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1984 in the 21st Century

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1984 is a classic novel whose relevance continues to confront us every day. Some people thought it was a book about the future of the past. The future is now. After the election of Donald Trump and his advisor, Kellyanne Conway’s suggestion we get used to using “alternative facts,” the nearly 70 year-old dystopian novel made the # 1 spot on Amazon’s bestseller list. 1984 in t 1984 is a classic novel whose relevance continues to confront us every day. Some people thought it was a book about the future of the past. The future is now. After the election of Donald Trump and his advisor, Kellyanne Conway’s suggestion we get used to using “alternative facts,” the nearly 70 year-old dystopian novel made the # 1 spot on Amazon’s bestseller list. 1984 in the 21st Century offers readers 25 different opinions and viewpoints on this seminal novel from right to left on the political spectrum, with pieces from teachers to journalists and writers, lawyers and politicians, and union activists. The essays range from academic treatises to personal reminiscences to political rants and screeds, and even fiction and theater. Essays by: David Brin*Matt Bai*Melissa Febos*Joseph Sutton*Mike Siegel*Sean Fitzpatrick*Tim Hanley*UnitedStateofCinema*Jay Strongman And Many More


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1984 is a classic novel whose relevance continues to confront us every day. Some people thought it was a book about the future of the past. The future is now. After the election of Donald Trump and his advisor, Kellyanne Conway’s suggestion we get used to using “alternative facts,” the nearly 70 year-old dystopian novel made the # 1 spot on Amazon’s bestseller list. 1984 in t 1984 is a classic novel whose relevance continues to confront us every day. Some people thought it was a book about the future of the past. The future is now. After the election of Donald Trump and his advisor, Kellyanne Conway’s suggestion we get used to using “alternative facts,” the nearly 70 year-old dystopian novel made the # 1 spot on Amazon’s bestseller list. 1984 in the 21st Century offers readers 25 different opinions and viewpoints on this seminal novel from right to left on the political spectrum, with pieces from teachers to journalists and writers, lawyers and politicians, and union activists. The essays range from academic treatises to personal reminiscences to political rants and screeds, and even fiction and theater. Essays by: David Brin*Matt Bai*Melissa Febos*Joseph Sutton*Mike Siegel*Sean Fitzpatrick*Tim Hanley*UnitedStateofCinema*Jay Strongman And Many More

30 review for 1984 in the 21st Century

  1. 4 out of 5

    Navi

    1984 holds a special place in my heart. I consider it one of my favourite book of all time. I have read it countless times yet it continues to surprise me with its relevance and resonance. This is why I was so excited to read 1984 in the 21st Century. It is a collection of twenty five articles that were written about 1984 and the relevance that it still holds in modern society. The majority of the articles use 1984 as a lens to examine the 2016 American election. I did not realize how political t 1984 holds a special place in my heart. I consider it one of my favourite book of all time. I have read it countless times yet it continues to surprise me with its relevance and resonance. This is why I was so excited to read 1984 in the 21st Century. It is a collection of twenty five articles that were written about 1984 and the relevance that it still holds in modern society. The majority of the articles use 1984 as a lens to examine the 2016 American election. I did not realize how political this collection would be. In hindsight, I should have read the book description more thoroughly. One of the criticisms I had with this collection is that the articles were too short to provide any in-depth discussion of the ideas presented by the writer. It left me with the bare bones idea of what the writer was trying to say. Unfortunately this was an average read for me. I liked the parts where the writer talked about how much 1984 meant to them but overall I did not learn anything new. I received a free copy of this title from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jane Shambler

    1984 In The 21st Century -- Lori Perkins 2.5 stars I got this book because of the cover and 1984 was one of my favorite books of my youth and it is still today. Although I do admit I haven't read it recently but it still is in my top 10 books to date. The idea of the book which was conceived back in 1948 by George Orwell as a dystopian vision of the future and big brother has definitely raised his ugly head. For instance you no longer can walk around London without being caught on at least half a 1984 In The 21st Century -- Lori Perkins 2.5 stars I got this book because of the cover and 1984 was one of my favorite books of my youth and it is still today. Although I do admit I haven't read it recently but it still is in my top 10 books to date. The idea of the book which was conceived back in 1948 by George Orwell as a dystopian vision of the future and big brother has definitely raised his ugly head. For instance you no longer can walk around London without being caught on at least half a dozen cameras. The phrase big brother is watching has been used many times, and now we have the invention of smart televisions which can collate what you watch and do in your own home. Kinda scary, just think what it felt like back in 1948. This book is a series of essays regarding 1984 and was compiled in reaction to the Trump Presidency. It was actually on Amazon's best seller list in January. There is the argument that if you compare Trump's first 100 days to 1984 you are now seeing the future due to the language used. The essays are in varying lengths but seem to refer to the Trump bureaucracy and and Big Brother. A lot of the essay points of discussion you can find on social media like Facebook and Twitter. The burning question is Trump Big Brother and if so what is the future of America This is an argument many are having the world over. The world seems to be moving away from America's dominance since world war 2 and creating the own alliances. Europe is definitely moving away from America. Briton? Well we wait and see. Although Trump won't come to the United Kingdom until our leaders and insure a happy welcome. Not going to happen. Sorry. The essays definitely inspire the argument but it is up to you to draw your own conclusions. I can understand why but I have trouble understanding how. If you have interest in 1984 then sure read it but if not then it really isn't for you. I gave the book 2.5 stars because I was kind of disappointing the cover suggested much more. *ARC provided by publisher via NetGalley*

  3. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Jane

    See more of my book reviews on my blog, Literary Flits This fairly balanced collection of essays uses often-bandied 1984 concepts as a starting point for twenty-five Americans to express thoughts on the political situation in their country in 2017. The book is a shameless jump onto the dystopian revival bandwagon, but does include ideas that I thought were worth expanding upon further as well as references to other novels in a similar vein that would make for interesting reading in the current cl See more of my book reviews on my blog, Literary Flits This fairly balanced collection of essays uses often-bandied 1984 concepts as a starting point for twenty-five Americans to express thoughts on the political situation in their country in 2017. The book is a shameless jump onto the dystopian revival bandwagon, but does include ideas that I thought were worth expanding upon further as well as references to other novels in a similar vein that would make for interesting reading in the current climate. My main disappointments with this anthology are two-fold. The majority of the essays pick up on and explain the same points from 1984 which results in a lot of repetition through the volume. I would also have liked perhaps fewer, but certainly deeper essays. All the offerings are short - some just a page or two - which, after the aforementioned repetition, doesn't give the essayist time to fully explore their theme. In several cases, this left me feeling that I only had a superficial view.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sue Wallace

    1984 in the 21st century by Lori perkins. After the election of Donald Trump and his advisor, Kellyanne Conway’s suggestion we get used to using “alternative facts,” the nearly 70 year-old dystopian novel made the # 1 spot on Amazon’s bestseller list. 1984 in the 21st Century offers readers 25 different opinions and viewpoints on this seminal novel from right to left on the political spectrum, with pieces from teachers to journalists and writers, lawyers and politicians, and union activists. The 1984 in the 21st century by Lori perkins. After the election of Donald Trump and his advisor, Kellyanne Conway’s suggestion we get used to using “alternative facts,” the nearly 70 year-old dystopian novel made the # 1 spot on Amazon’s bestseller list. 1984 in the 21st Century offers readers 25 different opinions and viewpoints on this seminal novel from right to left on the political spectrum, with pieces from teachers to journalists and writers, lawyers and politicians, and union activists. The essays range from academic treatises to personal reminiscences to political rants and screeds, and even fiction and theater. Good but slow read with good characters. Wasn't what I thought it was. 3*. Netgalley and Riverdale avenue books.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    This review originally published in Looking For a Good Book. Rated 3.0 of 5 Well, it didn't take long for someone to put out a collection of essays relating George Orwell's 1984 with the Donald Trump presidency. Of course it's been the lingo in the press and on social media since Trump won the U.S. election and editor Lori Perkins, who writes in her introduction of having had affection for 1984 for a long time, has pulled together a series of previously published short articles and essays remindi This review originally published in Looking For a Good Book. Rated 3.0 of 5 Well, it didn't take long for someone to put out a collection of essays relating George Orwell's 1984 with the Donald Trump presidency. Of course it's been the lingo in the press and on social media since Trump won the U.S. election and editor Lori Perkins, who writes in her introduction of having had affection for 1984 for a long time, has pulled together a series of previously published short articles and essays reminding the reader of the similarities between Trump's political bureaucracy and the famous world of 'big brother.' Most of the essays are very short. A couple of Kindle-pages in length for some of them. And actually, most of them don't really offer any new insight or comparisons. Anyone who spends time on Facebook will encounter much of the discourse that is here (though perhaps without the vehemence and inciting rhetoric). None of these essays/articles stood out as exceptionally keen or insightful - as I say...this discourse is already taking place on social media and in various presses (which is where these come from). But the advantage is that Perkins has gathered a number of them and brought them together. One of the more interesting, or at least daring, articles was "Why Orwell's Sudden Best-seller 1984 is More Applicable to Obama Than Trump" by Jay Strongman. One of my least favorite pieces (surprisingly, perhaps, given my 'other' job in the professional theatre, was "Orwell in America -- The Play" by Joseph Sutton which, first of all, was only the beginning portion of the play, and secondly, wasn't all that interesting. And of course there's no small part of this that is taking advantage of the tremendous, sudden interest in Orwell's 1984 and the sitting U.S. presidency of Donald Trump. Thanks to ebooks and print on demand, it's much easier for writers/editors/publishers to get books in front of the reading public very quickly. This volume contains the following: Introduction by Lori Perkins "George Orwell and the Self-Preventing Prophecy" by David Brin "1984 Was the Catalyst of Our Conversation" by David Jester "How 1984 Can Decode Trump’s First 100 Days" by Alexander J. Urbelis "Big Media is Big Brother" by Mike Siegel "Controlling The Present: How 1984 Predicted ‘Alternative Facts’ and ‘Fake News’" by Marc W. Polite "Trump is not Orwellian: He is the Distractor-in-Chief" by Matt Bai "Why Orwell’s Sudden Best-seller 1984 is More Applicable to Obama Than Trump" by Jay Strongman "1984: The Facts on the Ground are Emotions" by Alan Saly "Sure, It’s “1984” Again—And I Know It" by Perry Brass "Goodbye My Safety Blanket" by Stephen B. Pearl "Archie Andrews’ Orwellian Adventure" by Tim Hanley "Big Brother Sam" by Boze Hadleigh "The Year of My Dystopia" by Tracy Lawson "1984 and Walden: A Time and a Place in Two Volumes" by Tamara Rose "What We Desire Must Be Valued" by Rona Gofstein "George Orwell Through the Looking Glass" by Melli Pini "Why Don’t You “Like” Me?" by Maximilian Ximenez "2017 Should not be 1984" by Sherri Donovan "Orwell’s 1984: Are We There Yet?" by Sean Fitzpatrick "Teaching After Trump" by Melissa Febos "Why We Teach 1984 Today" by Ruth-Terry Walden "They Love Big Brother by Aaron Zwintscher Feminism in George Orwell’s 1984" by Tara Lighten Msiska "Orwell in America—The Play" by Joseph Sutton "Coming to a Theater Near You, Again" by Adam Birnbaum and Dylan Skolnick Looking for a good book? If you are a fan of George Orwell's 1984, or concerned about how much like 1984 our political system has devolved to, you may enjoy the insight, thoughts, and concerns expressed in the series of brief essays collected by Lori Perkins in 1984 in the 21st Century. I received a digital copy of this book from the publisher, through Netgalley, in exchange for an honest review.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Authentikate

    A huge thanks to Netgalley and www.riverdalebooks.com for this ARC in exchange for an honest review. Full disclosure: I’m an academic by former trade and an academic deep at heart. I’m also a political junkie. I’ve spent the past 20+ years grappling with issues in local, state, and federal government and rarely shy away from a fruitful conversation. Reading this book was like having a series of discussions with various people of various perspectives all hinging on whether George Orwell’s masterp A huge thanks to Netgalley and www.riverdalebooks.com for this ARC in exchange for an honest review. Full disclosure: I’m an academic by former trade and an academic deep at heart. I’m also a political junkie. I’ve spent the past 20+ years grappling with issues in local, state, and federal government and rarely shy away from a fruitful conversation. Reading this book was like having a series of discussions with various people of various perspectives all hinging on whether George Orwell’s masterpiece 1984 is apropos of our current administration. Some essayists argued that the real Big Brother happens under democrat administrations, where the common attack line is dems like big government and try to control what one eats, how much soda they drink, etc... Big Government then isn’t a far comparative leap to Big Brother. (Side note: there’s plenty of control by legislation on both sides). Some claimed Trump isn’t Orwellian as much as he is a distraction artist (side note: distractions is Orwellian as is was used to control). Other writers drew specific details out of current events to draw their comparisons. Orwell in 1984 coined the term “Doublespeak” to mean pay attention to what I say even though what I do may be very different. Here, the writer brought up Trump’s doublespeak when dealing with racial issues, an implied use of dog whistles and coded messages to draw attention elsewhere with the true meaning landing on its intended audience. Other “doublespeak crimes” include climate, the election fraud claim, and myriad lies. One particular salient essay brought up the use of false facts as a method to distract (and thus control). One needn’t look too hard to remember Kelkeyann Conway’s regrettable use of “alternative facts.” In 1984 Orwell imagined “telescreens” in every home and how spot-on was that!? Now, Big Brother broadcasts its message directly to the people via state news channels. At least half of the population is being controlled by alternative facts. Another Orwellian theme explored is surveillance and how we all pay for our own surveillance, and here the Facebook debacle would have been neatly explored, theft of personal data ultimately used for social control. Other examples amply given. From a purely academic pursuit, I really enjoyed this and could see it used as a part of a teaching tool in colleges and universities. An argument could be used to compare Orwell’s 1984 to many cherry-picked examples from both parties. Still, fun thoughtful read.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lori Perkins

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tony Parsons

    George Orwell set the standards for topics such as “Big Brother” for centuries to come. 1984, is also my number 1 book, as are all the others the author 1st. mentioned. Thank God for PDF. Old books are very toxic. The classics movies mentioned are also the top of the line. If you’re a Trump hater, which I’m not you’ll love this book. Put your thinking cap on. I did not receive any type of compensation for reading & reviewing this book. While I receive free books from publishers & authors, I am unde George Orwell set the standards for topics such as “Big Brother” for centuries to come. 1984, is also my number 1 book, as are all the others the author 1st. mentioned. Thank God for PDF. Old books are very toxic. The classics movies mentioned are also the top of the line. If you’re a Trump hater, which I’m not you’ll love this book. Put your thinking cap on. I did not receive any type of compensation for reading & reviewing this book. While I receive free books from publishers & authors, I am under no obligation to write a positive review, only an honest one. All thoughts & opinions are entirely my own. A very awesome book cover, great font & writing style. A very well written book. It was very easy for me to read/follow from start/finish & never a dull moment. There were no grammar/typo errors, nor any repetitive or out of line sequence sentences. Lots of exciting scenarios, with several twists/turns & a great set of unique characters to keep track of. This could also make another great movie, college PP presentation, or better yet a mini TV series or even a documentary (A & E, History channel). There is no doubt in my mind this is a very easy rating of 5 stars. Thank you for the free Riverdale Avenue Books; Author; PDF book Tony Parsons MSW (Washburn)

  9. 4 out of 5

    John Plowright

    ‘1984 in the 21st Century’ is a collection of twenty-five essays exploring the relevance of Orwell’s book today. Lori Perkins, in her introduction, makes it clear that the idea for the book crystallized with Trump’s election, and the language of Trump, Kellyanne Conway and Sean Spicer has certainly stimulated interest in Orwell’s dystopian vision, with ‘1984’ topping the Amazon.com best-seller lists in January; the screening of the 1984 film version of ‘1984’ in multiple cinemas across the US in ‘1984 in the 21st Century’ is a collection of twenty-five essays exploring the relevance of Orwell’s book today. Lori Perkins, in her introduction, makes it clear that the idea for the book crystallized with Trump’s election, and the language of Trump, Kellyanne Conway and Sean Spicer has certainly stimulated interest in Orwell’s dystopian vision, with ‘1984’ topping the Amazon.com best-seller lists in January; the screening of the 1984 film version of ‘1984’ in multiple cinemas across the US in April and the acclaimed stage adaptation of ‘1984’ hitting Broadway in June. Some would argue that Sinclair Lewis’s 1935 novel ‘It Can’t Happen Here’ is more prescient of the Trump phenomenon than ‘1984’ but there are less obvious ways in which ‘1984’ resonates today, such as the way in which we all tend to facilitate corporate Big Brother watching us by unthinkingly agreeing to the extremely lengthy small print terms and conditions of iTunes, Facebook and a dozen other businesses, thereby enabling them to access and analyse our personal data. Then there are Edward Snowden’s claims that GCHQ has mounted a massive surveillance exercise collecting information from every visible internet user. In short, there’s little difficulty in arguing the 21st century relevance of ‘1984’, although in a sense that’s beside the point, for even if Orwell’s personal dystopian vision had absolutely no present-day echoes his book would still be worth reading. In that sense deciding whether 1984 can decode Trump’s first 100 days (the essay by Alexander J. Urbelis), deciding whether ‘1984’ is more applicable to Obama than Trump (the essay by Jay Strongman) and many of the other contributions to ‘1984 in the 21st Century’ represent so much wasted effort. The authors would be much better writing ‘straight’ political commentary than using Orwell as a peg upon which to meditate upon the State of the Union. ‘1984 in the 21st Century’ is varied but the variation tends to be from bad to worse. The bottom of the barrel is represented by Rona Gofstein’s ‘What we desire must be valued’, the only appealing feature of which is its brevity. Its mind-numbing banality takes the form of sentiments such as, “I deeply believe that being able to pursue your dreams, your heart’s desire, makes life worth living.” Being force fed such nauseating pap would constitute my personal Room 101. I would like to find something positive to say about ‘1984 in the 21st Century but it’s difficult not to feel that in an attempt to jump upon the bandwagon outlined in my introduction it’s been thrown together with little thought, as epitomised by the fact that the book’s third, seventh and eighth sentences all contain typographical errors. We’re warned not to judge books by their covers but in this case you certainly can. It’s bad.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Tony

    Thanks to Net Galley for the ARC. As is the case with the writers here, 1984 is one of my all time favorite books. I have argued it is the most important book ever written in English. This book, while not that, is important because it keeps the conversation going. As is often the case with anthologies, it is uneven but worth the time.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Steve

  12. 4 out of 5

    T.J. Burns

  13. 5 out of 5

    Logan

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jen

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kelsey

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jenn Sadai

  17. 4 out of 5

    Shelia Hankins

  18. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Sipila

  19. 4 out of 5

    Alexia Polasky

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sean

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ricky Rodrigo

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sdz

  23. 4 out of 5

    Cata Vega

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lopez Gregory

  25. 4 out of 5

    Laura

  26. 5 out of 5

    DieAReader

  27. 4 out of 5

    Haselrig

  28. 5 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ashleigh

  30. 5 out of 5

    Melly Mel

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