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Rise Up Women!: The Remarkable Lives of the Suffragettes

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On 6 February 1918, after campaigning for over 50 years, British women were finally granted the vote. In November 1919, Lady Nancy Astor, took her seat in the House of Commons. History was made. A hundred years on, it is time to reflect on the daring and painful struggle women undertook to break into a political system that excluded them. In the voices of key suffragettes, On 6 February 1918, after campaigning for over 50 years, British women were finally granted the vote. In November 1919, Lady Nancy Astor, took her seat in the House of Commons. History was made. A hundred years on, it is time to reflect on the daring and painful struggle women undertook to break into a political system that excluded them. In the voices of key suffragettes, Rise Up Women! chronicles the founding of the National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies in the 1860s, led by Millicent Garrett Fawcett, and the formation of the more militant Women's Social and Political Union in 1903. 'Deeds Not Words!' was their slogan - and they took increasingly violent action, enduring police brutality, imprisonment and force-feeding. Charting the history of the movement through the lives of those who took part, Rise Up Women! illuminates the stories of lesser-known figures and depicts a truly national and international struggle. Brilliantly researched, vividly rendered and celebratory, it is an essential reminder of what it took to get where we are today - and the progress yet to be made.


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On 6 February 1918, after campaigning for over 50 years, British women were finally granted the vote. In November 1919, Lady Nancy Astor, took her seat in the House of Commons. History was made. A hundred years on, it is time to reflect on the daring and painful struggle women undertook to break into a political system that excluded them. In the voices of key suffragettes, On 6 February 1918, after campaigning for over 50 years, British women were finally granted the vote. In November 1919, Lady Nancy Astor, took her seat in the House of Commons. History was made. A hundred years on, it is time to reflect on the daring and painful struggle women undertook to break into a political system that excluded them. In the voices of key suffragettes, Rise Up Women! chronicles the founding of the National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies in the 1860s, led by Millicent Garrett Fawcett, and the formation of the more militant Women's Social and Political Union in 1903. 'Deeds Not Words!' was their slogan - and they took increasingly violent action, enduring police brutality, imprisonment and force-feeding. Charting the history of the movement through the lives of those who took part, Rise Up Women! illuminates the stories of lesser-known figures and depicts a truly national and international struggle. Brilliantly researched, vividly rendered and celebratory, it is an essential reminder of what it took to get where we are today - and the progress yet to be made.

30 review for Rise Up Women!: The Remarkable Lives of the Suffragettes

  1. 5 out of 5

    Roman Clodia

    'What a tragedy that such talent should be wasted upon women!' 'I ask that all of you here stand shoulder to shoulder with the militant women... Let them burn and destroy property! Let them do anything they will... this is a holy war!' This year, 2018, sees the centenary of (some) women in the UK finally winning the vote, albeit a limited suffrage hedged around with age, property and class-inflected qualifications. Atkinson's book pays homage to some of those foremothers (and some forefathers) 'What a tragedy that such talent should be wasted upon women!' 'I ask that all of you here stand shoulder to shoulder with the militant women... Let them burn and destroy property! Let them do anything they will... this is a holy war!' This year, 2018, sees the centenary of (some) women in the UK finally winning the vote, albeit a limited suffrage hedged around with age, property and class-inflected qualifications. Atkinson's book pays homage to some of those foremothers (and some forefathers) who enabled the right of women to participate in the governing of a country which taxed them yet excluded them from having a democratic voice. The 'suffragettes' of the title is carefully chosen: this is primarily a popular history of the WSPU (Women's Social and Political Union), the militant group led by the Pankhursts who embraced window-smashing before escalating to fire-bombs, arson, and the attack of artistic and cultural objects in national galleries and museums. While this is very readable, it's an accumulation of facts rather than analysis. Atkinson, to some extent, is an apologist for some of the violent methods adopted without articulating a sense of unease. I was sometimes confused, too, about exactly what the Pankhurst-led WSPU were fighting for especially when it came to the vexed issue of female vs. male suffrage - at times it seems like they're prioritising a vote for property-owning women above that of e.g. working-class, non-property-owning men, keeping the struggle for universal suffrage separated by gender. This leads to some strange political alliances: in attacking the Liberal government and disrupting their by-electioneering, the WSPU enabled Conservative candidates to slip in, for example. This is a strange anomaly given that some of the WSPU members, including Sylvia Pankhurst, were more inclined to the Left, the nascent Independent Labour Party and other radical bodies such as workers co-operatives. Some analysis and commentary of what is going on here would have contextualised the material more effectively. That said, the aim of the book is not to unpick some of these political tangles but to celebrate the women - however violent some of their actions are. Their commitment is unwavering, and there are harrowing episodes throughout as women are beaten, imprisoned, force-fed (in one case vaginally and rectally as well as orally), and forced to leave their homes for fear of re-arrest. This is undoubtedly a remarkable story, and Atkinson intersperses it with potted biographies of the women involved, name-checking those individuals - including men - who paved the way for universal suffrage. Only about 66% of the page-count is narrative, the rest is appendices. So this is certainly an engaging read and a suitable monument to women whose names are generally not well-known - I just would have liked a slightly more self-conscious approach to the problematics of celebrating a self-proclaimed militant political campaign conceived in violence and named, at least once, a 'holy war'.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    Rise up Women! – A Fantastic Chronicle of the Fight for Women’s Suffrage It is 100 years ago that some women finally gained the vote, after years of fighting for the right to do so. 110 years ago, this year close to half a million-people gathered in Hyde Park, London, and celebrated “Women’s Sunday”. This was a peaceful, good humoured event that still did not persuade the Members of Parliament or the Government to extend the franchise to women. Peaceful campaigning had gained nothing in the fight Rise up Women! – A Fantastic Chronicle of the Fight for Women’s Suffrage It is 100 years ago that some women finally gained the vote, after years of fighting for the right to do so. 110 years ago, this year close to half a million-people gathered in Hyde Park, London, and celebrated “Women’s Sunday”. This was a peaceful, good humoured event that still did not persuade the Members of Parliament or the Government to extend the franchise to women. Peaceful campaigning had gained nothing in the fight for suffrage, others began to look at other ways to protest. Today, even as someone has studied history and both undergraduate and post-graduate level, I had forgotten the humiliation that the suffragettes suffered. When you listen to the government today lecturing the world about democracy, one just to look back at how women were treated, and all they wanted was the vote. Diane Atkinson has managed to bring this to the fore, with her brilliantly written and researched Rise Up Women! She brings some clarity and honesty to the vitriol the suffragettes faced, as the white middle-class and upper-class males protected their monopoly on the levers of power. What comes through this excellent volume is the power of the bloody difficult women who continued to challenge the establishment and at the same time changed the perception of women, for the better, before the war in 1914. I must admit I do like the riposte Kitty Marion gave to the magistrate, who has said women may get the vote if they behaved, Marion replied “Men don’t always behave properly and they the vote.” When one thinks what these men did to the suffragettes is unforgiveable, force-feeding with maximum violence. Nose and throats widened with knives to insert the unwashed feeding tubes. It must never be forgotten that by 1903 seven countries, among them two countries in the Empire, Australia and New Zealand, had some form of female suffrage. It was Emmeline Pankhurst, Mancunian social reformer and her three daughters who founded the Women’s Social and Political Union in October 1903, that Atkinson rightly begins with, after discussing the previous reform acts. From here Atkinson gives a voice to the hundreds of unsung women who fought and supported the suffragette campaign. While Atkinson gives as many women as possible a voice, it can sometimes feel like an encyclopaedia, and it is the first encyclopaedia I have read cover to cover and enjoyed. What does scream out from every page is the sheer bloody mindedness of the women, the courage of large numbers of women campaigners. It also reminds us of the disgusting brutality by the government and their agents of violence, the police against the women. The so-called national hero, Winston Churchill, when Home Secretary, told the police to “throw the women around from one to the other.” Sometimes history is never straightforward, leaves some questions unanswered, and those answers we do get are not necessarily easy or pleasant. The research that went in to this book and the accounts relayed reminds us that the battle for female suffrage was not easy, pleasant. This is a wonderful book, totally engrossing read, and with over 600 pages to read and digest, an education and a reminder of what we have now and that work still needs to be done.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kirsty

    This is a beast of a book covering the suffragette movement and those involved in lots of detail.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Phee

    This is a fantastic book for someone who knows nothing about the fight for women's suffrage in England. It's super detailed, yet easy to understand. The only reason I am rating it 3 stars and not 4, is that I studied the changing role of women and the fight for womens sufferage at college. I didn't exactly learn anything new from this, it just refreshed things for me. Which is by no means the book's fault. I would whole heartedly recommend it though.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    This is a comprehensive chronological history of the WSPU. Just the WSPU, other people and groups are only mentioned as they affect the WSPU. It is therefore not a comprehensive history of the whole campaign for votes for women. As such it gives an excellent impression of the increase in militancy in the campaign. However the strict chronology does lead to a couple of issues. Firstly it is hard to keep track of all the women and they tend to merge. Secondly sometimes the information can feel a b This is a comprehensive chronological history of the WSPU. Just the WSPU, other people and groups are only mentioned as they affect the WSPU. It is therefore not a comprehensive history of the whole campaign for votes for women. As such it gives an excellent impression of the increase in militancy in the campaign. However the strict chronology does lead to a couple of issues. Firstly it is hard to keep track of all the women and they tend to merge. Secondly sometimes the information can feel a bit random and confusing. The reason the book isn’t a five star is that it only lays down the facts (from a WSPU viewpoint). There is no analysis, no discussion, no guidance in understanding the period in history more generally.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jason Wilson

    The campaign for female suffrage is an astonishing story and it’s done good justice here . Early political response is interesting - All parties contained pockets of support, though Tories were afraid women would vote to the left ( shades of current debates about extending voting age to 16) , Churchill in his Liberal patch was afraid they would vote Tory (Churchill’s response in general may politely be described as not one his best moments ) and Labour were sympathetic but wanted to sort male su The campaign for female suffrage is an astonishing story and it’s done good justice here . Early political response is interesting - All parties contained pockets of support, though Tories were afraid women would vote to the left ( shades of current debates about extending voting age to 16) , Churchill in his Liberal patch was afraid they would vote Tory (Churchill’s response in general may politely be described as not one his best moments ) and Labour were sympathetic but wanted to sort male suffrage first. And so the campaign gathered force. The book is not scared of the fact that human movements make mistakes : ruthless factionalism expelled some such as the Pethick-Trevinses who had been great benefactors for objecting to the more warlike language. Whether they were right or wrong, purging those who disagree with you is not good democratic practice. Also, though this was never a cause that was going to be won with good manners, some of the worst violence is hard to condone. In the end it was war that forced the hand. The suffragists had suffered long and were finally rewarded. This is a good chronicle of it all.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Dorie

    Rise Up, Women! :The Remarkable Lives of the Suffragettes By Diane Atkinson 2017 Bloomsbury Comprehensive and thoroughly researched, this 600+ page history of the campaign for Votes for Women in Great Britain between 1903-1914. Formed by the infamous Parkhurst sisters, the WSPU (Womens Social and Political Union) followed the Independant Labour Party. Selling pamphlets, newspapers they eventually expanded and moved from Manchester to London in 1906. The Suffragists were often targeted and arrested o Rise Up, Women! :The Remarkable Lives of the Suffragettes By Diane Atkinson 2017 Bloomsbury Comprehensive and thoroughly researched, this 600+ page history of the campaign for Votes for Women in Great Britain between 1903-1914. Formed by the infamous Parkhurst sisters, the WSPU (Womens Social and Political Union) followed the Independant Labour Party. Selling pamphlets, newspapers they eventually expanded and moved from Manchester to London in 1906. The Suffragists were often targeted and arrested on trivial charges and given sentences from 1 day to several months, many arrested numerous times. In 1908 the colors of purple, white and green were used to symbolize a Suffragette. In 1909 The Womens Exhibition in Knightsbridge lasted 2 weeks, with speeches, demonstrations and marches against the Bill of Rights. Jailed Suffragettes began hunger strikes and were force fed, often through the nose, until the women became so frail they were released for fear they would die while in their care. And 'Black Friday', November 18, 1910 when 150 women were physically and sexually assaulted by police at a now famous protest against Winston Churchill .....and many more events are chronicled in the fascinating and beautifully written history. There are many B&W photos throughout the book. Powerful...Remarkable...highly recommendationed. Excellent notes, as well!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Fiona Howells

    As the title suggests a non-fictional account of the lives of the main players in the fight for women's suffrage in the early part of the 20th Century. Some of them are well-known, such as Mrs Pankhurst and her daughters and Emily Davison, who threw herself under the King's racehorse at the Epsom Derby. I was also interested in the stories of the lesser known women (and men) who fought for the right of women to vote, especially the growing numbers of working women, who were taxed like men, but h As the title suggests a non-fictional account of the lives of the main players in the fight for women's suffrage in the early part of the 20th Century. Some of them are well-known, such as Mrs Pankhurst and her daughters and Emily Davison, who threw herself under the King's racehorse at the Epsom Derby. I was also interested in the stories of the lesser known women (and men) who fought for the right of women to vote, especially the growing numbers of working women, who were taxed like men, but had no say in the running of the country. Some of what happened to these women was horrific - sexual assault by policemen - the police were told to grab the women by the breasts among other things, the endless prison sentences, hunger strikes and force-feeding, all the time being ridiculed by the establishment. I thought it would be a very dense read, and at some points it was difficult to keep track of the multitude of Marys, Emilys and Margarets, but overall very readable and a very interesting read.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Karmen

    Reading this for a thesis, so most of it, especially the second half, is skim-read at best. It is very thorough with details and all the people involved, but all the details do get a little tiresome. I can't really see this as a casual read, but if I had to choose one book to keep of the movement, I guess this would be the one (despite being the first one I've read).

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jo

    Atkinson looks at the Suffragette movement and the women who took part in some of the militant actions. Fascinating and well worth reading although it is something of a hefty tome.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ellie (crackthespine)

    I LOVED this book. Yes, it took me two months to read, but it was so interesting and so well written.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Hali Davidson

    It's fantastic as a chronology of the WSPU, but it is only that. It would have been better had there been any amount of analysis, or had it discussed black feminism and how the leading suffragettes felt about race in general, yet alas. However, as a chronology, it is marvelous.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Frumenty

    Described in the preface as “a collective biography of the suffragette movement”, Rise up, women! is exactly that, biography. It follows the lives of a large number of women, and a few men, who in the period 1903 to 1914 were engaged in the militant struggle for the vote in Britain. A small band of British women and their allies had been seeking the vote since John Stuart Mill’s petition of 1867 and, in 1903 when the Women’s Social and Political Union (WSPU) was founded, they still had nothing t Described in the preface as “a collective biography of the suffragette movement”, Rise up, women! is exactly that, biography. It follows the lives of a large number of women, and a few men, who in the period 1903 to 1914 were engaged in the militant struggle for the vote in Britain. A small band of British women and their allies had been seeking the vote since John Stuart Mill’s petition of 1867 and, in 1903 when the Women’s Social and Political Union (WSPU) was founded, they still had nothing to show for it. Emmeline Pankhurst and her WSPU supporters brought a new attitude to the cause, seeing themselves not as petitioners seeking justice through the “proper channels”, but as soldiers committed to a real and escalating fight with the government until their demands were met. Many suffragists of the time thought them too extreme, their methods unconscionable and tending to bring the cause into disrepute. Activism of this sort demands extraordinary commitment and sacrifice; the imprisonments, the hunger strikes, and the pain and suffering of forced feeding, were embraced and endured by many for the sake of the cause. Suffragettes confronted hostile crowds, mockery (frequently of a sexual nature), casual violence, missiles, police brutality, extraordinary laws designed to frustrate them, sometimes long prison sentences, and repeated political betrayal and disappointment. They persevered. Their actions became ever more extreme: breaking windows, assaulting police and politicians, setting fire to pillar boxes, trashing the orchid house in Kew Gardens, damaging art works, setting fire to buildings and homes, and Emily Davison threw herself (with fatal result) in front of the King’s horse on Derby Day 1913. In the early 1980s I was involved in the campaign to stop the damming of the Franklin River in Tasmania. What strikes me most about this account of the suffragettes is how little of what we were doing in the 1980s had not been done before by the suffragettes: the constant pestering of politicians, the stunts and events (the suffragettes and their allies had a great flair for pageantry), the fundraising and merchandizing, the editorials and letters to the press, the strategic pressure on elections and by-elections (we also did referendums), and eventually (after I had quit, wondering how many times one could reasonably ask voters to vote on the same questions and disregard their choices) civil disobedience, actual bodies in front of bulldozers - “No!” was never allowed to be an acceptable answer. We won, largely because the matter was taken out of the hands of state politicians. The suffragettes won, I believe, because the First World War provided a circuit-breaker and Emmeline Pankhurst was sufficiently politically savvy to jump at the opportunity it provided. The politicians of 1918, for whom giving in to the demands of the hysterical fanatics of the years before the war had been politically unthinkable, were disposed to indulge the wishes of loyal women who had served the nation with credit through the war. Atkinson’s book makes no attempt to address the sometimes posed historical question of whether militancy hastened the enfranchisement of women in Britain, or whether it delayed it by bringing discredit to the cause. However, when one has read in such detail of such unrelenting campaigning in the face of formidable opposition, it beggars belief that any politician in his right mind would want to stir up the hornets’ nest of militant suffragism again by denying women the vote. I think the answer to that question may be deemed, in the language of the American Declaration of Independence, “self evident”.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mel

    This is a very good, very detailed popular history of the suffrage movement. It can get a bit repetitious with more and more women being tried and sent to Holloway and it comes across as rather a long list of facts, who, what and when, without much analysis or look at what was going on behind the scenes. But what it does is give you a vibrant picture of all the women involved in the movement, what they did, what their background was, and what their punishment was, with a lot of primary source ex This is a very good, very detailed popular history of the suffrage movement. It can get a bit repetitious with more and more women being tried and sent to Holloway and it comes across as rather a long list of facts, who, what and when, without much analysis or look at what was going on behind the scenes. But what it does is give you a vibrant picture of all the women involved in the movement, what they did, what their background was, and what their punishment was, with a lot of primary source extracts in the women's own words. The descriptions of the torture of force feeding are harrowing. The worst case was a woman, Fanny Parker who was anally and vaginally raped with instruments in the name of "force feeding". I mean I know Victorians are notorious for their lack of knowledge about women's anatomy but that can't be an excuse to put a feeding tube in a woman's vagina? (505) Mrs Humphrey Ward (whose books I see all the time in 2nd hand book shops but never bought) was a campaigner against women's rights. Delivering a petition against women's franchise to Parliament. Saying it would bring disaster upon England (111) 9 Feb 1907 women's march to Hyde Park 21st June Women's sunday in Hyde Park 1908 supported by wells, HArdy and zangwill (99) 175 first graphic description of feeding tube torture Black Friday 18 November 1910 saw many protesters sexually and physically abused by police and bystanders (249) Women's coronation procession saw between 40-60,000 women 17 June 1911 Included Welsh women who knitted socks as they marched.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Katherine

    This has taken me such a long time to complete. Now treat would suggest it was hard to read, wordy perhaps. But generally I found it quite easy going and it was written in an informative but not exclusive manner. My issue was the sheer size of the book. It’s not something you can easily pick up. Also whilst easy to read there is reference to a LOT of people and trying to remember who everyone is and how it connects can be difficult. Like many others have stated this is an extremely thorough acco This has taken me such a long time to complete. Now treat would suggest it was hard to read, wordy perhaps. But generally I found it quite easy going and it was written in an informative but not exclusive manner. My issue was the sheer size of the book. It’s not something you can easily pick up. Also whilst easy to read there is reference to a LOT of people and trying to remember who everyone is and how it connects can be difficult. Like many others have stated this is an extremely thorough account of the suffragettes but I think sometimes the detail slowed the pace of the reading. It was all too easy to put this down, and not want to really pick it up again. Despite all of that I do think it is a worthy read. I have certainly learnt more about the movements that helped me to have a political voice, and understand more the actions it took to have their voices heard.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Abby

    Very detailed account of radical suffragettes, including extensive bios of what happened to dozens of them in later life. They were courageous, driven women who endured much for their cause -- most particularly, gruesome forced feeding during prison hunger strikes -- but considering their many serious crimes of assault of public figures, arson, bomb throwing and bail jumping, they were treated much more leniently than would be the case in today's world. As a criminal defense attorney, I was cons Very detailed account of radical suffragettes, including extensive bios of what happened to dozens of them in later life. They were courageous, driven women who endured much for their cause -- most particularly, gruesome forced feeding during prison hunger strikes -- but considering their many serious crimes of assault of public figures, arson, bomb throwing and bail jumping, they were treated much more leniently than would be the case in today's world. As a criminal defense attorney, I was constantly amazed that the British prison system would let many of them out of a six month or even three -year sentence after less than a week of a hunger strike. It was fascinating to see how many participants were working-class women.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    A very detailed and factual account of all of the actions of the suffragettes. It's really incredible what they put themselves through and how long they were ignored and badly treated. This book was quite hard going; too many people to remember with too many similar events. Describing every action makes you realise how much they did but in the end it became tedious to read. More analysis was needed. It was really interesting to read about what happened to all the suffragettes during and after wo A very detailed and factual account of all of the actions of the suffragettes. It's really incredible what they put themselves through and how long they were ignored and badly treated. This book was quite hard going; too many people to remember with too many similar events. Describing every action makes you realise how much they did but in the end it became tedious to read. More analysis was needed. It was really interesting to read about what happened to all the suffragettes during and after world war I.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    As with her other books, I just don't get along with her style. Can't be faulted for detail and the overview of the increasing violence of the WSPU, so good in that sense, but there's a real lack of emotion or narrative behind it that I found made this more difficult to plough through as its hundreds of pages wore on. The onset of the First World War and the decisions these brought about, alongside the final winning of the vote, are brushed over in the shortest chapter of the whole book!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rose Nicholson

    What a history, essential reading. Reads like a thriller with the action galloping along. The lengths these brave women went to and the adversity they faced is inspiring, and the actions taken through the wrongheadedness of the men (and women amazingly) against them is astounding. If you vote, read this and be proud, inspired and thankful. If you don't, read this and be ashamed.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Felipe CZ

    The story about the women's suffrage movement in the UK, which was one of the early 20th century's greatest civil rights struggles, directed by the Pankhurst family. By using shock tactics to get their message, their campaigns ade a change after the First World War and in 1928, women were given the vote.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Victoria Frow

    Very good. A prior knowledge of this subject is needed when reading this book as even though you are introduced singularly to each major suffragette you need to have a prior understanding who they are and what they did beforehand. This book is heavy with well researched and written comprehension of the subject. Recommended.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sean Ollett

    Excellent. I did not know enough about the suffragettes and this book was great on the events, timeline and a lot of the individuasls involved. We all know the Pankhursts but so many other brave women risked everything. The prison and force feeding was an appalling story.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Garlinge

    What a beast of a book! But I am so glad I took the time to read about these amazing women and what they were willing to do to gain the vote. I’m quite ashamed of how little I know about the suffragette movement and this was a very comprehensive overview to start my further research.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Olwen

    A very detailed academic text examining the campaign for women to achieve suffrage. I am in awe of their courage, and deeply grateful for what they stood up for.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Chloe Leathlean

    Very well written book which gives you a thorough understanding of the chronological period of time leading towards women's suffrage. Not an easy book to read, but very worthwhile.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Denice

    I wanted to love this book, but I didn’t. It was so dry I found myself skipping through pages and then I just didn’t pick it up to read anymore. I returned it to the library unread.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Wendy Rouse

    Highly recommended reading for understanding the suffrage movement in the United Kingdom.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Patti

    This book is long but very engaging, not to mention disturbing. We should all hail those who fought the bitter and fierce battle for all of us.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Blair

    Truly one of the most comprehensive and detailed books about the suffragettes. While laboriously long it is easily read and damn near impossible to put down. Well worth the effort.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Taylor

    I learnt so f*cking much from this book. I'm furious, sad, happy, empowered, disheartened & PROUD AF all in one. I'm still thinking about it. I'm still feeling all of those things and more. I love the song about the suffragettes from Horrible Histories and yet now, whenever I hear it, I cry. I've listened to it over ten times since I've finished this book and I'm still crying at it. The fact we learnt about 0.00000000001% of their history (basically we didn't have the vote and now we do and we s I learnt so f*cking much from this book. I'm furious, sad, happy, empowered, disheartened & PROUD AF all in one. I'm still thinking about it. I'm still feeling all of those things and more. I love the song about the suffragettes from Horrible Histories and yet now, whenever I hear it, I cry. I've listened to it over ten times since I've finished this book and I'm still crying at it. The fact we learnt about 0.00000000001% of their history (basically we didn't have the vote and now we do and we should be thankful, to the people who gave us it not the fighters) angers me beyond belief. I didn't realise there was so much to know because it's so downplayed and I feel cheated and manipulated. Girls deserve to know their history, boys deserve to know because this is their history too - all so women and men know to push forward, not back. This book will stay with me forever. Thank you to the women and men who fought for our right to vote.

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