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A History of Children's Books in 100 Books takes a global perspective and traces the development of the genre from ancient stories, such as Aesop's Fables and the Indian Panchatantra, through the Puritan primers of the 17th century to the Harry Potter series and books as technology. Taking the approach of its precursor, The History of the Book in 100 Books, this book is abo A History of Children's Books in 100 Books takes a global perspective and traces the development of the genre from ancient stories, such as Aesop's Fables and the Indian Panchatantra, through the Puritan primers of the 17th century to the Harry Potter series and books as technology. Taking the approach of its precursor, The History of the Book in 100 Books, this book is about children's books as artifacts, as well as the texts they contain, and the industry and society that produced them. It covers aspects of selection, design, production and marketing of books for children. For the most part, illustrations are key components of children's stories, visualizing fantastic scenes and making them instantly recognizable, and such artwork is beautifully reproduced throughout. The chapters, with topic examples, are: 1. Oral traditions and pre-literacy; baby's first book; folk tales; nursery rhymes; board books; Sumerian "lullaby" tablet; Dr. Seuss. 2. Fables around the world for the young; Panchatantra (India 200 AD). 3. ABC of Aristotle (Middle English); pop-ups, picture books, early learning; alphabet books. 4. Educational books, non-fiction; adult influence; behavior; The New England Primer. 5. Smaller books for small readers; child protagonists; miniature books; chapter books. 6. Animal Magic; Mother Goose; Charlotte's Web; Beatrix Potter; The Jungle Book; A. A. Milne. 7. Innocence, experience, genre books; imperialism; religion; Little Women; Black Beauty. 8. Fairies and Frighteners: Grimm Brothers; Japanese Fairy Tales; Edward Gorey; Maurice Sendak; Der Strewwelpeter. 9. New genres, adventure stories; pulp fiction; C. S. Lewis; Pippi Longstocking; H. G. Wells. 10. Wartime: Destruction of books; series; awards; Le Petit Prince; Nazi button book; Roald Dahl; Matilda. 11 Comics; new media; Manga; survival manuals; cartoons; advertising; political correctness; awards. This is an authoritative introduction for general readers, for those interested in illustration arts, and for students of children's literature, its history, and the history of books. It is an essential selection for specialty and general collections.


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A History of Children's Books in 100 Books takes a global perspective and traces the development of the genre from ancient stories, such as Aesop's Fables and the Indian Panchatantra, through the Puritan primers of the 17th century to the Harry Potter series and books as technology. Taking the approach of its precursor, The History of the Book in 100 Books, this book is abo A History of Children's Books in 100 Books takes a global perspective and traces the development of the genre from ancient stories, such as Aesop's Fables and the Indian Panchatantra, through the Puritan primers of the 17th century to the Harry Potter series and books as technology. Taking the approach of its precursor, The History of the Book in 100 Books, this book is about children's books as artifacts, as well as the texts they contain, and the industry and society that produced them. It covers aspects of selection, design, production and marketing of books for children. For the most part, illustrations are key components of children's stories, visualizing fantastic scenes and making them instantly recognizable, and such artwork is beautifully reproduced throughout. The chapters, with topic examples, are: 1. Oral traditions and pre-literacy; baby's first book; folk tales; nursery rhymes; board books; Sumerian "lullaby" tablet; Dr. Seuss. 2. Fables around the world for the young; Panchatantra (India 200 AD). 3. ABC of Aristotle (Middle English); pop-ups, picture books, early learning; alphabet books. 4. Educational books, non-fiction; adult influence; behavior; The New England Primer. 5. Smaller books for small readers; child protagonists; miniature books; chapter books. 6. Animal Magic; Mother Goose; Charlotte's Web; Beatrix Potter; The Jungle Book; A. A. Milne. 7. Innocence, experience, genre books; imperialism; religion; Little Women; Black Beauty. 8. Fairies and Frighteners: Grimm Brothers; Japanese Fairy Tales; Edward Gorey; Maurice Sendak; Der Strewwelpeter. 9. New genres, adventure stories; pulp fiction; C. S. Lewis; Pippi Longstocking; H. G. Wells. 10. Wartime: Destruction of books; series; awards; Le Petit Prince; Nazi button book; Roald Dahl; Matilda. 11 Comics; new media; Manga; survival manuals; cartoons; advertising; political correctness; awards. This is an authoritative introduction for general readers, for those interested in illustration arts, and for students of children's literature, its history, and the history of books. It is an essential selection for specialty and general collections.

30 review for A History of Children's Books in 100 Books

  1. 5 out of 5

    Hilary

    This is a lovely, big book with generous amounts of big colour illustrations, which is exactly what I want in a book about books. Lots of interesting children's book facts, I was surprised that after Dorothy Kunhardt's humorously titled Junket is Nice, she made a touchy-feely book in 1940! I thought this was a recent thing. Edible hornbooks-a sort of paddle shaped gingerbread with the alphabet on popular in the 1700s. There are pop up books, books that turn into a mini theatre, books with paper This is a lovely, big book with generous amounts of big colour illustrations, which is exactly what I want in a book about books. Lots of interesting children's book facts, I was surprised that after Dorothy Kunhardt's humorously titled Junket is Nice, she made a touchy-feely book in 1940! I thought this was a recent thing. Edible hornbooks-a sort of paddle shaped gingerbread with the alphabet on popular in the 1700s. There are pop up books, books that turn into a mini theatre, books with paper cut out dolls, and the scariest young children's book I have ever seen called The Tribulations of Tommy Tip Top, a cautionary tale about misbehaving, I certainly wouldn't want to see this book at bedtime. Sadly my copy is from the library, this is the sort of book to flick through and dip into from time to time not one I would read cover to cover. It is wonderful to look through, and nice to spot so many favourites.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    Not what I hoped for. A big coffee-table book with small font, so almost impossible for me to actually read. Nor is there any clarity about what the actual 100 books are or why they're chosen... rather it's just another history of kid-lit, of which inumerable already exist. The bits of text I do squint to make out are boring. Also, it's from a British perspective, which, again, has been done. There's a bit from the Empire, but it's not truly international, which would be best, or American, which Not what I hoped for. A big coffee-table book with small font, so almost impossible for me to actually read. Nor is there any clarity about what the actual 100 books are or why they're chosen... rather it's just another history of kid-lit, of which inumerable already exist. The bits of text I do squint to make out are boring. Also, it's from a British perspective, which, again, has been done. There's a bit from the Empire, but it's not truly international, which would be best, or American, which would make it more palatable to me. Otoh, I do have books and illustrators to investigate, and I may be adding significantly to my TBR. "The Life of a Bold AB on His Ship in the Rolling C" by Will Kidd Frederick Warne aka Frederick Warne & Co for illustration Dr. Seuss' "Midnight Paintings" are actual fine art... I must remember to recommend the Panchatantra in the Children's Books group. I wish we could find a modern edition, beautifully illustrated, of stories from that tradition in every library, instead of more and more Aesop. The Bird Talisman as ill. by Henry Allen Wedgwood is another lost story from an eastern tradition. Other illustrators that intrigue me include L.M. Glazier and Raphael Tuck aka Raphael Tuck and Sons and Alhaji Abubakar Imam I also want to investigate The Children of the New Forest by Frederick Marryat aka "Captain" Marryat, The Rose and the Ring, The Boy Who Drew Cats and Other Japanese Fairy Tales, and The King of the Golden River, all of which seem vaguely familiar to me but insufficiently so. Barry Moser's art for Alice in Wonderland is probably worth a look. He did also reinsert an episode Tenniel caused to be left out, about a Wasp. Welp, at a relatively easy $29.95, this heavy epic will be snatched up by libraries. Too bad, imo. I'd rather they invested in some of the source material, even if only by repairing books that, instead, they're weeding. (I opine that older children's books could be shelved protectively and kept out-of-the-way for scholars and nostalgic adults.)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Christen

    A gluttonous feast for anyone interested in how books for children have grown and changed throughout the years. The kind of book that begs to be set in the floor and flipped through as you rest on your stomach and elbows.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Deb

    I was disappointed by this. The narrative was choppy and disconnected. The book itself is lovely, but the title is misleading, since each of the 100 books is supported by descriptions of it's predecessors and successors which brings the number of books covered closer to 1000. A scholarly compendium, rather than a fun read. I was disappointed by this. The narrative was choppy and disconnected. The book itself is lovely, but the title is misleading, since each of the 100 books is supported by descriptions of it's predecessors and successors which brings the number of books covered closer to 1000. A scholarly compendium, rather than a fun read.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ben

    This is a very comprehensive, almost academic look at the history and trends in children's books and the publishing industry that has sprouted up around them. Because it's written from a British standpoint, there were a lot of books I've never heard of and will be checking out soon. I really enjoyed this book and the only complaint is the size, since it doesn't lend to holding. I had to read it while eating at the table, which slowed my progress immensely, but I honestly don't see how that could This is a very comprehensive, almost academic look at the history and trends in children's books and the publishing industry that has sprouted up around them. Because it's written from a British standpoint, there were a lot of books I've never heard of and will be checking out soon. I really enjoyed this book and the only complaint is the size, since it doesn't lend to holding. I had to read it while eating at the table, which slowed my progress immensely, but I honestly don't see how that could be avoided. Without the size, the reader would lose out on all the wonderful images. It's displayed and formatted with such attention to detail, it's delightful. I really loved how they structured it too.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Vera

    A great book on - like the title says - children's books. From ABC's to adventure books and comics, this book covers the whole variety of the history of children's literature. The authors selected their choices carefully and clearly put a lot of effort in research. I admire how they tell so much in comparatively little space. The book is greatly designed (it's big!) with lots of pictures to get a very good idea of what the books described looked like. The book is originally British, but I think A great book on - like the title says - children's books. From ABC's to adventure books and comics, this book covers the whole variety of the history of children's literature. The authors selected their choices carefully and clearly put a lot of effort in research. I admire how they tell so much in comparatively little space. The book is greatly designed (it's big!) with lots of pictures to get a very good idea of what the books described looked like. The book is originally British, but I think the text is not just translated but rather transferred to German in my edition. One of my best buys this year!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Lovely illustrations

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jbondandrews

    A fascinating read. Just a pity there weren't more books from other cultures. A fascinating read. Just a pity there weren't more books from other cultures.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy

    WORLD comments here. WORLD comments here.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Barbara Thomas

  11. 4 out of 5

    Cathrine

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mills College Library

    002.08309 C378 2017

  13. 4 out of 5

    Michele

  14. 4 out of 5

    Paula

  15. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth B

  16. 4 out of 5

    Erica Thomas

  17. 5 out of 5

    Karyn Palmer

  18. 5 out of 5

    Krystal Day

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rin Ron

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ann-Marie Parsons

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Barden

  22. 4 out of 5

    Brandy Luther

  23. 5 out of 5

    Cody

  24. 4 out of 5

    Mackenzie Virginia

  25. 5 out of 5

    HueL

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Volker

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mary Ronan Drew

  28. 5 out of 5

    Susan Brouillard

  29. 4 out of 5

    Yasmin

  30. 4 out of 5

    Duncan

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