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The Million-Dollar, One-Person Business: Make Great Money. Work the Way You Like. Have the Life You Want.

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The indispensable guide to earning a six-figure take-home income on your own terms, from Forbes.com contributing writer Elaine Pofeldt. The rise of one-million-dollar, one-person businesses in the past five years is the biggest trend in employment today, offering the widest range of people the most ways to earn a living while having the lifestyles they want. In The Million- The indispensable guide to earning a six-figure take-home income on your own terms, from Forbes.com contributing writer Elaine Pofeldt. The rise of one-million-dollar, one-person businesses in the past five years is the biggest trend in employment today, offering the widest range of people the most ways to earn a living while having the lifestyles they want. In The Million-Dollar, One-Person Business, Elaine Pofeldt outlines the pathways to joining this entrepreneurial movement, synthesizing advice from hundreds of business owners who've done it. She explains how to identify, launch, grow, and reinvent the business, showing how a single individual can generate $1 million in revenue--something only larger small companies have done in the past. Both inspirational and practical, this book will appeal to all who seek a great worklife and a great lifestyle.


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The indispensable guide to earning a six-figure take-home income on your own terms, from Forbes.com contributing writer Elaine Pofeldt. The rise of one-million-dollar, one-person businesses in the past five years is the biggest trend in employment today, offering the widest range of people the most ways to earn a living while having the lifestyles they want. In The Million- The indispensable guide to earning a six-figure take-home income on your own terms, from Forbes.com contributing writer Elaine Pofeldt. The rise of one-million-dollar, one-person businesses in the past five years is the biggest trend in employment today, offering the widest range of people the most ways to earn a living while having the lifestyles they want. In The Million-Dollar, One-Person Business, Elaine Pofeldt outlines the pathways to joining this entrepreneurial movement, synthesizing advice from hundreds of business owners who've done it. She explains how to identify, launch, grow, and reinvent the business, showing how a single individual can generate $1 million in revenue--something only larger small companies have done in the past. Both inspirational and practical, this book will appeal to all who seek a great worklife and a great lifestyle.

30 review for The Million-Dollar, One-Person Business: Make Great Money. Work the Way You Like. Have the Life You Want.

  1. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    A super practical guide to help you scale your one-person business into something more profitable. Small scale entrepreneurs will enjoy the breakdown of the seven most profitable one-person businesses. A great crash course for anyone who checks the "sole proprietor" box on your tax returns. If your idea is good and your expertise is real, but your profits are stagnating, read this book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chris Johnson

    There's a big caveat to this otherwise great book and it's this: Margins. I've run an owner-centric business that sold over a million dollars worth of services. And cost-of-delivery is ALWAYS always a big issue. How much do you keep? She talks about "fitness on the go" which is a licensed personal training outfit in Canada. She mentions an astonishing 4 million from a one-person business. But then as you read it, we learn that the affiliated trainers get 91% of the revenue, cutting the business d There's a big caveat to this otherwise great book and it's this: Margins. I've run an owner-centric business that sold over a million dollars worth of services. And cost-of-delivery is ALWAYS always a big issue. How much do you keep? She talks about "fitness on the go" which is a licensed personal training outfit in Canada. She mentions an astonishing 4 million from a one-person business. But then as you read it, we learn that the affiliated trainers get 91% of the revenue, cutting the business down to an affair that's closer (with fees) to $500,000 +/-. This claim then is that there's a 1mm revenue load with 25% profit. That's probably normal because Elaine is a veteran jounalist and writer and is used to the underlying assumptions of businesses with "normal" profit margins. 25% is a great margin, but this betrays the premise of the book somewhat. There's another criticism that I'll share a little later on, too. This one is the reason it's a "4-star" and not 5-star business book. /// That said, this book is a pleasure to read. You should read it if you like business books. It came to me in a point in my life where I was looking to simplify my outputs and deliverables. Over at my past business, I created unnecessary complexity. And I am looking to grow something without necessarily needing to build a team. So this book was recommended by a couple of friends and I grabbed it. It's written by a real writer turned business advisor. The sentences are crisp and the stories are told with a journalistic flair. There is, in Elaine's book, a lot of respect for the audience of solopreneurs in the craft. The book goes through a lot less "rah-rah" motivation than a lot of start-your-own deal books. It takes os through the stories of entrepreneurs that are in modern publishing, e-commerce, and other categories and talks a little bit about what's making their businesses work well. You get an overview of different business models, and one of them will likely "feel right." That's welcome. And we learn how to pick a business, operate a business and to "retain data," in order to get smarter, and there are specific products recommended for e-commerce. Also welcome. Another welcome part is that it doesn't shy away from some "businesses that never should have started in the first place." Cautionary tales are told about parent's money and the risks aren't covered. Keep the cash coming in. The final point of criticism is this: scale is relative. There's an underlying, subtle assumption that a business must keep growing in size to be meaningful. This sort of marches to that hymn a little more than I'd like. A business SHOULD get better, but growth in terms of revenue isn't a prerequisite for that. And a reminder that when we own businesses WE should be in charge of our businesses. That said, it's easy to be critical of a book. And I think that this is in the top 1% of books. I try to make a "useful" review so you'll understand what you're reading.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Frederic D.

    What started off as an interesting and promising read quickly became a repetitive sharing of a couple of success stories. Very biased storytelling and very little insights on how to get started on a business. Not the guidebook i was looking for.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Hartfiel

    This book reminded me very much of Chris Guillebeau's Side Hustle except the entrepreneurs featured here have all hit the seven figure mark and do this full time. To be clear, while most of these were all one employee businesses, don't for a minute think any of these entrepreneurs hit one million in revenue without help - their help just came in the form of contractors. Lots of practical advice and business profiles here but perhaps the best part of the book are the Appendices which are packed w This book reminded me very much of Chris Guillebeau's Side Hustle except the entrepreneurs featured here have all hit the seven figure mark and do this full time. To be clear, while most of these were all one employee businesses, don't for a minute think any of these entrepreneurs hit one million in revenue without help - their help just came in the form of contractors. Lots of practical advice and business profiles here but perhaps the best part of the book are the Appendices which are packed with tips and exercises to help you find the right business idea for you as well as loads of resources, tools and books to help you start your business or increase it's productivity and help you get learner and meaner. A good, quick read.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Brad Carl

    I was shocked at how elementary this book was. 80% of it was stories about different small businesses - how they started, how they changed, how they grew, etc. I got nothing out of this, really. I'm not saying I'm smarter than the average person, but it was not enlightening for me at all. It was boring. I found myself struggling to want to read the book. I suppose the intent was that these stories would be inspiring, and maybe they were for some people. But.... what I was really hoping for was g I was shocked at how elementary this book was. 80% of it was stories about different small businesses - how they started, how they changed, how they grew, etc. I got nothing out of this, really. I'm not saying I'm smarter than the average person, but it was not enlightening for me at all. It was boring. I found myself struggling to want to read the book. I suppose the intent was that these stories would be inspiring, and maybe they were for some people. But.... what I was really hoping for was guidance on figuring out business ideas that would work for me. I was happy to find a couple of pages about this in the back of the book, but that was about it. If you're sick of working for The Man inside a cubicle and are looking for some inspiration to go out on your own - and you have little to no business sense or experience - this book might be for you. But if you've been around the block a few times.....you probably should skip this one.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Dena (Batch of Books)

    More and more people are turning to side hustles and entrepreneurship as an alternative (or in addition) to their day jobs. In my experience, stay-at-home moms are some of the best side-hustlers out there. As a work-from-home mom myself, I’m always interested in books that discuss the entrepreneurial spirit, ideas, and tips for making the solopreneur lifestyle work. I’ve read quite a few books on this topic, and The Million-Dollar One-Person Business was a good addition to my collection. The Stron More and more people are turning to side hustles and entrepreneurship as an alternative (or in addition) to their day jobs. In my experience, stay-at-home moms are some of the best side-hustlers out there. As a work-from-home mom myself, I’m always interested in books that discuss the entrepreneurial spirit, ideas, and tips for making the solopreneur lifestyle work. I’ve read quite a few books on this topic, and The Million-Dollar One-Person Business was a good addition to my collection. The Strongest Aspect of this Book: The stories that Elaine Pofeldt tells are fantastic. She uses examples of entrepreneurs who started one-person ventures and grew them into million-dollar businesses. Not all of them got things perfect on the first try, or even the second. But with some tweaking, the businesses she features all got their revenue up to a million dollars or more. I loved the stories. They’re so inspiring. The other thing I loved is the statistics the author shared. She goes into the exact numbers of people who have been able to make the solopreneur lifestyle work. The choices they made, when/if to grow, and how they came up with their ideas. The Downside to this Book: Like many business books, the action items are vague. I’m a person that needs clear steps to follow — go here and do this. Instead, this book used general terms and broad advice. Good advice, but too broad for my taste. Regardless, it’s a good book to read if you’re interested in entrepreneurship, starting a side hustle, or launching a one-person business. It introduces readers to a new way of looking at side hustles, how to get ideas, and how to fine-tune your idea. Source: Thank you to the Blogging for Books program for sending me a copy of this book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    I liked; Quick, light read Inspiring stories of solo entrepreneurs in 6 industries that you want to look up to dive in deeper detail Nice additional tools Tone of voice I didn’t like: Paints a very romanticised picture of entrepreneurship, e.g. Focuses on revenue rather than profit. Not very differentiated from similar books like 4 hour workweek, besides that it’s more inspiring with plenty of stories. Sometimes comes across patronizing, with best intentions of course ‘google it and you’ll find it’ I liked; Quick, light read Inspiring stories of solo entrepreneurs in 6 industries that you want to look up to dive in deeper detail Nice additional tools Tone of voice I didn’t like: Paints a very romanticised picture of entrepreneurship, e.g. Focuses on revenue rather than profit. Not very differentiated from similar books like 4 hour workweek, besides that it’s more inspiring with plenty of stories. Sometimes comes across patronizing, with best intentions of course ‘google it and you’ll find it’ I wish: Would love this book for the european market, to see the differences Would rather recommend 4 hour work week, as it’s more practical, more direct and more hands-on

  8. 4 out of 5

    Marcey Rader

    I can't say I learned a lot of new stuff, but I read a lot of business books :) From an inspiration standpoint, this was a great, easy, quick read. I like that Elaine profiled multiple industries, people that opted to grow, stay small, sell, and/or pivot to fit their lifestyle. So much of purchasing is about the story and two of the companies profiled, Easy Lunch Boxes and Brooklinens I'm now going to be a customer of.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Rishabh Srivastava

    Had been meaning to read the book after listening to the author on the Tim Ferriss podcast. Did not get any value out of it. Rattles off "success" stories without diving deep into the elements that allowed individuals to scale their businesses. Also does not adequately differentiate between million-dollar profit businesses from million-dollar revenue businesses. Much more of an "inspirational" book rather than a practical one. Would not recommend.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    I love reading business books, but didn't feel as if I got anything new out of this. While I loved the stories the author highlighted, it didn't feel as if there were groundbreaking concrete, actionable steps or resources that went along with those highlights. Essentially, was a "meh" book. Sort of inspirational. Fast read. That's about it.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Bearbig

    A good book that smartly constraints the scope of the topic, good to read as a general roadmap for solo business. It introduces many case studies of solo entrepreneurs who started business in all different area, and got 1 million revenue annually. I found the most valuable advice from this book is to build your contractor/freelancer army, which means when doing business, you need to outsource the heavy-lifting jobs to other people, and focus on the core business yourself.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Harlen

    Feels like it suffers from a lot of selection bias. Also 90% of the book is short anecdotes, which don't really go into much detail.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Adrian Luben

    Good for keeping up the motivation.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Charles

    Good easy read for anyone thinking of starting an online business. Gives several examples of successful entrepreneurs and their path to success.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Leroy O'Donnell

    Book Review – The Million Dollar One Person Business “Uncovering an idea that you will enjoy thinking about every day - whether that is when you are writing copy for your website or answering a customer's question about it - is the secret. Of course, you need to do your market research to make sure there are other people interested in buying what you plan to sell. You can't build a million-dollar, one-person business around a passion that only ten people on the planet share, unless you have achie Book Review – The Million Dollar One Person Business “Uncovering an idea that you will enjoy thinking about every day - whether that is when you are writing copy for your website or answering a customer's question about it - is the secret. Of course, you need to do your market research to make sure there are other people interested in buying what you plan to sell. You can't build a million-dollar, one-person business around a passion that only ten people on the planet share, unless you have achieved such elite status in your niche that people will be willing to pay you very high prices.” Pros: Case studies Simple Inspiring – just due to relevance/repetition Cons: Average writing No depth Repetition Does what it says on the tin – profiles of owners who have built lean one-person businesses that have reached 1M in revenue. 1. The million-dollar, one-person revolution Common categories a. Ecommerce b. Manufacturing c. Information content creation d. Professional services e. Personal services f. Real estate Why people do it (freedom, security etc) 2. What makes million-dollar one-person businesses work a. Geekdom – loving the topic b. Ditch the DIY – outsource and automate well c. Simplify selling and fulfilment – don’t try to be everything d. Nurture a community – don’t compete on price but build a community who love your products and ideas. 3. What business could you start a. Right size your goals – decide how big you want to grow the biz, yourself. Don’t be influenced by others. b. Identify passion and value – what do you love doing and how can you uniquely bring value to people. c. How much investment can you risk? d. Get clear on what matters – decide on what you really want from your business and build it that way (time freedom, etc) e. Consider the possibilities – goes into detail on the six common categories for 1M businesses. Identify where your passion meets the market – market test. 4. Make it happen a. Financing options b. Ask your target customers and listen to them – iterate to provide them what they want. c. Evolve presentation. d. Price right for perceived value – sometimes smaller lower priced packages will work better e. Social Advertising – Facebook/google – pick the right one for your target market. f. Use a major online retailer – amazon etc g. Get an accountant. h. Manage cashflow – speed incoming payments, delay outgoing payments, reduce inventory (drop ship), keep savings. i. Put the right systems in place for growth. j. Remove barriers to buy – mattresses = 100 days risk free trial. k. Increase customer reviews l. Create a scalable product or service – shouldn’t be time based/limited. 5. Keep getting smarter a. Its your business lab – experiment & iterate b. Stay focussed on the right work. c. Find help you can trust 6. Realise and reset your vision a. Retake your entrepreneurial temperature – review semi-regularly what you want from the biz, iterate accordingly. b. Stay true to your evolving goals – don’t listen to others (you should raise capital etc). c. Dodge distractions – don’t always chase the shiny opportunities.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Pollock

    Great overview for new entrepreneurs or those considering entrepreneurship. This book offers some creative examples of micro business owners making it work. Rating it a 3 because there was nothing new for me here given I’ve been a one-person business owner for 10 years.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    So what was my expectation on deciding to read this? Inspiration for one of course, but then I want some actionable ideas. To sum up what I took away, yes, there are a lot of people doing $1M+ one person businesses, and thus it is not as statistically blind to be one as it is to assume you can be the next Zuckerberg. Then, there are a set of 5 key areas you should explore: content, ecommerce, rental income, professional services -- and there should be one more but it didn't make much of an impact So what was my expectation on deciding to read this? Inspiration for one of course, but then I want some actionable ideas. To sum up what I took away, yes, there are a lot of people doing $1M+ one person businesses, and thus it is not as statistically blind to be one as it is to assume you can be the next Zuckerberg. Then, there are a set of 5 key areas you should explore: content, ecommerce, rental income, professional services -- and there should be one more but it didn't make much of an impact. Then, you can do a lot with gig work, outsourcing, etc. --> read 4-hour workweek for this it covered it oh so much better. Then, there are lots of partners like Amazon (for Pofeldt it was he-that-shall-not-be-named throughout the book. Duh, we know who you were talking about and the refusal to say the name was obvious) That was about it. Tim Ferris covered the subjects here much better, so as a recommendation I'd go there.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    This is a good starter book for those completely green to business or being self employed/entrepreneur. However if you've been in the game for years or are an avid reader of business publications like Entrepreneur magazine, Inc, Fast Company or if you listen to the various business related podcasts that are out there none of this information will be new to you. The book gets repetitive on highlighting similar traits between various millionaire business owners who run a "lean" operation (meaning This is a good starter book for those completely green to business or being self employed/entrepreneur. However if you've been in the game for years or are an avid reader of business publications like Entrepreneur magazine, Inc, Fast Company or if you listen to the various business related podcasts that are out there none of this information will be new to you. The book gets repetitive on highlighting similar traits between various millionaire business owners who run a "lean" operation (meaning little resources such as employees). I feel like as a result the book runs more horizontal than vertical. A deeper dive into the inner workings of these dynamics would have set this book apart.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    This book started off pretty strong, but pretty quickly fell through the floor. I've been curious for the past 6-12 months how you can create products or experiences that allow you to reach a bigger audience at a better scale. So I bought this book pretty readily and hopefully. Unfortunately, what could have been said in about 40-50 pages was strung out to about 200. It isn't a bad book, but it isn't a book that I would strongly recommend as a must read. More like a book that you can read and it This book started off pretty strong, but pretty quickly fell through the floor. I've been curious for the past 6-12 months how you can create products or experiences that allow you to reach a bigger audience at a better scale. So I bought this book pretty readily and hopefully. Unfortunately, what could have been said in about 40-50 pages was strung out to about 200. It isn't a bad book, but it isn't a book that I would strongly recommend as a must read. More like a book that you can read and it will give you a little bit of insight, but likely not any lightning bolts.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ableabelian

    Here's the thing about this book: You're not getting a how-to. You're not even really getting in depth case studies; there's an overview of five common fields people make their businesses in, and there are some case studies, but these are very cursory overviews. Hey look, this couple's family has beehives - they started exporting honey. This guy started a custom planner business. This guy really liked boots, and decided he would start selling boots. Some of them would be great to get a more det Here's the thing about this book: You're not getting a how-to. You're not even really getting in depth case studies; there's an overview of five common fields people make their businesses in, and there are some case studies, but these are very cursory overviews. Hey look, this couple's family has beehives - they started exporting honey. This guy started a custom planner business. This guy really liked boots, and decided he would start selling boots. Some of them would be great to get a more detailed breakdown of what, precisely, they did. You don't get that, so the book isn't terribly actionable. But, deeper than that, there's a deep seeded philosophical tension to this book. The author crows about how more and more people are self employed (they're "reaping the benefits of this new economy", except it doesn't bother to acknowledge how many of those self employed people are gig workers or independent contractors without the stability or benefits of a typical full time job). The author also loves to tote just how big it is these people do this *without any employees*. They do it themselves. And yet in literally every single example given, a common constant is eventually people started hiring contractors. Philosophically, it's hard for me to accept a book that is *constantly* raving how these people do this *on their own when* 1) they don't, they do, in fact, have hired work, and 2) that said work is propping up the very system that causes this instability to begin with. That said, my philosophical qualms are my own. Practically speaking, if this book is around and you can pick it up for cheap, it's not a BAD read. There were not any actionable take-aways though, so I'm not bothering to get it for my reference shelf.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Bruce Harpham

    Read this book after seeing it recommended on Tim Ferriss's blog. If you were inspired by the concepts in "The Four Hour Workweek" but wanted DETAILS on how to make such an Internet company work and scale up, this is the book for you. In a way, it's a great "sequel" to the Four Hour Work Week. The reporting is excellent. In each of the stories, you will find revenue, profits, change over time, and the stories of scaling up. For example, food businesses that scale up by using a "copacker" to scale Read this book after seeing it recommended on Tim Ferriss's blog. If you were inspired by the concepts in "The Four Hour Workweek" but wanted DETAILS on how to make such an Internet company work and scale up, this is the book for you. In a way, it's a great "sequel" to the Four Hour Work Week. The reporting is excellent. In each of the stories, you will find revenue, profits, change over time, and the stories of scaling up. For example, food businesses that scale up by using a "copacker" to scale up. The author has done great work in describing a new category of business: small companies that are highly profitable with minimal employees. I also liked that the author laid out categories of businesses that tend to do best (e.g. ecommerce, information products etc). On a personal note, I was delighted to see several Toronto entrepreneurs featured here - these success stories are not confined to America. Two areas where the book could have been better: -Since financial success is a key criteria for the book, why not include an appendix showing income statements for the businesses profiled? The narrative sometimes made it hard to understand profit margins and similar points. -Push for greater details and name names. At multiple points, the author vaguely refers to entrepreneurs growing by using a "large ecommerce company." Yet, this mysterious company is not named. I assume she meant Amazon. Additional specific details on vendors used, suppliers used etc would make the book even more helpful for the reader

  22. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    This book provides a lot of inspiration for people that want to be a solopreneur or run a million dollar business. It is not a how-to manual. I think of it this way -- not all of us want to work for corporations nor do we want to start a billion dollar business with zillions of employees to worry about. This book shows that is possible to make that happen. You can run a small business by yourself and still meet all of your financial dreams. You are most likely going to need to outsource, but it This book provides a lot of inspiration for people that want to be a solopreneur or run a million dollar business. It is not a how-to manual. I think of it this way -- not all of us want to work for corporations nor do we want to start a billion dollar business with zillions of employees to worry about. This book shows that is possible to make that happen. You can run a small business by yourself and still meet all of your financial dreams. You are most likely going to need to outsource, but it is possible if you are willing to invest the time and energy. You will have to have some basic knowledge of drop-shipping, shopify or a fulfilled by amazon business in order to mimic some of the stories in this book. If you've run a blog or a small online business before, you should be able to understand the insights in this book. If you are looking for a step-by-step guide to becoming a millionaire this book isn't for you.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Alison Jones

    The growth of massive one-person businesses has been one of the most interesting side-effects of the digital revolution, and this book helpfully demonstrates the range of businesses and niches that have achieved this and some of their common characteristics. There are some useful tips here too, and it's well written (Pofeld is a journalist and tells a story well). But overall it's really a collection of successful business owners' stories, which gets a bit repetitive, with rather broad 'how-to' The growth of massive one-person businesses has been one of the most interesting side-effects of the digital revolution, and this book helpfully demonstrates the range of businesses and niches that have achieved this and some of their common characteristics. There are some useful tips here too, and it's well written (Pofeld is a journalist and tells a story well). But overall it's really a collection of successful business owners' stories, which gets a bit repetitive, with rather broad 'how-to' commentary, but no clear big idea or new insights.  I think the title is slightly misleading too: as anyone who's been in business for any length of time knows, it's not revenue but profit that makes or breaks you. And some may have started as one-person businesses but many of the examples she gives are partnerships and/or employ many more people in the form of contractors and freelances. So. Some useful stuff, but not one that I'll be stopping people in the street to tell them about. 

  24. 4 out of 5

    Alejandro I Sanoja

    "Out of more than twenty-eight million small business in the United States, twenty-three million are 'non-employers', meaning no one has a job there except the owners." This is a great book for solo-preneurs or small business owners. It's for you if you've been thinking about starting a business for a while, or already have one but don't know where to go next for growth. It shares a lot of valuable experiences and insights from other entrepreneurs who have been successful at running a profitable "Out of more than twenty-eight million small business in the United States, twenty-three million are 'non-employers', meaning no one has a job there except the owners." This is a great book for solo-preneurs or small business owners. It's for you if you've been thinking about starting a business for a while, or already have one but don't know where to go next for growth. It shares a lot of valuable experiences and insights from other entrepreneurs who have been successful at running a profitable business. You will get strategic as well as tactical information that you can put into action as soon as you finish reading the book. If you already have a business or are looking into starting a business that can help you make 6 or 7 figures a year, then this is the book for you. Recommended by: Tim Ferriss Podcast

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jenn Bradshaw

    As the owner of not one, but two online businesses, I've been wondering if it's possible to bootstrap to success. THE MILLION DOLLAR ONE-PERSON BUSINESS proves that running lean all the way to huge profits is possible. Through case studies and in-depth analysis, the author dissects what makes some lean startups succeed while others fizzle out. This is one of my top five recommended reads for someone considering starting their own business. Running a business, especially a bootstrapped startup, is As the owner of not one, but two online businesses, I've been wondering if it's possible to bootstrap to success. THE MILLION DOLLAR ONE-PERSON BUSINESS proves that running lean all the way to huge profits is possible. Through case studies and in-depth analysis, the author dissects what makes some lean startups succeed while others fizzle out. This is one of my top five recommended reads for someone considering starting their own business. Running a business, especially a bootstrapped startup, is hard work, and the author doesn't sugar coat this aspect of entrepreneurship. I came away from this reading with more ideas for our own businesses and how to group them with little to no borrowing. If you're tired of the grind and want an honest look at lean startups, start with this book. I'll be coming back to this book and it's various worksheets frequently.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Davor

    This has to be one of the WORST books I have ever read. I am not even trying to be dramatical, honestly, of the 150 business/self-help books I have read, this one battle for the top. I am honestly amazed at how one can write a book about a million dollar one person business and not give ONE concrete advice about the business side. This honestly felt like an instagram post/bland journalist article, where the author talked about some people who sold their website for a couple of hundred thousand dol This has to be one of the WORST books I have ever read. I am not even trying to be dramatical, honestly, of the 150 business/self-help books I have read, this one battle for the top. I am honestly amazed at how one can write a book about a million dollar one person business and not give ONE concrete advice about the business side. This honestly felt like an instagram post/bland journalist article, where the author talked about some people who sold their website for a couple of hundred thousand dollars. And to make things even worse, then she started talking about doing yoga, finding cheap massages and buying food at Costco. I am honestly shook by this book, I do not recommend this book to ANYONE, only if you are sick of life and want to waste a couple of hours of your life. It has been a long time since a book managed to irritate me to this degree.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jody Robinson

    It’s clear she’s got a huge professional crush on Laszio Nadler and Tools4Wisdom, which she references several times in the book. She talks often about businesses with a million in revenue, but it’s not clear how profitable many of the companies become, because she refers mainly to gross, not net revenue. It seemed promising at the beginning, but didn’t quite deliver any practical advice on scaling a business or how... only had some stories of ones that did. It seems geared for people looking for It’s clear she’s got a huge professional crush on Laszio Nadler and Tools4Wisdom, which she references several times in the book. She talks often about businesses with a million in revenue, but it’s not clear how profitable many of the companies become, because she refers mainly to gross, not net revenue. It seemed promising at the beginning, but didn’t quite deliver any practical advice on scaling a business or how... only had some stories of ones that did. It seems geared for people looking for the secret sauce to start a business or scale it up. It’s not bad, but a little on the clinical side, and there really is no secret sauce I discovered. I think it would be more interesting if she had some stories of how she connected and interviewed these entrepreneurs. She stands at a distance from her audience and her subjects. It reads a bit like a masters thesis studying $1M gross revenue businesses.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Oak

    The Million-Dollar One-Person Business: Make Great Money. Work the Way You Like. Have the Life You Want by Elaine Pofeldt is an innovative book offering business advice to entrepreneurs. I liked the premise of the book: developing a business for one person that would yield a high profit. I also liked how Pofeldt gave broad advice for starting a business – such as how to fund it – as well as specific and detailed advice on minor subjects – such as how to organize emails in Gmail. One of my favori The Million-Dollar One-Person Business: Make Great Money. Work the Way You Like. Have the Life You Want by Elaine Pofeldt is an innovative book offering business advice to entrepreneurs. I liked the premise of the book: developing a business for one person that would yield a high profit. I also liked how Pofeldt gave broad advice for starting a business – such as how to fund it – as well as specific and detailed advice on minor subjects – such as how to organize emails in Gmail. One of my favorite chapters was “Realize and Reset Your Vision,” which talks about retaking your entrepreneurial temperature and staying true to evolving your goals. If you enjoy entrepreneurial pursuits, The Million-Dollar One-Person Business is a good book to pick up. *I received this book for review*

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey

    As someone who is starting their own business I found this to be a great guidebook to help me along my way. Elaine Pofeldt has run her own successful business for 10 years and she lends her guidance to people who are wanting to branch out on their own and become independently successful. I'm hoping this book with help me avoid some of the pitfalls that small businesses face and that I will be able to flourish doing something that I love. This is a must read for someone thinking of starting a bus As someone who is starting their own business I found this to be a great guidebook to help me along my way. Elaine Pofeldt has run her own successful business for 10 years and she lends her guidance to people who are wanting to branch out on their own and become independently successful. I'm hoping this book with help me avoid some of the pitfalls that small businesses face and that I will be able to flourish doing something that I love. This is a must read for someone thinking of starting a business for themselves. I received a copy of this book from Blogging for Books for and honest review.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Yves

    This light book is a well-cobbled assembly of one-person success stories without the (harder work) of directional input by the people themselves. As an entrepreneur myself that built a company up from nothing I set this aside for months because it did not address the do it now ethos that is critical. So finally finishing today. Thinking about it and the reason it tips into three tars is because it is a good stepping stone for people thinking about setting up a side hustle, as Gary Vaynerchuk demo This light book is a well-cobbled assembly of one-person success stories without the (harder work) of directional input by the people themselves. As an entrepreneur myself that built a company up from nothing I set this aside for months because it did not address the do it now ethos that is critical. So finally finishing today. Thinking about it and the reason it tips into three tars is because it is a good stepping stone for people thinking about setting up a side hustle, as Gary Vaynerchuk demoed by hitting garage sales and selling finds. This book is a primer light motivator but could have been an important book if it found the way to tap into their readers’ motivation.

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