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Star Wars: The Classic Newspaper Comics Vol. 2

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This second of three volumes reprints for the first time the classic Star Wars newspaper strip in its complete format. No other edition includes each Sunday page title header and “bonus” panels in their meticulously restored original color. The epic seven-days-a-week sagas begin with "Han Solo at Stars' End,” based on novel by Brian Daley, adapted by Archie Goodwin and Alfr This second of three volumes reprints for the first time the classic Star Wars newspaper strip in its complete format. No other edition includes each Sunday page title header and “bonus” panels in their meticulously restored original color. The epic seven-days-a-week sagas begin with "Han Solo at Stars' End,” based on novel by Brian Daley, adapted by Archie Goodwin and Alfredo Alcala, followed by seven complete adventures by the storied team of Archie Goodwin and artist Al Williamson. The pair had previously worked together on Creepy, Eerie, and Blazing Combat comics magazines, the Flash Gordon comic book, and 13 years on the Secret Agent Corrigan newspaper strip. They seamlessly shifted gears to take over, at George Lucas’s request, the Star Wars newspaper strip. Included are all strips from October 6, 1980 to July 25, 1982


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This second of three volumes reprints for the first time the classic Star Wars newspaper strip in its complete format. No other edition includes each Sunday page title header and “bonus” panels in their meticulously restored original color. The epic seven-days-a-week sagas begin with "Han Solo at Stars' End,” based on novel by Brian Daley, adapted by Archie Goodwin and Alfr This second of three volumes reprints for the first time the classic Star Wars newspaper strip in its complete format. No other edition includes each Sunday page title header and “bonus” panels in their meticulously restored original color. The epic seven-days-a-week sagas begin with "Han Solo at Stars' End,” based on novel by Brian Daley, adapted by Archie Goodwin and Alfredo Alcala, followed by seven complete adventures by the storied team of Archie Goodwin and artist Al Williamson. The pair had previously worked together on Creepy, Eerie, and Blazing Combat comics magazines, the Flash Gordon comic book, and 13 years on the Secret Agent Corrigan newspaper strip. They seamlessly shifted gears to take over, at George Lucas’s request, the Star Wars newspaper strip. Included are all strips from October 6, 1980 to July 25, 1982

46 review for Star Wars: The Classic Newspaper Comics Vol. 2

  1. 5 out of 5

    Neil R. Coulter

    These comics are just about my favorite Star Wars ever written. They are goofy adventures, where the creativity is free and joyful. Even the black and white daily strips are vibrant, and the full-color Sunday editions are beautiful. In other words, this book is a huge contrast to the current SW books, which feel restricted and controlled. Even though these stories aren’t (and probably never strictly were) “canon,” elements in them anticipate a lot of future SW movie design. An X-wing on page 103 These comics are just about my favorite Star Wars ever written. They are goofy adventures, where the creativity is free and joyful. Even the black and white daily strips are vibrant, and the full-color Sunday editions are beautiful. In other words, this book is a huge contrast to the current SW books, which feel restricted and controlled. Even though these stories aren’t (and probably never strictly were) “canon,” elements in them anticipate a lot of future SW movie design. An X-wing on page 103 is the kind of design used in the sequel trilogy, not in the original movies of this book’s era. The “Traitor’s Gambit” story (209–235) takes place in an underwater city, with a sequence of underwater speeders being attacked by sea monsters that looks very much like Episode 1’s planet core scene. (Also, Silver Fyre is a more interesting femme fatale than Doctor Aphra or Sana Starros.) The way Luke tries to use the Force to communicate with an angry creature in “The Night Beast” (256–265) anticipates Ezra Bridger and others who will demonstrate a Force connection with animals. Princess Leia travels the galaxy trying to recruit new allies to the Rebels, just as the older Leia does between Episodes 8 and 9. Starting on page 100 (April 26, 1981), each Sunday edition starts with a “Star Wars Scrapbook” panel and a panel illustrating any scene from the first two films. Each of the scrapbooks is a single image of a character or prop from the first two films. I found it really interesting to see which visual elements most intrigued the artist at that early stage. Some of it’s obvious (Darth Vader appears a couple of times, as does Yoda), but other choices are unusual (Chewbacca’s bowcaster is featured twice; the Cloud City twin-pod car makes appearances in movie and concept-art forms; Owen Lars appears once, as does the Lars family landspeeder, glimpsed only in the background of the first movie). It’s an era before everybody knew everything about SW, and all of it was exciting and fresh. The stories don’t make a lot of sense, and some of the narrative threads (such as the Luke–Leia–Han love triangle) were rendered outdated by the next movie. But over and over there is a lively, thrilling feel to these comic strips that’s missing from most SW today.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Joe Francis

    This book is the second of three volumes, and a mixture of the Sunday color strips (which tend to be three rows) and the black and white weekday strips (which are each just one row of three panels). We start off here with an adaptation of Han Solo At Star's End with art by Alfredo Alcala before getting into the Archie Goodwin/Al Williamson stories. I remember reading this week by week when I was younger. The ones I read then were ALL in color. I didn't know the color ones were only the ones print This book is the second of three volumes, and a mixture of the Sunday color strips (which tend to be three rows) and the black and white weekday strips (which are each just one row of three panels). We start off here with an adaptation of Han Solo At Star's End with art by Alfredo Alcala before getting into the Archie Goodwin/Al Williamson stories. I remember reading this week by week when I was younger. The ones I read then were ALL in color. I didn't know the color ones were only the ones printed in the Sunday papers (with black and white single line strips printed in the weekday papers) but due to the episodic and repetitious nature of newspaper strips, I didn't realize I had missed out on anything. It's good to be able to see all the weekday strips I missed. Al Williamson's art is, of course, fantastic. The photo-realism he brings to the strip is amazing. The only criticism I have is that the color strips seem to have been photocopied from the original newspapers archives? I do not know, but they still have halftone color and lack fidelity compared to the black and white dailies which, according to the credits, are high quality scans of original artwork supplied through Heritage Auctions. The Marvel editions of these strips, where the art is rejigged to fit a regular comic book page, do not seem to suffer from this and have been recolored by computer, losing the half tone. So, I'd say if you want the strips in their original aspect and format then this volume would be good for you, but be aware that the color strips do lack fidelity in places, although the B&W strips are very crisp and clear. If you want the strips ALL in color and all crisp then I'd suggest seeking out the two volumes of Marvels "Star Wars Legends Epic Collection: The Newspaper Strips". Having said that, if you're an Al Williamson aficionado then you're probably going to prefer the B&W pages in this volume better anyway.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Grant

    The tone of the strips changed considerably with the new writing and art team. Setting the stories between Episodes IV and V allowed the strip to use the continuity to tell stories leading up to Empire.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Archie Goodwin and Al Williamson are the perfect Star Wars creative team.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Matt

  6. 5 out of 5

    Robert Barker

  7. 5 out of 5

    Amy

  8. 4 out of 5

    Guy

  9. 4 out of 5

    William A. Champagne

  10. 5 out of 5

    『(ARJUN REDDY™)』(^_^)

  11. 5 out of 5

    Drew

  12. 5 out of 5

    MATTHEW P

  13. 4 out of 5

    Dan Wagner

  14. 5 out of 5

    Travis Barton

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mark

  16. 5 out of 5

    Shane Phillips

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lynn Finkelstein

  18. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Kennedy

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Scatena

  20. 5 out of 5

    Travis Brainerd

  21. 5 out of 5

    Dennis Ticen

  22. 4 out of 5

    David

  23. 4 out of 5

    Alberto Martín de Hijas

  24. 4 out of 5

    Allen Berry

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Townsend

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ken

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ben

  28. 4 out of 5

    Matt Piechocinski

  29. 4 out of 5

    rêveur d'art

  30. 5 out of 5

    Will Hoover

  31. 5 out of 5

    Spot

  32. 5 out of 5

    Paul Porry

  33. 5 out of 5

    Mikebo

  34. 5 out of 5

    Henri

  35. 4 out of 5

    Sydney Virgil

  36. 4 out of 5

    Miriam

  37. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Fitzgerald

  38. 4 out of 5

    Paul

  39. 5 out of 5

    Edward Randall

  40. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Boshart

  41. 5 out of 5

    Michael Ryzy

  42. 5 out of 5

    Samuel

  43. 5 out of 5

    Edgar Middel

  44. 4 out of 5

    Mikha'El Hurley

  45. 4 out of 5

    Charlotte Fisher

  46. 4 out of 5

    Xerxes

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