web site hit counter Feminism from A to Z - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Feminism from A to Z

Availability: Ready to download

Written by the author of the Stonewall Award-winning book, This Day in June, Feminism From A to Z is an alphabetical primer on feminism for teen girls. Each chapter examines a topic that offers call-to-action exercises incorporated into each lesson. Together, the chapters take a look at history and current events through the lens of feminist theory and introduce an inclusi Written by the author of the Stonewall Award-winning book, This Day in June, Feminism From A to Z is an alphabetical primer on feminism for teen girls. Each chapter examines a topic that offers call-to-action exercises incorporated into each lesson. Together, the chapters take a look at history and current events through the lens of feminist theory and introduce an inclusive and wide range of feminist thoughts and perspectives. Includes an introduction to readers on how to use the book and an alphabetical list of ways to take feminist action.


Compare

Written by the author of the Stonewall Award-winning book, This Day in June, Feminism From A to Z is an alphabetical primer on feminism for teen girls. Each chapter examines a topic that offers call-to-action exercises incorporated into each lesson. Together, the chapters take a look at history and current events through the lens of feminist theory and introduce an inclusi Written by the author of the Stonewall Award-winning book, This Day in June, Feminism From A to Z is an alphabetical primer on feminism for teen girls. Each chapter examines a topic that offers call-to-action exercises incorporated into each lesson. Together, the chapters take a look at history and current events through the lens of feminist theory and introduce an inclusive and wide range of feminist thoughts and perspectives. Includes an introduction to readers on how to use the book and an alphabetical list of ways to take feminist action.

30 review for Feminism from A to Z

  1. 5 out of 5

    ☆Dani☆ ☆Touch My Spine Book Reviews☆

    This was perfect for anyone who wants to learn about feminism. This is a great educational tool that should help young people see the importance of feminism and to take action. I received a copy of this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. To find this review and others please visit touchmyspinebookreviews.com

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sha

    Disclaimer: I received this ARC courtesy of Magination Press and NetGalley. I am grateful for the opportunity to review an ARC for my readers, but this will not influence my final rating. All opinions expressed in this review are my own and based solely on the book. I’m only sad that I had to be twenty-two years old before such a comprehensive guide to feminism landed in my lap. Gayle E. Pitman is right in that an alphabetical guide is an entertaining and clear way to navigate the many concepts t Disclaimer: I received this ARC courtesy of Magination Press and NetGalley. I am grateful for the opportunity to review an ARC for my readers, but this will not influence my final rating. All opinions expressed in this review are my own and based solely on the book. I’m only sad that I had to be twenty-two years old before such a comprehensive guide to feminism landed in my lap. Gayle E. Pitman is right in that an alphabetical guide is an entertaining and clear way to navigate the many concepts that fold into feminism. Each chapter (and thus letter of the alphabet) explores a different aspect of feminism, including intersectionality, the importance of saying “no,” sexism in the workplace, etc. The chapters also end with activities to further the learning, like lessons on embroidery or instructions on how to change a tire. Pitman provides very clear explanations. Many of the concepts she introduced are ones I have learned in passing (either on the internet, through friends, or in university classes). But to her own explanations she adds personal experiences, anecdotes, occasional statistics (I’ve never been one for a book heavy on stats, though of course they are important), and many excerpts from well-known studies. “Feminism is not something we just made up,” she’s saying. “There’s proof and there’s cause and effect.” One activity that really stood out to me asked readers to consider how transgender people would feel in various places. For example, would they feel safe in gym class? In a public washroom? At home, on the bus, in class? The goal of the activity was the consider how someone else’s perspective (specifically, a transgender person’s perspective) would differ from one’s own. Pitman’s book does this on several occasions, challenging the reader to look outside their own experiences: because, as she shows at multiple points, feminism is about understanding the experiences of others (not only your own). Her book looks at feminism for women of colour, feminism for plus-size women, feminism for the LGBTQ+ community. Not only that, but she praises the important of men working for feminism. I’ve always been for men supporting feminism (I know some feminists are not for it, and that can be their opinion). Pitman supports her reasons why men need to be allies and never puts down cisgender male experiences or equates them as lesser. I do question where this book would thrive. As much as I enjoy it, it’s not what I would curl up with on a Monday night after a long day of work. Perhaps parents should look into having this book in the home for kids to be able to access — because may I just say schools do not cover this content even close to enough. Schools should have this on display for children to browse. But as a leisure reading, no. Not as much. Unless your goal is, indeed, to access feminist theories — which this book covers in spades. This book has five crowns hands down. Pitman is clear on the content and not only does she teach the material, she clearly understands and lives what she preaches. Her passion for feminism comes through on the page, making me want to share in her love. Join me on my book journey!

  3. 5 out of 5

    MissBecka Gee

    Thanks to NetGalley and Magination Press for sending me a copy of this book. Described as an alphabetical primer on feminism for teen girls. This is a great starter kit for teens. Lots of positive reinforcements for finding personal strength, being independent and speaking up for yourself and others. The overall information contained in the pages was super, I especially liked the Herstory sections. "Hell hath no fury like a drag queen scorn." ----Sylvia Rivera------ When I looked into the author I was Thanks to NetGalley and Magination Press for sending me a copy of this book. Described as an alphabetical primer on feminism for teen girls. This is a great starter kit for teens. Lots of positive reinforcements for finding personal strength, being independent and speaking up for yourself and others. The overall information contained in the pages was super, I especially liked the Herstory sections. "Hell hath no fury like a drag queen scorn." ----Sylvia Rivera------ When I looked into the author I wasn't surprised to find she's a professor. This reads a bit like a textbook. Complete with "homework" in the try this sections. Some of the try this stuff was a bit over zealous (I'm looking at you cross stitch instructions). I did like that she included helpful everyday things, like learning to say No in everyday occurrences and how to change a tire. These are both things I think everyone should know how to do. It did seems geared more to older teens despite the impression that it could be passed on to kids much younger.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Faith Simon

    I received a copy of this title from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. I loved this book!!! I throughly enjoyed reading it, it felt exactly like an action-packed fictional novel, I was entirely enthralled all the way through and could barely put it down. This was filled with absolutely vital information, was very informative, educational, but also quirky and fun. I really enjoyed the end of every chapter with the “Try this!” section, I felt that it helped me connect to the material mor I received a copy of this title from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. I loved this book!!! I throughly enjoyed reading it, it felt exactly like an action-packed fictional novel, I was entirely enthralled all the way through and could barely put it down. This was filled with absolutely vital information, was very informative, educational, but also quirky and fun. I really enjoyed the end of every chapter with the “Try this!” section, I felt that it helped me connect to the material more and made me feel apart of a revolution, the activities really contributed to my understanding, retainment, and enjoyment of the book’s contents. I also very much enjoyed the “HERSTORY” section of every chapter, a lot of research was clearly done for this book and I learned a lot of history and about a lot of women I’d never even heard of, but whom have obviously greatly impacted the feminist movement and who should be greatly recognized far beyond a few books. I walked away from this book with greatly impactful knowledge and motivation, and I really appreciate that about it. Additionally, I also really liked that images of certain examples being used in the text were included, the content then feels a lot more real when compared to simple visualization. Everything that’s mentioned actually happened!! This book is a brilliant educational tool and a call for action. Everybody should read this book at least once in their lives.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    Feminism from A to Z is exactly what the title says. It's a book about feminism trying to help teenage girls navigate the time when puberty hits and life becomes complicated. Each chapter covers an important topic - important for girls and women alike -, with an uplifiting approach and some tips to overcome obstacles, as well as a piece of feminist herstory. Feminism from A to Z is exactly what the title says. It's a book about feminism trying to help teenage girls navigate the time when puberty hits and life becomes complicated. Each chapter covers an important topic - important for girls and women alike -, with an uplifiting approach and some tips to overcome obstacles, as well as a piece of feminist herstory.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Becca Akins

    A good introduction for young teen girls.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mar B

    Only at 10% in I was irremediably in love with this book!❤️ What a wonderful gift to humanity! Because empowering girls makes the world a much better place! I’m buying a few and gifting them! [See reviews for similar feminist books HERE on my blog ] What makes this book so special is all the wonderful combination of history and invective activities all explained with a wonderfully down-to-earth but still elegant language. It even includes is a "take-action" list! Feminism broken down to it's basic Only at 10% in I was irremediably in love with this book!❤️ What a wonderful gift to humanity! Because empowering girls makes the world a much better place! I’m buying a few and gifting them! [See reviews for similar feminist books HERE on my blog ] What makes this book so special is all the wonderful combination of history and invective activities all explained with a wonderfully down-to-earth but still elegant language. It even includes is a "take-action" list! Feminism broken down to it's basics and explained with a wonderfully down-to-earth style JUST PERRRRRFECT for YA! Other books to read to understand gender equality YA and Adult: fantasy, contemporary, dystopians, historical fiction, memoirs, own-voices. All gems! Daniela Ark Bookworm, book blogger, writer, collector of stories that matter and passionate about feminism, diversity, and equality. email: [email protected]

  8. 5 out of 5

    Isaiah

    I got an ARC in return for an honest review from NetGalley. I got this book because I can't help myself. I am unabashedly addicted to feminist writing and feminist theory. I devour it all. If I agree with it or not, I want to read it. I want to learn. This book had an interesting premise of educating younger feminists and giving them a framework to base their own feminism off of. The book does an amazing job of not being too far leaning in one direction or another of feminism. It is very middle ro I got an ARC in return for an honest review from NetGalley. I got this book because I can't help myself. I am unabashedly addicted to feminist writing and feminist theory. I devour it all. If I agree with it or not, I want to read it. I want to learn. This book had an interesting premise of educating younger feminists and giving them a framework to base their own feminism off of. The book does an amazing job of not being too far leaning in one direction or another of feminism. It is very middle road, with a few exceptions. There was even discussions on TERFs (which if you have read some of my other recent reviews you know how strongly I feel about that branch) and different branches of feminism that I had never heard an official term for, despite being an avid reader. I had three issues with this book: 1. Who the heck likes French knots? That is just madness! The idea of doing your own needlework and realizing how being feminine is itself a form of feminism and feminist power is wonderful. I just hate French knots as they kick my butt and always have. For more information about feminist needlework tumblr is a great resource. My favorite blogger has her own site too. She has made waves and is amazing. I wish to one day have her skill. 2. I was taught in undergrad by Dr. Luis Cordon about Freud and the unspoken history of Freud's work. Dr. Cordon said that Freud actually believed that the women and girls he was seeing were raped and being abused. However polite society men (the ones doing the raping) told him in no uncertain terms that if he continued with that view that they would believe he was a pervert because no self respecting man would ever do that to his own daughter and that perverts were not going to be tolerated. Freud in fear for his career changed his theory and made the bastardized version people are aware of today. This story is not told in the book, but I feel like it would have made the section about Freud even more powerful as it shows that men have dictated what has and has not happened to women, even if the men themselves were the cause of the trauma. That men who spoke out against the masculine order of things were often forced to change or they were kicked out. It would have been so cool to see that! 3. Gloria Steinem. I am so against her being a feminist hero and the go to for people talking about what a good feminist is like. She active fights against trans people and belittles their lives. She has said amazingly problematic things in her speeches at college campuses (such as when she said that rich white women were the most oppressed at her talk on UCONN campus in the early 2010's). While this book stayed away from praising her as perfect as many other books and feminists do, I am just saddened to see her mentioned in any capacity by name when so many other feminists could have made the same points. bell hooks for example was not mentioned until the bibliography/further reading sections and is much more palatable for younger feminists.  The book covered so much and was such a wonderful starting place for so many future feminists. I am very thankful it exists. I am also thankful that I didn't have to cringe my way through it or have to defend my right to exist or the rights of my friends and family to exist. This book is wonderfully inclusive and even if someone doesn't go further in their reading, they will have a wonderful basis for feminist thought. To see more reviews check out https://mibookreviews.wordpress.com/

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

    I received this eARC from the publisher through NetGalley, in exchange for an honest review 4.5 ⭐️ "So many girls don't have easy access to the tools of feminism. In fact, if we learn about feminism at all, it probably won't be until after we finish high school" - Gayle E. Pitman Ain't that the truth... How many adult women didn't know about feminism until way past high school? How many of us didn't want to identify as feminist because we thought it was too harsh a word? How many of us still don't? I received this eARC from the publisher through NetGalley, in exchange for an honest review 4.5 ⭐️ "So many girls don't have easy access to the tools of feminism. In fact, if we learn about feminism at all, it probably won't be until after we finish high school" - Gayle E. Pitman Ain't that the truth... How many adult women didn't know about feminism until way past high school? How many of us didn't want to identify as feminist because we thought it was too harsh a word? How many of us still don't? This is a brilliant book written in ABC-format (the easiest book format there is, according to Pitman) designed for teenagers to learn and understand what is feminism and how they can apply it in their own life. It is (almost always) inclusive and intersectional, and breaks down the many feminist theories there are in a way that teenagers will understand. It also shares many stories from women who made a difference in the fight for equality, including WOC and LGBT+ people. The author uses interesting examples that will call to what teenagers know, such as Disney movies (The Little Mermaid, Inside Out). She also knows what teenagers (especially teenage girls) go through and doesn't ask them to do any more than they are capable of. At the end of each chapter, there is an activity than can be done by the reader alone or organized in a group to see what is being said in the book in action. Many of those activities would make for great class sessions if the book was used as teaching material. Unfortunately, there are also drawbacks. -Since this a US-centered book; (1) the author assumes that readers will know about the story of Adam and Eve (and so that they were raised as Christians or have been in contact enough with Christianity), (2) there is also no picture of Rosie the Riveter, whom might not be a famous name for every reader (I know the picture much better than the name myself). -The use of the LGBT acronym is never defined outside of the 4 first letters, and the + (or any other letters included in the different versions of said acronym). -The terms "girls and women" is used a few times, excluding non-binary and genderqueer folks. -The term "rape culture" is never defined and, while a loaded term, it might be something readers will have heard of but never heard the definition for. -The part where Pitman talks about the uterus and women and some undertones of uterus=woman, which is exclusive to trans, genderqueer and non-binary folks. This is repeated when she asks "what if men could menstruate", since trans men can experience menstruating. The last entry (Z for Zero) includes a hopeful message for americans, tackling the 2016 US elections. and comparing it to Corazon Alquino's run against Ferdinand Marcos in the Philippines. In itself, it is a very good book that I hope will be displayed in schools and used in classes to highlight the good that feminism can do.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Isabel

    I recieved an ARC through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I love reading feminist literature and I have been trying to read more of it in 2017 and 2018 since I like broadening my horizon. The last one I read was one which was very important to Norway "ikke send meg til en kone-doktor" which tells the struggles of Norwegian females and how abortion ended up being free here. And how badly it was before and even the deaths of females because of abortions done in what you would call an ba I recieved an ARC through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I love reading feminist literature and I have been trying to read more of it in 2017 and 2018 since I like broadening my horizon. The last one I read was one which was very important to Norway "ikke send meg til en kone-doktor" which tells the struggles of Norwegian females and how abortion ended up being free here. And how badly it was before and even the deaths of females because of abortions done in what you would call an back alley. I highly recommend everyone to do check out feminist literature once in a while. This book reminds me a lot of Feminism pågår by Sassa Buregren and Elin Lindell. This one however does cover a broader specter but I found it somewhat lacking with regards to disability and feminism in that regard and I'd like for the book to look into that more. Another reviewer pointed out Gloria Stenem which I do have a huge problem with, and I do not at all consider her a real feminist based on her statements and sayings of trans people. I'd never ever be okay with it. Another good perk is that if you have a friend or relative that wants to get into feminism but you struggle with giving them a 101, this one could be used as that. It takes history into account which I do think is extremely important since the past does influence us today. I would however like more information about TERFs, SWERFs and white feminism in general. BUT I do think the book does a good job for an intro.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Em

    As a grade six teacher, I am constantly looking to expand our classroom library to include books that will provide timeless guidance for every student. This book is a treasure. It's provided a starting point for many a great discussion with my 11 and 12 year old students. The information in the book is written so accessibly and it was a treat to read the book in full AFTER a student had already run up to me multiple times to share the impact of a study, show a thought provoking quote, or make a As a grade six teacher, I am constantly looking to expand our classroom library to include books that will provide timeless guidance for every student. This book is a treasure. It's provided a starting point for many a great discussion with my 11 and 12 year old students. The information in the book is written so accessibly and it was a treat to read the book in full AFTER a student had already run up to me multiple times to share the impact of a study, show a thought provoking quote, or make a connection. I think we often have a tendency to believe young people aren't "ready" for certain topics, but providing them relevant texts they see themselves in is a beautiful place to start. This book has done that for our room tenfold!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Diana

    Great introduction to feminism, for teens or even for adults looking to learn. I thought it hit most all of the key points, including the importance of intersectionality and body positivity. I liked that the book presented the topics and then encouraged you to think and draw your own conclusions, and even included activities to go beyond the information presented in the book. I did think that perhaps the topic of rape culture could have been addressed further, but for the most part this was a ve Great introduction to feminism, for teens or even for adults looking to learn. I thought it hit most all of the key points, including the importance of intersectionality and body positivity. I liked that the book presented the topics and then encouraged you to think and draw your own conclusions, and even included activities to go beyond the information presented in the book. I did think that perhaps the topic of rape culture could have been addressed further, but for the most part this was a very solid and accessible read.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Diana

    I like what the overall point and message is but I feel like some parts were overreaching. No surprise since there needed to be 26 words that somehow not only represent feminism but that can be used to make a valid point. Every point is valid and a great lesson for readers but a few came off like an odd roundabout way to get to the point. I received this book via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Russell

    I didn’t realize this was a teen book when I picked it up, but I really enjoyed it. I like how the author organized the book, and I love her focus on intersectionality. This would be a great book for all teenagers to read. I would really like it to have gone even more in depth, so I appreciate that Dr. Pitman provided a further reading list.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Chinlee

    I am a feminist and this shouldn't be hard to say. But, I have a hard time because the word feminist has in pop culture become a word associated with either mockery,disdain, or hatefulness. This book does a good job of informing without punishing the reader into ideologies or principals. I think this book is a perfect introductory to teens and adults who want to understand the broadness of what is feminism. It is very informative and there are lots of resources. I borrowed this from my library b I am a feminist and this shouldn't be hard to say. But, I have a hard time because the word feminist has in pop culture become a word associated with either mockery,disdain, or hatefulness. This book does a good job of informing without punishing the reader into ideologies or principals. I think this book is a perfect introductory to teens and adults who want to understand the broadness of what is feminism. It is very informative and there are lots of resources. I borrowed this from my library but want to purchase my own copy to further look up topics and also, pass along to friends to read.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    This is a book I wish I had received when I was fourteen years old. I've been looking for a book like this for some time, actually. Oftentimes when I've read books that claim to be an introduction to feminism, they often end up being an introduction to what the author thinks about feminism. That's not to say those authors are wrong or make bad arguments, but in the past it's made me feel like I've ended up jumping into a conversation without enough contextual information to participate. Feminism f This is a book I wish I had received when I was fourteen years old. I've been looking for a book like this for some time, actually. Oftentimes when I've read books that claim to be an introduction to feminism, they often end up being an introduction to what the author thinks about feminism. That's not to say those authors are wrong or make bad arguments, but in the past it's made me feel like I've ended up jumping into a conversation without enough contextual information to participate. Feminism from A to Z is a resource that makes you feel like you're being given the tools to start participating in a bigger conversation. These tools come in the form of discussion topics, history lessons, and do-it-yourself activities that equip you to keep thinking and talking about a topic. And it's fun! Other Thoughts: I really did appreciate the history aspect. I don't think I've run into a "feminism primer" in the past that has spent time giving clear, independent summaries of meaningful historical events like the Stonewall Riots or where the idea that gay people "recruit" comes from. I know that in the last year I read that there is a term called "womyn" and that it is problematic, but found the Google results that came up a little confusing. This book made history events clear and contextualized. I wish I had this sort of resource before I started college. I also loved the activities! At the end of every chapter, there are various activities to do. These can be anything from doing a journaling session, learning embroidery, hosting a discussion, or doing research. I was one of those kids who liked doing activities in books like these, so that hands-on approach felt very encouraging and familiar. There was a very well-rounded view of feminism, I thought. There was an intersectional presence throughout the book that addressed how race, sexual identity, gender identity, and class status affect privilege. I was really surprised to see that fatphobia made its way into the book! I do think that there could have been a more prominent discussion of how disability and feminism intersect, but ableism did come up a few times. Overall, this read was easy to engage with but worked hard to ensure that readers will be able to address difficult topics in future conversations. I had a great time reading it, and I might even try to go through this with my younger sister in a couple years when she becomes a teenager. With a resource like this, I would hope that her introduction to feminism will be a lot less confusing than mine was.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    According to one poll, 82% of participants said that "men and women should be social, political, and economic equals." But only 20% of those same participants considered themselves to be feminists. ... So most people embrace feminist values, but they're not willing to label themselves with the term. ... How can one, eight-letter word hold so much power? Maybe that's why so many people shy away from it—because it has the power to create radical change. Pitman's book explains the basic tenants According to one poll, 82% of participants said that "men and women should be social, political, and economic equals." But only 20% of those same participants considered themselves to be feminists. ... So most people embrace feminist values, but they're not willing to label themselves with the term. ... How can one, eight-letter word hold so much power? Maybe that's why so many people shy away from it—because it has the power to create radical change. Pitman's book explains the basic tenants of feminist theory in the context of an informational ABC book geared towards young adults. Some of the terms used stood well on their own, such as R for Radical, while others, such as E for Easy Bake Oven, required a more detailed explanation on its application to feminist theory. Accompanying each letter was a beautiful, brightly colored illustration depicting some of the topics covered in the chapter. After giving a brief overview on how the term applied to feminist theory, each chapter had a section entitled 'Feminist Herstory', which provides stories about people throughout history (or folklore) contributed to the modern understanding of feminism. Each chapter closes with a 'Try This!' section which includes action-oriented exercises to help further develop an awareness of feminist concepts. I personally did not participate in any of the 'Try This!' exercises, but many of them looked fun and interesting, particularly making a feminist magazine and creating blackout poetry. I have a Master's degree in Psychology so many of the psychological and sociological terms discussed were a review for me. However, I was surprised by how much I learned about feminist theory in general. The point I found most interesting was that there are many different kinds of feminists. The type of feminist I am most familiar with (someone whose focus is on equal rights in the workplace, education, and in politics) is called a liberal feminist. Overall, I am giving this book 4 stars. Even though it is marketed for teenagers, this primer on the tenants of feminist theory will appeal to a wider audience looking for empowerment and equality.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Aimee

    I loved this book! The author assigned each letter a word. Many of these words she upended others she simply dives in and examines in great detail. Each word has contextual information, history, psychosocial information, etc. Each word has an exercise regarding the material. Some exercises are creative and others are practical (comparing the functionality and sturdiness of boys and girls clothing, changing a tire, etc.) but all reinforce learning of key concepts. Some of my favorite words: • Don’ I loved this book! The author assigned each letter a word. Many of these words she upended others she simply dives in and examines in great detail. Each word has contextual information, history, psychosocial information, etc. Each word has an exercise regarding the material. Some exercises are creative and others are practical (comparing the functionality and sturdiness of boys and girls clothing, changing a tire, etc.) but all reinforce learning of key concepts. Some of my favorite words: • Don’t –she goes into historical psychosocial issues surrounding don’t • Easy bake oven—the influence toys have • Tough—the effect that expecting boys to be tough is having on our society • Zero—my favorite—“When a girl wants to diet herself into a size zero, she is aspiring to become nothing.” --Jean Kilbourne One of the things I didn’t agree with was her section on heroine in which she talks about “benevolent sexism”. One of her examples was when she was giving a lecture and did not know how to work the video equipment. Two male students came to the rescue and she talked about why it didn’t feel right to her. My bet is that if two females came up to help her, she wouldn’t have had the same issue. That doesn’t “feel” right to me or very well thought out to me. If I am in a situation where I need help, I really don’t care what the gender of the person is that helps me. This book was intended for teens and preteens. She hits that target audience perfectly by going into the correct depth for that audience and exercises geared for that group. To say the least this book is very thought provoking and an asset to any library. Thanks so much to Netgalley, the publishers, and the author for providing me with a copy for an honest review.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    Thanks to Netgalley for the ARC! I enjoyed so much about this book. Even though it was written for young adults, it taught me a lot about feminism. Because, as the author says, many people look at feminism as women being loud and obnoxious and demonstrating and marching all the time. I know that’s not the case now, and I can see there’s a value in what’s called feminism that I never understood. I enjoyed how the book was organized in A-Z topics, and how it gave “herstory” and then a “you try thi Thanks to Netgalley for the ARC! I enjoyed so much about this book. Even though it was written for young adults, it taught me a lot about feminism. Because, as the author says, many people look at feminism as women being loud and obnoxious and demonstrating and marching all the time. I know that’s not the case now, and I can see there’s a value in what’s called feminism that I never understood. I enjoyed how the book was organized in A-Z topics, and how it gave “herstory” and then a “you try this” section with suggestions. The history was really interesting and had good sources and photos and information about women I never knew existed (shame on me!). The “you try” section was a little bit of a stretch sometimes, I felt, though some ideas would be cool, especially in a book club setting. I also thought some of them were unrealistic, and one was unsafe (yes, it is empowering to change a tire, but no, girls should not be following directions in a book to do this alone! People get crushed by automobiles all the time. I really think that one should be adjusted or taken out). This book, though very informative and necessary for young people to read should not, in my opinion, be read alone. If I had a daughter, I would read it and discuss it with her as the book covers sex and abortion and other topics that should be discussions, not just reading material. That being said, I wish this book was around when I was younger. I wouldn’t have felt so weird thinking of myself as a feminist if I had these facts, and I would’ve loved to learn about these topics sooner. A book I feel is surfacing at the right time!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ana

    Feminism from A-Z by Gayle E. Pithman, PHD Non-Fiction 4/5 stars Publication Date: 23 October 2017 I received a free e-book from the publishers via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. Feminism From A-Z is an alphabetical primer on feminism for teenage girls. Each chapter examines a different topic related to feminism, and includes activities relevant to that topic, as well as biographical ‘her-story’ entries. Every topic is backed up with feminist theory that draws on other disciplines, such Feminism from A-Z by Gayle E. Pithman, PHD Non-Fiction 4/5 stars Publication Date: 23 October 2017 I received a free e-book from the publishers via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. Feminism From A-Z is an alphabetical primer on feminism for teenage girls. Each chapter examines a different topic related to feminism, and includes activities relevant to that topic, as well as biographical ‘her-story’ entries. Every topic is backed up with feminist theory that draws on other disciplines, such as psychology and sociology. An example I enjoyed was ‘E’ for Easy Bake Oven. It explored the process of gendering children through toys. Where boys receive blocks and action figures, girls receive toys like the Easy Bake Oven, which encourage girls to be home makers. It discusses concepts such as androcentrism, gender polarisation and biological essentialism. It brings up the role of the media and advertising in creating and perpetuating gender roles and stereotypes. The activity for this chapter explained, step-by-step, the process of changing a tyre. I really enjoyed Feminism From A-Z. I thought it was well researched, and it explained things simply, but intelligently for a teen audience. The activities were age appropriate and thought provoking, and the her-story biographies were fascinating and inspiring. I wish I had a book like this when I was a teenager

  21. 5 out of 5

    Alicia Herrington

    A good primer for an important (and timely) subject. Librarian: Feminism can be a really touchy subject among some segments of the population. There's a lot of confusion about what it means, and even people who believe in feminist ideals sometimes believe themselves to not be feminists. This book hopes to dispel some of those misconceptions, especially among teen girls. It does that by structuring the book in the most basic way possible, as an ABC book. I spend a lot of time looking for books that A good primer for an important (and timely) subject. Librarian: Feminism can be a really touchy subject among some segments of the population. There's a lot of confusion about what it means, and even people who believe in feminist ideals sometimes believe themselves to not be feminists. This book hopes to dispel some of those misconceptions, especially among teen girls. It does that by structuring the book in the most basic way possible, as an ABC book. I spend a lot of time looking for books that explain tough subjects in ways that teens can understand. This book succeeds on that score. I'll need to go over the collection to see if we need another book on this subject, but if we do I'll recommend it for purchase. Reader: As a reader I found this book to be a satisfactory explanation of the subject manner. There was nothing groundbreaking in it, and very little that I didn't already know. Admittedly, I'm not the target audience. I'm an adult who freely admits to being a feminist, rather than a teen who doesn't really know what the word even means. If I did fall into that demographic, I'm sure that I would find this an informative and interesting book.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    3.75 stars This book is very informative, but I would say parts of it are a little too informative. Some chapters have just too much fact-based info, and not enough personal connection. That being said, the format is really great (it's an ABC book so it covers lots of topics). I especially enjoyed the addition of the "Try This!" and "Feminism Through History" sections. The "Try This!" portion offered the reader an opportunity to DO SOMETHING with the knowledge they're gaining, which I think is a 3.75 stars This book is very informative, but I would say parts of it are a little too informative. Some chapters have just too much fact-based info, and not enough personal connection. That being said, the format is really great (it's an ABC book so it covers lots of topics). I especially enjoyed the addition of the "Try This!" and "Feminism Through History" sections. The "Try This!" portion offered the reader an opportunity to DO SOMETHING with the knowledge they're gaining, which I think is a really essential part of teaching teens about feminism. The history lessons every chapter added a nice background to the claims being made, and helped the topics feel grounded. The illustrations are really nice, and I like the added colour. The cover is super pretty too. Overall, I think this is a really good informative book that could've used a little more anecdote's, and is a really necessary book to have for teens.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Erin Dealey

    Fabulous book to use on your own in a journey of discovery and self-growth. Also great for teachers & librarians #WomensHistoryMonth --or anyone, honestly. It's listed as #YA, but the book is not just for teens. I know many adults who would love this. And the HerStory sections & TRY THIS! activities can be used in the classroom w Ss (boys too) as young as 5th or 4th grade. Gayle Pitman gives us a toolbox to raise awareness of and counteract those mindsets and behaviors we should have outgrown lo Fabulous book to use on your own in a journey of discovery and self-growth. Also great for teachers & librarians #WomensHistoryMonth --or anyone, honestly. It's listed as #YA, but the book is not just for teens. I know many adults who would love this. And the HerStory sections & TRY THIS! activities can be used in the classroom w Ss (boys too) as young as 5th or 4th grade. Gayle Pitman gives us a toolbox to raise awareness of and counteract those mindsets and behaviors we should have outgrown long ago.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Isabel

    This book brought me to tears. With beautiful illustrations and accessible language, it breaks down the major tenets of feminism for young readers. It felt like I was listening to a wise aunt passing down precious wisdom, and it was emotional for me because I wish I had an empowering book like this when I was young. This is a book I absolutely need in hard copy form (I read a digital galley), so that I may share it with friends and students. I am very grateful that this book exists!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    I wish I had read a book like this when I was younger. An empowering book that will appeal to many different types of readers. It is an accessible introduction to feminism with activities at the end of every chapter that is even more needed in this day and age. I will be sharing this book with my son and daughter as well as my students. Thank you to Gayle Pitman for this important and timely book as well as APA and Netgalley for the ARC.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Becca Crum

    This book is extremely informative while also being entertaining and straight-forward enough to keep your attention. This book wonderfully articulates the struggles that women face and rights and misconceptions that people may have about what "feminism" actually means. I also thoroughly enjoyed the "Herstory"-s that the author included to add in important figures throughout history to better put things into perspective. This book is extremely informative while also being entertaining and straight-forward enough to keep your attention. This book wonderfully articulates the struggles that women face and rights and misconceptions that people may have about what "feminism" actually means. I also thoroughly enjoyed the "Herstory"-s that the author included to add in important figures throughout history to better put things into perspective.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Mai (mailinsbooks)

    I recieved an ARC through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This book was amazing! I think everyone should read this to understand what feminism stands for. I really enjoyed how inclusive this book was (class, race, sexuality etc.) Another great part I enjoyed a lot were the historic backgrounds and interactive sections. Overall I highly highly recommend this book!

  28. 5 out of 5

    JanieH

    The short introductions to a wide variety of feminist issues is great reading for teens and adults alike. I especially like that each chapter contains exercises and ideas to make you think and explore the topic further. Fuller review coming soon...

  29. 4 out of 5

    Smart Bookaholics Inc Bookstore

    Wonderful book that I will be passing down to all the girl's in my family! It was set up alphabetically which helps if your looking for a certain subject. This doesn't have to be read in order. I received this free arc for an honest review. Wonderful book that I will be passing down to all the girl's in my family! It was set up alphabetically which helps if your looking for a certain subject. This doesn't have to be read in order. I received this free arc for an honest review.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Anya

    I absolutely adore this book. It was incredibly educational and I would absolutely recommend this book to anyone and everyone, no matter your age, gender, or beliefs! It taught me about how to love yourself and everyone around you.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.