web site hit counter exit RACISM. rassismuskritisch denken lernen - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

exit RACISM. rassismuskritisch denken lernen

Availability: Ready to download

Obwohl Rassismus in allen Bereichen der deutschen Gesellschaft wirkt, ist es nicht leicht, über ihn zu sprechen. Keiner möchte rassistisch sein, und viele Menschen scheuen sich vor dem Begriff. Das Buch begleitet die Leser*innen bei ihrer mitunter ersten Auseinandersetzung mit Rassismus und tut dies ohne erhobenen Zeigefinger. Vielmehr werden die Leser*innen auf eine rassi Obwohl Rassismus in allen Bereichen der deutschen Gesellschaft wirkt, ist es nicht leicht, über ihn zu sprechen. Keiner möchte rassistisch sein, und viele Menschen scheuen sich vor dem Begriff. Das Buch begleitet die Leser*innen bei ihrer mitunter ersten Auseinandersetzung mit Rassismus und tut dies ohne erhobenen Zeigefinger. Vielmehr werden die Leser*innen auf eine rassismuskritische Reise mitgenommen, in deren Verlauf sie nicht nur konkretes Wissen über die Geschichte des Rassismus und dessen Wirkungsweisen erhalten, sondern auch Unterstützung in der emotionalen Auseinandersetzung mit dem Thema. Übungen und Lesetipps eröffnen an vielen Stellen die Möglichkeit, sich eingehender mit einem bestimmten Themenbereich zu befassen. Über QR-Codes gelangt man zu weiterführenden Artikeln, Videos und Bildern. Ergänzend dazu finden sich in fast jedem Kapitel Auszüge aus sogenannten Rassismus-Logbüchern – anonymisierte Tagebücher, die ehemalige Student*innen von Tupoka Ogette in ihrer eigenen Auseinandersetzung mit Rassismus geführt haben und in denen sie über ihre Emotionen und Gedankenprozesse berichten. Auch Handlungsoptionen kommen nicht zu kurz. Ziel des Buches ist es, gemeinsam mit den Leser*innen eine rassismuskritische Perspektive zu erarbeiten, die diese im Alltag wirklich leben können.


Compare

Obwohl Rassismus in allen Bereichen der deutschen Gesellschaft wirkt, ist es nicht leicht, über ihn zu sprechen. Keiner möchte rassistisch sein, und viele Menschen scheuen sich vor dem Begriff. Das Buch begleitet die Leser*innen bei ihrer mitunter ersten Auseinandersetzung mit Rassismus und tut dies ohne erhobenen Zeigefinger. Vielmehr werden die Leser*innen auf eine rassi Obwohl Rassismus in allen Bereichen der deutschen Gesellschaft wirkt, ist es nicht leicht, über ihn zu sprechen. Keiner möchte rassistisch sein, und viele Menschen scheuen sich vor dem Begriff. Das Buch begleitet die Leser*innen bei ihrer mitunter ersten Auseinandersetzung mit Rassismus und tut dies ohne erhobenen Zeigefinger. Vielmehr werden die Leser*innen auf eine rassismuskritische Reise mitgenommen, in deren Verlauf sie nicht nur konkretes Wissen über die Geschichte des Rassismus und dessen Wirkungsweisen erhalten, sondern auch Unterstützung in der emotionalen Auseinandersetzung mit dem Thema. Übungen und Lesetipps eröffnen an vielen Stellen die Möglichkeit, sich eingehender mit einem bestimmten Themenbereich zu befassen. Über QR-Codes gelangt man zu weiterführenden Artikeln, Videos und Bildern. Ergänzend dazu finden sich in fast jedem Kapitel Auszüge aus sogenannten Rassismus-Logbüchern – anonymisierte Tagebücher, die ehemalige Student*innen von Tupoka Ogette in ihrer eigenen Auseinandersetzung mit Rassismus geführt haben und in denen sie über ihre Emotionen und Gedankenprozesse berichten. Auch Handlungsoptionen kommen nicht zu kurz. Ziel des Buches ist es, gemeinsam mit den Leser*innen eine rassismuskritische Perspektive zu erarbeiten, die diese im Alltag wirklich leben können.

30 review for exit RACISM. rassismuskritisch denken lernen

  1. 4 out of 5

    Hans

    Ich möchte sofort losgehen und jedem einzelnen Menschen auf der Welt dieses Buch in die Hand drücken.

  2. 4 out of 5

    leynes

    This is a book on Anti-Black racism in Germany. I'm Black. And from Germany. This book is actually aimed at white Germans, so I'm definitely not the target group, but I wanted to read it myself in order to be able to recommend it to white people with a good conscience. In her introduction, Tupoka Ogette actually gives a trigger warning for People of Color, as she uses some racist language in the book (e.g. when citing historic quotes with the n-word in it) and details episodes of everyday racism This is a book on Anti-Black racism in Germany. I'm Black. And from Germany. This book is actually aimed at white Germans, so I'm definitely not the target group, but I wanted to read it myself in order to be able to recommend it to white people with a good conscience. In her introduction, Tupoka Ogette actually gives a trigger warning for People of Color, as she uses some racist language in the book (e.g. when citing historic quotes with the n-word in it) and details episodes of everyday racism that could potentially trigger People of Color. I am incredibly grateful for this trigger warning and I also think it is necessary, especially in regards to the log entries that are part of this book [Tupoka is an anti-racist trainer and in this book she included some log entries from her former white students and boy, I wasn't prepared for all the foolery. I am all here for people learning and growing but getting this authentic and honest look at the white mind, it's enough to say, I wasn't ready.] Exit RACISM is an incredibly important book since racism is still somewhat of a taboo topic in Germany. Racism in Germany is regarded as an individual, conscious misstep by others. That means it is assumed that racism can only occur with Nazis or other "bad" people and that there must be a clear intention. Tupoka Ogette breaks this taboo with her book, as have done some Black (German) women before here (see: Farbe Bekennen, Deutschland Schwarz Weiß or Plantation Memories). This book is definitely an introduction. Nothing more. Tupoka Ogette is extremely patient and lays the groundwork – the basics – for the white reader who thus far in their life hasn't really considered the topic of racism. Tupoka Ogette calls this state of mind "Happyland," it is the condition in which white people live before they actively and consciously deal with racism. And therefore, in the book, she defines and illustrates terms that are essential for anti-racist thinking, like white fragility, institutionalised racism, Othering, colorism, racial stress, white gaze, white privilege etc. And whilst I was familiar with all of these terms, I appreciate that Tupoka Ogette introduced them into the German discourse as well. [A little side rant on German discourse as a whole though: I find it incredibly concerning that most German discourse on Anti-Black racism is only (!) burrowing from the discourse in the US, nothing more. We take most of the terms that were mediated / negotiated in the US context and apply them without translating them into the German context. That's extremely problematic. For example: currently, there's no term in the German language for "mixed people" that isn't derogatory. As a mixed person myself, this is extremely frustrating. Therefore, we need to have more of these discussions in German (the language, that is!). Black Germans should be able to identify themselves in their own mother tongue, I don't wanna be forced to always switch into English when referring to myself. And there's a similar issue with certain German words simply being to unwieldy / awkward to actually be used frequently and organically in German discourse (e.g. if you compare the English term "victim blaming" to the complicated German term "Täter*innen-Opfer-Umkehr").] Anyways, Tupoka Ogette's aim with her book is twofold: on the one hand she wants to educate German people on racism (and the history of racism in Germany), on the other hand she wants to accompany (and therefore comfort, at least to a certain extent) white Germans as they come to the realisation that they have been socialised in a racist system that they, and only they, profit from. Tupoka Ogette describes the many phases that white Germans go through in order to fully come to that realisation and acknowledge it: denial, defense, shame, guilt, recognition. Sounds like the five stages of grief? Well, white Germans are mourning the loss of their ignorance. I really appreciate that Tupoka Ogette often stressed that it must always be more important to talk about racist acts than about how they were called out. Oftentimes, when calling out racism, especially as a BIPoC, what ensues is actually not a discussion of the racist act or utterance, but rather the manner in which BIPoC call out racism. This is extremely harmful. Tabooing racism within German society is an enormous obstacle to discourse. Racism does not disappear just because we do not want to name it or see it. Whiteness defines itself through the "other", through those who are not white. So whiteness needs the person who is not white and can only exist in distinction to him/her, because whiteness as a construct was created exactly for this purpose. In everyday life, the category "whiteness" does not play a role for white Germans [that's white privilege, in case you didn't know]. White people claim the sovereignty to interpret racism in the spirit of "I didn't mean it that way, therefore it's not that bad." Tupoka Ogette explains why this, among other defense mechanisms, is harmful as well. I also appreciate that Tupoka Ogette dedicates a lot of her time in this book to educate white Germans on how racist all their institutions are, beginning from kindergarden and school to university and the workplace. In one chapter, Tupoka Ogette details how some of our most revered philosophers like Kant and Hegel actually believed in white supremacy [see: Kant: “Die N* von Afrika haben von der Natur kein Gefühl, welches über das Läppische stiege.” and Hegel: “Der N* stellt den Menschen in seiner ganzen Wildheit und Unbändigkeit dar.”]. So, for instance, the Age of Enlightenment had a profoundly racist dimension. The collective repression of this dimension and the lack of an intensive examination of our own past is the reason why racism can survive so persistently in our systems and institutions. Tupoka Ogette asks the important question: Why are we not teaching this in our schools? Why are German students graduating with only words of praise for Kant and Hegel in their ears? Another important topic that is completely suppressed in our educational system is Germany's role in the colonisation of the African continent. [Something I learned from reading exit RACISM is that there is actually a Swahili term for the African Holocaust: Maafa; which basically means "great tragedy" or "catastrophe".] Not only was Germany involved in the shipping of African slaves, and therefore making huge financial profits from the slave trade. No, in 1914, Germany actually had the fourth largest colonial empire in terms of area (fifth largest, in terms of population). If you're not from Germany this might be mind-boggling to you but most white Germans will be unable to name the former German colonies in Africa. They simply don't know. The myth that Germany wasn't as bad as France or Great Britain is persistent in Germany up to this day. Most Germans also don't know of the Herero and Nama genocide which was the first genocide of the 20th century, waged by the German Empire against the Ovaherero, the Nama, and the San in German South West Africa (now Namibia), where between 24,000 and 100,000 Hereros, 10,000 Nama and an unknown number of San were brutally tortured and killed. The first phase of the genocide was characterized by widespread death from starvation and dehydration, due to the prevention of the Herero from leaving the Namib Desert by German forces. Once defeated, thousands of Hereros and Namas were imprisoned in concentration camps, where the majority died of diseases, abuse, and exhaustion. Up to this day, the federal government is still rejecting to pay reparations or even recognise these acts as a genocide. And only in 2018 did Germany return all of the remaining skulls and other human remains which were examined in Germany to scientifically promote white supremacy; years after the demands of Namibian ambassadors. Most Germans don't know that. And they don't wanna know. Tupoka Ogette also searches for reasons behind this suppression of knowledge, behind the unwillingness of white Germans to deal with the topic of racism. She writes: "The fact that Germany is responsible for the horror of the Holocaust, and thus bears a heavy collective guilt, has led us - as Germans - to banish everything associated with the term racism from our collective consciousness and above all from our collective self-image; in order to restore our broken self-image at least a little bit." One of my favorite chapters in this book is the chapter on language and power. In it, Tupoka Ogette writes that we often see language as something completely neutral. Something that represents and depicts reality. But language is much more. On the one hand, the way we speak is shaped by the history, the context and our perspective. Likewise, language is also flexible and, like societies themselves, always in motion. On the other hand, the way we speak about things, situations and people also changes reality. There is more behind words than a string of letters. They transport emotions and evoke associations in our minds. In this context, Tupoka Ogette also discusses various terms that were designated to Black German people by white Germans over the centuries [like the n-word, the m-word(s), "farbig" (= colored), "dunkelhäutig" (= dark-skinned)] versus the terms that Black people have claimed for themselves [like "Schwarz" (= Black), "Afro-Deutsch" (= Afro-German), "Person of Color"]. I appreciate that Tupoka Ogette also stated that self-designations are negotiation processes that take time. Like I discussed in my little rant before, I really hope that the variety of terms gets broadened in the future. Another of my favorite parts of this book was Tupoka Ogette's answer when it comes to white people derailing by stating that they are suffering as well: "All people want to be heard in their pain. People do not want to be perpetrators. Human beings want to be victims. Well, not in reality. They do not really want to suffer. But they want people to know that they too have suffered." And therefore, Tupoka Ogette's strategy when it comes to re-focusing the discussion on racism on actual racism is quite brilliant. She lets white people know that "to deal with racism and your positioning in it as a white person does not mean that you cannot have experienced terrible things. [...] It simply means that: 1) you have not experienced racism, and 2) when we talk about racism, we talk about racism. And just because we take the time to talk about it doesn't mean that all other painful experiences in life are not equally valuable, hurtful or worth hearing." That's such a beautiful and eloquent answer, I will definitely use it when white people try to derail from the discussion on racism to talk about the manifold ways in which they have suffered. Let's focus, baby! Lastly, I want to leave you with a brilliant quote by Tsepo Bollwinkel [in exit RACISM, Tupoka Ogette featured three small essays by BIPoC and this one was my favorite], unfortunately, it's quite un-translatable, so I guess you have to learn German to fully understand it: “Mir mangelt es fortan an jeglicher Sensibilität für Eure Kultur der Täter-Opfer-Umkehr. Weil mein gar nicht mehr so Kleiner ein Schwarzer Deutscher ist und der jetzt schon ganz schön Große auch. Weil kein Schönreden, Hinunterschlucken, Nicht-so-emotional-Sein ihre Lage auch nur einen Hauch verbessern wird. Weil rassistische Kackscheiße tatsächlich schrecklich stinkt, und zwar uns, den Rassifizierten, nicht Euch, den Rassisten.” A-FUCKING-MEN!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Claudia / BeautyButterflies

    "...wenn ich dir mit meinem Auto über die Füße fahre. Verändert sich dann dein Schmerz darüber mit meiner Aussage, ob ich es bewusst oder versehentlich gemacht habe?" Einer von vielen Sätzen, die mir nicht mehr aus dem Kopf gehen will! Die in meiner Denkweise etwas verändert haben. Bye Bye Happyland - Und das ist ok! Tupoka Ogette beschreibt sachlich und auf sehr angenehme, nicht anklagende Weise was Rassismus bedeutet, wie er entstanden ist und wie Rassismus auf POC wirkt, genau so wie sie es a "...wenn ich dir mit meinem Auto über die Füße fahre. Verändert sich dann dein Schmerz darüber mit meiner Aussage, ob ich es bewusst oder versehentlich gemacht habe?" Einer von vielen Sätzen, die mir nicht mehr aus dem Kopf gehen will! Die in meiner Denkweise etwas verändert haben. Bye Bye Happyland - Und das ist ok! Tupoka Ogette beschreibt sachlich und auf sehr angenehme, nicht anklagende Weise was Rassismus bedeutet, wie er entstanden ist und wie Rassismus auf POC wirkt, genau so wie sie es auch in ihren Seminaren macht. Im Vergleich zu Alice Hasters Buch ist exit RACISM weniger persönlich, emotional belastet und dadurch etwas einfacher zu verdauen, wenngleich die Themen identisch sind. Ich würde empfehlen dieses Buch vorher zu lesen und dann erst „Was weiße Menschen nicht über Rassismus hören wollen: aber wissen sollten“. Denn Tupoka erklärt gleich zu Beginn welche Emotionen und „Stadien“ auf Weiße Menschen zukommen, wenn Sie beginnen sich auf diese rassismuskritische Reise begeben. Auf den Weg raus aus Happyland. Auch werden in diesem Buch mehr Unterstützungen für die emotionalen Auseinandersetzung mit dem Thema gegeben und mehr Lösungsversuche. Enthalten sind auch Übungen für die Leser*innen, es wird auf weiterführende Materialien (https://www.exitracism.de/) hingewiesen, sowie Tagebucheinträge von Seminarteilnehmern vorgelesen. Gerade durch letzteres fühlt man sich als Leser*in mit den eigenen Gedanken und Gefühlen nicht so alleine und spürt ein gewisses Verständnis. Mir hat der Mix aus Seminarinhalten, persönlichen Geschichten, Erzählungen von Seminarteilnehmern und eben auch verständliche Lösungsansätze sehr gut gefallen. Für mich der perfekte Einstieg in das Thema Rassismus und der Beginn diesen aktiv im eigenen Leben zu bekämpfen.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sadie

    Von allen Büchern, die ich bisher zum Thema Rassismus gelesen habe, ist dieses das bislang beste - nicht, dass die anderen schlecht und/oder uninteressant waren, im Gegenteil, aber bei exit RACISM passt alles: Absender*in, Ansprache, Struktur, Informationsgehalt, Zielpublikum. Tupoka Ogette zeigt auf, wie Rassismus enstand, welchem Zweck er einst diente und heute noch dient, wie tief er verwurzelt ist und warum Verneinen, Ablenken, Umkehren oder komplettes Ablehnen keine Option ist. Kurzum: Ein B Von allen Büchern, die ich bisher zum Thema Rassismus gelesen habe, ist dieses das bislang beste - nicht, dass die anderen schlecht und/oder uninteressant waren, im Gegenteil, aber bei exit RACISM passt alles: Absender*in, Ansprache, Struktur, Informationsgehalt, Zielpublikum. Tupoka Ogette zeigt auf, wie Rassismus enstand, welchem Zweck er einst diente und heute noch dient, wie tief er verwurzelt ist und warum Verneinen, Ablenken, Umkehren oder komplettes Ablehnen keine Option ist. Kurzum: Ein Buch ganz besonders für deutsche weiße Menschen, die ihre Privilegien bisher noch nicht erkannt haben (oder erkennen wollten). Diese Menschen sind die klar umrissene Zielgruppe, und da es sich hierbei oft um Menschen handelt, deren Selbstverständnis (Ich, rassistisch? Never!) und tatsächliches Handeln nicht korrelieren, führt Ogette sie ganz behutsam an die Thematik heran und schärft den Blick. Sie erklärt mit schier unendlicher, bewundernswerter Geduld (die muss man in der Form erstmal aufbringen...), warum "Ich sehe keine Hautfarben" ebenso keine Lösung ist wie "Aber ich habe schwarze Freunde" oder "Ach, jetzt stell dich mal nicht so an, das war schon immer so." Verständlich, sympathisch und extrem lehrreich - dieses Buch sollte nicht nur verpflichtende Schullektüre sein, sondern auch zum Curriculum von Lehramtsstudierenden, Menschen in der Erzier*innenausbildung und der Ausbildung von ähnlichen Berufen gehören. Um etwas zu bewegen, ist Zuhören meist der erste Schritt - dieses Buch bietet dafür den perfekten Einstieg und so viel mehr (und das mit dem Hören geht hier auch wörtlich, denn das von der Autorin eingelesene Hörbuch ist nicht nur wirklich gut produziert, es steht auch bei diversen Streamingportalen kostenlos zur Verfügung, hier findet ihr die Links).

  5. 5 out of 5

    Miss V

    Ein Buch, das möglichst viele gelesen haben sollten. Es liest sich sehr schnell, da es recht dünn ist und hier liegt mein erster Kritikpunkt. Ich finde es toll, dass sich dieses Buch explizit an Nicht-PoCs richtet, doch dann darf die Frage, ob weiße Personen nicht auch Opfer von Rassismus werden können, nicht mit einem lapidaren "Nein. Das ist eine Diskriminierungserfahrung." beantwortet werden und Schluss aus. Hier vermisse ich die Auseinandersetzung zwischen den Begrifflichkeiten Rassismus - Dis Ein Buch, das möglichst viele gelesen haben sollten. Es liest sich sehr schnell, da es recht dünn ist und hier liegt mein erster Kritikpunkt. Ich finde es toll, dass sich dieses Buch explizit an Nicht-PoCs richtet, doch dann darf die Frage, ob weiße Personen nicht auch Opfer von Rassismus werden können, nicht mit einem lapidaren "Nein. Das ist eine Diskriminierungserfahrung." beantwortet werden und Schluss aus. Hier vermisse ich die Auseinandersetzung zwischen den Begrifflichkeiten Rassismus - Diskriminierung - Othering. Das sind alles hochkomplexe Themenbereiche, die miteinander verzahnt sind, in dem Buch aber viel zu kurz kommen. EDIT Nachdem ich mich vermehrt mit Rassismus befasst habe, ist für mich klar, dass weiße Personen nicht Opfer von Rassismus werden können, da sie es über kurz oder lang sind, die von rassistischen Strukturen profitieren, selbst wenn ihnen nichts ferner liegt als rassistisches Gedankengut. Dieser Gedankenprozess hat für mich, als weiße Person, allerdings viele Bücher und Stunden an Grübelei angedauert. Umso mehr schade finde ich es, dass die obrige Frage nur mit einer knappen Antwort abgespeist wird. Ich kann mir vorstellen, wie erschöpfend es für BIPoC sein muss, solche Fragen, deren Antwort eigentlich auf der Hand liegen sollte, wieder und wieder durchzukauen. Aber gerade das will dieses Buch ja leisten: Dinge, die für Personen, die unter rassistisch geprägten Strukturen leiden, selbstverständlich sind, Personen erklären, die von rassistisch geprägten Strukturen profitieren. Darum finde ich, dass hier eine Chance nicht genützt wurde. EDIT ende Auch nicht für so gelungen halte ich die Anordnung der Logbucheinträge. Ich hätte es hier schön gefunden, wenn die anonymisierten Beiträge dennoch einer einzelnen Person zuordenbar sind und so den Gedankenprozess von "Das geht mich alles nichts an" bis zu "Mir wurden die Augen geöffnet" abbilden. Denn die Kursteilnehmer*innen hatten nicht dieselben Voraussetzungen, als sie ihr Logbuch begannen. Hier wäre es schön gewesen, mitverfolgen zu können, wie einsichtig die besonders skeptischen Personen schlussendlich waren. Dass hier bewusst mit der Reihenfolge gebrochen und so die Chronologie zerstört wurde, halte ich auch für suboptimal. Wie gesagt, dieser Prozess, wenn das Erkennen von rassistischen Strukturen einsetzt, ist hochinteressant. Hier wurde, mMn, die Chance verpasst, zu zeigen, was es heißt, diese Strukturen zu erkennen. Die Eigen- vs. Fremdbezeichnung von PoC wurde mMn nicht deutlich genug erklärt. Es wurde gezeigt, welche Ausdrücke verwerflich sind, aber keine als Fremdbezeichnung vorgeschlagen. Schwarze (großgeschrieben) und Person of Color sind Eigenbezeichnungen - sind laut Ogette diese Wörter auch als Fremdbezeichnung empfehlenswert? Sollte generell auf Fremdbezeichnungen verzichtet werden? (Ist das denn überhaupt möglich?) Mich hat dieser Punkt ratlos zurückgelassen, weil er einfach stillschweigend übergangen wird. Gerade weil das Buch damit wirbt, sich an weiße Personen zu richten, hätte ich mir hier mehr Klarheit gewünscht. Videolinks per QR-Codes sind zwar nett gemeint, doch der Großteil der Auswahl der Links ist englischsprachig und ist damit nicht für alle Personen zu gebrauchen. Ich finde, der Zugang zu so wichtigen Inhalten im Buch sollte möglichst niederschwellig gehalten werden, doch hier wird vorausgesetzt, dass die Leser*innen über a) Smartphones und b) Englischkenntnisse (auf höherem Niveau) verfügen.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nina

    Ein sehr direktes und sehr lehrreiches Buch welches ich definitiv weiterempfehlen kann. Das Einzige was ich mir gewünscht hätte ist, dass die Logbucheinträge von Tupoka Ogettes Studenten eher am Stück gegen Ende des Buches einbezogen worden wären. Da jeweils am Ende verschiedener Kapitel einzelne Einträge aller Studenten eingefügt wurden, war es besonders im Hörbuch leider schwer sich daran zu erinnern, welche Einträge zusammengehören und somit der Entwicklung der Studenten im Laufe des Seminars Ein sehr direktes und sehr lehrreiches Buch welches ich definitiv weiterempfehlen kann. Das Einzige was ich mir gewünscht hätte ist, dass die Logbucheinträge von Tupoka Ogettes Studenten eher am Stück gegen Ende des Buches einbezogen worden wären. Da jeweils am Ende verschiedener Kapitel einzelne Einträge aller Studenten eingefügt wurden, war es besonders im Hörbuch leider schwer sich daran zu erinnern, welche Einträge zusammengehören und somit der Entwicklung der Studenten im Laufe des Seminars zu folgen. instagram || my blog || twitter

  7. 5 out of 5

    NAT.orious reads ☾

    4 STERNE ★★★★✩ Dieses Buch ist eine gute Wahl für dich, wenn… du noch wenig rassismuskritische Dialoge geführt hast und diese in der realen Welt auch oft abblockst, egal ob mit POC oder deren allies. Hier bekommst du ohne jemandem Rede und Antwort stehlen zu müssen die schmerzhafte Wahrheit serviert, dass du, ich und wir alle einen Haufen Arbeit leisten müssen. Und dass es keine Entschuldigung gibt, das nicht zu tun. ⤐ CALL FOR HELP: Do you know books or sources that specifically help me 4 STERNE ★★★★✩ Dieses Buch ist eine gute Wahl für dich, wenn… du noch wenig rassismuskritische Dialoge geführt hast und diese in der realen Welt auch oft abblockst, egal ob mit POC oder deren allies. Hier bekommst du ohne jemandem Rede und Antwort stehlen zu müssen die schmerzhafte Wahrheit serviert, dass du, ich und wir alle einen Haufen Arbeit leisten müssen. Und dass es keine Entschuldigung gibt, das nicht zu tun. ⤐ CALL FOR HELP: Do you know books or sources that specifically help me as a white person to lead fruitful dialogues/arguments with my privileged peers about racism and how to fight it? Especially Germany. I hope to not sound arrogant, I just really feel like I've not learned much new in this, except even more rage and desperation. Comparing all lives matter rubbish to so, if your house is on fire, I can complain that mine matters as well although it's completely fine? is not the way to go in the long run, not for me at least, I think. Books like this one or Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race are wonderful and valuable, but not what I think I need to become a better ally. ⤐ Gesamteindruck. Durch dieses Buch ist mir klar geworden, dass ich vor allem Werkzeuge finden und gebrauchen lernen muss, als weiße Person meinen Teil zu leisten. Ich möchte ein besserer Verbündeter werdebn. Inzwischen bin ich an einem Punkt angekommen - und ich hoffe, ich transportiere das jetzt nicht als Arroganz/Ignoranz - an dem ich es für mich als wichtiger und wertvoller sehe, zu lernen, mit meinen weißen Kollegen zu sprechen und sie aufzuklären, und das am besten ohne den Zeigefinger. Das ist erstens unfair weil ich genau so noch mehr an meinen rassistischen Zügen arbeiten muss und zweitens wenig hilfreich. Wenn ihr diesbezüglich also Tips habt, immer her damit! Insgesamt hat mich dieses Buch auch ziemlich wütend gemacht und mir ist aufgefallen, dass gut 80% meines sozialen Umfeldes sich doch sehr wohl in Happy Land fühlen. Und das ist eine Schande für Deutschland. Deutschland tut nämlich gerne so, als ob wir unsere schreckliche Vergangenheit total gut aufgearbeitet hätten. In Wahrheit sind wir Meister der Verdrängung. Die Juden sind nämlich nicht das einzige Volk, dass unsere Vorfahren ausgelöscht wollten sehen. Noch viel schlimmer: bei anderen ist es ihnen sogar gelungen. Anfang des 20. Jahrhunderts hat die Kolonialmacht Deutschland die Herero und die Nama brutal niedergemetzelt und dem Erdboden gleich gemacht. Zahlreiche Male wurde ein Antrag gestellt, dass Deutschland diesen Völkermord anerkennt. Aber "Nenene, hier Rassismus, das geht ja gar nicht auf meine Kuhhaut. Außerdem wird man ja wohl noch eine Meinung haben dürfen. Hmpf. All lives matter." ⤐ Darum geht's. ‘Die Europäer sind nicht zu Sklavenhändlern geworden, weil sie Rassisten waren. Andersherum wird ein Schuh draus. Sie wurden Rassisten um Menschen für ihren eigenen Profit versklaven zu können. Sie brauchten eine ideologische Untermauerung, eine moralische Legitimierung ihrer weltweiten Plünderungsindustrie.’ Tupoka gibt uns mit ihrem Buch exit Racism. einen schmerzhaften aber bitter nötigen Einblick in die Realität von 'Schwarz sein in Deutschland'. Besonders für alle unter uns, die ernsthaft denken, Rassismus wäre kein Problem und "nein, auf keinen Fall sind wir rassistisch" könnte es hier einige Augenöffner geben. Allerdings hab ich so den Zweifel, ob die Art von Leute sich das überhaupt reinziehen würden. _____________________ 4 STARS. Would stay up beyond my typical hours to finish it. I found some minor details I didn't like, agree with or lacked in some kind but overall, this was enjoyable and extraordinary.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Rosamunde Popcorne

    Sehr empfehlenswert die eignenen sozialisierten Alltagsrassismen zu erkennen und zu bekämpfen! Und vllt auch mal den ein oder anderen Kollegen darauf hinzuweisen das sein unnachgiebiges "Wo kommst du her?" auch eine Form von Rassismus ist. Sehr empfehlenswert die eignenen sozialisierten Alltagsrassismen zu erkennen und zu bekämpfen! Und vllt auch mal den ein oder anderen Kollegen darauf hinzuweisen das sein unnachgiebiges "Wo kommst du her?" auch eine Form von Rassismus ist.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Wow, dieses Buch sollte definitiv eine Pflichtlektüre in der Schule sein

  10. 4 out of 5

    Elena

    "Kurz gesagt: Du bist rassistisch sozialisiert worden. So, wie viele Generationen vor Dir, seit über dreihundert Jahren." - Tupoka Ogette, "Exit Racism" Willkommen im Happyland! Unserem Alltag, unserer Wirklichkeit, unserem Denken, unserem System. Rassistisch? Sind doch immer nur die anderen! Du nennst mich eine*n Rassist*in? Was bildest du dir ein?! Weiße Menschen verbinden Rassismus gegen Schwarze und PoC meist mit Extremismus, mit Nazis. Dass Rassismus aber eigentlich ständig im Alltag vorkommt "Kurz gesagt: Du bist rassistisch sozialisiert worden. So, wie viele Generationen vor Dir, seit über dreihundert Jahren." - Tupoka Ogette, "Exit Racism" Willkommen im Happyland! Unserem Alltag, unserer Wirklichkeit, unserem Denken, unserem System. Rassistisch? Sind doch immer nur die anderen! Du nennst mich eine*n Rassist*in? Was bildest du dir ein?! Weiße Menschen verbinden Rassismus gegen Schwarze und PoC meist mit Extremismus, mit Nazis. Dass Rassismus aber eigentlich ständig im Alltag vorkommt und Teil unserer Realität ist, institutionell ist und fest in unseren Strukturen verankert ist, ist uns oft nicht bewusst. Tupoka Ogette weist mit ihrem Buch "Exit Racism" einen Weg aus diesem Happyland. Das Buch bzw. Hörbuch ist so aufgebaut, dass man als Leser*in bzw. Hörer*in zum Mitdenken und Nachdenken und auch zum Mitmachen angeregt wird. Die Autorin stellt immer wieder Fragen, sodass einem bewusst wird, wie tief der Rassismus auch im eigenen Leben verankert ist. Tupoka Ogette zeigt Rassismus in den verschiedensten Institutionen auf: von der KiTa über die Schule bis hin zu unserer alltäglichen Sprache. Ergänzt wird das Hörbuch noch mit weiterführenden Infomaterialien, die auf ecitracism.de zu finden sind. Ich habe beim Hören viel gelernt. Auch, dass ich noch viel an mir selbst arbeiten muss. Dass ich besser zuhören muss. Dass ich besser aufpassen muss, was um mich herum passiert. Bye bye Happyland. Meine Gefühle beim Hören fasst wohl auch dieser eine Satz von einem der Seminarteilnehmer von Tupoka Ogette ziemlich gut zusammen: "Frau Ogette, ich habe das Gefühl, 40 Jahre meines Lebens in Happyland gelebt zu haben und sie haben mich jetzt da rausgeschubst. Es fühlt sich an, als wäre ein Tornado durch meinen Kopf geweht." Bitte lest oder hört dieses Buch. Lasst auch durch euren Kopf einen Tornado wehen und setzt euch mit dem Thema Rassismus auseinander. Das Hörbuch gibt es auf Spotify.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Fernwehwelten

    "Exit Racism" war mein zweites Buch in diesem Monat rund um das unheimlich wichtige Thema Rassismus - was es bedeutet, dass es so viel mehr ist, als die klassische Vorstellung, wie wir etwas daran ändern können. Ich glaube, dass man zu solch einem Buch keine vernünftige Rezension schreiben kann, wenn man nicht selbst gänzliches Verständnis des Themas vorweisen kann. Ich persönlich kann nur sagen, dass es genauso viel vermittelt hat, wie "Was weiße Menschen nicht über Rassismus hören wollen". Tei "Exit Racism" war mein zweites Buch in diesem Monat rund um das unheimlich wichtige Thema Rassismus - was es bedeutet, dass es so viel mehr ist, als die klassische Vorstellung, wie wir etwas daran ändern können. Ich glaube, dass man zu solch einem Buch keine vernünftige Rezension schreiben kann, wenn man nicht selbst gänzliches Verständnis des Themas vorweisen kann. Ich persönlich kann nur sagen, dass es genauso viel vermittelt hat, wie "Was weiße Menschen nicht über Rassismus hören wollen". Teilweise waren die Inhalte ähnlich, wurden aber gänzlich anders aufgearbeitet, ein wenig interaktiver, was den Leser zusätzlich zum Nachdenken und Auseinandersetzen mit dem Themengebiet auffordert. Wenn ich könnte, würde ich dieses Buch nicht nur als Empfehlung kennzeichnen, sondern geradeweg als Pflichtlektüre.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Miss.Nerdstagram

    It‘s time to leave happy land. It’s time to exit racism. Ich als halb Asiatin wurde aus meinem Happy Land gezogen, viele Beispiele kenne ich aus meinem Alltag, habe es nur nie aus der Perspektive betrachtet. Ich habe vermutlich schon sehr früh meine Mauern aufgebaut... Ich bin einfach überzeugt davon das dieses Buch jeder gelesen haben sollte. Es zeigt nicht nur auf wie und warum wir in unserer Rosaroten Welt leben, sondern auch wie man da raus kommt und lernt kritischer zu denken. Es veranschaul It‘s time to leave happy land. It’s time to exit racism. Ich als halb Asiatin wurde aus meinem Happy Land gezogen, viele Beispiele kenne ich aus meinem Alltag, habe es nur nie aus der Perspektive betrachtet. Ich habe vermutlich schon sehr früh meine Mauern aufgebaut... Ich bin einfach überzeugt davon das dieses Buch jeder gelesen haben sollte. Es zeigt nicht nur auf wie und warum wir in unserer Rosaroten Welt leben, sondern auch wie man da raus kommt und lernt kritischer zu denken. Es veranschaulicht die Auswirkungen, die eine ganz nett gemeinte Frage haben kann. Die aber einem BPoC auf Dauer immensen Schaden aussetzt. Wir sind rassistisch sozialisiert aufgewachsen, können das aber ändern. Nicht nur Black Live Matters sollte uns dazu bewegen. Einen Riesen Dank an die Autorin für dieses Buch👏🏽

  13. 4 out of 5

    julesandherbooks

    Pflichtlektüre.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Merle

    “Kurz gesagt: Du bist rassistisch sozialisiert worden. So, wie viele Generationen vor Dir, seit über dreihundert Jahren.” Das Buch hat mir wirklich die Augen geöffnet. Es ist sehr direkt und anschaulich. Der Stil und Ton dieses Buches ist aber nicht belehrend. Ich persönlich habe an keiner Stelle dieses Buches direkte Vorwürfe gehört. Zwar stößt einem das Buch schon mit manchen Aussagen vor den Kopf und macht einen emotional, aber es ging nie um Schuld. Sehr anschaulich wird auch der Unterschied “Kurz gesagt: Du bist rassistisch sozialisiert worden. So, wie viele Generationen vor Dir, seit über dreihundert Jahren.” Das Buch hat mir wirklich die Augen geöffnet. Es ist sehr direkt und anschaulich. Der Stil und Ton dieses Buches ist aber nicht belehrend. Ich persönlich habe an keiner Stelle dieses Buches direkte Vorwürfe gehört. Zwar stößt einem das Buch schon mit manchen Aussagen vor den Kopf und macht einen emotional, aber es ging nie um Schuld. Sehr anschaulich wird auch der Unterschied zwischen Schuld und Verantwortung erklärt. Denn Schuld haben wir nicht, aber wir müssen Verantwortung übernehmen. Mir fällt es unglaublich schwer, über dieses Buch eine Rezension zu schreiben. Noch immer habe ich Angst, das Falsche zu sagen bzw. zu schreiben. Aber ich bin auf der Reise. Raus aus Happyland, rein in das rassismuskritische Denken. Und da hat das Buch exit RACISM von Tupoka Ogette mir ein solides Grundwissen vermittelt. Besonders "gut" fand ich die Kapitel über die deutsche Kolonial-Vergangenheit. Wie angesprochen habe auch ich im Unterricht nichts über die deutschen Kolonien gelernt, und erst durch dieses (Hör)Buch genaueres erfahren. Auch wenn es keine leichte oder unbedingt schöne Lektüre ist, so kann ich dieses Buch wirklich allen empfehlen, die sich mit Rassismus auseinandersetzen wollen.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Monerl

    Die Autorin zeigte mir in diesem Buch, wo ich selbst noch an mir arbeiten muss und kann. Dies ist ein vorbildliches “Mitmachbuch”, in das man in sich gehen und seine Denke sezieren muss. Absolute Lese- und Hörempfehlung mit Beispielen, die den Weg aus dem weißen “Happyland” weisen, um die Augen, Ohren und alle weiteren Sinne für Rassismus zu öffnen und dagegen anzugehen. Die Welt muss revolutioniert werden!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Anka Räubertochter

    Eine Anleitung zum Anti-Rassismus, die jede weiße Person lesen sollte.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Isabel

    So so wichtig! Alle weißen Menschen müssen dieses Buch lesen, damit wir daran arbeiten können Rassismus nicht noch weiter zu reproduzieren 🙏 Das Buch gibt es übrigens auch als Hörbuch bei Spotify.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

    (will keine sterne vergeben, weil es finde ich kein buch ist was man als weißer mensch gut oder schlecht finden kann) wichtiges buch, noch besser als hörbuch von der autorin selbst gelesen! aber, vielleicht eher für anfänger gedacht, für die die thematik komplett neu ist. trotzdem bin ich sehr froh es gehört zu haben und lege es euch wärmstens ans herz, noch eher aber werde ich es diversen verwandten ans herz legen..

  19. 4 out of 5

    poesiechaos

    5 / 5 Sterne ✩✩✩✩✩ Ganz einfach eine Pflichtlektüre für alle, die dem Irrglauben verfallen sind, Rassismus sei heutzutage kein Problem (mehr) und/oder man selbst frei von jeglichem rassistischen Denken.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Dr. Tobias Christian Fischer

    Rassismus in Deutschland ist nicht einfach nur eine radikale Randerscheinung, sondern ein tief in der Mitte unserer Gesellschaft verwurzeltes System. Er geht auf die pseudobiologische Abwertung von nicht-weißen Menschen zurück, die dazu diente, Ausbeutung und Kolonialisierung zu legitimieren. Die dazugehörigen Vorurteile schrieben sich der weißen Gesellschaft so tief ins moralische Empfinden, dass sie bis heute Bestand haben. Erst wenn wir unsere Komfortzone verlassen und den Betroffenen wirklic Rassismus in Deutschland ist nicht einfach nur eine radikale Randerscheinung, sondern ein tief in der Mitte unserer Gesellschaft verwurzeltes System. Er geht auf die pseudobiologische Abwertung von nicht-weißen Menschen zurück, die dazu diente, Ausbeutung und Kolonialisierung zu legitimieren. Die dazugehörigen Vorurteile schrieben sich der weißen Gesellschaft so tief ins moralische Empfinden, dass sie bis heute Bestand haben. Erst wenn wir unsere Komfortzone verlassen und den Betroffenen wirklich zuhören, können wir den strukturellen Rassismus in Deutschland bekämpfen.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Leah

    Play it on repeat for all them racists! Da möchte ich Tupoka Ogette einfach einen Strauß Rosen und eine Dankeskarte für dieses Buch schicken - es ist zwar super anstrengend, vor allem, weil man sich mit den unschönen Gefühlen wie Schuld und Scham konfrontiert sieht, aber auch so unfassbar lohnenswert. Eigentlich traurig, dass sie dabei so gelassen und verständnisvoll mit und über Weiße und Rassismus spricht, wenn ich mir vorstelle, dass auch sie das Thema so wütend machen muss. Besonders gefiel m Play it on repeat for all them racists! Da möchte ich Tupoka Ogette einfach einen Strauß Rosen und eine Dankeskarte für dieses Buch schicken - es ist zwar super anstrengend, vor allem, weil man sich mit den unschönen Gefühlen wie Schuld und Scham konfrontiert sieht, aber auch so unfassbar lohnenswert. Eigentlich traurig, dass sie dabei so gelassen und verständnisvoll mit und über Weiße und Rassismus spricht, wenn ich mir vorstelle, dass auch sie das Thema so wütend machen muss. Besonders gefiel mir der Aufbau des Buches und das Erklären von allen Vokabeln - wobei meine Lieblingsstellen wohl die zu Weißer Zerbrechlichkeit und Derailing waren - wusste gar nicht, dass es eine Psychologie dahinter gibt, wenn irgendwelche Eimer sagen: "aBeR mEiN fReUnD iSt ScHwArZ". Zwischendurch muss ich zugeben, dass ich auch immer mal heulen musste - besonders als sie von dem Herero-Aufstand erzählte. In einer idealen Welt müsste Europa bis zum Ende des Erdzeitalters Reperationen an die afrikanischen Länder zahlen für den Scheiß, den sie da verursacht haben. Schön fand ich auch immer wieder, dass sie betonte, den Rassismus aus der rechten Ecke zu holen, damit eben auch so alltägliche Kleinigkeiten aufgedeckt werden können, wie wenn die eigenen Eltern oder Großeltern mal wieder "N..." ganz non-chalant in den Raum werfen. Ich nehme auf jeden Fall mit, dass man nicht immer so einen Schmerzvergleich machen muss, wenn es um Diskriminierung geht und, dass mein Dorflebensumfeld nicht sonderlich divers ist.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Julia

    Als Einstieg in die Thematik sehr gut und auch, wenn man Noah Sows Deutschland Schwarz Weiß und Alice Hasters Was weiße Menschen nicht über Rassismus hören wollen bereits gelesen hat, eröffnet Tupoka Ogettes Herangehensweise eine andere und mir neue Perspektive. Als Ergänzung dazu lohnt sich auf jeden Fall der Blick in diese von der Autorin zusammengestellte und zu Beginn des Buches genannte Linksammlung. Gerade in aktuellen Zeiten eine Lektüre, die insbesondere weiße Menschen gelesen (oder gehö Als Einstieg in die Thematik sehr gut und auch, wenn man Noah Sows Deutschland Schwarz Weiß und Alice Hasters Was weiße Menschen nicht über Rassismus hören wollen bereits gelesen hat, eröffnet Tupoka Ogettes Herangehensweise eine andere und mir neue Perspektive. Als Ergänzung dazu lohnt sich auf jeden Fall der Blick in diese von der Autorin zusammengestellte und zu Beginn des Buches genannte Linksammlung. Gerade in aktuellen Zeiten eine Lektüre, die insbesondere weiße Menschen gelesen (oder gehört) haben sollten.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    4.5/5 Sehr gutes Buch zum Thema Rassismus. Der einzige Verbesserungsvorschlag wäre, etwas mehr auf die zusätzlichen Materialien auf der Website einzugehen. Diese sind zwar ein tolles Angebot, aber zum einen viel auf Englisch (was manche Menschen insbesondere Ältere vor Probleme stellen kann), zum anderen fand ich viele Beiträge wichtig genug, dass der Begriff auch kurz im Buch erklärt werden sollte. Einfach eine kurze Zusammenfassung des Materials mit Verweis auf weitere Materialien auf der Websit 4.5/5 Sehr gutes Buch zum Thema Rassismus. Der einzige Verbesserungsvorschlag wäre, etwas mehr auf die zusätzlichen Materialien auf der Website einzugehen. Diese sind zwar ein tolles Angebot, aber zum einen viel auf Englisch (was manche Menschen insbesondere Ältere vor Probleme stellen kann), zum anderen fand ich viele Beiträge wichtig genug, dass der Begriff auch kurz im Buch erklärt werden sollte. Einfach eine kurze Zusammenfassung des Materials mit Verweis auf weitere Materialien auf der Website wäre super. Genauso wäre eine Übersetzung oder Zusammenfassung des englischen Zitats gut, da nicht jeder Englisch auf diesem Level versteht.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Suitcaselife

    Dieses Buch sollte Pflichtlektüre in jeder einzelnen Schule sowie für alle Lehramtsstudent*innen sowie Erzieher*innen werden.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Fiona

    Am Anfang kam ich mir als Leser fehl am Platz vor, denn dieses Buch richtet sich eher an Menschen, die sich mit dem Thema Alltagsrassismus und White Privilige noch nie auseinander gesetzt haben. Ich bin mir der Privilegien und auch Biases bewusst und genau deswegen habe ich dieses Buch gelesen, um mich weiter damit auseinander zu setzen. Die Autorin geht aber erstmal von null Reflektion aus. Das ist auch ok, man will ja Leute, die "neu" im Thema sind nicht direkt verlieren und verschrecken. Ihre Am Anfang kam ich mir als Leser fehl am Platz vor, denn dieses Buch richtet sich eher an Menschen, die sich mit dem Thema Alltagsrassismus und White Privilige noch nie auseinander gesetzt haben. Ich bin mir der Privilegien und auch Biases bewusst und genau deswegen habe ich dieses Buch gelesen, um mich weiter damit auseinander zu setzen. Die Autorin geht aber erstmal von null Reflektion aus. Das ist auch ok, man will ja Leute, die "neu" im Thema sind nicht direkt verlieren und verschrecken. Ihre Fragen wie "Bist du jetzt wütend wenn du das liest, möchtest du das Buch wegwerfen?", haben mich dann aber ein bisschen genervt. Aber ok, es ist ein emotionales Thema und sie will, dass die Leute ihre Emotionen auch wahrnehmen. Ich verstehe das Vorgehen. Alles in allem reisst das Buch von Kolonialgeschichte bis zu persönlichen Berichten von Alltagsrassismus viele Themen an und betrachtet sie aus verschiedenen Perspektiven. Ich denke um sich mit dem Thema vertraut zu machen, ist das Buch gut. Mir persönlich hat der nächste Schritt gefehlt. Aber ich habe durchaus etwas gelernt.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Michael Reiter

    Raus aus Happyland. Über die Geschichte des Rassismus, über institutionalisierte Diskriminierung und über das Gefühl, fremd in der eigenen Heimat zu sein, nur weil man anders aussieht. Wer dieses Buch aus eigenem Antrieb zur Hand nimmt, wird nicht übermäßig schockiert und/oder verärgert darüber sein, von Tupoka Ogette an der Hand genommen und an den Ausgang von Happyland begleitet zu werden. Wer der Meinung ist, dass Rassismus ja überhaupt nicht (mehr) existiere und dass ihm unterschiedliche Hautf Raus aus Happyland. Über die Geschichte des Rassismus, über institutionalisierte Diskriminierung und über das Gefühl, fremd in der eigenen Heimat zu sein, nur weil man anders aussieht. Wer dieses Buch aus eigenem Antrieb zur Hand nimmt, wird nicht übermäßig schockiert und/oder verärgert darüber sein, von Tupoka Ogette an der Hand genommen und an den Ausgang von Happyland begleitet zu werden. Wer der Meinung ist, dass Rassismus ja überhaupt nicht (mehr) existiere und dass ihm unterschiedliche Hautfarben überhaupt nicht auffallen würden, wird das Buch nicht von selbst lesen wollen. Aber genau diese Menschen sollten sich mit dem Thema Rassismus auseinander setzen. Sie sollten erkennen, dass sie andauernd von unendlich vielen Privilegien profitieren und somit den institutionalisierten Rassismus unterstützen, ergo Rassisten sind, ob sie wollen oder nicht. Genau so wie wir - du und ich. Das Bewusstsein, dass es in unserer Gesellschaft nun mal so ist, ist der erste Schritt dazu, dagegen etwas tun zu können. Empfehlung für alle Menschen, die des Reflektierens mächtig sind und die sich weiterentwickeln wollen.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Milena

    Manchmal musste ich eine Pause einlegen und tief durchatmen, bevor ich weiterlesen konnte. Manchmal musste ich erst ein paar Tränen wegblinzeln, bevor ich weiterlesen konnte. Und manchmal - eigentlich sogar recht oft - hatte ich das Bedürfnis, mich auszutauschen und über das Gelesene und Gelernte zu sprechen. Ich will "Happyland" verlassen und aktiv werden. Ich will Verantwortung übernehmen. Und ich will allen (weißen) Menschen dieses Buch ans Herz legen, weil Tupoka Ogette wirklich genau die ric Manchmal musste ich eine Pause einlegen und tief durchatmen, bevor ich weiterlesen konnte. Manchmal musste ich erst ein paar Tränen wegblinzeln, bevor ich weiterlesen konnte. Und manchmal - eigentlich sogar recht oft - hatte ich das Bedürfnis, mich auszutauschen und über das Gelesene und Gelernte zu sprechen. Ich will "Happyland" verlassen und aktiv werden. Ich will Verantwortung übernehmen. Und ich will allen (weißen) Menschen dieses Buch ans Herz legen, weil Tupoka Ogette wirklich genau die richtigen Worte findet.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Akilnathan Logeswaran

    "Alle Menschen wollen in ihrem Schmerz gehört werden. Menschen wollen nicht Täter sein. Menschen wollen Opfer sein. Also nicht wirklich, sie wollen nicht wirklich leiden, aber man soll es ihnen lassen, dass auch sie gelitten haben, dass es auch ihnen schlecht geht, dass auch sie unterdrückt werden." Ein grandioses Buch, welches ich wünschte, es hätte es schon viel früher gegeben. Und am besten wäre es, wenn es quasi eine Anleitung für alle Menschen wäre, wie man Anderen zu hört, mit ihnen fühlt, "Alle Menschen wollen in ihrem Schmerz gehört werden. Menschen wollen nicht Täter sein. Menschen wollen Opfer sein. Also nicht wirklich, sie wollen nicht wirklich leiden, aber man soll es ihnen lassen, dass auch sie gelitten haben, dass es auch ihnen schlecht geht, dass auch sie unterdrückt werden." Ein grandioses Buch, welches ich wünschte, es hätte es schon viel früher gegeben. Und am besten wäre es, wenn es quasi eine Anleitung für alle Menschen wäre, wie man Anderen zu hört, mit ihnen fühlt, aber vor allem eines tut, anzuerkennt, dass wir rassistisch sozialisiert worden sind. Dass es Rassismus weiterhin gibt, und zwar strukturell, in Schule, Institutionen, dem Arbeitsmarkt und auch sonst überall. Rassismus ist dabei nicht nur der Hass, sondern eben auch Zugang, Privileg, Ignoranz, Apathie und viel mehr! Ich habe unglaublich viel gelernt und kann es drigend weiterempfehlen, vor allem auch um grundsätzliche Dinge zu begreifen, warum z.B. "woher kommst Du?" eine verletzende Frage sein kann, uvm.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Alike

    Ein sehr anwendungsorientiertes, hilfreiches Buch für weiße Menschen, die sich mit Rassismus und der dessen Strukturen (insbesondere in Deutschland) auseinandersetzen wollen. Nicht nur wegen aktuellem Anlass der BlackLivesMatter-Proteste, sondern grundsätzlich ein wichtiges Buch.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jana

    Wirklich augen-öffnend. Jeder Deutsche, der sich zur Zeit auf die Seite von BLM stellt, sollte sich das anhören/lesen, um sich auch dem Rassismus im eigenen Land zu stellen. Das Hörbuch ist kostenlos auf Spotify

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.