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What if instead of feeling guilty and anxious about money, you felt happy and secure? Shannon Lee Simmons shows you how to create a financial plan that will let you spend knowing you’ll be ready for the future Managing your money can be frustrating and confusing. Life is expensive. It doesn’t matter if you make $40,000 or $140,000 a year, it can feel like you’re constantly What if instead of feeling guilty and anxious about money, you felt happy and secure? Shannon Lee Simmons shows you how to create a financial plan that will let you spend knowing you’ll be ready for the future Managing your money can be frustrating and confusing. Life is expensive. It doesn’t matter if you make $40,000 or $140,000 a year, it can feel like you’re constantly broke. Can you afford that new car, that vacation, that night out? You think so, but it feels impossible to know. And rigid budgets that force you to spend your money in unrealistic ways (like $9.50 per week for pants) don’t make things any clearer. But what if there was a new way to manage your money? One that left you certain you had your bases covered—both for your monthly bills and your future retirement—and then let you enjoy your money by spending it. (Yes, we just said that.) Enter Shannon Lee Simmons, a totally new voice in the world of personal finance, one who understands the new and very real pressures to survive modern life and keep up in the age of social media. Shannon doesn’t lecture, judge or patronize. The founder of the wildly popular New School of Finance, Shannon recognized that most of her thousands of clients felt broke, no matter what their income. And feeling broke can be as bad as actually being broke, because it leads to overspending and misery. Worry-Free Money takes a fresh approach to finances, looking at the root cause of the pressure to spend and showing why traditional budgets don’t work. It is a deeply practical book that will help you break the cycle of guilt, understand why you overspend and find hope—and fun—in getting your money under control.


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What if instead of feeling guilty and anxious about money, you felt happy and secure? Shannon Lee Simmons shows you how to create a financial plan that will let you spend knowing you’ll be ready for the future Managing your money can be frustrating and confusing. Life is expensive. It doesn’t matter if you make $40,000 or $140,000 a year, it can feel like you’re constantly What if instead of feeling guilty and anxious about money, you felt happy and secure? Shannon Lee Simmons shows you how to create a financial plan that will let you spend knowing you’ll be ready for the future Managing your money can be frustrating and confusing. Life is expensive. It doesn’t matter if you make $40,000 or $140,000 a year, it can feel like you’re constantly broke. Can you afford that new car, that vacation, that night out? You think so, but it feels impossible to know. And rigid budgets that force you to spend your money in unrealistic ways (like $9.50 per week for pants) don’t make things any clearer. But what if there was a new way to manage your money? One that left you certain you had your bases covered—both for your monthly bills and your future retirement—and then let you enjoy your money by spending it. (Yes, we just said that.) Enter Shannon Lee Simmons, a totally new voice in the world of personal finance, one who understands the new and very real pressures to survive modern life and keep up in the age of social media. Shannon doesn’t lecture, judge or patronize. The founder of the wildly popular New School of Finance, Shannon recognized that most of her thousands of clients felt broke, no matter what their income. And feeling broke can be as bad as actually being broke, because it leads to overspending and misery. Worry-Free Money takes a fresh approach to finances, looking at the root cause of the pressure to spend and showing why traditional budgets don’t work. It is a deeply practical book that will help you break the cycle of guilt, understand why you overspend and find hope—and fun—in getting your money under control.

30 review for Worry-Free Money: Stop budgeting, Start Living

  1. 4 out of 5

    Hilary Land

    I genuinely learned things from this book.It is simplistic in its philosophies but that was welcomed by a novice like me. Also it's Canadian so we don't have to skip chapters upon chapters about 401Ks I genuinely learned things from this book.It is simplistic in its philosophies but that was welcomed by a novice like me. Also it's Canadian so we don't have to skip chapters upon chapters about 401Ks

  2. 5 out of 5

    Paula

    I want everyone to read this book!!! It revolutionized the way I handle my finances. I now know that I'm doing better financially than I thought I was. Implementing her strategies feels good and I can see me using it long-term. The examples she gives are a bit too upper-class for me to relate to but are still informative. Spread the Money Love! I want everyone to read this book!!! It revolutionized the way I handle my finances. I now know that I'm doing better financially than I thought I was. Implementing her strategies feels good and I can see me using it long-term. The examples she gives are a bit too upper-class for me to relate to but are still informative. Spread the Money Love!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Leah

    Great book if you're looking for a happier way to budget your money so you don't feel so strapped down. I'm a finance major so I love learning new ways of organizing finances and budgeting so I enjoyed this book, it's very practical. Basically you figure out where all your money is going, and mark it down as either a fixed expense (which you can't change, like hydro, car insurance, etc.), and everything else you spend your money on. You look at your expenses and find out what's most and least imp Great book if you're looking for a happier way to budget your money so you don't feel so strapped down. I'm a finance major so I love learning new ways of organizing finances and budgeting so I enjoyed this book, it's very practical. Basically you figure out where all your money is going, and mark it down as either a fixed expense (which you can't change, like hydro, car insurance, etc.), and everything else you spend your money on. You look at your expenses and find out what's most and least important to you and get rid of the expenses that are unimportant. That way you can create an Emergency account, a Short term savings account (trips, upgrade car, etc), and a long term savings plan (retirement). The thing that's different about this book is that Simmons sections out a sort of allowance, a guilt free account that you're allowed to spend on whatever you wish, literally called the "Happy spending account." I'd say the majority of the book is going through examples of different people's finances. Whether it be a young couple, a divorcee, an older couple trying to retire, literally all walks of life. There are soooo many examples walking through all their expenses and cutting out what and prioritizing what they really want. When we are faced with situations that we want to spend additional money we need to sit back and calculate if it’s within our means, and ensure we would still be able to pay our fixed expenses and savings. Write down every category of expenses and rate from 1-5, 5 being must and 1 being unimportant to you, work through the 1-3’s to see if you can eliminate those expenses. The psychological benefit of having an emergency account is better than putting a few grand into your debt repayment plan. Me personally, instead of putting it into a 1% savings account which isn’t even beating inflation out it into a GIC that you can tap into if necessary, in your portfolio anyway you should have some GIC’s anyways, low risk investments. But that's just me, I know most people would benefit psychologically by having an emergency account.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Alexa

    Instead of reading this book, go get yourself a copy of Ramit Sethi's I Will Teach You To Be Rich. These books offer similar concepts, but Ramit gives much more solid advice and better actionable steps. The big thing Ramit and Shannon have in common that I like is their form of anti-budget: put aside the money you need for rent, savings etc FIRST, then spend whatever is leftover, guilt-free. But I like Ramit better since he advocates to ruthlessly hack away at expenses that you get no joy from. Instead of reading this book, go get yourself a copy of Ramit Sethi's I Will Teach You To Be Rich. These books offer similar concepts, but Ramit gives much more solid advice and better actionable steps. The big thing Ramit and Shannon have in common that I like is their form of anti-budget: put aside the money you need for rent, savings etc FIRST, then spend whatever is leftover, guilt-free. But I like Ramit better since he advocates to ruthlessly hack away at expenses that you get no joy from. Shannon does this too but I find her approach too.....wussy? (Oh no, watch out, I'm using some "Money Hate" language). Listing all recurring expenses as "fixed" costs that cannot be changed is silly. A $200 phone bill, while a recurring expense, can be negotiated to a lower price. You can always change providers or change to a different plan. $100 on cable and struggling to survive? Cut the cord! Shannon lists gym memberships and other subsriptions under "fixed" expenses as well, and that bothered me. I'm all for gym memberships and paying for subscriptions if they truly bring you happiness, but these expenses are by no means "fixed." Shannon also advises to have several bank accounts to keep track of money you can and can't spend. I agree, I think that's a good idea for some people. However, she and I disagree on the point that bank fees are okay. Nu-unh. You are paying the bank to borrow YOUR money. No no no. You lose tons of money to the bank this way. RAMIT SAID NO FEES!!! (Probably my fave quote from Ramit's book - seriously, go read that book instead). Also, Worry-Free Money is filled with far too many examples instead of actual steps to follow. I don't care how Sam and Dani are doing. How are you helping ME? I understand that examples make the advice look more approachable and real, but there were far too many of them. I couldn't get over this example: At one point Shannon tells the story of a couple buying a truck. Apparently, $25,000 for a new truck is a no-no. But $18,000 for a used truck is a-ok. Is there seriously not an option to get a cheaper used truck??! I can't imagine that being the best deal available. And although Shannon helps people save and budget, I was disappointed to find that there's zero info on investing. Shannon also uses random buzz words throughout the book like "Hard Limit", "Fixed Expense", "F*ck-it Moment," "Life Checklist".... ick. Stop saying "fetch," it's not going to happen. And she's clearly into astrology. "'...The part that wants the house in the suburbs and the family, and the other part that wants to be more carefree and travel for six months a year.' (He's a Gemini. So, you know, it made sense.)" "Being an overachieving Capricorn and hell-bent for leather towards financial security, I headed straight to the Internet and started researching places for sale." Barf. This is not for me. I must not be her target demographic. Worry-Free Money just didn't click with me. But if you are just starting out and want basic, encouraging, fluffy financial advise, this book could be for you.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Allison

    "Things change month to month, day by day. You don't have a crystal ball. With one paycheque you may need to buy a lot of cheese. With another, a DustBuster and no cheese. Life is random." "Getting control of your finances means living within your means without hating your life." "Things change month to month, day by day. You don't have a crystal ball. With one paycheque you may need to buy a lot of cheese. With another, a DustBuster and no cheese. Life is random." "Getting control of your finances means living within your means without hating your life."

  6. 4 out of 5

    Becca Polegatto

    Loved this book! Shannon writes about finances in a fun and relatable way. She breaks down the basics and makes you feel like what you want in life when it comes to money is actually achievable. This is a must read for everyone! "Getting control of your finances means living within your means without hating your life." Loved this book! Shannon writes about finances in a fun and relatable way. She breaks down the basics and makes you feel like what you want in life when it comes to money is actually achievable. This is a must read for everyone! "Getting control of your finances means living within your means without hating your life."

  7. 4 out of 5

    Chantel

    This was a simple read that was easy to follow. I love that fact that it was Canadian. I find it so hard to follow other books because Canadians don’t have the same systems such as 401k. I genuinely was able to learn from this book!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Laura Douglass

    This book was fantastic for understanding some of the psychology around money and budgeting, as well as practical, tactical advice. I would say this + Wealthing Like Rabbits is my new go-to financial starter kit for those looking to learn more about personal finance.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kate Spencer

    I thought this was a very good book, more so for those who have not had any experience in managing their money (which I personally think finances should be taught in high school). Not the best Financial book I have read, but I did like it and got one or two nuggets of information that I will carry with me. Shannon pointed out a lot of new influences that contribute to how we spend our money - "fear of missing out", social media, fitting in, etc. I did like how she brought this into the mix - thi I thought this was a very good book, more so for those who have not had any experience in managing their money (which I personally think finances should be taught in high school). Not the best Financial book I have read, but I did like it and got one or two nuggets of information that I will carry with me. Shannon pointed out a lot of new influences that contribute to how we spend our money - "fear of missing out", social media, fitting in, etc. I did like how she brought this into the mix - this will probably resonate more with a younger generation. One thing she talked about, that I have been subscribing to in my way of thinking about spending money is it a "need" vs a "want". Think about why you want to buy that and what is its emotional return on investment in your life. Definitely worth the read if you need that extra help with your money.

  10. 4 out of 5

    erika

    I just finished this, so I should come back and revisit this in a few months or a year to assess its true impact. That said, I really enjoyed this book and its nonjudgmental but practical attitude towards money. Useful advice on dealing with shame and "keeping up with the Joneses", and an approach that allows for pleasure and fun rather than extreme frugality. The book leads you to consider all of the competitive and social and self-numbing aspects of spending, which was enlightening (& a little I just finished this, so I should come back and revisit this in a few months or a year to assess its true impact. That said, I really enjoyed this book and its nonjudgmental but practical attitude towards money. Useful advice on dealing with shame and "keeping up with the Joneses", and an approach that allows for pleasure and fun rather than extreme frugality. The book leads you to consider all of the competitive and social and self-numbing aspects of spending, which was enlightening (& a little embarrassing). Primarily useful if your income is mid-range or higher; not useful if your income is at a poverty level.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Roma Del

    Well written. Shannon 's approach is very realistic, and up to date. Amust read for everyone whether you are in your 20's or 50's . I read the Wealthy Barber years ago but I definitely can say I enjoyed reading this book. better. I felt like I was listening to Shannon speaking. Well written. Shannon 's approach is very realistic, and up to date. Amust read for everyone whether you are in your 20's or 50's . I read the Wealthy Barber years ago but I definitely can say I enjoyed reading this book. better. I felt like I was listening to Shannon speaking.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Anne-Marie

    I found this book recommended on Half Banked financial website (super recommend that website btw), and immediately borrowed it from the library. I was initially hoping for some Canadian-specific general financial advice about investing and financial planning. I didn't get the investing piece (that's okay) but I did get a lot out of this book. Shannon Lee Simmons takes a really no-nonsense, accessible approach about realistically adjusting your spending and creating financial plans for you. A lot I found this book recommended on Half Banked financial website (super recommend that website btw), and immediately borrowed it from the library. I was initially hoping for some Canadian-specific general financial advice about investing and financial planning. I didn't get the investing piece (that's okay) but I did get a lot out of this book. Shannon Lee Simmons takes a really no-nonsense, accessible approach about realistically adjusting your spending and creating financial plans for you. A lot of the tips she includes I've either done or try to do (which made me feel relieved not going to lie) but I also did a lot of the exercises she provided and reflecting on my financial goals. While, like any advice book, she has "terms" for different things (like Hard Limits on spending, Meaningful Savings, Happy Spending vs. Unhappy Spending) it's not cheesy or annoying for me personally - you have to call your savings something after all! This isn't for people who are genuinely, truly poor/living under the poverty line/facing systemic societal money issues. And she acknowledges that at the beginning of the book. But if you're someone who makes at least okay money but struggles with how to 'budget', how to pay down debt, how to avoid being house-poor or constantly stressed about money, or just want to get a new perspective on your finances, it's worth taking a look. And it's Canadian. Which I really, really appreciated. Also build an emergency savings fund. It will save your ass. Guaranteed.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Meghan

    I really liked this book. I learned things!! And didn’t feel frustrated/lost/bored while reading about personal finances!! It’s practical, realistic, and has a great resource section… and! It’s! Canadian! Simmons tone is warm and accessible — and who would have guessed I would ever describe a personal finance guide as a book I was eager to return to and continue reading???? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯. A note: Simmons acknowledges her book is likely to be most helpful for those working with a steady middle-ish ra I really liked this book. I learned things!! And didn’t feel frustrated/lost/bored while reading about personal finances!! It’s practical, realistic, and has a great resource section… and! It’s! Canadian! Simmons tone is warm and accessible — and who would have guessed I would ever describe a personal finance guide as a book I was eager to return to and continue reading???? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯. A note: Simmons acknowledges her book is likely to be most helpful for those working with a steady middle-ish range of income, and it covers the basics. Simmon’s approaches are refreshing — no budgeting, a ‘hard-limit’, happy vs. unhappy spending — and they all stem from a philosophy rooted in looking at societal pressures/human nature. There’s no shaming tone, her strategies, systems, and tips are realistic and relevant, and it felt largely ~ in-touch ~ throughout (I also really enjoyed the variety of her client examples/stories peppered throughout). Would definitely recommend.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    The most different, simplest, and emotionally intelligent personal finance book I've read. And in my career I've gone through quite a few. I'm what people would call "good" with money - and I changed my own approach after reading this. Shannon Lee Simmons forgets all the regular advice about spending and very simply says: pay your essentials; make some savings; then spend the rest of your money guilt-free because you've taken care of the important things. She's not prescriptive with percentages o The most different, simplest, and emotionally intelligent personal finance book I've read. And in my career I've gone through quite a few. I'm what people would call "good" with money - and I changed my own approach after reading this. Shannon Lee Simmons forgets all the regular advice about spending and very simply says: pay your essentials; make some savings; then spend the rest of your money guilt-free because you've taken care of the important things. She's not prescriptive with percentages or categories or amounts. Instead, she works with what's realistic. And always takes into account how money makes you feel (and believe me I'm not a touchy-feely guy). Because if it's always weighing you down with guilt you'll eventually ditch your plan and go back to old habits. So pick this up. Change or tweak your money. And feel great about it.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Robin Smillie

    Completely and totally life-changing!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sabrina

    I saw her speak at the Regina Public Library and really liked her personality and approach to personal finances. Some of what she said in her talk totally changed the way I look at budgeting. I would recommend the book to anyone — it’s very reader-friendly, with real-life examples of situations many of us find ourselves in. I actually did all of the exercises and found them quite helpful. Looking forward to putting this new system in action!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Melanie Belanger

    A great, comprehensive and realistic approach for people struggling with money. This book is perfect for people who want to start getting their financial life in order.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Amy Inglis

    Such a good read! Love the fresh perspective on finances. Shannon's humor used made for an interesting read. I love the ease of implementing her plan and we immediately followed through. My only regret is that I wish I had read it sooner! Such a good read! Love the fresh perspective on finances. Shannon's humor used made for an interesting read. I love the ease of implementing her plan and we immediately followed through. My only regret is that I wish I had read it sooner!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Adam

    What? A book about (non)budgeting and finances AND bettering life? Count me in. I drank the kool-aid. I'm in the Worry-Free 'cult' and telling everyone I know about it. Encouraging book on not only getting a grasp on money but on not feeling inadequate and guilty. What? A book about (non)budgeting and finances AND bettering life? Count me in. I drank the kool-aid. I'm in the Worry-Free 'cult' and telling everyone I know about it. Encouraging book on not only getting a grasp on money but on not feeling inadequate and guilty.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    Great resource and super motivating! Right after the first few chapters, I had my notebook out and had figured out my expenses as pr the book. I also sent an email to my bank and asked if I can open up a secondary bank account as suggested. I truly think this book is a perfect got to for those looking to freshen up their financial situation. Some of the information was quite repetitive (like the examples) but overall, definitely worth the read!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Amber

    It’s rare that I can say I loved reading a finance book, but this is one. The author really takes a holistic approach to finance, not just looking at it in a vacuum as an isolated facet of life. Love it or hate it, money is what makes the world go round, and it’s necessary for life. I appreciate the way the author flips the script away from the traditional strict budgeting approach to one that considers both musts-dos and wants, and ultimately guides you to making sound decisions based on happin It’s rare that I can say I loved reading a finance book, but this is one. The author really takes a holistic approach to finance, not just looking at it in a vacuum as an isolated facet of life. Love it or hate it, money is what makes the world go round, and it’s necessary for life. I appreciate the way the author flips the script away from the traditional strict budgeting approach to one that considers both musts-dos and wants, and ultimately guides you to making sound decisions based on happiness. Happiness and finance are in fact not mutually-exclusive in this approach. Another positive- this system is equally appropriate for low earners and high earners. There are excellent resources, ample real-life examples, and it’s ultimately very readable and, fun (no, really). Highly recommended for anyone who has experienced a sense of financial dread or felt like they aren’t living up to financial/life expectations. This was a library loan, but I’m purchasing a copy for my personal library so I may highlight and reference it time and again.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Marie Poulin

    This is one of the best and most practical money books I've ever read (and I've read a lot!) How do you answer the question "can I afford this?" with any kind of accuracy? Without going into debt? Without sacrificing your financial future? How do you know how much you should be putting away? The book starts by covering money mindset, FOMO, and lifestyle expectations so you understand how/why you feel the way you do about your money. One of my favourite things is how she acknowledges that we get ou This is one of the best and most practical money books I've ever read (and I've read a lot!) How do you answer the question "can I afford this?" with any kind of accuracy? Without going into debt? Without sacrificing your financial future? How do you know how much you should be putting away? The book starts by covering money mindset, FOMO, and lifestyle expectations so you understand how/why you feel the way you do about your money. One of my favourite things is how she acknowledges that we get ourselves into trouble through a series of "F*** it moments." Everything is so relatable and written in a modern day perspective and understanding (aka, credit cards are not the devil, but you need to really understand how to use to your advantage). Then she dives into how to actually break down your monthly spending into a system THAT MAKES SENSE and works. It helps you answer the question "can i afford this?" with a real system and understanding behind why or why not, and what happens if/when you decide to buy something you can't afford. She equips you with a more educated understanding of finances so that you make less poor choices, and really understand what you can and cannot afford. Then—one of the missing pieces—she explains how to put into a place a STRATEGIC BANKING PLAN. This is where she gets specific about what happens to your money after each paycheck, and how to make sure you don't feel stretched too thin. This is the only system I've read and implemented that I can actually see working in the long term, and really has helped me understand current day financial situation, plus also allows me to understand the future impact of my day to day decisions. I was spreadsheeting the crap out of everything during and after reading the book. Another great concept? Distinguishing between happy and unhappy spending, so you actually have a budget for the things you love, and really work to reduce the "stuff" that doesn't bring you a ton of happiness. SO many good nuggets, just buy the damn book. This is the most clear picture I've ever had of my finances, and I'm actually excited to use this system. It's also really great to see so many real-world examples of people's finances along with her recommendations, and shows how all the numbers shake out over time. It's maybe cliche to say, but it really is a game-changer!!

  23. 5 out of 5

    E

    Shannon is awesome and helped me and my partner figure out our new financial realities once we finished school and got decent jobs. This book packages all that advice and planning in a more generic prescription for creating a sustainable, realistic budget (subtitle notwithstanding) that meets various obligations and still leaves some breathing room. I was a bit surprised at how many of the case studies included paying off mortgages and implicit expectations of steady employment when that is not Shannon is awesome and helped me and my partner figure out our new financial realities once we finished school and got decent jobs. This book packages all that advice and planning in a more generic prescription for creating a sustainable, realistic budget (subtitle notwithstanding) that meets various obligations and still leaves some breathing room. I was a bit surprised at how many of the case studies included paying off mortgages and implicit expectations of steady employment when that is not the reality for a large chunk of her audience, and I wish there were a tiiiiiiiny bit more about investing, but overall the book provides a solid and reasonable blueprint that can be customized as needed. (Yes, this is me coming out as a personal finance nerd.)

  24. 5 out of 5

    Diane B

    I heard this author speak as part of a finance for women panel late last year. As a result of attending the panel, I ended up hiring a fee for service financial advisor - no regrets! Although I didn't end up working with Shannon, the advice here on strategic budgeting is very similar. It has taken awhile to adjust to the new approach, but it is a highly practical method to living well, within your means. Shannon also has some great tools to use to check-in on whether spending is aligning with you I heard this author speak as part of a finance for women panel late last year. As a result of attending the panel, I ended up hiring a fee for service financial advisor - no regrets! Although I didn't end up working with Shannon, the advice here on strategic budgeting is very similar. It has taken awhile to adjust to the new approach, but it is a highly practical method to living well, within your means. Shannon also has some great tools to use to check-in on whether spending is aligning with your true personal priorities. Definitely recommend this one!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Qwerty88

    I am not the target market for this book. There was some good stuff about resetting your life checklist, but otherwise exceptionally basic. Well enough written for someone who hasn't picked up a personal finance book before, or who struggles with finances despite a reasonable salary. Highly amusing that she does the obig dig at the latte factor, and then several examples include people deciding to cut back somewhat on takeout coffee. I am not the target market for this book. There was some good stuff about resetting your life checklist, but otherwise exceptionally basic. Well enough written for someone who hasn't picked up a personal finance book before, or who struggles with finances despite a reasonable salary. Highly amusing that she does the obig dig at the latte factor, and then several examples include people deciding to cut back somewhat on takeout coffee.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sidrah

    This book is incredible! If you worry about money (I mean who doesn't) and shy away from financial advice like me then this book is perfect for you. Shannon Lee Simmons uses simple, cut the crap language to help people understand the way they handle their money better. She also uses real-life examples and organized charts to make this touchy subject more approachable. Really awesome, Shannon is great. This book is incredible! If you worry about money (I mean who doesn't) and shy away from financial advice like me then this book is perfect for you. Shannon Lee Simmons uses simple, cut the crap language to help people understand the way they handle their money better. She also uses real-life examples and organized charts to make this touchy subject more approachable. Really awesome, Shannon is great.

  27. 4 out of 5

    V

    Did I and the other reviewers read the same book? This book was incredibly basic and offered zero valuable insight. Unless you want to hear this woman talk at great lengths about her choice of couch, do yourself a favour and get The Wealthy Barber instead.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    4.5 out of 5! This is a super helpful and great book for any Canadian looking to figure out how to spend within their means and feel good about their money. A lot of finance advice I find can be really obvious and is mostly just common sense, but Shannon Lee Simmons had a lot of tips that immediately made me rethink the way I'm spending and saving and feel a lot better about my finances. The top 5 points from the book are: 1. The 'Beyonce' factor: Don't compare your financial situation to your 'Jon 4.5 out of 5! This is a super helpful and great book for any Canadian looking to figure out how to spend within their means and feel good about their money. A lot of finance advice I find can be really obvious and is mostly just common sense, but Shannon Lee Simmons had a lot of tips that immediately made me rethink the way I'm spending and saving and feel a lot better about my finances. The top 5 points from the book are: 1. The 'Beyonce' factor: Don't compare your financial situation to your 'Joneses' and what you own to others--you don't know what they're going through. Do you feel bad about Beyonce buying a yacht? No, because her life is completely different than yours. It's the same for your peers. 2. Figure out your spending 'hard limit': After deducting the money you're saving each month and your predictable monthly expenses from your monthly take-home income after taxes, that number is your 'hard limit'. Know that number well and don't spend beyond it. 3. Maximize your 'happy spending': To remove expenses you don't feel good about from your life, rate each expense from the last 3 months of your life on a 'happiness' scale from 1 to 5. Eliminate, rethink or reduce the spending that doesn't make you happy, and prioritize your spending around keeping the 5s. 4. Be financially honest: If you're struggling financially and pressure from your friends and family are making you spend beyond your means, be honest and open about your finances. This could include talking about your income, your debts, your feelings around the spending, everything. You'll be surprised at how others will open up by their financial insecurities as well. 5. Spend based the success you want: What are the (realistic) things you want to have done to consider yourself successful? How do your finances play into that? Prioritize your saving and spending based on what you want to accomplish. Those are very generalized points from the book, but you should still give it a read. There are more, smaller points, and there are lots of examples to get a better understanding of each one. The examples are actually what docked this from a 5-star to 4.5--they were a little overkill at times, and kept going when I was ready for her to move on, especially when they weren't relevant to me. However, I'd still recommend it to all Canadians to feel better about their finances.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Arwy

    If I could give this book endless negative stars, I totally would. Alas, there is no such option on Goodreads. I read this book till about 23%. Every page was a struggle, and I DNF. I flipped through the rest of the book, and no, it didn’t get any better. It’s been a really long time since a book rubbed me the wrong way so much. This started from the first page and didn’t end. At one point, the author uses F-word at every other sentence of one of the chapters. And I cringe. I hate when people swe If I could give this book endless negative stars, I totally would. Alas, there is no such option on Goodreads. I read this book till about 23%. Every page was a struggle, and I DNF. I flipped through the rest of the book, and no, it didn’t get any better. It’s been a really long time since a book rubbed me the wrong way so much. This started from the first page and didn’t end. At one point, the author uses F-word at every other sentence of one of the chapters. And I cringe. I hate when people swear. To sum up my feelings about this book: WHAT she says is wrong, and HOW she says it is even more wrong. On top of that, I looked up the author on LinkedIn and on her website, and I have very strong doubts in her having the necessary knowledge and experience to advise anything to anybody, let alone writing a book about money. I don’t know the author personally, but she is a colleague here in Toronto, Canada. We work exactly in the same field. I have a lot of compassion and empathy for all people, and even more so for women in finance. It’s an old boys’ club, no matter if somebody tells you otherwise. I really wanted to be kind, but I just can’t. And it makes me very sad. Before you follow somebody’s advice, figure out if they are the right person to ask. Please research if they have knowledge, experience, and education to even give any advice to you. I could have said a lot more, and maybe I will. But I want to stop right here for now. If you want to read about money, please read something else, just not this book.

  30. 5 out of 5

    CM

    I first heard about Shannon from a Debt Free in 30 podcast. I enjoyed her interview enough to want to read her book(s). I listened to the audio book and I am so glad that I borrowed it from the library. I would have been upset if I actually spent money on this (either audio or ebook) because although the idea of not budgeting (which is actually not tracking) is appealing to me, the swearing (F*ck it moments) was too much for me. I didn't care for the astrology references but that wasn't as annoy I first heard about Shannon from a Debt Free in 30 podcast. I enjoyed her interview enough to want to read her book(s). I listened to the audio book and I am so glad that I borrowed it from the library. I would have been upset if I actually spent money on this (either audio or ebook) because although the idea of not budgeting (which is actually not tracking) is appealing to me, the swearing (F*ck it moments) was too much for me. I didn't care for the astrology references but that wasn't as annoying as the swearing. It's too bad. There are a lot of books on finances that tell you that you have to set a budget and then track every penny to make sure you're following that budget. I find that way too time consuming. I really like the idea of setting a budget / hard limit and everything else is kind of flexible but within a limit. You don't have to categorize all of the other non-fixed expenses. She also had some good suggestions on how to decide whether lifestyle changes would be too much to handle. It did help me to understand what I do want to spend my money on (happy spending). I wanted to read this with my husband, but I cannot recommend that he reads it. I'll take some of the ideas that I remember and share it with him.

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