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La vida de Albert Espinosa cambió cuando tenía 13 años de edad: le diagnosticaron un cáncer; con 14 años le amputaron la pierna izquierda; a los 16 le quitaron el pulmón izquierda; y ya los 18 le extrajeron parte del hígado. Su enfermedad le enseñó que morir no es triste, que lo triste es no vivir. «Siempre me pareció interesante escribir un libro sobre lo que me enseñó el La vida de Albert Espinosa cambió cuando tenía 13 años de edad: le diagnosticaron un cáncer; con 14 años le amputaron la pierna izquierda; a los 16 le quitaron el pulmón izquierda; y ya los 18 le extrajeron parte del hígado. Su enfermedad le enseñó que morir no es triste, que lo triste es no vivir. «Siempre me pareció interesante escribir un libro sobre lo que me enseñó el cáncer y cómo eso se puede aplicar a la vida diaria. Me pareció que ahí había un buen libro. Y eso es loque os intentaré contar en El mundo amarillo. Este no es un libro de autoayuda, no creo mucho en la autoayuda. Es tan solo un libro donde recojo experiencias que me han servido.»


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La vida de Albert Espinosa cambió cuando tenía 13 años de edad: le diagnosticaron un cáncer; con 14 años le amputaron la pierna izquierda; a los 16 le quitaron el pulmón izquierda; y ya los 18 le extrajeron parte del hígado. Su enfermedad le enseñó que morir no es triste, que lo triste es no vivir. «Siempre me pareció interesante escribir un libro sobre lo que me enseñó el La vida de Albert Espinosa cambió cuando tenía 13 años de edad: le diagnosticaron un cáncer; con 14 años le amputaron la pierna izquierda; a los 16 le quitaron el pulmón izquierda; y ya los 18 le extrajeron parte del hígado. Su enfermedad le enseñó que morir no es triste, que lo triste es no vivir. «Siempre me pareció interesante escribir un libro sobre lo que me enseñó el cáncer y cómo eso se puede aplicar a la vida diaria. Me pareció que ahí había un buen libro. Y eso es loque os intentaré contar en El mundo amarillo. Este no es un libro de autoayuda, no creo mucho en la autoayuda. Es tan solo un libro donde recojo experiencias que me han servido.»

30 review for El mundo amarillo

  1. 4 out of 5

    maegan

    Albert Espinosa is a cancer survivor. This disease robbed him of years of school, of his leg and of one of his lungs. It is precisely those tragic experiences that taught him the keys to happiness, to living life to the fullest, and they are the ones he shares in The Yellow World. In his own words, "it's not philosophy, it's not religion, it's just lessons from Cancer applied to life." Some I found interesting, some I found useful and applicable, and some I disagreed with (my past self was defini Albert Espinosa is a cancer survivor. This disease robbed him of years of school, of his leg and of one of his lungs. It is precisely those tragic experiences that taught him the keys to happiness, to living life to the fullest, and they are the ones he shares in The Yellow World. In his own words, "it's not philosophy, it's not religion, it's just lessons from Cancer applied to life." Some I found interesting, some I found useful and applicable, and some I disagreed with (my past self was definitely a teenage hormone-driven fool so she's not smarter than me, thank you very much). These things usually happen with self-help books. You can pat yourself in the back if you end up applying at least 1 of the lessons in the book. I don't know how many lessons I will apply yet, but I enjoyed reading this book nevertheless. It has been equally moving and enjoyable. I've cried and smiled at the same time and that's something that doesn't happen every day.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    Positive, exciting, moving, touching, funny, heartfelt and brave. And yellow. First of all we get to know some bits from the story of a young boy who gets diagnosed with cancer... From here on it goes unconventionally. No dramatic stories, no tear-jerking episodes of heartbreak and loss, no grieving over lost time and health... Instead, we get discoveries. Various discoveries about life that were presented to him during these times, even though he did not understand some of them back then. Overhe Positive, exciting, moving, touching, funny, heartfelt and brave. And yellow. First of all we get to know some bits from the story of a young boy who gets diagnosed with cancer... From here on it goes unconventionally. No dramatic stories, no tear-jerking episodes of heartbreak and loss, no grieving over lost time and health... Instead, we get discoveries. Various discoveries about life that were presented to him during these times, even though he did not understand some of them back then. Overheard conversations, insights, experiences... They are sometimes eye-opening; sometimes silly; sometimes moving. Then we are delved into a magical world of yellows. A world that exists but that is not always noticeable, yet it happens to all of us. These people are really important in our lives. Who are yellows? Everyone has a certain amount of them in their life... Do you know how to find them? This book is positive, exciting, moving, touching, funny, heartfelt and brave. The author clearly has fun writing it and enjoys sharing his deep thoughts, even from a long time ago. You can't help but resonate with these young guys, 'Eggheads' as he puts it with an uplifting sense of humour, who despite their varyingly dire circumstances try to live their normal lives, share joys and jokes with each other, have dreams and best friends. It made me feel we often see a stereotypical, dark-painted picture when we hear the word 'cancer'. On the other hand, he acknowledged it and befriended it. He even liked the word 'tumour'. Not unsurprisingly, it rhymes with the word humour. Trust your dreams and they'll come true. Trust and true are very similar words, and they are similar because they are actually close to each other, really very close. So close that if you do trust something, it will come true. Have you seen a yellow around you?

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mady

    I was expecting this to be more of an autobiography. Unfortunately these lists that Albert Espinosa made and that this book consists of were alle over the place and not really my cup of tea. This whole concept of "the yellows" was also really weird and most of the time not even comprehensible. I was expecting this to be more of an autobiography. Unfortunately these lists that Albert Espinosa made and that this book consists of were alle over the place and not really my cup of tea. This whole concept of "the yellows" was also really weird and most of the time not even comprehensible.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Damaskcat

    Albert Espinosa spent ten years battling cancer and lost a leg and a lung to the disease. These misfortunes have not stopped him having a zest for life which positively leaps off the pages of this book. The author gives some fascinating insights into what having cancer and looking death in the face has taught him. The most important thing is probably that death and losses of any kind are not things to be feared. There are twenty three discoveries which the author lists and describes and then he e Albert Espinosa spent ten years battling cancer and lost a leg and a lung to the disease. These misfortunes have not stopped him having a zest for life which positively leaps off the pages of this book. The author gives some fascinating insights into what having cancer and looking death in the face has taught him. The most important thing is probably that death and losses of any kind are not things to be feared. There are twenty three discoveries which the author lists and describes and then he explains his theory about the ‘yellows’ in everyone’s life. These are people who have an impact on your life whether you spend five minutes with them or many years. At first I thought this theory was a little off the wall but then I started thinking back over my own life and realised that I have had some ‘yellows’ in my life who have given me insights which are still important to me many years later. Not all the of the twenty three discoveries will resonate with everyone but the ones that gave me ‘light bulb moments’ were the tenth discovery – ‘Don’t be afraid of being the person you have become’ and the sixteenth discovery – ‘The difficult thing isn’t accepting how you are, but how everyone else is.’ When reading several of the other discoveries I found myself nodding in agreement with them. This is such a hugely positive book and yet it doesn’t gloss over the negatives. I found myself laughing and crying at times and I know I will re-read this book several times and that it will probably give me something new at every reading. If you like books which make you think then this is one for you. It isn’t a self-help book – or only in the very broadest sense of the term – and it could give you welcome insights into your own life.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Katherine Hayward Pérez

    A few days ago, I finished reading this. I saw "Pulseras Rojas" last Summer on TV- a series about kids at a hospital in Barcelona. They were between about 8 and 14 years old, and were in the hospital for varying reasons. The 8 year old was in a coma after kids dared him to jump off the highest diving board into the pool in exchange for him forming part of their group. There were 2 kids with cancer, a girl with anorexia, and a boy with heart problems. The series told of the friendships one forms A few days ago, I finished reading this. I saw "Pulseras Rojas" last Summer on TV- a series about kids at a hospital in Barcelona. They were between about 8 and 14 years old, and were in the hospital for varying reasons. The 8 year old was in a coma after kids dared him to jump off the highest diving board into the pool in exchange for him forming part of their group. There were 2 kids with cancer, a girl with anorexia, and a boy with heart problems. The series told of the friendships one forms when in a common situation eg in hospital. In order to better get through their experiences in hospital, they formed a friendship group called "Pulseras Rojas ( red bracelets) "pulseras" for short. Lleo, the Founder of the group, had kept all his ID bracelets from previous hospital stays and gave one to each group member. The book had me hooked from the first page. It was based on Albert's own experiences of having been diagnosed with cancer, his take on cancer and how he dealt with it, and what he learnt from the people he met whilst in Hospital. The book is cleverly written, with each chapter focusing on a "discovery" he made resulting from his experiences. He claims a person will have 23 people that meet who can be classed as "Yellows" (the equivalent of a best friend) in their life, and will meet them in different situations. He says these are people who one isn't afraid to be themselves with, and the difference between a friend and someone who fits into the select group of "The Yellows" is that the people in this group are people you don't have to have much contact with or need to have seen for awhile, for there always to be that bond between you that means you always get on. The book teaches the reader alot about friendship, your attitude to life when you have an illness or disability that requires you to be in hospital at various points in your life. Also the importance of friends In helping you cope with your hospital stay, and the importance of friendship outside the hospital. From my own experience, the nurses, some drs and the friends I made during hospital stays were incredibly valuable to me. The book also says we shouldn't be scared of death or losing someone. I lost a good friend who I was in Hospital with years ago, and friends have come and gone in my life, but I really value the ones I have and hope to keep them for years to come. I also know I'll meet more in unexpected places and at various stages of my life. Finally, I enjoyed the book as I could identify with it due to meeting people I classed as friends in hospital, and I could identify with what one feels when in hospital. In short, a very enjoyable book. There's also an English language version available. I'd highly recommend it to anyone regardless of if they have experience of disability, illness or hospital stays or not. Taken from my blogpost The Value of Friendship at http://katherinehaywardmylifewithcp.b...

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mary Marsell

    Espinosa insists that this is not a book about how to survive cancer, or even a self-help book, but I think it is. He says it's about how to survive life and how to live, and that is also true. The best moments for me were not self-help, however, but rather the anecdotal experiences from his time in the hospital and with other cancer patients; young patients taking ownership of their baldness and becoming a gang called the Eggheads, and sharing pain-coping strategies and street wisdom. They visi Espinosa insists that this is not a book about how to survive cancer, or even a self-help book, but I think it is. He says it's about how to survive life and how to live, and that is also true. The best moments for me were not self-help, however, but rather the anecdotal experiences from his time in the hospital and with other cancer patients; young patients taking ownership of their baldness and becoming a gang called the Eggheads, and sharing pain-coping strategies and street wisdom. They visit the other Eggheads (the babies). That was great. They have wheelchair races, escape outside to sunbathe or watch the 1990 World Cup. These friendships formed during this time are intense. Reminiscent of Stand By Me, ET, Goonies, ... Espinosa has turned his tales into Pulseras Rojas (Red Bracelets- Catalan) and a Spielberry Red Band Society. I loved the art of positive "wanking". I loved the farewell party for his leg. These vignettes are the best part of the book. For me a straight forward memoir would have been so much better. Still, it's so worth the read as we can now share the idea that a yellow wold is a world the colour of the sun, a world that's within everyone's reach, a world worth living.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Reix

    I respect the author and I admire him because of his fortress, but I haven't liked the book at all. He starts the book saying that this is not a self-aid book... well, in my opinion he's done just the opposite thing that he pretended. Talking about the "yellows"... well, I don't share his opinion at all. I really behave with my friends as if they were the "yellows" he mentions. Why your "yellows" should not last forever? Why they can only be 23 and everybody has 23? When I was reading such a thin I respect the author and I admire him because of his fortress, but I haven't liked the book at all. He starts the book saying that this is not a self-aid book... well, in my opinion he's done just the opposite thing that he pretended. Talking about the "yellows"... well, I don't share his opinion at all. I really behave with my friends as if they were the "yellows" he mentions. Why your "yellows" should not last forever? Why they can only be 23 and everybody has 23? When I was reading such a things, I felt as if I was reading something very similar to the horoscope... things that the author invents for feeling better, but nothing with sense (at least, for me)

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sofia Samu

    I generally don't read self-help books. They tend to stress me more than help me. So if it was any other self-help book, it would have probably been 3 stars. But here's the thing: Albert Espinosa created my favourite tv show (Pulseras Rojas) and this book had some references to the show that melted my heart (even though the show started a few years after this book was published). I have even started a rewatch of the show because of the nostalgic feelings this book invoked in me. I generally don't read self-help books. They tend to stress me more than help me. So if it was any other self-help book, it would have probably been 3 stars. But here's the thing: Albert Espinosa created my favourite tv show (Pulseras Rojas) and this book had some references to the show that melted my heart (even though the show started a few years after this book was published). I have even started a rewatch of the show because of the nostalgic feelings this book invoked in me.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Emin

    The blurb for this book says that Albert Espinosa did not want to write a book about surviving cancer, and in the author's introduction he says it is not a self-help book. Yet the inspiration that leaps from the pages as you read this mean it will help you, if you are anything like me, to enhance your own life experiences. Espinosa begins each chapter with a quote from someone who has had an impact on him, which is such a great way to start each section. The explanations of what he has learned fr The blurb for this book says that Albert Espinosa did not want to write a book about surviving cancer, and in the author's introduction he says it is not a self-help book. Yet the inspiration that leaps from the pages as you read this mean it will help you, if you are anything like me, to enhance your own life experiences. Espinosa begins each chapter with a quote from someone who has had an impact on him, which is such a great way to start each section. The explanations of what he has learned from each of the experiences he describes are easy to understand and relate to. I have gained some positive ideas from his suggestions. At the end of the book the author describes how to recognise your own "yellows" and while part of the time I was thinking that some of it sounded a bit far out, when I closed the book I was listing the people in my head who I would consider yellows of my own. The Yellow World may not be a self-help book by definition, but I found it to be a very helpful read, and will read it again in future. I was send a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Stevedutch

    Unfortunately I was expecting something else when I ordered this, and after reading some of the more effusive reviews: I don't know; something a bit different, something, perhaps, profound. But, considering the tragic circumstances of the author's childhood as a cancer sufferer, all I got from this series of recommendations gleaned from a lifetime of comparative pain and suffering, were a series of rather facile reflections on a particular life that, in some instances, I found mildly offensive. B Unfortunately I was expecting something else when I ordered this, and after reading some of the more effusive reviews: I don't know; something a bit different, something, perhaps, profound. But, considering the tragic circumstances of the author's childhood as a cancer sufferer, all I got from this series of recommendations gleaned from a lifetime of comparative pain and suffering, were a series of rather facile reflections on a particular life that, in some instances, I found mildly offensive. By comparison to, say, something like 'Cancer Ward' by Solzhenitsyn, which a reader may find very definitely a life-changing experience, this came across as nothing better than a twee series of not very insightful fairy tales.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    Completely and utterly off the wall but he also makes complete sense. I'm looking forward to meeting the rest of my yellows! Completely and utterly off the wall but he also makes complete sense. I'm looking forward to meeting the rest of my yellows!

  12. 4 out of 5

    nana

    A light read and some reminders for life from a recovered patient fighting years of cancer in his youth. Also, this book reminds me of Coldplay’s song “Yellow” which I could relate to certain important “yellows” in my own life. A new understanding of the lyrics was inspired, and made me feel grateful for some beautiful, enlightening moments and people I encountered. Look at the stars, look how they shine for you And everything that you do It was all yellow... Some learnings/ quotes I like: - Feeling A light read and some reminders for life from a recovered patient fighting years of cancer in his youth. Also, this book reminds me of Coldplay’s song “Yellow” which I could relate to certain important “yellows” in my own life. A new understanding of the lyrics was inspired, and made me feel grateful for some beautiful, enlightening moments and people I encountered. Look at the stars, look how they shine for you And everything that you do It was all yellow... Some learnings/ quotes I like: - Feeling of pain is relative. - “I thought it would be a good idea to have one: not a medical history but a life history...How good it is to be able to read the things that worried you two or three years ago and to realise that now you couldn’t care less about them” - “Diaries are only part of a life history; they are not enough in themselves...Memory is so selective...” - Write a record of daily moments and pieces that tell how your day was formed: your happiness and your learnings too; include physical objects; with a goal to gift it to someone - “I like it when memories have a smell.” - “Breathing out, like blowing out a candle, always makes things better. I like to think there’s something magical in it.” - “Bad decisions crystallise, bad decisions after a while, turn into good decisions. Accept this and you will be happy in your life and above all happy with yourself.” [How to get along with your old self and not to be regretful and guilty of your past actions] - “The important thing isn’t what you look at, but what you get out of looking...I never judged anyone again. I just enjoy other people’s passions.” - “It is possible to change your brain...So, don’t believe anything that comes straight from the factory. Think about it carefully and your life will improve.” [On living consciously] - “It was as if your anger dissipated with the echo of your rage...The echo of rage has this power: the power to minimise your anger, the power to show you how ridiculous it is to shout and throw your toys out of the pram.” - “I really like discovering what someone’s passion is; passion is what interests me the most.” - “Sometimes it’s not so important to follow a path as to leave the path we’ve been following, choose another one and realise that there’s more than one way to get where we’re going. Don’t judge; try not to be absolute. Every path can be good; it just has to be clearly the product of a particular decision.” - “Your normal life stops still and so you need many more activities to fight against all this not living...” - “I remember when people were saying the late-night talk show The Martian Chronicles was trash...Thousands of sick people laughed with that programme, enjoyed it. It gave them strength; it gave them life. It made them participants in a world that had stepped away from them for a moment.” - “Why do banks have to be so serious...” [Author trying to redecorate his hospital rooms and started challenging social norms of some places or certain occupation] - “It might seem like meditation, but really it’s just being still. Everything in this world would be a great deal better if we just stayed still for a while, stayed very still. Twenty-minute hibernations.” - “I’m still looking for roommates. You can find roommates in real life...somewhere else: in a lift, ar work, in a shop.” - “...finding doctors means finding people who can cure you or listen to you...” “Nurses...can go with you anywhere, give you moral support or share with you all the thousands of problems you have” “Porters are individuals, lucky encounters, altruistic people who give you a hand at different moments of you life.” - “Night-time gives you the strength to change the rhythm of your life. All you need to know is what you want to change and that the dawn will not come soon.” - “I have always believed in the power of the night; I’m sure that the night makes your wishes come true.” - “It’s as if when you are almost ready to fall asleep your whole self is in agreement with what you are thinking, and this encourages you and gives you energy...makes us less animal and more human...” - “I loved waking up at that time, when the whole hospital would be asleep...as if the whole place belonged to me...I planned my life, worked on my dreams and aspired to do everything.” - “...we are the fruit of what we live through in our childhood and our adolescence; we are the product of many moments.” -“And even when you are an adult, you live through a lot of moments, but what happens is that you stop noticing...to truly know yourself you need to go back to your moments, analyse them and accept them for what they are.” -To not get angry: notice your point of no return >>>! -“Closing your eyes eliminates one of your senses, the sense that distracts you most, that brings in the most information.”

  13. 5 out of 5

    Petrina Binney

    Not so much a self-help book as one man’s philosophy, in The Yellow World we get to know the author as a very positive, enthusiastic, young man who, yes - has survived ten years of cancer, but has brought with him a beautifully child-like way of looking at the world. And he’s quite right. Everything becomes overcomplicated because of the rules that we all follow and the mindset we take for granted. Rather than reserve our intimacy for our lovers, Mr. Espinosa advises that we should seek out and r Not so much a self-help book as one man’s philosophy, in The Yellow World we get to know the author as a very positive, enthusiastic, young man who, yes - has survived ten years of cancer, but has brought with him a beautifully child-like way of looking at the world. And he’s quite right. Everything becomes overcomplicated because of the rules that we all follow and the mindset we take for granted. Rather than reserve our intimacy for our lovers, Mr. Espinosa advises that we should seek out and recognise our ‘yellows’: those especially close friends we all used to have as children. Friends we could hug relentlessly, and take naps with. We should have friends like that throughout our lives. We should have no fear of death. We should talk about it. We should really open ourselves up and let the world in. What comes across in this book is an unwaveringly optimistic man who truly lives his life. And although some of his advice is a little jarring to a British sensibility (such as I am stuck with), for example: sharing secrets because “what you hide is what says the most about you,” - from page 73 (The Yellow World by Albert Espinosa), I really liked it.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kerry

    So, this isn't really a "cancer survivor story" as such but more about the life lessons Albert Espinosa has learnt growing up battling cancer. He breaks down his thoughts and experiences into four "parts" according to a poem he finds inspirational by Gabriel Celaya called, "Autobiography", which, by the way I loved too! There's, "Beginning", "Carrying On", "Living" and "Relax" and I think just like Albert intended, this book is about his "yellow world" and is written in a very unique way just as So, this isn't really a "cancer survivor story" as such but more about the life lessons Albert Espinosa has learnt growing up battling cancer. He breaks down his thoughts and experiences into four "parts" according to a poem he finds inspirational by Gabriel Celaya called, "Autobiography", which, by the way I loved too! There's, "Beginning", "Carrying On", "Living" and "Relax" and I think just like Albert intended, this book is about his "yellow world" and is written in a very unique way just as he uniquely sees the world. It won't be to everyone's taste but I enjoyed Albert's "yellow world" and enjoyed his take on things. I certainly took some thought provoking moments from it and, just like Albert can, at times, see the "yellow world" he creates in my day to day. Don't expect massive, life changing self help from this book but more, some time to consider things outside the box!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    I wasn't quite sure what to expect from this book but I was pleasantly surprised. Albert Espinosa had cancer since he was a child but after losing a lung and a leg he is now cured! He shares his feelings about things he has learned through his times in hospital and the way he has coped and learned from these. He talks about twenty-three things he has learned that now he uses in his day to day life. He alk at length about yellows. Yellows are people who come into your life that you feel a deep co I wasn't quite sure what to expect from this book but I was pleasantly surprised. Albert Espinosa had cancer since he was a child but after losing a lung and a leg he is now cured! He shares his feelings about things he has learned through his times in hospital and the way he has coped and learned from these. He talks about twenty-three things he has learned that now he uses in his day to day life. He alk at length about yellows. Yellows are people who come into your life that you feel a deep connection with - they may be friends but could also be passing acquaintances. This is the kind of book you can dip in and out of and go back to again and again as there re some lovely uplifting ideas that we could all use in our lives. This was more uplifting than I expected it to be.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mel

    I have been watching the series to this book today. Lots of tears, because I know that life in hospital is exactly like that. Death is with us every day, even if we don't want to see it. Since I started working as a nurse, cancer, death and diseases have become a part of me. And the more you talk and learn about it, the less scared you get but can actually see the beauty of it. This book is beautifully written and I wish people could think that way without experiencing something like Albert did. I have been watching the series to this book today. Lots of tears, because I know that life in hospital is exactly like that. Death is with us every day, even if we don't want to see it. Since I started working as a nurse, cancer, death and diseases have become a part of me. And the more you talk and learn about it, the less scared you get but can actually see the beauty of it. This book is beautifully written and I wish people could think that way without experiencing something like Albert did.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ela Erciyes

    This was a must-read after watching and loving Fox’s rendition of Red Band Society. I have mixed feelings about it, I loved some chapters and had to power through others as I couldn’t relate to them. Overall, though, I can say that Espinosa’s outlook on life changed my worldview for the better. Oh, and also, now I can’t stop identifying Yellows every time a stranger evokes a certain feeling in me. Cat-like girl from that math class I attended, I’m talking about you.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Grace

    A somewhat healing book. It is the kind of book where you feel like your life has temporarily come on a standstill and you need some insight, to feel refreshed and rejuvenated, this book is that book to read. It is simple but straightforward yet deep. The kind of book which unravels itself differently each time you reread it and live life. Definitely recommend. This book will make you feel thankful and bright.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Daniele Iavarone

    I was expecting to face a typical biography, but instead what I found was a handbook of life tips written in a catchy style, but with some repetitions. If you like this genre, I would definitely suggest you to read Randy Pausch's "The Last Lecture". I was expecting to face a typical biography, but instead what I found was a handbook of life tips written in a catchy style, but with some repetitions. If you like this genre, I would definitely suggest you to read Randy Pausch's "The Last Lecture".

  20. 4 out of 5

    Luisa

    i won a copy of this book in the good reads giveaway, the book is ok, it has some very interesting ideas on how to deal with issues in life and the problems we face, and a interesting look at friendships (or yellows)

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ilyah Nazrah

    I really wanted to love this book. I really did. There were some good and useful lessons to take away from it but it wasn't enough to really hold my attention. Maybe at a different place in time, I'll reread it and think differently. I really wanted to love this book. I really did. There were some good and useful lessons to take away from it but it wasn't enough to really hold my attention. Maybe at a different place in time, I'll reread it and think differently.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Luca Nicoletti

    One of the best book I've ever read. I relate to anything written in this book. The author goes through 23 'improvements' you can have in your life. Highly recommended read, a MUST I'd say. Suggesting this to almost everyone I know and that I care about. One of the best book I've ever read. I relate to anything written in this book. The author goes through 23 'improvements' you can have in your life. Highly recommended read, a MUST I'd say. Suggesting this to almost everyone I know and that I care about.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sophie

    I really connected to this book, it was so heartfelt and actually made me think deeply about my own life! I did think for some people it might not be for them hence the 4 stars, but I really enjoyed it and I think the author is such a strong and inspiring man

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tanja

    Albert Espinosa's advices to see the bright side of sickness and the nearing time of death...I would be such a crap cancer patient. Albert Espinosa's advices to see the bright side of sickness and the nearing time of death...I would be such a crap cancer patient.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Rehan Abd Jamil

    I'm going to find my own yellow world soon :) I'm going to find my own yellow world soon :)

  26. 5 out of 5

    Adelina Iștoc

    the world really needs many books like this. and i need many yellows too. :') the world really needs many books like this. and i need many yellows too. :')

  27. 4 out of 5

    Isabel Vélez

    This sucked...so bad.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Drew Budds

    this book was not useful at all. i have read all of it and i still don't know what he is talking about this book was not useful at all. i have read all of it and i still don't know what he is talking about

  29. 4 out of 5

    Gsc

    A lot to take in with this book. Perhaps too much in one read? Will need to revisit.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    Thanks, CJ! xx

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