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Red Hood and the Outlaws, Volume 2: Who Is Artemis?

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Writer Scott Lobdell (SUPERMAN, TEEN TITANS) and artist Dexter Soy (RED HOOD/ARSENAL) shed fiery light on the Outlaws’ most mysterious member in RED HOOD AND THE OUTLAWS VOL. 2: WHO IS ARTEMIS? Little is known about the Amazon warrior Artemis, even by her teammates in the so-called “Outlaws.” But Red Hood and Bizarro are about to get a crash course when her past comes back Writer Scott Lobdell (SUPERMAN, TEEN TITANS) and artist Dexter Soy (RED HOOD/ARSENAL) shed fiery light on the Outlaws’ most mysterious member in RED HOOD AND THE OUTLAWS VOL. 2: WHO IS ARTEMIS? Little is known about the Amazon warrior Artemis, even by her teammates in the so-called “Outlaws.” But Red Hood and Bizarro are about to get a crash course when her past comes back to haunt all three of them—with a vengeance! Soon the team finds itself a long way from the streets of Gotham in Qurac[AR1] . Not only is the war-torn Middle Eastern country Artemis’ former home, it’s also the site of great personal tragedy for both the wayward Amazon and for Red Hood. It was in Qurac where Artemis lost her best friend, and where Jason Todd got himself murdered by the Joker, back before Robin became the Red Hood. Now someone in Qurac is using the ancient weapon of Artemis’ people—the Bow of Ra—to commit genocide, and only an Amazon can tame its incredible power. But stopping the Bow means marching right into the middle of a war zone...and in a war between Amazons and mankind, whose side will Artemis take? Collects RED HOOD AND THE OUTLAWS #7-11.


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Writer Scott Lobdell (SUPERMAN, TEEN TITANS) and artist Dexter Soy (RED HOOD/ARSENAL) shed fiery light on the Outlaws’ most mysterious member in RED HOOD AND THE OUTLAWS VOL. 2: WHO IS ARTEMIS? Little is known about the Amazon warrior Artemis, even by her teammates in the so-called “Outlaws.” But Red Hood and Bizarro are about to get a crash course when her past comes back Writer Scott Lobdell (SUPERMAN, TEEN TITANS) and artist Dexter Soy (RED HOOD/ARSENAL) shed fiery light on the Outlaws’ most mysterious member in RED HOOD AND THE OUTLAWS VOL. 2: WHO IS ARTEMIS? Little is known about the Amazon warrior Artemis, even by her teammates in the so-called “Outlaws.” But Red Hood and Bizarro are about to get a crash course when her past comes back to haunt all three of them—with a vengeance! Soon the team finds itself a long way from the streets of Gotham in Qurac[AR1] . Not only is the war-torn Middle Eastern country Artemis’ former home, it’s also the site of great personal tragedy for both the wayward Amazon and for Red Hood. It was in Qurac where Artemis lost her best friend, and where Jason Todd got himself murdered by the Joker, back before Robin became the Red Hood. Now someone in Qurac is using the ancient weapon of Artemis’ people—the Bow of Ra—to commit genocide, and only an Amazon can tame its incredible power. But stopping the Bow means marching right into the middle of a war zone...and in a war between Amazons and mankind, whose side will Artemis take? Collects RED HOOD AND THE OUTLAWS #7-11.

30 review for Red Hood and the Outlaws, Volume 2: Who Is Artemis?

  1. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    I've always liked Red Hood/Jason Todd, but I'm still sorta surprised when I love his titles. Like, they somehow shouldn't be as good as they are, you know? Especially since Scott Lobdell has been hit-or-miss with me. His Superman stuff wasn't always impressive or even remotely good a lot of the time. But. Here we are. A new day! And this was such a good story in general, but also a great origin story for Artemis and a surprisingly good facing your demons story for Jason. And the art! Zero complaint I've always liked Red Hood/Jason Todd, but I'm still sorta surprised when I love his titles. Like, they somehow shouldn't be as good as they are, you know? Especially since Scott Lobdell has been hit-or-miss with me. His Superman stuff wasn't always impressive or even remotely good a lot of the time. But. Here we are. A new day! And this was such a good story in general, but also a great origin story for Artemis and a surprisingly good facing your demons story for Jason. And the art! Zero complaints. Fantastic stuff, very expressive. Kenneth Rocafort is one of my favorites anyway, but nothing here from the other artist(s?) was ugly or weird. I'm genuinely looking forward to reading more about this anti-Trinity team. Definitely recommended!

  2. 4 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    I can't believe I'm giving a Scott Lobdell book a 4 out of 5. I just can't fucking believe it. Red Hood is now working with Artemis (The sexy Amazon Warrior) and Bazarro (The superman without much smarts) and they are doing GOOD! But you know these three can't do that for long. The first issue focuses on Bizarro and Jason deciding if he should kill the beast or not. The next few issues work with mostly Artemis past and by the end of the arc a lot changes but inside that arc you really see her an I can't believe I'm giving a Scott Lobdell book a 4 out of 5. I just can't fucking believe it. Red Hood is now working with Artemis (The sexy Amazon Warrior) and Bazarro (The superman without much smarts) and they are doing GOOD! But you know these three can't do that for long. The first issue focuses on Bizarro and Jason deciding if he should kill the beast or not. The next few issues work with mostly Artemis past and by the end of the arc a lot changes but inside that arc you really see her and Jason dealing with life experiences and their past and how to overcome it. Then last issue in the volume us spoiler full so I won't talk much about it but has some of the best sad panels I've seen. Good: I can't believe how much I'm connecting with everyone. Even Jason, who's always been my least liked in Bat Family, is really coming around. Bizzaro is a fucking joy and I love him. I even really liked Artemis journey and her acceptances of the past but willingness to move on to the future. Also the art remains solid and stylish. Bad: The emotional moments or choices can feel a little on the nose. Also sometimes the reasoning behind what characters do doesn't make much sense. Maybe over the mystical artifact makes people bad thing. Overall this was really fucking fun. I can't believe I enjoy a Scott Lobdell book or a Outlaws book but here we are. I hope it continues to be one of the best and most surprising DC books so far. A 3.5-4 out of 5.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    The successful rebirth of Red Hood and the Outlaws continues with a solid second volume, one that's only held back by it's slight brevity and a somewhat predictable main arc. Part of the series newfound charm is that it does everything it sets out to do really well. Scott Lobdell's improvement is clear to see and although he's not exactly re-inventing the wheel or writing the comic of the century, he doesn't need to. Jason and Artemis continue to entertain and Bizarro is lovable, making this new The successful rebirth of Red Hood and the Outlaws continues with a solid second volume, one that's only held back by it's slight brevity and a somewhat predictable main arc. Part of the series newfound charm is that it does everything it sets out to do really well. Scott Lobdell's improvement is clear to see and although he's not exactly re-inventing the wheel or writing the comic of the century, he doesn't need to. Jason and Artemis continue to entertain and Bizarro is lovable, making this new team much more endearing than the New 52 version ever were. Oh, and Jason's character development during (view spoiler)[his return to Qurac (hide spoiler)] ? Great stuff. Who Is Artemis? also offers a few visual treats, including the return of artist Kenneth Rocafort (who was the highlight of the New 52 run). Dexter Soy and Veronica Gandini continue to impress, as Soy draws the Outlaws brilliantly and Gandini's colour work is superb. Although I didn't enjoy this volume as much as the first, it still had it's fair share of great moments and left me looking forward to the next one. Forget the reputation this series (and it's writer) once had and give Red Hood and the Outlaws a shot.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mizuki

    "People change when they come back from the dead, trust me." Well.......that has to be the best quote I've seen in a while... In this second volume, the artwork is slightly different and I don't like it as much as the previous volume, but it's okay. (Nice artwork is always welcome!) A few funny things that I had noticed: (1.)I understand that having to crawl out of your grave sucks big time, so no one should do it more than once. XD (2)I noticed that unlike poor Superman and poor Batman, in the N "People change when they come back from the dead, trust me." Well.......that has to be the best quote I've seen in a while... In this second volume, the artwork is slightly different and I don't like it as much as the previous volume, but it's okay. (Nice artwork is always welcome!) A few funny things that I had noticed: (1.)I understand that having to crawl out of your grave sucks big time, so no one should do it more than once. XD (2)I noticed that unlike poor Superman and poor Batman, in the New-52 Bizarro doesn't have his underpants on the outside, well good for him...good for him. (3)Recently I've started to think Alfred should be promoted to sainthood for being the awesome guy that he is. XD I will stop here, I don't want to bother people with my Red Hood fangirl's screaming and exclaiming. Review for Vol. 1 https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... and...do excuse me for pimping my Red Hood fanart again...next time I should draw Bizarro and Artemis. (LINK: https://www.deviantart.com/darkchildr...) [email protected]/05/2019: Artemis Grace chibi, done! (Link: https://www.deviantart.com/darkchildr...) Review for vol. 1 https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... Review for vol. 3 https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... Review: Batman: A Death in the Family https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

  5. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea 🏳️‍🌈

    I really enjoyed this one! Again, I’m continually surprised by how well balanced and well written this series is. And Artemis feels like a real character! I have yet to feel like she’s being sexualized or treated like a side kick. While the last volume told Rebirth!Jason’s origin, this volume tells Artemis’ origin. She has a very interesting backstory and quite a bit of this tale involves her close “friend” Akila. This is where I wonder if DC refused to allow Lobdell to make them gay or if he per I really enjoyed this one! Again, I’m continually surprised by how well balanced and well written this series is. And Artemis feels like a real character! I have yet to feel like she’s being sexualized or treated like a side kick. While the last volume told Rebirth!Jason’s origin, this volume tells Artemis’ origin. She has a very interesting backstory and quite a bit of this tale involves her close “friend” Akila. This is where I wonder if DC refused to allow Lobdell to make them gay or if he personally decided not to go that far. We get panels of them being rather close, looking at each other affectionately and Artemis says “We we’re sisters... we were more.” So, it’s clear they were lesbians, Harold. Why not go that extra step? I’m confused. Anyway, throughout this volume, I never felt like that was being sensationalized or sexualized so, I’m thankful for that. There’s quite a bit of Jason struggling with what the right thing to do is regarding Bizarro. All other Superman clones were destroyed before they were “born”. There’s even an Of Mice and Men moment that broke my heart. But, I’m loving where his partnership with Red Him and Red Her has gone. The chemistry between the three of them is great. I love getting more insight into this Jason’s history. I’m looking forward to seeing where this series goes.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    Human sacrifice, dogs and cats living together – mass hysteria. What is happening? Scott Lobdell wrote the entire run of Red Hood and the Outlaws and it was awful. Now we've gotten our second great arc with Rebirth. In the first issue Jason is troubled by if he's doing the right thing with Bizarro, and struggles with what to do reminiscent of "Of Mice and Men". Then we move into Artemis's new origin and we head to Qurac. Lobdell splits up the team and they all get moments to shine. Even Bizarro, Human sacrifice, dogs and cats living together – mass hysteria. What is happening? Scott Lobdell wrote the entire run of Red Hood and the Outlaws and it was awful. Now we've gotten our second great arc with Rebirth. In the first issue Jason is troubled by if he's doing the right thing with Bizarro, and struggles with what to do reminiscent of "Of Mice and Men". Then we move into Artemis's new origin and we head to Qurac. Lobdell splits up the team and they all get moments to shine. Even Bizarro, whose every appearance has annoyed the crap out of me for the last 40 years, is likable. In fact, he might be my favorite character. Well done, Scott Lobdell. It's taken 20+ years, but you've finally written a comic I enjoy. Received an advance copy from DC and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    [Read as single issues] Go back in time and tell past-me that the New 52 Red Hood & The Outlaws just needs to be skipped, because this is like a totally different book. Scott Lobdell is doing some superb work with these three characters, bringing the focus away from Jason Todd and onto Artemis for this second storyline that puts her unique tribe of Amazons in the spotlight, as well as shedding some light on her new Rebirth origin and giving Bizarro some character defining moments along the way. T [Read as single issues] Go back in time and tell past-me that the New 52 Red Hood & The Outlaws just needs to be skipped, because this is like a totally different book. Scott Lobdell is doing some superb work with these three characters, bringing the focus away from Jason Todd and onto Artemis for this second storyline that puts her unique tribe of Amazons in the spotlight, as well as shedding some light on her new Rebirth origin and giving Bizarro some character defining moments along the way. The balance between the three characters has rotated nicely after the first Jason-heavy arc, and I fully expect the Bizarro arc that follows to do the same. I thoroughly enjoyed every issue of this arc, and I am just as surprised as you are to say that about two volumes in a row. We get Kenneth Rocafort to pencil the prologue issue here, and if you've got him on your 'fill-in' story, you're doing something right. Then series artist Dexter Soy returns, and his art remains as dependable and fluid as ever. I enjoy his inks as well as his pencils, they really give the characters good depth, and he seems to have hit his stride after pencilling 12+ issues and only taking a break for one. Yep, I'm in shock too, but Red Hood & The Outlaws is pretty damn good. Whodathunk?

  8. 4 out of 5

    Wing Kee

    What is happeneing? Are we in the Upside Down??!!! World: The art for the most part is good, it's not as good as the last arc and Soy and others do a good job but it's just not the same. That being said the Bizarro issue really had ugly colors and lines making it not my cup of tea. The art has been really restrained which is not what I usually expect from a Lobdell written book, the cleavage shots are there but not excessive so wow editors do know how tone him down. I did however did not like th What is happeneing? Are we in the Upside Down??!!! World: The art for the most part is good, it's not as good as the last arc and Soy and others do a good job but it's just not the same. That being said the Bizarro issue really had ugly colors and lines making it not my cup of tea. The art has been really restrained which is not what I usually expect from a Lobdell written book, the cleavage shots are there but not excessive so wow editors do know how tone him down. I did however did not like the Joker licking the crowbar...not needed. The world building on the otherhand for this arc is fantastic, really fantastic. The creation of the second Amazonian city and the chosen warrior was interesting and putting them in Quarac and their patron being Ra was just brilliant. Also the stuff with Jason, yes it's been done so many times and it's been covered by so many tones and angles but here in this arc with the character moments it was great and world changing for Jason, good job Lobdell... (holy crap I just said that). Story: Lobdell has made a character book, I can't believe it and I will keep saying that because I just simpy cannot believe I'm reading this book and he's the writer. This books focus is on character and that makes this so much more than the action punch punch smash smash that this book is. The quiet moments in this book in the first 3 issues were fantastic, this is what we need more in superhero books, a weighted reason for the fight and to care when it happens. The pacing is perfect, the Bizarro issue moved me and so did Artemis and her background it was so good. Great story. Characters: I can't believe I'm going to say that Jason's story is interesting here. So many writers has done the Joker crowbar scene and the brooding angsty kid that can't get past that anger but Lobdell did something here that I don't know if he will stick with but he let Jason have resolution and move on. I love that, please let it stick. I also felt that Jason found his personal voice a lot more this arc that separates himself from the other Robins. Artemis' arc and origin is so good and well thought out and just different enough and tied into Wonder Woman enough to be amazing. Her origin was just so good and informs the character that she is, she's much more consistent this arc and her personal voice is starting to come through. I did not really like the forehead to forehead scene at the end of the book as I felt it was not earned but it was a quiet tender moment that I really enjoyed (but please don't make them a thing, please). Bizarro, is great, he's simple but great and I look forward to more of him discovering the world and finding his place, I really want to explore him as a character. I can't believe that Lobdell went form tits ass and explosions to quiet moments, characters and story. Read this if not for the story but for proof that unicorns exist and they can poop rainbows. Onward to the next book!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Batastrophe

    I, like so many others, continue to be pleasantly surprised by this iteration of the Outlaws. And I mean, it's quite a surprise. This volume begins by telling a slower-paced, more emotional story about Jason and Bizarro's relationship. There's action, but it also takes the time to slow down and delve into some of Jason and Bizarro's history and emotions. What I like the most about this iteration of the Outlaws is how this time around it's clear what the emotional focus is for each character's stor I, like so many others, continue to be pleasantly surprised by this iteration of the Outlaws. And I mean, it's quite a surprise. This volume begins by telling a slower-paced, more emotional story about Jason and Bizarro's relationship. There's action, but it also takes the time to slow down and delve into some of Jason and Bizarro's history and emotions. What I like the most about this iteration of the Outlaws is how this time around it's clear what the emotional focus is for each character's story is, as well as the main emotional focus of the series: this is a story about Jason, and that's clear no matter what else is going on plot-wise. My favorite detail of this series so far is how we periodically see little flashbacks that Jason has as he's reminded of his past. These moments do an incredible amount to inform Jason's character. This is the kind of stuff I just eat up, and also the kind of stuff that isn't always there in comic books. I'm always up for a good fight scene, but I'm usually far more interested in why the characters are fighting, y'know? Speaking of, I really enjoyed the backstory we got on Artemis and Akila. It really gave her some much-needed background, and was a good story as well. I also love that this book doesn't get distracted with any superhero in-fighting, as often happens in comics. I'm so tired of each time two characters on the same side disagree, they turn to their fists first. But here, Jason and Artemis are having a rather large disagreement, but through it all they've got each other's backs and don't let it come between them as teammates, which is something I absolutely love. The book offers a nice character-driven story and I think the tone fits the book perfectly. I almost have a hard time believing that I'm saying this, but Red Hood and the Outlaws is so far one of the best-written books in Rebirth, and it's one that shouldn't be missed. Though I do have to dock points for the (thankfully brief) return of the dreaded mouth-helmet.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Emma Gerts

    Can we all say queer-baiting? Despite this comic being entitled "Who is Artemis?" I finished it still not feeling like I have any real sense of her character or who she is. Jason remains far and away the most interesting and fleshed out character, though the brief moments of insight about Bizzaro's development and learning to be human were intriguing. Artemis' relationship with Akira just felt weird - she keeps referring to her as "friend" and "sister", but the dialogue and the art, to me, were Can we all say queer-baiting? Despite this comic being entitled "Who is Artemis?" I finished it still not feeling like I have any real sense of her character or who she is. Jason remains far and away the most interesting and fleshed out character, though the brief moments of insight about Bizzaro's development and learning to be human were intriguing. Artemis' relationship with Akira just felt weird - she keeps referring to her as "friend" and "sister", but the dialogue and the art, to me, were saying they were lovers. Given that we know the Amazons are canonically lesbian and bisexual I can't see any reason for this sort of queer baiting, which was off putting. Overall I enjoyed the story and Jason remains a really interesting and entertaining character, but I think more work needs to be done on fleshing out Artemis and Bizzaro for this team to really work.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jenny Clark

    Is it just me, or are the comic volumes getting smaller? I have some that are almost 200 pages, and this one is not even 150.I feel like there should have been at least one more volume, to finish up the story line. Bizarro is dead? hurt? IDK. It does end on an emotional note, and I did enjoy seeing the characters grow and become closer. The art is not my favorite, but it is consistent through out the run and is decent enough. The story line is pretty good too, if it is a bit clichéd. Over all, l Is it just me, or are the comic volumes getting smaller? I have some that are almost 200 pages, and this one is not even 150.I feel like there should have been at least one more volume, to finish up the story line. Bizarro is dead? hurt? IDK. It does end on an emotional note, and I did enjoy seeing the characters grow and become closer. The art is not my favorite, but it is consistent through out the run and is decent enough. The story line is pretty good too, if it is a bit clichéd. Over all, looking for more of this series next year, as it comes out collected like this.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Eri

    why are comics writers so rude honestly but as usual cried a lot over Jason typical review to come

  13. 5 out of 5

    Yerasly

    This series is good for me, is it one of the best rebirth series right now? Maybe. But I do highly enjoy it, especially this volume. It had a cliffhanger ending so can't wait to pick up the next arc. This series is good for me, is it one of the best rebirth series right now? Maybe. But I do highly enjoy it, especially this volume. It had a cliffhanger ending so can't wait to pick up the next arc.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Aarthika

    Loving this series!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    ARC REVIEW Story: Before it gets into Artemis' story the first issues explains a little bit more about Bizzaro and where he came from. It also explains that at some point in time they may be forced to deal with him, permanently but this is not that time. Artemis is looking for a weapon that was gifted to her people from the Gods, and if the right person uses it it is a weapon of mass destruction. It was in Gotham at one point but now it's back to where it all started, and not just for Artemis bu ARC REVIEW Story: Before it gets into Artemis' story the first issues explains a little bit more about Bizzaro and where he came from. It also explains that at some point in time they may be forced to deal with him, permanently but this is not that time. Artemis is looking for a weapon that was gifted to her people from the Gods, and if the right person uses it it is a weapon of mass destruction. It was in Gotham at one point but now it's back to where it all started, and not just for Artemis but for Jason too. They find out it is back in Quarac, the place where Artemis' home is hidden from the world and the place where The Joker killed Jason. Their plane is shot down by the Quarac military and the three of them are separated. Jason is taken by the military, Bizzarro lands in a civilian area and they ask him for help; while Artemis lands at home and is faced with the embodiment of her guilt. Jason hears one story and Artemis hears another which side is right and will Artemis be able to stand up and do the right thing? Art: Mirko Colak does issue 7 and I really like it except for the eyes, the eyes all look small and beady. Kenneth Rocafort draws the prologue wonderfully, great action and attention to detail. Dexter Soy takes over for the rest of the volume and does a fantastic job at it. Some brilliant coloring by Veronica Gandini and Dan Brown. Characters: Red Hood and the Outlaws consist of Jason Todd who was once a Robin, but was brutally murdered by The Joker and brought back to life by the Lazarus Pit and is now Red Hood. Artemis is an Amazon much like Wonder Woman except years ago a small fraction of the Amazons left Themyscira and found another pantheon to shelter them. And Bizarro a Superman clone gone wrong, the only surviving clone from that failed experiment. Review: It's Jason Todd so I'm pretty much going to love it. He is one of my favorite characters from the Batman series, I love guys with tortured pasts and who are kinda assholes. The overall story was downright good. It was captivating and entertaining. It shows real character development for Jason and Artemis. It was a great story I couldn't put it down.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Malum

    This kind of reminded me of comics before they became convoluted crossover messes. We have a great, self-contained story that moves at a decent clip and has as much heart as it does action. The art is also really good, with special mention going to the panel where Bizarro gets punched and you can see his skin ripple. The only thing that I thought was weird was some of the onomatopoeia that was used. "Grab" and "shove" are a bit on the nose. It didn't detract from the book, it was just an unusual This kind of reminded me of comics before they became convoluted crossover messes. We have a great, self-contained story that moves at a decent clip and has as much heart as it does action. The art is also really good, with special mention going to the panel where Bizarro gets punched and you can see his skin ripple. The only thing that I thought was weird was some of the onomatopoeia that was used. "Grab" and "shove" are a bit on the nose. It didn't detract from the book, it was just an unusual choice.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Justin Nelson

    Similarly to Volume 1, this was standard, enjoyable, but ultimately forgettable, comic book fare. Story-wise, a formulaic McGuffin and Lost Friend tale. Lobdell could have leaned further into the contrasts of Artemis and Wonder Woman and how their experiences and pasts shaped their characters. Same with Jason...some attempts at interesting connections to trauma of his convoluted past that also fall short. The artwork from Dexter Soy alternates between some beautiful, sketchy work and some that l Similarly to Volume 1, this was standard, enjoyable, but ultimately forgettable, comic book fare. Story-wise, a formulaic McGuffin and Lost Friend tale. Lobdell could have leaned further into the contrasts of Artemis and Wonder Woman and how their experiences and pasts shaped their characters. Same with Jason...some attempts at interesting connections to trauma of his convoluted past that also fall short. The artwork from Dexter Soy alternates between some beautiful, sketchy work and some that looks rushed and unfinished. Not bad, not great, looking for more from the possibilities that these 3 characters could bring to a story.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa

    i would give my life for jay and artemis to be happy they deserve so much better

  19. 4 out of 5

    Morgan A Kelley

    Not as good as volume 1, but I still highly enjoyed it.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ivy

    5 🌟 The Outlaws go to Quarac to find the Bow of Ra.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Weaving Fiction ( Sj )

    This wasn't quite as good as the first volume, so I'm giving it 3.5 stars. I really enjoyed the characters but the main arc of this felt rushed and a little unsubstantial. This wasn't quite as good as the first volume, so I'm giving it 3.5 stars. I really enjoyed the characters but the main arc of this felt rushed and a little unsubstantial.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Paxton Holley

    I’m really enjoying the humor and heart that Lobdell is putting into these comics. Great, fun, stories.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Joe

    The Amazon story is great. The Jason Todd story is great. The Bizzaro story is great..good work. Outlaws are fun.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Becky Loader

    Good follow-up to volume 1 and background story for Artemis. Art is very good.

  25. 4 out of 5

    TehBeast

    So this was a good book. I liked the story with Artemis and Akira, about the Bow of Ra that essayer really cool. Um I really dont like the “Villian” in General, that was a complete waste of time and I feel they could have a better villian than that. This was a short book as well I didn’t like that. Overall good book

  26. 4 out of 5

    Louis Skye

    Slightly inconsistent art in the first couple of issues but once it got back on track, the issues were beautiful to read. Liked the throwbacks to Jason’s ‘past’ life and his death. He’s such a complex and fascinating character. Hope we get more. I’m perplexed by the forced hetero-ness of Artemis and Akila’s relationship. The chemistry between them is practically leaping off the page but it’s only vaguely, very vaguely, implied that there was a romance between them. Comics’ cowardice about anything Slightly inconsistent art in the first couple of issues but once it got back on track, the issues were beautiful to read. Liked the throwbacks to Jason’s ‘past’ life and his death. He’s such a complex and fascinating character. Hope we get more. I’m perplexed by the forced hetero-ness of Artemis and Akila’s relationship. The chemistry between them is practically leaping off the page but it’s only vaguely, very vaguely, implied that there was a romance between them. Comics’ cowardice about anything non-traditional makes for painful and frustrating reading. I like the cliffhanger in the end, and anpm hoping we get to learn more about Bizarro. I’m still surprised that the creep Lobdell has written a good story. I just wish we could ret-con such people out of existence.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jacqueline O.

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I enjoyed volume 2 of Red Hood and the Outlaws just as much as I enjoyed volume 1, and I read it twice. Jason Todd, Bizarro, and Artemis are turning out to be a great team, if not exactly conventional - although that is part of the charm. Volume 2 starts off with Red Hood (Jason Todd) challenging a group of mobsters and drug lords. He basically tells them to leave Gotham now or else. The mobsters of course do not listen. Bizarro joins the fight and when Killer Croc arrives to help the villains, I enjoyed volume 2 of Red Hood and the Outlaws just as much as I enjoyed volume 1, and I read it twice. Jason Todd, Bizarro, and Artemis are turning out to be a great team, if not exactly conventional - although that is part of the charm. Volume 2 starts off with Red Hood (Jason Todd) challenging a group of mobsters and drug lords. He basically tells them to leave Gotham now or else. The mobsters of course do not listen. Bizarro joins the fight and when Killer Croc arrives to help the villains, he destroys Killer Croc. However, this croc is a fake, a robot. The gangsters are angry that they didn't get the "merchandise" they paid for - but Jason is concerned about Bizarro's actions and violence. However, when Jason asks specifically if Bizarro knew Croc was not alive - Bizarro states he knew. Returning home to their hideout, Jason talks to Artemis who has discovered more information about Bizarro. The Superman clones from Cadmus have all been extremely violent, and Lex Luthor had ordered their destruction. Bizarro escapes. Next, Jason and Bizarro are on a hill in the country overlooking Gotham. Bizarro talks of his memories and then states that he knows they aren't real. However, he also wants to make new memories with "Red Him" (Red Hood) and "Red Her" (Artemis). Jason considers shooting Bizarro, but changes his mind. Artemis and Jason look for information to help her find the Bow of Ra. This leads them to Qurac. Both Jason and Artemis must confront their pasts as well as learning to trust and rely on each other and Bizarro. Jason is quickly captured by soldiers. He's taken to the exact place where he died as a teenager (see A Death in the Family). Jason not only must confront his memories of what happened and his feelings and anger at the Joker for causing his death, but he hallucinates his own wounded body and has to confront the spirit. Jason is able to conquer his fears, his memories, and his triggers. He then realizes from conversations with the local dictator that it isn't the dictator who has the Bow of Ra. The dictator of Qurac had it at one point, and in trying to use it, Artemis's once friend, Akila (the Shim'tar) was brought back from the dead (something Jason has unique experience with) and the experience left her, well, less than sane (something else that Jason also has experience with). But Jason also learns the dictator no longer has the deadly weapon. And if he no longer has it, there is only one other person who could - and who was incidentally responsible for the slaughter in the country of Qurac. Meanwhile, Artemis seeks out her friend. She is welcomed back with open arms to the company of Amazons. Slowly she begins to suspects something is wrong, but she accepts Akila's tale that the dictator is responsible for everything. Meanwhile, Bizarro locates a band of refugees and attempts to aid them. Bizarro gives the impression of a simple but gentle giant - like the "monster" in some versions of Frankenstein (essentially the "monster" isn't monstrous - it's the people around him and they react which are monsters). The people treat Bizarro well when he tries to help, but when their trek ends at the base of a mountain, one man explodes in anger. The final conflict is between the soldiers of Qurac, the Amazons-in-exile, Artemis, Jason, and Akila. Jason quickly convinces Artemis that the dictator doesn't have the Bow of Ra. Artemis realizes only Akila could have it. She confronts Akila who admits attacking the citizenry of Qurac with it, because she wishes her people to be free. There is a battle. Bizarro knocks his way through the mountain and joins in. Artemis realizes she is also Shim'tar - a position both women had battled and trained for. She picks up the Bow and fires an arrow at Akila. The power of the bow does not harm Artemis but flows through her. It hits Akila full force, who is overwhelmed and about to explode with considerable power (not to mention damage). Bizarro flies her straight up, where she explodes out of harms way of any innocents. Bizarro falls to Earth and appears dead. Again, Red Hood and the Outlaws is an impressive book. The characters are deep and complex. Although all three may be termed "anti-heroes", none would violate their own personal code for personal gain or to harm others. Even when confronting gangsters, Jason, surprisingly finds a less terminal way to get them out of Gotham. Jason would be appalled if Bizarro were to use extreme force. Artemis is in many ways the same - she can be extremely violent, especially if the Bow of Ra becomes a permanent part of her kit. Yet, she also has a code. And it may be her code that led to her friend to be chosen by the gods to hold the Bow. Yet it now appears Artemis was chosen instead - or she is certainly chosen now. Bizarro is, well, he's the gentle giant - he wants to help and is slowly learning his own strength and how to limit that. Jason now knows he can trust Bizarro within limits. However, at the end of the current volume, Bizarro is dead. That most certainly won't last, because: comics. Red Hood and the Outlaws is a surprisingly well-written, intense book with complex, driven characters. I do feel it needs to expand a bit and additional team members brought on board, but overall I am very impressed and will continue to buy the series in graphic novel format.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    I didn't love this volume quite as much as the previous one, but it's still really good. Honestly, I think the biggest problem is that the title storyline could have used another issue or two, to fully flesh out Artemis's backstory and relationship with Akila. That said, there's some amazing scenes, particularly between Jason and Bizarro and Jason's confrontation with his traumatic past. I didn't love this volume quite as much as the previous one, but it's still really good. Honestly, I think the biggest problem is that the title storyline could have used another issue or two, to fully flesh out Artemis's backstory and relationship with Akila. That said, there's some amazing scenes, particularly between Jason and Bizarro and Jason's confrontation with his traumatic past.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ben Truong

    This trade paperback picks up where the previous volume left off, collecting the next five issues (7–11) of the 2016 on-going series. Despite being named Red Hood and the Outlaws: Who Is Artemis?, the first issue opens of the trade paperback with a one-shot centered on Bizarro. Written by Scott Lobdell and penciled by Mirko Colak this one-shot deals with Bizarro creation, in short Artemis and Jason Todd finds out that their Bizarro was a failed experiment and was decommissioned to be destroyed, b This trade paperback picks up where the previous volume left off, collecting the next five issues (7–11) of the 2016 on-going series. Despite being named Red Hood and the Outlaws: Who Is Artemis?, the first issue opens of the trade paperback with a one-shot centered on Bizarro. Written by Scott Lobdell and penciled by Mirko Colak this one-shot deals with Bizarro creation, in short Artemis and Jason Todd finds out that their Bizarro was a failed experiment and was decommissioned to be destroyed, but was not from an oversight. Todd was placed in the dilemma of what to do with Bizarro, with a Kryptonite bullet in a gun, he and Bizarro goes on a road trip where they bonded and Todd decided to let Bizarro live. The rest of the trade paperback focuses on Artemis. Hearing rumors that the Bow of Ra is being used – a weapon that can harness the power of the sun and only an Amazon could use, the Outlaws travels to Qurac to investigate. En route to Qurac, their plane was shot down, separating the Outlaws. Bizarro lands in a small town of refugees seeking a hero to help with their plight, Todd finds himself incarcerated by Ahmed Heinle – the Supreme Leader of Qurac a placed in a cell near the place with was killed by the Joker many years ago, and Artemis finds herself among her tribe – the Baba-Mighdall and reunited with her best friend Akila, who Artemis thought she killed many years ago. Red Hood and the Outlaws: Who Is Artemis? deals with mainly with Artemis past relationship with her best friend Akila, while trying to deal with her resurrected form in the present. Although it's not an origin story per say, it did open up some history to this relatively unknown character. Jason Todd as Red Hood also shares a significant portion of the spotlight, by moving his death to Qurac (instead of Ethiopia), we see Todd's past – specifically his time as Robin and his death at the hands of the Joker. Although it's been done before, Todd confronting his death and resurrection, but this time it seems fresh and new. I had to take a double take to check that Scott Lobdell did indeed write the entire trade paperback, because it was written rather well. I really enjoyed this story arc, although I may have wanted a more in depth history of Artemis of Bab-Mighdall, what he gave was sufficient to quell my fan boy heart a tad. I like the parallels of Jason Todd resurrection with that of Akila and having Todd tell Artemis that when a person is brought back to life – they don't return fully or the same. There were three pencilers that contribute in this trade paperback. Mirko Colak penciled the Bizarro one-shot (Red Hood and the Outlaws #7), Kenneth Rocafort penciled the prologue for the Who Is Artemis? story arc (Red Hood and the Outlaws #8), while the rest of the trade paperback was penciled by Dexter Soy. For the most part, the penciling was well done Kenneth Rocafort brings a nostalgia feeling, being he was the first Red Hood and the Outlaws penciled for the first issue. Colak penciling was also well done, albeit her Jason Todd civilian looks slightly Asian – a nice concept, but I don't think that’s what Colak intended. Soy's penciling is amazing, I really love his beautiful style – I am glad that he's the artist attached to the series. All in all, Red Hood: Who Is Artemis? is a wonderfully continuation to the first trade paperback. Surprisingly, the writing is rather strong and the pencil ling was amazing as always.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jacquie Fortin

    A fairly solid second volume. Rather than an arc that spurred more character development and growth, this volume was more of a character study in how Artemis and Jason deal with their inner struggles and past regrets. Though enjoyable, it felt slightly more disjointed to me than the first volume. That said, I enjoyed delving into Artemis' past and finding out more about the significance and power of the Bow of Ra. It was an awfully weird coincidence for Jason to end up at that particular part of A fairly solid second volume. Rather than an arc that spurred more character development and growth, this volume was more of a character study in how Artemis and Jason deal with their inner struggles and past regrets. Though enjoyable, it felt slightly more disjointed to me than the first volume. That said, I enjoyed delving into Artemis' past and finding out more about the significance and power of the Bow of Ra. It was an awfully weird coincidence for Jason to end up at that particular part of Quarac (and he says as much himself). As engaging and heartbreaking as it is to see Jay's struggle with the trauma of his murder, actually ending up next to the compound where it happened for no particular reason seemed like an odd choice. He could have had the same struggle without such a convenient plot device. All the same, I like that he now sees working with others (rather than always going it alone and only on his terms) as a strength. Artemis' tragic relationship with Akila was a real highlight for me, though I wish it could have been extended beyond one book. They did a good job of making the relationship feel like it had history and depth, but (view spoiler)[tossing Akila away at the end (literally) just so that Artemis could have the bow for herself (hide spoiler)] seemed like a bit of a waste of potential to me. Then again, who knows. As Jason often points out, (view spoiler)[death often isn't a particularly permanent thing in this universe, regardless of how impossible it seems for someone to come back (hide spoiler)] . The only odd and sort of obnoxious thing to me was how hesitant the book was about making it explicitly obvious that Artemis and Akila were romantically involved. It was loud and clear to me, and yet the book often seemed to hide behind the word 'sister' and 'best friend,' as if repeating this would distract your attention away from the parts that make it clear that while, yes, they are both those things, they are also more. Do I wish that readers didn't need to be smacked in the face in order to understand that a w/w relationship that's being developed is, in fact, not platonic? Yes, yes I do. But the joke of 'just gals being pals' is so often repeated that it's no secret that being a normal amount of obvious doesn't usually cut it. Even just one or two changes of 'sister' to something more intimate would have been enough to get the point across, I think, since both Akila does directly call her 'my love' once. Basically, if you're going to include it, then don't half-ass it. Commit to it, you know?

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