web site hit counter The Nature Fix: Why Nature Makes Us Happier, Healthier, and More Creative - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Nature Fix: Why Nature Makes Us Happier, Healthier, and More Creative

Availability: Ready to download

From forest trails in Korea, to islands in Finland, to eucalyptus groves in California, Florence Williams investigates the science behind nature’s positive effects on the brain. Delving into brand-new research, she uncovers the powers of the natural world to improve health, promote reflection and innovation, and strengthen our relationships. As our modern lives shift drama From forest trails in Korea, to islands in Finland, to eucalyptus groves in California, Florence Williams investigates the science behind nature’s positive effects on the brain. Delving into brand-new research, she uncovers the powers of the natural world to improve health, promote reflection and innovation, and strengthen our relationships. As our modern lives shift dramatically indoors, these ideas—and the answers they yield—are more urgent than ever.


Compare

From forest trails in Korea, to islands in Finland, to eucalyptus groves in California, Florence Williams investigates the science behind nature’s positive effects on the brain. Delving into brand-new research, she uncovers the powers of the natural world to improve health, promote reflection and innovation, and strengthen our relationships. As our modern lives shift drama From forest trails in Korea, to islands in Finland, to eucalyptus groves in California, Florence Williams investigates the science behind nature’s positive effects on the brain. Delving into brand-new research, she uncovers the powers of the natural world to improve health, promote reflection and innovation, and strengthen our relationships. As our modern lives shift dramatically indoors, these ideas—and the answers they yield—are more urgent than ever.

30 review for The Nature Fix: Why Nature Makes Us Happier, Healthier, and More Creative

  1. 4 out of 5

    Miranda Reads

    4.5 stars A surprisingly enjoyable journey into what it means to be healthy and happy. we all need nearby nature: we benefit cognitively and psychologically from having trees, bodies of water, and green spaces just to look at; we should be smarter about landscaping our schools, hospitals, workplaces and neighborhoods so everyone gains. So much of health and happiness in the "modern" world is found through non-natural means. Sad? Here's a handful of pills. Bored? Here's a screen and a controlle 4.5 stars A surprisingly enjoyable journey into what it means to be healthy and happy. we all need nearby nature: we benefit cognitively and psychologically from having trees, bodies of water, and green spaces just to look at; we should be smarter about landscaping our schools, hospitals, workplaces and neighborhoods so everyone gains. So much of health and happiness in the "modern" world is found through non-natural means. Sad? Here's a handful of pills. Bored? Here's a screen and a controller. Depressed? Exercise in a gym, plus more pills. And yet, the more mankind has developed these catch-all cures...the further we stray from nature. Florence Williams decides to go back to nature and find clues to what we left behind. She seeks to answer the question, "Does nature really help? And can we measure it?" (The answer is yes, to both). Nature appears to act directly upon our autonomic systems, calming us, but it also works indirectly, through facilitating social contact and through encouraging exercise and physical movement. She traveled the world - from Japan to Finland to Scotland and beyond - seeking out the latest research into how the natural world benefits mankind. And her results? Absolutely stunning. If you have time for vacation, don’t go to a city. Go to a natural area. Try to go one weekend a month I have never truly considered the impact of nature upon my life. Nature was always just sort of *there* in the background. You look out a window, you see trees. Boom. Done. I mean, I did notice that I would feel better after a walk in a park or reading a book under the shade of my maple tree. But I always connected that to having free time and just having fun in general. Apparently not. It was incredibly cool to learn about the measurable effects nature has on our bodies - calmer brains, higher T-cells (which combat infections) and stress levels dropping like hot potatoes. Reading her book has convinced me - taking long walks in a park is an absolute must and hiking with my family on trails is going to be the number-one priority this summer. May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view. YouTube | Blog | Instagram | Twitter | Facebook | Snapchat @miranda_reads

  2. 4 out of 5

    Brandice

    The Nature Fix: Why Nature Makes Us Happier, Healthier, and More Creative delves into why nature is good for us. Traveling the world and immersing herself in different cultures, Florence Williams discusses various perspectives and theories surrounding nature, often participating in related studies while she travels. Most of us don’t spend enough time outside to truly appreciate nature and the benefits it offers many people. We get consumed by the fast pace of metropolitan life and easily distrac The Nature Fix: Why Nature Makes Us Happier, Healthier, and More Creative delves into why nature is good for us. Traveling the world and immersing herself in different cultures, Florence Williams discusses various perspectives and theories surrounding nature, often participating in related studies while she travels. Most of us don’t spend enough time outside to truly appreciate nature and the benefits it offers many people. We get consumed by the fast pace of metropolitan life and easily distracted by competing screens and apps. I too, am guilty of this, though I’ve made an effort recently to be better about it, taking advantage of a tree-lined trail just 3-4 minutes away from my house. ”We don’t experience natural environments enough to realize how restored they can make us feel, nor are we aware that studies also show they make us healthier, more creative, more empathetic and more apt to engage with the world and with each other. Nature, it turns out, is good for civilization.” Overall, I found The Nature Fix to be an enjoyable read. I didn’t learn a ton of new information here, but it was still interesting. I appreciated Williams’ humor throughout, and her acknowledgment of having difficulty realizing the full benefits of nature in certain situations, particularly in some the research studies where she was skeptical, or anxious (likely as a result of her adjustment to a more chaotic day-to-day city life). The Nature Fix was a great reminder that green is good for us. ”Go outside, often, sometimes in wild places. Bring friends or not. Breathe.”

  3. 5 out of 5

    ☘Misericordia☘ ⚡ϟ⚡⛈⚡☁ ❇️❤❣

    So, we all seem to need our nature fix: the more the merrier. The alternative is the Acute Nature Deficit Disorder which we all seem to have, to some extent. A tour de force on how we might interact with nature, why we are the way we are and what could we do about getting better about satisfying our internal neanderthal (or whatever that internal lizard is that demands that we go and traipse the woods or get anxious). A lot of data-based studies seem to have been used to get to the conclusions pr So, we all seem to need our nature fix: the more the merrier. The alternative is the Acute Nature Deficit Disorder which we all seem to have, to some extent. A tour de force on how we might interact with nature, why we are the way we are and what could we do about getting better about satisfying our internal neanderthal (or whatever that internal lizard is that demands that we go and traipse the woods or get anxious). A lot of data-based studies seem to have been used to get to the conclusions presented which in my book goes for a great read. A reread and a fav. Q: As one of MacKerron’s papers concludes: “On average, study participants are significantly and substantially happier outdoors in all green or natural habitat types than they are in urban environments.” (And, in case you’re wondering, the data didn’t just reflect a vacation effect, since he factored that in.) (c) Q: What Mappiness reveals—our epidemic dislocation from the outdoors—is an indictment not only of the structures and habits of modern society, but of our self-understanding. (c) Q: “People may avoid nearby nature because a chronicdisconnection from nature causes them to underestimate its hedonicbenefits.” (c) Q: We don’t experience natural environments enough to realize how restored they can make us feel, nor are we aware that studies also show they make us healthier, more creative, more empathetic and more apt to engage with the world and with each other. Nature, it turns out, is good for civilization. (c) Q: Our nervous systems are built to resonate with set points derived from the natural world. Science is now bearing out what the Romantics knew to be true. (c) Q: And there were a lot of other things they didn’t know: who was best helped, by what mechanisms in the brain and body, what was the right dose, and, moreover, what qualified as “nature”? I personally like Oscar Wilde’s broad definition: “a place where birds fly around uncooked.” (c) Q: I would meet researchers convinced that the secret to nature’s power lies in its geometric fractal patterns, or its particular sound vibrations, or the aerosols from trees. It was a sensory extravaganza. (c) Q: Scientists are quantifying nature’s effects not only on mood and well-being, but also on our ability to think—to remember things, to plan, to create, to daydream and to focus—as well as on our social skills. (c) Q:

  4. 5 out of 5

    ~☆~Autumn♥♥☔ Wells

    I just finished this book and its very interesting and informative overall but it was only going to get 4 stars until almost the last page when she finally mentions asthma and says that some should not go out in the tree pollen! (finally she thinks of that) Children with attention deficit disorder should be taught outside as "they can't bounce off the walls there". The difference for small boys is amazing. I have always thought it was torture to be cooped but in a hot reeking classroom and not I just finished this book and its very interesting and informative overall but it was only going to get 4 stars until almost the last page when she finally mentions asthma and says that some should not go out in the tree pollen! (finally she thinks of that) Children with attention deficit disorder should be taught outside as "they can't bounce off the walls there". The difference for small boys is amazing. I have always thought it was torture to be cooped but in a hot reeking classroom and not allowed to go outside. Its like torture for small children and very bad for them. She really discusses this at length. In Germany they have "forest classes" outside. Also, classrooms are toxic with magic marker odors and other toxins which can cause brain damage. There is usually no fresh air as teachers won't open the window or there are NO windows to be opened. For a time I had to sit too near the chalkboard and I am allergic to chalk and it gave me asthma. It was impossible for me to say anything about this and I just had to endure it. I hope people will read this book and wake up about these problems. I was surprised to learn that being out in nature also makes a big difference for those with PTSD. People need to be around trees and water. These things are far more important than we realized.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    As much as I wanted to love this book, and was excited to finally get my hands on it, I found the material to be presented in such a dry and slogging format I was relieved to finally finish it. The author's writing style tends to focus chapters on key studies or events going on, and takes what should be a 5-10 page story and extends it into something much longer. This book could have been 1/3 the length with the same takeaways and would have been better. As much as I wanted to love this book, and was excited to finally get my hands on it, I found the material to be presented in such a dry and slogging format I was relieved to finally finish it. The author's writing style tends to focus chapters on key studies or events going on, and takes what should be a 5-10 page story and extends it into something much longer. This book could have been 1/3 the length with the same takeaways and would have been better.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mario the lone bookwolf

    The beliefs of indigenous peoples gain new quality from this point of view. Please note that I have put the original German text to the end of this review. Just if you might be interested. It would be interesting if the biodiversity and biodiversity in an environment further enhance the positive effect. Whether natural space is not equal to natural space. That a monoculture of spruce, a cornfield, etc. has less positive power. Whether a varied area, in which different habitats and climatic zones a The beliefs of indigenous peoples gain new quality from this point of view. Please note that I have put the original German text to the end of this review. Just if you might be interested. It would be interesting if the biodiversity and biodiversity in an environment further enhance the positive effect. Whether natural space is not equal to natural space. That a monoculture of spruce, a cornfield, etc. has less positive power. Whether a varied area, in which different habitats and climatic zones are present, is healthier. As medium forests and grasslands that manage with fewer species. That the variety reinforces the positive health effect and generates more joy and relaxation. If one wants to interpret it esoterically, one could also assume that every living being from the fauna and flora has its characteristics. Their qualities for human health cannot be quantified because we do not yet begin to understand the mechanisms. But more variety and potential synergies may be, just intuitive, the best for all involved parties. Monotony and uniformity are contra productive in many other areas. Precisely given the quantum phenomena in photosynthesis, the non-decyphered language of plants, the yet to be discovered micro-orders of microorganisms (nanobacteria, viruses, ...), it´s arrogant to reject hypotheses. Given the phenomenal ignorance, any explanation more likely to be in the realm of fantasy could be correct. What all together affects a person when she or he moves in natural areas, possibly even for a longer time when making camping trips. Or, like indigene peoples, are always in direct contact with nature for a lifetime. How it affects perception and cognitive abilities. In contrast, in the modern world, humans are almost always in dead, artificial environments. If one imagined it with recognizable radiations, the civilized Westerners would sit in shielded isolation chambers. Nature deities and a consciousness existing in everything move into the realm of the possible. Regarding creativity, in particular, this explains why many prodigies have revolutionary ideas, especially in natural environments and during their disused walks. That could be further interpreted. Simple plants on a thin layer of humus, garnished with one or the other more massive mammal, have measurable effects on the human mind. When a historical invention is made, what is the proportion of the environment to even think at first? What affects the biochemistry and neurochemistry of the brain to enable it to reach such heights? Where does the exact right combination of components, which act in just the Heureka moment, come from? And is it just a coincidence that in the right environment, the right person gets the right dose to get the right idea? Depending on personal preferences, this can be interpreted quite differently from a philosophical, metaphysical, computational or scientific point of view. And there are also the real sensory impressions, changing backgrounds, different angles and millions of details that are a balm for the nervous system and food for the brain. The "forest bathing" in Japan or the "forest healing programs in Korea" are precursors to a new, long overdue symbiosis between man and nature. How productivity and creativity in education, work and also in the private sector could be increased. When one combines natural and living spaces. Until recently, that was not technologically feasible or too expensive. But with the new, emerging technologies, green, living interiors, flowing transitions between natural spaces and living spaces, and a novel spatial and urban planning concept can be created. Not so speak off the positive effects on the quality of life, especially in metropolitan areas. A simple, ignored reason for the increased numbers of mental health problems in cities could be the lack of touch with nature. Its absence is against a million-year co-evolution with and in natural environments. How complex the matter is, shows the intertwining of biological topics with just about everything in the categories of Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Categor... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Categor... Many technologies are based on mechanisms that, in nature, are only entangled as simple subroutines in much more complicated machinery, those functions and meanings are minimally understood. This includes only the biological component, without adding the physical ideas. Like hypothetical, other dimensions affecting or interacting the biology of one, like our, dimension. If something exists in 2 places at the same time and in the same place but is still separated by insuperable filters of reality. And makes one happy. Die Glaubensvorstellungen von indigenen Völkern gewinnen unter diesem Gesichtspunkt eine zusätzliche Qualität. Interessant wäre, ob die Biodiversität und Artenvielfalt in einer Umgebung den Effekt noch steigert. Ob Naturraum nicht gleich Naturraum ist. Dass eine Monokultur von Fichten, ein Maisfeld, etc. nicht dieselbe Wirkung haben wie ein unveränderter Naturraum. Ob ein abwechslungsreiches Areal, in dem verschiedene Biotope und Klimazonen vorhanden sind, gesünder ist. Als durchschnittliche Wälder und Graslandschaften, die mit weniger Arten auskommen. Das quasi die Vielfalt der positiven, gesundheitlichen Wirkung noch eine zusätzliche Verstärkung gibt, weil mehr Freude und Bewunderung erzeugt wird. Wenn man es esoterisch interpretieren möchte, könnte man auch davon ausgehen, dass jedes Lebewesen aus Fauna und Flora eigene Eigenschaften besitzt. Deren Qualitäten für die menschliche Gesundheit lassen sich noch nicht quantifizieren, weil wir die Mechanismen noch nicht ansatzweise begreifen. Aber mehr Vielfalt, Abwechslung und Synergien dürften, rein intuitiv, auch in diesem Bereich für alle Parteien am günstigsten sein. Schadet Monotonie und Uniformität doch in vielen anderen Bereichen auch. Gerade angesichts der Quantenphänomene bei der Fotosynthese, der undechiffrierten Sprache der Pflanzen, den noch zu entdeckenden Mikrogrößenordnungen von Kleinstlebewesen (Nanobakterien, -Viren,…) mutet es arrogant an, Hypothesen zu verwerfen. Angesichts des phänomenalen Unwissens könnte jede, eher ins Reich der Fantasy gehörende, Erklärung richtig sein. Was alles auf einen Menschen einwirkt, wenn er sich in Naturräumen bewegt, eventuell auch länger aufhält und Campingtrips unternimmt. Oder, wie die Naturvölker, ein Leben lang immer in unmittelbaren Kontakt mit der Natur ist. Wie sich das auf die Wahrnehmung und Kognitionsfähigkeiten auswirkt. In Kontrast dazu, in der modernen Welt fast immer in toten, künstlichen Umgebungen zu sein. Würde man es sich mit erkennbaren Strahlungen vorstellen, säßen die zivilisierten Westler in abgeschirmten Isolationskammern. Naturgottglaube und ein in allem existendierendes Bewusstsein rücken so in den Bereich des Möglichen. Gerade hinsichtlich der Kreativität erklärt das, warum viele Wunderkinder gerade in natürlichen Umgebungen und während ausgedienter Spaziergänge revolutionäre Ideen hätten. Das könnte man weiter interpretieren. Schlichte Pflanzen auf einer dünnen Humusschicht, mit dem einen oder anderen größeren Säugetier garniert, haben messbare Auswirkungen auf den menschlichen Geist. Wenn eine historische Erfindung gemacht wird, wie groß ist dann der Anteil der Umgebung darauf, überhaupt erst den Gedanken zu fassen? Was wirkt auf die Bio- und Neurochemie des Hirns, um es zu solchen Höhenflügen zu befähigen? Woher kommt die genau richtige Kombination der Komponenten, die in just dem Heureka Moment wirken? Und ist es dann noch Zufall, dass genau in der richtigen Umgebung die richtige Person die richtige Dosis erhält um die richtige Idee zu haben? Das kann man je nach persönlicher Präferenz philosophisch, metaphysisch, rechnerisch oder wissenschaftlich ganz verschieden interpretieren. Und da sind auch noch die realen Sinneseindrücke, wechselnde Untergründe, verschieden weite Blickwinkel und Millionen Details, die Balsam für das Nervensystem und Nahrung fürs Gehirn sind. Das "Waldbaden" in Japan oder die "Wald Heilungs Programme in Korea" sind Vorstufen zu einer neuen, längst überfälligen Symbiose zwischen Mensch und Natur. Wie sich die Produktivität und Kreativität in Bildung, Beruf und auch im privaten Bereich steigern lassen könnte. Wenn man Natur- und Lebensräume miteinander vereinigt. Das war bis vor kurzem rein technologisch nicht machbar beziehungsweise unfinanzierbar. Aber mit den neuen, aufkommenden Technologien lassen sich begrünte, lebende Innenräume, fließende Übergänge zwischen Naturräumen und Wohnräumen und ein neuartiges Raum- und Stadtplanungskonzept erschaffen. Von den positiven Auswirkungen auf die Lebensqualität, insbesondere in Ballungsräumen, gar nicht zu sprechen. Ein schlichter Grund der verstärkten Zunahme psychischer Probleme in Großstädten könnte im Mangel an Naturbezogenheit liegen. Deren Absenz ist wider einer Millionen Jahre währenden Koevolution mit und in der Natur. Wie komplex die Materie ist, zeigt die Verflechtung der biologischen Themenbereiche mit so ziemlich allem in den Kategorien der Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Categor... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Categor... Viele Technologien fußen auf Mechanismen, die in der Natur nur als schlichte Subroutinen in viel komplexere Maschinerien verstrickt sind, deren Funktion und Sinn sich uns minimal erschließt. Das umfasst nur die biologische Komponente, ohne die physikalischen Hypothesen mit einzubeziehen. Wie etwa hypothetische, weitere Dimensionen auf die Biologie einer Dimension wirken oder wechselwirken. Wenn etwas an 2 Orten gleichzeitig und am selben Ort, aber trotzdem durch Filter getrennt, existiert. Und einen glücklich macht.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Laura Leaney

    I already spend as much time as I can outside, so reading Florence Williams's book was a great affirmation of my devotion to all things in nature: oceans, rivers, lakes, birds, predators, trees, and more trees. Preaching to the already converted is an easy job - but I fervently wish that more institutions would pay attention to the deep physiological/psychological connection that human beings have with nature. Schools should incorporate more outside activities and studies. Buildings should be co I already spend as much time as I can outside, so reading Florence Williams's book was a great affirmation of my devotion to all things in nature: oceans, rivers, lakes, birds, predators, trees, and more trees. Preaching to the already converted is an easy job - but I fervently wish that more institutions would pay attention to the deep physiological/psychological connection that human beings have with nature. Schools should incorporate more outside activities and studies. Buildings should be constructed with nature in mind. Give us trees, give us air, and give us a little more silence.......please. Still, despite the fact that I already know I feel better hanging around outside, Williams's book articulates why I feel the way I do - and she incorporates the current science behind it. Why do we think better while walking in nature? Why is our memory better? Why is our mood? This book gathers many answers in an attempt to reveal the significance of getting outside. The author writes: Humans have brains that are sensitive to social and emotional stress and we always have. Perhaps what matters is not the source of the stress but the ability to recover from it. This is a key point, because it's perhaps what we've lost by giving up our connection to the night skies, the bracing air and the companionate chorus of birds. When I'm walking across a pleasant landscape, I feel I have time and I feel I have space. I'm breathing deeply things that smell good and seeing things that bring delight. It's hard not to feel the pull of a grounded reality when you're dipping into a muddy trail or a flowing river. And yet, apparently 15% of the population hates anything to do with the natural world. They hate the dirt, they hate bugs, and their stress (cortisol) levels do not dip down. Interesting. But the other 85% of us probably feel trapped by car exhaust, traffic, leaf blowers, and four walls. Of course, if you're a park ranger or a ski instructor then you're already living the life of Riley - but most of us can't do that and survive economically. (Or perhaps we just think so). Still, some great points are made about "containerized children" and ADHD, points which lead to the overall message of the book: nature heals. I'm a believer.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Crytzer Fry

    I don’t review a great number of nonfiction on Goodreads, but to those who know me (and my penchant for fiction writing that includes sensory nature descriptions), it’s probably no surprise that this book had been on my radar for a long while. For years, I’ve grown increasingly alarmed at the rapid rate at which humans have disconnected from nature. I probably really started to notice it when my nephew – now 18 -- was growing up glued to an electronic screen, instead of playing outside and lookin I don’t review a great number of nonfiction on Goodreads, but to those who know me (and my penchant for fiction writing that includes sensory nature descriptions), it’s probably no surprise that this book had been on my radar for a long while. For years, I’ve grown increasingly alarmed at the rapid rate at which humans have disconnected from nature. I probably really started to notice it when my nephew – now 18 -- was growing up glued to an electronic screen, instead of playing outside and looking UP and OUT. So, for me, the book validated that we do, indeed, have a lack-of-outdoor-time epidemic and that it is absolutely affecting our mental, emotional and physical health as human beings. The book uses concrete science studies to explain why many humans seem to thrive when spending more hours outdoors, and why they are less healthy when they don’t. I found myself frequently nodding my head in agreement with the author’s annoyance of airplane and road noise, and her attraction to the restorative properties of nature’s music. And her resistance to “virtual reality” nature, which is no substitute for the real thing… This book isn’t just for nature lovers, though. In fact, I’d argue it is for non-nature lovers. The book (and research) points out that “we’ve grown more irritable, less sociable, more narcissistic, more distracted and less cognitively nimble” due to our lost connection to nature. And that “we think of nature as a luxury, not a necessity,” – when, really, we need to heed the recommendations within: to spend, at a minimum, 5 hours in nature per month; to seek awe; to spend time in forests … for our own health. Did you know that a walk in the woods reduces cortisol levels and high blood pressure? Or that 1 in 4 middle-aged women in the US takes antidepressants? Or that nature exposures, which lead to more exercise, can help you grow more brain cells? As noted, I don’t review a lot of nonfiction, but this book read to me less as a book and more as a series of journalistically reported essays. Many times, there were no transitions from one paragraph to the next, and the chapters didn’t seem intuitively organized. Sources and studies were essentially attributed in Associated Press Style – which is to say that the flow of the narrative often felt bogged down with researchers’ names and study names, etc. (vs. a footnote system that might have been less distracting). It is interesting to note that even the author, in her acknowledgements, talks of “reporting this book” rather than “writing” it. And it does feel like reporting. Even so, I was so fascinated by the subject and the studies – because I like to read scientific studies – that I was not deterred by this choice of format. I highlighted many passages and plan to take to heart many of the suggestions in the book as I work toward greater creativity and clarity this year. Despite any style misgivings, I absolutely loved the content of this book!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    The book doesn't flow well. It's basically chapters (short stories) of how other countries experience and interact with nature. All I could think when reading it was that the author wanted to visit all these cool places and the book was an afterthought (and what paid for the trips). The ending still didn't give me the closure or cohesive-ness that this book greatly needed. Good ideas, just poorly executed and not really enjoyable to read. The book doesn't flow well. It's basically chapters (short stories) of how other countries experience and interact with nature. All I could think when reading it was that the author wanted to visit all these cool places and the book was an afterthought (and what paid for the trips). The ending still didn't give me the closure or cohesive-ness that this book greatly needed. Good ideas, just poorly executed and not really enjoyable to read.

  10. 5 out of 5

    KC

    This is a must read for anyone who is in a rut, unhappy, or even for those who already embrace and benefit from the great outdoors. Thorough and thought provoking text. Nature really can be a wonderful pill for all that ails you.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Very dry and boring, very little about the science behind the premise. It was mostly about this woman's nature hikes with various professionals who take "city people" out into nature for a couple hours. The "proof" as evidenced by lower vital signs is so little that natural variation throughout the day is easily twice or more, so basically it proves nothing. Found myself skimming, and decided to dnf it. Life's too short to read crappy books. Very dry and boring, very little about the science behind the premise. It was mostly about this woman's nature hikes with various professionals who take "city people" out into nature for a couple hours. The "proof" as evidenced by lower vital signs is so little that natural variation throughout the day is easily twice or more, so basically it proves nothing. Found myself skimming, and decided to dnf it. Life's too short to read crappy books.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Schuyler

    Psychology and sociology books are some of my favorite, so naturally I was excited when I heard about this book. So I was a little disappointed when I couldn't really get into this book which seemed to be more focused on the author's journey during her study of nature's effects on people and cultures. What I liked: The fun tidbits from studies about the effects of nature on people The author's enthusiasm about nature What I didn't like: The author sharing her opinions of everyday things unrelated to Psychology and sociology books are some of my favorite, so naturally I was excited when I heard about this book. So I was a little disappointed when I couldn't really get into this book which seemed to be more focused on the author's journey during her study of nature's effects on people and cultures. What I liked: The fun tidbits from studies about the effects of nature on people The author's enthusiasm about nature What I didn't like: The author sharing her opinions of everyday things unrelated to the topics of the book The unnecessary details of her journey: what she ate, drank, and how tall the researchers she met were Excessive poetry references The author using unscientific methods to back her studies, many statements akin to "He looked like he benefited from nature" This could have been better represented by cutting out the excess and brought down to a short book or article form.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa

    I just didn't get on with this. I'd heard mostly good things about The Nature Fix on the By the Book podcast, so when I needed to use up a bunch of Audible credits it seemed like the perfect opportunity to pick it up. Maybe that was my mistake though, because it's kind of hard to tell if I didn't like this book because of the book itself or because of the audiobook narration. I didn't notice that this audiobook wasn't narrated by the author on picking it up, and that was my main mistake to be hon I just didn't get on with this. I'd heard mostly good things about The Nature Fix on the By the Book podcast, so when I needed to use up a bunch of Audible credits it seemed like the perfect opportunity to pick it up. Maybe that was my mistake though, because it's kind of hard to tell if I didn't like this book because of the book itself or because of the audiobook narration. I didn't notice that this audiobook wasn't narrated by the author on picking it up, and that was my main mistake to be honest. I generally don't like it when non-fiction isn't narrated by the author, particularly when there are memoir elements - and in this book Williams draws a lot on her own personal life and also her own personal interactions with the various experts she speaks to on her nature expeditions (both abroad and at home in America). This audiobook was narrated by Emily Woo Zeller, and while she strikes me as probably a great fiction audiobook narrator, I couldn't stand her style with non-fiction. She came across quite poorly for me - in sections where snippets of interviews and interactions with experts were given, she put on voices for them and attempted accents that were at best slightly awkward and at worst a little... unintentionally racist-sounding? It was incredibly off-putting, and as a result I found it really hard to concentrate on what she was telling me (and ultimately made me not really care all that much). In terms of the text itself, it did seem fairly well researched but it wasn't really what I was looking for. Williams delves more into different countries and experts who particularly take city dwellers out of their 'unnatural' habitats and plonk them in the woods and wilderness on various expeditions and retreats. However, I couldn't help but feel like there wasn't really a whole lot of weight behind what she was saying, and there didn't feel like there was a lot of emphasis on how to guide those who live in cities to really get the benefits of nature despite the restrictions to natural spaces. She seemed more interested in commenting on her interviewee's appearances, the food she was eating, moaning about how she'd had to move to a city away from her more rural home, and also dropping subtle hints to the fact she didn't agree with medication throughout (especially relating to mental health which really irked me). On a personal level too, I really disliked the way she portrayed the city of Glasgow, which is where I have lived my entire life. She painted it in a very negative light, which wasn't particularly pleasant for me to hear. No trashing my city please! Overall this just felt like a massive waste of time, because at the end of the day the takeaway is obvious - nature is good for you, and we should get outside more, especially if we live in cities and work in offices. Well duh. It didn't really need to be a full-blown book at the end of the day - I agree with other reviewers that say this would have been better as a long read than a book of this length. And definitely don't pick up the audible copy if you are still going to give this a go because it was probably one of the most off-putting performances I've ever heard.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Allie

    I am really shocked at the high reviews on this one. I was less than unimpressed.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lena

    I loved this book, I hated this book. Over and over again you hear about how necessary nature is for our well being. Over and over again you hear about how nature is being dismissed unless it can be of (immediate) financial benefit. The statistics presented for nature deprivation in children were damning. But the book doesn’t end with the author moving her children back to Colorado. Even with everything she learned Florence Williams still prioritized whatever moved her to D.C. over the peace, I loved this book, I hated this book. Over and over again you hear about how necessary nature is for our well being. Over and over again you hear about how nature is being dismissed unless it can be of (immediate) financial benefit. The statistics presented for nature deprivation in children were damning. But the book doesn’t end with the author moving her children back to Colorado. Even with everything she learned Florence Williams still prioritized whatever moved her to D.C. over the peace, harmony, and health she, and her children, enjoyed in Colorado.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Rachel León

    (3.5 stars, rounded up because this book inspired me to get outside more) Florence Williams outlines why getting into nature is so essential for our health and well being. She also talks about the implications of all the time we spend "plugged in." I have always loved being in nature, but my introvert default mode is to curl up on the couch. This book reminded me of how good I feel when I'm in nature, how much clearer I think, and how much more creative I am. Overall, it's an interesting read. (3.5 stars, rounded up because this book inspired me to get outside more) Florence Williams outlines why getting into nature is so essential for our health and well being. She also talks about the implications of all the time we spend "plugged in." I have always loved being in nature, but my introvert default mode is to curl up on the couch. This book reminded me of how good I feel when I'm in nature, how much clearer I think, and how much more creative I am. Overall, it's an interesting read.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Esther Marie

    Truly more of a 3.5 stars than a 4 for me, BUT it definitely made me think and since I'm an earlier reviewer it seems mean to curve downwards. I am reviewing an advance reading copy. The strength of this book is the skill that Williams has with setting a scene. Her descriptions are very visual and engaging. My favorite chapters were about nature therapy and the role of nature within society in both Japan and Korea. She also does a good job of citing her sources, which is something that writers i Truly more of a 3.5 stars than a 4 for me, BUT it definitely made me think and since I'm an earlier reviewer it seems mean to curve downwards. I am reviewing an advance reading copy. The strength of this book is the skill that Williams has with setting a scene. Her descriptions are very visual and engaging. My favorite chapters were about nature therapy and the role of nature within society in both Japan and Korea. She also does a good job of citing her sources, which is something that writers in the "popular science" genre sometimes really fail at. Similar to other popular science authors, (Mary Roach, for example), Williams is herself a character in her journey to learn more about "why nature makes us happier, healthier, and more creative." For the most part she comes across as earnest and self-aware, but if her voice gets under your skin early on, she can come across as a little annoying. I think that this is a problem that editing could definitely remedy, and it may not be a problem with the book when it is published. The primary downfall of this book (or at least the advance reading copy) is that it seems to lack a real focus or narrative arch. Williams does a lot of research into LOTS of ways that humans interact with nature as well as studies looking into how nature impacts the moods and health of people. A ton of food for thought, but there isn't a clear journey. My opinion is that this book would have been more powerful if it were slightly less episodic. I am passing this book along to my boyfriend (who bemoans our living in New York City and yearns for rural life) so I can say that I would recommend this book, especially to people who already hold some beliefs that green space is superior to urban/concrete space. It's also worth noting, however, that my coworker--a born and bred New Yorker--thought that The Nature Fix was a bunch of hooey. **Update** The boyfriend who hates city life *adored* Nature Fix and called it one of the best books he has read recently. He's a scientist, too, which I think speaks highly of Williams's ability to write clearly and use scholarly resources. For me, this book remains 3.5 although I haven't looked at a finished copy since my review.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Emily Crow

    The subject matter is fascinating--the author travels around the world, talks to researchers, and participates in different projects that are attempting to demonstrate all the different ways that being around nature is good for us. Some of the projects were kind of goofy, like virtual reality treadmills or taking walks with EEGs on her head, others made me wish I could experience them as well, such as Japanese forest bathing or a therapeutic kayaking trip. I'm less enthusiastic about Williams' w The subject matter is fascinating--the author travels around the world, talks to researchers, and participates in different projects that are attempting to demonstrate all the different ways that being around nature is good for us. Some of the projects were kind of goofy, like virtual reality treadmills or taking walks with EEGs on her head, others made me wish I could experience them as well, such as Japanese forest bathing or a therapeutic kayaking trip. I'm less enthusiastic about Williams' writing style, however. It's quite readable, and I think would be appealing to those who are only casually interested in the topic, which is good, but sometimes her random pop cultural references or strange comments about someone's appearance would be distracting. Her chapter about the Finns seemed especially glib and patronizing, at various points characterizing them as "gnomic" and being in a state of arrested development (due to their enduring love of being outside). Despite my reservations, this is one of the more interesting nature books I've read this year, and I would recommend it to just about anyone. Even if you think you don't like nature, it might still improve your health.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Holly

    Well-balanced and extremely interesting (like her earlier book on Breasts). Sort of reminded of Mary Roach. I'm disappointed that I missed hearing Williams speak when she was in town recently. Well-balanced and extremely interesting (like her earlier book on Breasts). Sort of reminded of Mary Roach. I'm disappointed that I missed hearing Williams speak when she was in town recently.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    I got the drift of this very early on. I listened to it while outside in the back forty- in nature- while walking the dog. So I abandoned this one after 50% through it. I got what I wanted from it: Being in nature = good for the mind and the body. City life and stress = bad. I didn't need to listen to the author tell me of all the studies and reduced blood pressure measurements, etc. She did a good job driving that point home early in the book... the rest seemed to be supporting evidence and studi I got the drift of this very early on. I listened to it while outside in the back forty- in nature- while walking the dog. So I abandoned this one after 50% through it. I got what I wanted from it: Being in nature = good for the mind and the body. City life and stress = bad. I didn't need to listen to the author tell me of all the studies and reduced blood pressure measurements, etc. She did a good job driving that point home early in the book... the rest seemed to be supporting evidence and studies. I give it four star b/c it made a valuable point and evidence was given to back that point up. Actually I could have told you being out in nature was good for you and relaxing when I was a kid of nine years old- but no one ever asked.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    If you go back millennia, the early human mind developed several elements to help it survive, fight or flight, communication and the ability to think strategically. Being immersed in the natural world all day must have had a deeper impact too as it is only over the past few years that the effects of us not having much contact with nature are becoming startlingly apparent. There has always been a theory that being outdoors is good for you, but to prove that just being outdoors does have a real ef If you go back millennia, the early human mind developed several elements to help it survive, fight or flight, communication and the ability to think strategically. Being immersed in the natural world all day must have had a deeper impact too as it is only over the past few years that the effects of us not having much contact with nature are becoming startlingly apparent. There has always been a theory that being outdoors is good for you, but to prove that just being outdoors does have a real effect rather than just being hearsay. Florence Williams moved from Colorado to Washington DC and was missing the outdoors and open spaces decided to see how the evidence stacked up and to try some of these thongs out for herself. Her travels would take to the gardens of Singapore, to the Finnish forests, on a river trip with veterans suffering from PTSD, to investigate the 'Forest bathing' in Japan and how children with ADHD can dramatically reduce their drug intake by being outdoors for a period of time. These are just a few of the many examples that she includes. They all have one common element though, being outdoors is good for your physical and mental health. This connection to nature is deep-rooted and as the evidence is now showing, essential. In this excellent book by Williams, she mixes solid science with a compelling narrative on all the benefits that others have gained from putting down the mobile device and getting outdoors. It needn't be a monumental hike across the uplands either, just spending a minimum of five hours a month, even around your local parks will have a noticeable difference to your well being. This book is not just highly recommended, but I would argue requisite reading.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Marigold

    Time spent in nature is restorative, creativeizing, anxiety busting, miraculous. This book explains how this has been explored by scientists looking to prove and explain nature's benefits. The Nature Fix felt disjointed to me, hopping around the world and briefly visiting scientists or forest rangers. It wasn't until I was near the end of this book that I realized the connections between its message and what I try to do at work. The accumulated evidence of measurable positive impact achieved thr Time spent in nature is restorative, creativeizing, anxiety busting, miraculous. This book explains how this has been explored by scientists looking to prove and explain nature's benefits. The Nature Fix felt disjointed to me, hopping around the world and briefly visiting scientists or forest rangers. It wasn't until I was near the end of this book that I realized the connections between its message and what I try to do at work. The accumulated evidence of measurable positive impact achieved through time spent outside is powerful. But again, the disjointed scattering of information made the idea of rereading to find pertinent facts a dreaded chore promptly discarded. I read this while on a long wilderness retreat, curious of the effect the combination of setting and story could have. Underwhelmed. I wanted to be blown away. But I do think it's important that nature benefits research has been investigated and collected in this volume.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kaisha

    From Japanese forest bathing to Finnish metsänpeitto (being covered by forest) Williams explores the role of nature in human well-being. Current neuroscience has finally given us the tools to test how things like the smell of trees, quiet green spaces, and urban vs. natural views affect the brain. This book provides science for the sceptics and inspiration for the couch potatoes to "go outside, often, sometimes in wild places. Bring friends or not. Breathe." From Japanese forest bathing to Finnish metsänpeitto (being covered by forest) Williams explores the role of nature in human well-being. Current neuroscience has finally given us the tools to test how things like the smell of trees, quiet green spaces, and urban vs. natural views affect the brain. This book provides science for the sceptics and inspiration for the couch potatoes to "go outside, often, sometimes in wild places. Bring friends or not. Breathe."

  24. 4 out of 5

    Shelly

    I’ve been missing the outdoors of Wisconsin lately. (Easier to do during the summer and early fall. Though my son loves Wisconsin winters.) So this book is a good match for me. It’s an exploration of the science of nature’s effect on people. I liked how she went to several countries and shared their research and programs. A couple chapters seemed a little repetitive but she made up for that by following up those chapters with ones on vets with PTSD and children with ADHD.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sharen

    A must-read. Florence Williams has explained what we all know (common sense) and she has done the research to back it up. This book needs to be read by every mayor and the members of council in every city worldwide. Schools, hospitals, and all who care about public health and sustainability, need to recognize the vital importance of nature in our lives.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Deanna

    Super informative and fun little read about nature and yourself and your body. Though I didn't get to read it in nature just reading it kind of made me feel better. I love being outside and I honestly feel so much better surrounded by trees and wildlife and after reading this book I've been convinced that I need to buy a log cabin in the middle of nowhere so thanks for that haha Super informative and fun little read about nature and yourself and your body. Though I didn't get to read it in nature just reading it kind of made me feel better. I love being outside and I honestly feel so much better surrounded by trees and wildlife and after reading this book I've been convinced that I need to buy a log cabin in the middle of nowhere so thanks for that haha

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Booth

    A great book researching how time in nature effects us. Scientific studies where we find that being outside or in nature compared to the city or a control had an effect on blood pressure and other bodily functions in a positive way. We have become greatly removed from nature and our health has started to show it. Worth taking a look at!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Led

    As an urbanite, like millions of people in the world today, having no accessible wilderness to hike in for months (almost a year now, in fact) because of quarantine, I guess reading about nature is how I attempt to slake the desire. If there's a straightforward answer to the title's why after following the author's immersion trips and a plethora of related experiments to corroborate this material, based off of how parts could go roundabout, there simply isn't a direct answer to what is special a As an urbanite, like millions of people in the world today, having no accessible wilderness to hike in for months (almost a year now, in fact) because of quarantine, I guess reading about nature is how I attempt to slake the desire. If there's a straightforward answer to the title's why after following the author's immersion trips and a plethora of related experiments to corroborate this material, based off of how parts could go roundabout, there simply isn't a direct answer to what is special about nature. That doesn't disappoint me though because for all I know, with or without reasons, I take pleasure in the immense wonders of nature. (The patchy writing flow is another story.) But I'd go best for insights that don't painstakingly check sweat amount for cortisol levels to prove how restorative nature is, because I myself feel this: nature is awe-inspiring, and it enables brain-resting. All the benefits follow. A few added learning I enjoyed were the sections about Finland and Singapore. "We come out in nature not because the science says it does something to us, but because of how it makes us feel."

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    Have you gotten your 5 hours of recommended nature time this month? (I'm writing this now, as I sit outside, enjoying the bird songs, the buzz of lawnmowers, and the wind whipping around the budding leaves). A great book about why we need nature, how it improves our bodies and minds, and why it's such a thing we've become disconnected from across the globe. A nice companion to both of Robin Wall Kimmerer's books. My one complaint is that the production on the audiobook isn't spectacular. The perf Have you gotten your 5 hours of recommended nature time this month? (I'm writing this now, as I sit outside, enjoying the bird songs, the buzz of lawnmowers, and the wind whipping around the budding leaves). A great book about why we need nature, how it improves our bodies and minds, and why it's such a thing we've become disconnected from across the globe. A nice companion to both of Robin Wall Kimmerer's books. My one complaint is that the production on the audiobook isn't spectacular. The performer is fine, but there are some tone/sound issues. Not Earth-shattering, but jarring at times.

  30. 4 out of 5

    jackie norris

    Enjoyable non fiction - not too dry or academic. Short answer seems to be that we aren’t sure why nature has so many positive impacts on health (both mental and physical) but it does and you should spend more time in it.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.