enjoyable and simple. If you come for the right reasons (pure shallow entertainment) you'll be pleased.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    EVERYONE knows Jordan from his masterful Wheel of Time series, but all too often his Conan books have been overlooked and underappreciated by the masses. Jordan's Conan is THE BEST out of all the author's who have chronicled the mighty Cimmerian, including his creator Robert Howard AND L. Sprague DeCamp, in my opinion. I devoured Jordan's Conan novels in High School like a fiend, and always was left wanting more. It says much that when I met Jordan at Marcon years ago, I set aside a WOT novel to EVERYONE knows Jordan from his masterful Wheel of Time series, but all too often his Conan books have been overlooked and underappreciated by the masses. Jordan's Conan is THE BEST out of all the author's who have chronicled the mighty Cimmerian, including his creator Robert Howard AND L. Sprague DeCamp, in my opinion. I devoured Jordan's Conan novels in High School like a fiend, and always was left wanting more. It says much that when I met Jordan at Marcon years ago, I set aside a WOT novel to get my Conan Chronicles vol 1 signed.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jaclyn Goss

    3 books, packed into one neat package :) Really enjoyed this series. It's complete fantasy! Conan is undefeatable, covered in scars, young incredibly strong, and his mere presence makes women wet between the legs. Ladies rarily wear more then scarves, but still a fun read :) 3 books, packed into one neat package :) Really enjoyed this series. It's complete fantasy! Conan is undefeatable, covered in scars, young incredibly strong, and his mere presence makes women wet between the legs. Ladies rarily wear more then scarves, but still a fun read :)

  9. 4 out of 5

    Savanna

    I expected more because I love WoT. But it didn't appeal to me at all. It was crudely written and cliché and too full of objectified tits for me to like. So I didn't finish it. Therefore don't take my review too seriously. I expected more because I love WoT. But it didn't appeal to me at all. It was crudely written and cliché and too full of objectified tits for me to like. So I didn't finish it. Therefore don't take my review too seriously.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Dimitrios Mistriotis

    TLDR: Read if into Conan (like me), check better options otherwise. It took me long to read this book as I had to start and stop it twice. Once to leave for studies (and then stay forever in the country I studied) and then when I had to stop my holidays. I decided to get it to my new home in UK and read it in one go which was a mistake and a bet on "I will read it after almost 10 years damn-it" As I have read probably from another person in GoodReads, Robert Peterson is great at giving amazing des TLDR: Read if into Conan (like me), check better options otherwise. It took me long to read this book as I had to start and stop it twice. Once to leave for studies (and then stay forever in the country I studied) and then when I had to stop my holidays. I decided to get it to my new home in UK and read it in one go which was a mistake and a bet on "I will read it after almost 10 years damn-it" As I have read probably from another person in GoodReads, Robert Peterson is great at giving amazing descriptions of the people and places where the stories take place. You can almost feel the deserts, the mountains and the sea, and also sense the dust of the battles as well as the scent and looks of the gorgeous while sometimes wicked women :). The plot of the individual stories not so great and that Robert E. Howard feeling is not exactly there. It really feels like the plot is a means to an end which is take you from place to place. Also the three stories share a very loosely similar plot. Something that I did not like is the role of magic in Jordan's world. Sorcerers are a little bit too powerful and capable for Hyborian world standards, having real power to manifest entities and craft powerful spells, something a bit too far for this specific universe. I would suggest this book to people that are really into Conan like me and want something more. For this very reason I will read the second volume of Chronicles at some time in the future. People not interested to Conan tales should better look elsewhere, while newcomers could be better served with the writings of RE Howard. In either case if you choose to invest your time it is better to read stories with at least a small time gap between them.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ben Goldberg

    It’s hard for me to adequately describe how I felt about these three novellas. I think a lot of us have books that we revered when we were younger but revile as adults. Going back to some authors from the 1980s there is a certain peaceful charm to the old tried and true tropes that’s bring me back to the imagination of my youth. With Robert Jordan it’s a little bit different. I feel like he was the last and most popular bastion of fantasy from the 80s and 90s that was characterized by the classic It’s hard for me to adequately describe how I felt about these three novellas. I think a lot of us have books that we revered when we were younger but revile as adults. Going back to some authors from the 1980s there is a certain peaceful charm to the old tried and true tropes that’s bring me back to the imagination of my youth. With Robert Jordan it’s a little bit different. I feel like he was the last and most popular bastion of fantasy from the 80s and 90s that was characterized by the classical tropes, but drawn out into much longer epics. I found these short stories more tolerable than reading the Wheel of Time because they are short and pulpy... the story is over before you have a chance to get too bored with the reams of irrelevant description and chapter after redundant chapter of Nynaeve tugging her braid, crossing her arms, grasping the One Power, men commenting on not understanding women, women commenting on not understanding men, seemingly ad infinitum. Robert Jordan is one for very heavy description. But comparing this to modern authors, this kind of beautiful, flowery prose feels plastic. When I read a book by Joe Abercrombie or Brandon Sanderson, I know that the author is using ever single thing he puts on the page. Nothing is for no reason. But with Robert Jordan, despite his excellent command of the English language and robust lexicon, I often get the sense that he is just putting together the story as he goes along, there is no grand scheme, no moral, the plot is simple and thin. But again, I find this much more tolerable for pulpy 175 page novellas than the commitment of reading 14 thousand page monstrosities with no concrete synthesis, dimensionless characters (especially women), and major, major pacing issues.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    This is what it is...and that's no bad thing...what it is is (lots of us of the word is I know) is a anthology of three Conan novels written not by the original author of the Conan stories though much in that spirit. The author is I understand well known for his own canon of tales which I haven't read yet but I did enjoy his Conan tales ..I'm some ways alike with a Bond or Holmes pastiche there is some common ground in these tales ..there's usually a evil necromancer somewhere..Conan usually figh This is what it is...and that's no bad thing...what it is is (lots of us of the word is I know) is a anthology of three Conan novels written not by the original author of the Conan stories though much in that spirit. The author is I understand well known for his own canon of tales which I haven't read yet but I did enjoy his Conan tales ..I'm some ways alike with a Bond or Holmes pastiche there is some common ground in these tales ..there's usually a evil necromancer somewhere..Conan usually fights some conjured demon of some sort and there's a Conan girl who has fallen under the spell of his subtle wooing technique..a technique that is often Weinsteinesque in its surety. These books feel of testerone if found in the Olympic village they would fail the drugs test Conan is a uber man and although this is somewhat laughable in the modern context it's harmless enough...I can only suspect that if they are still writing Conan by now he is racked with some guilt over his previous womanizing and henchmen body count. In honesty he slashes slightly less in this the body count was notably down there are some of these books dripping in blood but I'm regard that these books are kind of reserved. Did I enjoy the tales for all my moaning about the formulaic nature..yes I did...I don't really want an enlightened Conan really a barbarian who is maybe also Vegan and knits his own chainmail?...Nah I will pass on that.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mr SSingh

    So being a WOT fan since I first read it in high school, I had never got around to reading any of Robert Jordan's other novels. Fallon Blood never peaked my interest because of the civil war era theme. Warriors of Altaii was very recent. And I always knew he had written Conan novels. "But Conan's not Epic!" My brain said for the longest time. "It's Sword and Sorcery, and that's beneath me!" How wrong I was. I read Robert E. Howards original stories, which were awesome and fun. And then I finally So being a WOT fan since I first read it in high school, I had never got around to reading any of Robert Jordan's other novels. Fallon Blood never peaked my interest because of the civil war era theme. Warriors of Altaii was very recent. And I always knew he had written Conan novels. "But Conan's not Epic!" My brain said for the longest time. "It's Sword and Sorcery, and that's beneath me!" How wrong I was. I read Robert E. Howards original stories, which were awesome and fun. And then I finally got around to reading Jordan's take on it. Both are great fun, I think, it might be blasphemy to say, but I prefer Robert Jordan's take. In this rare case, someone else writing in the authors world is better than the original. This one RARE case though. I thouroughly enjoyed these books. Holy shit, this is just pure masculine fun! What a Conan novel should be. You definitely wouldn't be able to get away with writing this today. Haha. But whatever, this is why older books rock, why 90's fantasy rocks. My favorite part, one of my favorites, the SFW part, is how there are this group of villains that are reminiscent of 'The Forsaken'. He didn't even need to describe them so well, could just be generic bad guys, but they all have their personalities, their flaws/weaknesses, their separate motivations and plots. It's F'ing great. I love the pacing. I love the variety of things that happen. It's not just all bar fights and big battles, there's a strength contest, at one point a villain just lets Conan and co into his house sip wine and bargain. And Conan just is a great character. Not a big dumb brute in the least bit, but an intelligent, thoughtful, yet maybe rash and unwise because he's still young. He didn't have any strong fear or apprehension of sorcery as in the original novels, which I found interesting. Sword and Sorcery isn't just stereotypical knight kills dragon/wizard saves princess, Conan is worth reading even if you're strictly an epic fantasy guy. These are just pure fun. Period. Read them. Read Howard as well.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Chaitanya

    I love WoT series. I believe it influenced me more than LoTR to love high fantasy. And, Robert Jordan is a master of fantasy. Having said that, I had no high expectations on Conan series (c'mn all Conan movies were cheesy, over the top action, melodrama, vulgar etc) as they were mostly for teenage boys. They date back to 30s and lot of generation-al influence is associated w/ the books. It's an influential work & there is an old-fashioned feel to it but it's so simplistic. Same thing applies to R I love WoT series. I believe it influenced me more than LoTR to love high fantasy. And, Robert Jordan is a master of fantasy. Having said that, I had no high expectations on Conan series (c'mn all Conan movies were cheesy, over the top action, melodrama, vulgar etc) as they were mostly for teenage boys. They date back to 30s and lot of generation-al influence is associated w/ the books. It's an influential work & there is an old-fashioned feel to it but it's so simplistic. Same thing applies to RJ's work as well. This book is well written and is more light-hearted. The plot is surprisingly good and it flows quite well. The characters are one dimensional & forgettable. The villains are more likable sometimes. Women would hate the chauvinistic narrative but, its about a barbarian and we should give it a pass. Always wanted to read to check if there were any influences on WoT. I think there were few and I liked the book for that :) 3/5!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Brian Rutherford

    Conan at his sword-swinging finest Robert Jordan's finest works in my opinion. I love his take on Robert Howard's creation. He adds a depth of character to the grim barbarian that Howard failed to instill. Also, Jordan's sense of humor is imbued in his works. I love all his Conan novels and will continue to reread them for the rest of my life. Conan at his sword-swinging finest Robert Jordan's finest works in my opinion. I love his take on Robert Howard's creation. He adds a depth of character to the grim barbarian that Howard failed to instill. Also, Jordan's sense of humor is imbued in his works. I love all his Conan novels and will continue to reread them for the rest of my life.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Rios

    Conan the Barbarian defines pulp fantasy, and Jordan does a fine job of capturing the spirit of that kind of book. Additionally, it's entertaining to read early Jordan, and it is interesting to see Jordan grow into his own voice in these three novels. Conan the Barbarian defines pulp fantasy, and Jordan does a fine job of capturing the spirit of that kind of book. Additionally, it's entertaining to read early Jordan, and it is interesting to see Jordan grow into his own voice in these three novels.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Dantegideon

    Well written, but this Conan never seems to have any fun, despite the profusion of “well-rounded” bosoms. (Seriously, RJ is constantly harping on about how round the women’s bosoms are. It’s a bit weird.)

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sophie

    Conan the Barbarian!!!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ryk Langton

    Good old swashbuckling fun with lots of action and sorcery.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Alice Diorio

    Jordan is as talented as Howard in writing Conan

  21. 5 out of 5

    Josiah John

    Very good take on the Conan story. Will have to see if I can fine Volume 2.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Shortsman

    The women are a bit one-sided, they all have big breasts and big butts, but honestly if that's the taste Conan is supposed to have I guess it makes sense that all his love interests look the same. The women are a bit one-sided, they all have big breasts and big butts, but honestly if that's the taste Conan is supposed to have I guess it makes sense that all his love interests look the same.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Chad Boulanger

    Finally, a worthy successor Having reread the original Conan sagas many times and also the comics, it is refreshing to hear new tales that do not sully the original. Bravo.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Francis Bacon

    some good conan

  25. 5 out of 5

    Josh

    Robert Jordan is my favorite author of all time, but I had never read any of his works except The Wheel of Time. This had been on my to-read list for a while, but I never felt any rush to read because I had heard that it wasn't to be compared with his groundbreaking epic fantasy series. That is indeed the case. Interestingly, you can clearly see some of Jordan's writing style in this - the prose, especially the descriptions, are lush and evocative, utilizing solid vocabulary that reminds one of Robert Jordan is my favorite author of all time, but I had never read any of his works except The Wheel of Time. This had been on my to-read list for a while, but I never felt any rush to read because I had heard that it wasn't to be compared with his groundbreaking epic fantasy series. That is indeed the case. Interestingly, you can clearly see some of Jordan's writing style in this - the prose, especially the descriptions, are lush and evocative, utilizing solid vocabulary that reminds one of the Wheel of Time. Other aspects, however, are shockingly opposite. The story lines are simplistic, and the events that unfold are so amateurish that it's hard to believe this is the same author. I understand that this was probably due to the publisher wanting certain types of stories, namely, fairly mindless "sword-and-sorcery" that merely entertains. Jordan probably had his hands tied with what he could do with Conan, and was stuck to writing formulaic stories that re-hash the same themes over and over again. Still, it is hard to accept such a stark contrast with his original work. The stories are chock-full of deus ex machina, Chekov's Guns, and every other 80's-era adventure trope you can think of. Conan is much like Bond - the stories all follow a common theme. He travels to a new place, gets embroiled into some conflict with a sorcerer that he didn't want, sleeps with numerous women (who all just happen to be beautiful and voluptuous), and wins by some unlikely twist that you probably saw coming, saving the entire world every time. Even worse, the villains all seem to ultimately cause their own demise in the end, their magics turning against them, as if this was some moral that the franchise is trying to impress upon the reader. It would have been interesting if Robert Jordan had been given full reign to direct the franchise as he saw fit - but I know that he was only one of many Conan writers following in Howard's footprints. Still, these stories feel far too outdated at this point, especially in its gender roles. This is chauvinistic male adventure writing at its most stereotypical, essentially junk-food for the mind, with stories that are instantly forgettable as the reader moves on to get the next "fix". As long as you don't expect The Wheel of Time, and if you're a Conan fan, you might enjoy these.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Bobby Luke

    Robert Jordan does a very good job of creating evil, powerful, interesting villains in these short stories. He doesn't do a very good job of convincing me that Conan can take them down like he does. The majority of the time, Conan manages to save the day by a series of very coincidental and convenient circumstances. An ax thrown by one person who was just killed by Conan happens to fly across the room and hit the villain in the back. An amulet with a villain's soul trapped inside somehow kills b Robert Jordan does a very good job of creating evil, powerful, interesting villains in these short stories. He doesn't do a very good job of convincing me that Conan can take them down like he does. The majority of the time, Conan manages to save the day by a series of very coincidental and convenient circumstances. An ax thrown by one person who was just killed by Conan happens to fly across the room and hit the villain in the back. An amulet with a villain's soul trapped inside somehow kills both him and the demon that tries to absorb it. A demon who has been absorbing souls the entire story..... You get the picture. Great storytelling, very interesting bad guys - not so interesting resolutions. You could definitely see some of the ideas that inspired parts of Jordan's Wheel of Time saga - and it was fun to see that. Desert people reminiscent of the Aiel, etc. The other major issue that I had with these stories was how chauvinistic and demeaning Conan could be towards women. Yes, he is a whore. That is one thing, and I could maybe live with it in perhaps a James Bond-esque sort of way. That would work, if Conan were as suave and smooth as Bond. But he's not. He is rough, intense and overpowering. Rather than making women fall for him, he grabs them and kisses their squirming kicking bodies until they finally succumb. Yes, I know he is a barbarian - and blah blah blah. All I am saying is that this aspect of Conan's character made him severely unlikeable for me. It's was just hard for me to root for someone who treats women the way he does. And it was more than just his forceable promiscuity, it was his overall attitude toward women. His comments, attitudes, and justifications about women are the sort of material that - if released as a new novel today - would probably drive women's rights groups to understandable anger and rage. So it was definitely a fun read, but it certainly had flaws for me. Great plot setup, great thematic elements, great villians, great action sequences - but a somewhat unlikeable main character and very poor resolutions to the main conflicts of the story.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Bobby Bao

    A decent, old-schooled fantasy to fill my craves and catch me up to the genre. Although I disagree with quite a lot of the depictions in the book, such as most, if not all, of the women are well-curved and perk of breasts and that they are only playthings for the pleasures of the flesh, the novels are well written. But not so much in terms of plot. I noticed quite a few plot holes and dropped plot points. Conan and his brusque alpha male DNA also gets old to read about. I guess it's just the tim A decent, old-schooled fantasy to fill my craves and catch me up to the genre. Although I disagree with quite a lot of the depictions in the book, such as most, if not all, of the women are well-curved and perk of breasts and that they are only playthings for the pleasures of the flesh, the novels are well written. But not so much in terms of plot. I noticed quite a few plot holes and dropped plot points. Conan and his brusque alpha male DNA also gets old to read about. I guess it's just the times this was written. At least he has to respect to back away if any wench says no. Would recommend, but just be aware that there is lots of sex.

  28. 5 out of 5

    James

    I really enjoyed these three tales of Conan and his assorted friends. Each followed a similar pattern - a magic-practising bad guy has ambitions for power, somehow Conan gets caught up, reluctantly, in taking them down, having plenty of sword fights and encountering scantily-clad damels to ravish along the way. Very pulpy, not particularly politcally correct in terms of sexual politics, but written with such style and humour that I got carried away with it all. Conan's a very well thought throug I really enjoyed these three tales of Conan and his assorted friends. Each followed a similar pattern - a magic-practising bad guy has ambitions for power, somehow Conan gets caught up, reluctantly, in taking them down, having plenty of sword fights and encountering scantily-clad damels to ravish along the way. Very pulpy, not particularly politcally correct in terms of sexual politics, but written with such style and humour that I got carried away with it all. Conan's a very well thought through character, not just some big lunk - he's more complex than, say, John Carter, and his world is rich in detail and well-drawn supporting characters, some of whom cross into multiple stories. I'd be interested to read the next set of 3 Robert Jordan-authored Conan tales.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    This is the worst cover to a Conan book I have ever seen. It looks like a romance novel. It was a fun read, though. It seemed a little more light hearted than the Robert E. Howard stuff I remember (from over 20 years ago). Sometimes Conan would say something that seemed out of character for him, but overall it was the Conan I know and love. Although, it just seemed wrong to describe him as "longing to ravage" the wench from the 3rd novel. "longing to ravage"? maybe sword and sorcery novels have This is the worst cover to a Conan book I have ever seen. It looks like a romance novel. It was a fun read, though. It seemed a little more light hearted than the Robert E. Howard stuff I remember (from over 20 years ago). Sometimes Conan would say something that seemed out of character for him, but overall it was the Conan I know and love. Although, it just seemed wrong to describe him as "longing to ravage" the wench from the 3rd novel. "longing to ravage"? maybe sword and sorcery novels have more in common with romance novels than I realized...

  30. 5 out of 5

    Fraggle

    before he started WOT, R. Jordan wrote a series of Conan stories. And, you can tell he is still learning the ropes. While i guess you can't expect much from a conan story, hack and slash seems to go hand in hand with what its all about, i still was hoping for a bit more and, you can still see, he just doesn't like women. before he started WOT, R. Jordan wrote a series of Conan stories. And, you can tell he is still learning the ropes. While i guess you can't expect much from a conan story, hack and slash seems to go hand in hand with what its all about, i still was hoping for a bit more and, you can still see, he just doesn't like women.

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