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In a fit of enlightenment democracy and ebullient goodwill, King Verence invites Uberwald's undead, the Magpyrs, into Lancre to celebrate the birth of his daughter. But once ensconced within the castle, these wine-drinking, garlic-eating, sun-loving modern vampires have no intention of leaving. Ever. Only an uneasy alliance between a nervous young priest and the argumentati In a fit of enlightenment democracy and ebullient goodwill, King Verence invites Uberwald's undead, the Magpyrs, into Lancre to celebrate the birth of his daughter. But once ensconced within the castle, these wine-drinking, garlic-eating, sun-loving modern vampires have no intention of leaving. Ever. Only an uneasy alliance between a nervous young priest and the argumentative local witches can save the country from being taken over by people with a cultivated bloodlust and bad taste in silk waistcoats. For them, there's only one way to fight. Go for the throat, or as the vampyres themselves say...Carpe Jugulum


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In a fit of enlightenment democracy and ebullient goodwill, King Verence invites Uberwald's undead, the Magpyrs, into Lancre to celebrate the birth of his daughter. But once ensconced within the castle, these wine-drinking, garlic-eating, sun-loving modern vampires have no intention of leaving. Ever. Only an uneasy alliance between a nervous young priest and the argumentati In a fit of enlightenment democracy and ebullient goodwill, King Verence invites Uberwald's undead, the Magpyrs, into Lancre to celebrate the birth of his daughter. But once ensconced within the castle, these wine-drinking, garlic-eating, sun-loving modern vampires have no intention of leaving. Ever. Only an uneasy alliance between a nervous young priest and the argumentative local witches can save the country from being taken over by people with a cultivated bloodlust and bad taste in silk waistcoats. For them, there's only one way to fight. Go for the throat, or as the vampyres themselves say...Carpe Jugulum

30 review for Carpe Jugulum

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lyn

    Go for the throat! That may not be the exact translation for Carpe Jugulum, the title to Terry Pratchett’s 1998 Discworld novel (and 23rd in the series) but it describes Pratchett’s approach to a searing roast of a parody for vampire lit. Published seven years before Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight books, this does not make fun of that vampire interpretation, but Sir Terry does poke good fun at all things vampire when a family of the undead come down out of Uberwald and subtly invades Lancre. But the w Go for the throat! That may not be the exact translation for Carpe Jugulum, the title to Terry Pratchett’s 1998 Discworld novel (and 23rd in the series) but it describes Pratchett’s approach to a searing roast of a parody for vampire lit. Published seven years before Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight books, this does not make fun of that vampire interpretation, but Sir Terry does poke good fun at all things vampire when a family of the undead come down out of Uberwald and subtly invades Lancre. But the witches of Lancre, led by Granny Weatherwax and Nanny Og, are more than a match for the bloodsuckers. Also making this an enjoyable visit to the Discworld is the first appearance of the Nac Mac Feegle. Fans of the Tiffany Aching sub-series will want to read this as well to get a very early glimpse of the drinking, fighting and stealing tiny heroes. Good fun.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Melki

    Death reached down and took a handful of sand. He held it up, and let it slip through his fingers. CHOOSE, he said. YOU ARE GOOD AT CHOOSING, I BELIEVE. "Is there any advice you could be givin' me?" said Granny. CHOOSE RIGHT. This one is all about choices: life or death, justice or mercy, to obey blindly or to fight back. Vampires have taken over Lancre, and it's up to the witches and a befuddled priest to kick some bat! Oh, my, how I loved this book! From Magrat's insistence on taking EVERYTHING for Death reached down and took a handful of sand. He held it up, and let it slip through his fingers. CHOOSE, he said. YOU ARE GOOD AT CHOOSING, I BELIEVE. "Is there any advice you could be givin' me?" said Granny. CHOOSE RIGHT. This one is all about choices: life or death, justice or mercy, to obey blindly or to fight back. Vampires have taken over Lancre, and it's up to the witches and a befuddled priest to kick some bat! Oh, my, how I loved this book! From Magrat's insistence on taking EVERYTHING for the baby along on the journey to the way Granny and the priest "helped" each other over the mountains - it all made me happy. Lusty, boozy old Nanny Ogg continues to be my favorite. Observe as she shares her views on dealing with cow-stealin' pixies - "...I'd rather have 'em in here pissin' out than outside pissin' in. There's more of them and they'll make your ankles all wet. Talks back to a vampire - "I'm fed up with you smarming at me smarmily as if you were Mr. Smarm!" And gives advice to Agnes on how to tame one of the bloodsuckers by using feminine wiles - "Marry him, said Nanny firmly. "You can refine a husband. Maybe you could point him in the direction of blutwurst and black puddings and underdone steak." "You really haven't got any scruples, have you, Nanny?" said Agnes. "No," said Nanny simply. "This is Lancre we're talkin' about. If we was men, we'd be talking about laying down our lives for the country. As women, we can talk about laying down." Ah, the book is filled with the wisdom of Nanny, and also the wisdom and bravery of others who play a part in the overthrow of those damned vamps. It seems a close call for a while there, but in the end, Headology and the power of a cup of tea will triumph. But, what did I say this one was about? Oh, right . . . CHOICES. We also have choices. We can also choose to keep our thoughts focused on some vague promise that may await us someday, OR we can choose to see the beauty that surrounds us everyday. Behold, the wisdom of Mightily Oats - "The world is ... different," Oats's gaze went out across the haze, and the forests, and the purple mountains. "Everywhere I look I see something holy." CHOOSE RIGHT.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Carpe Jugulum (Discworld #23), Terry Pratchett Carpe Jugulum is a comic fantasy novel by British writer Terry Pratchett, the twenty-third in the Discworld series. It was first published in 1998. Count Magpyr and family, vampires from Überwald, are invited to the naming of Magrat and King Verence's daughter, to be conducted by the Omnian priest, Mightily Oats. During the party after the ceremony, Verence tells Nanny Ogg and Agnes Nitt that the Count has informed him that the Magpyr family intend to Carpe Jugulum (Discworld #23), Terry Pratchett Carpe Jugulum is a comic fantasy novel by British writer Terry Pratchett, the twenty-third in the Discworld series. It was first published in 1998. Count Magpyr and family, vampires from Überwald, are invited to the naming of Magrat and King Verence's daughter, to be conducted by the Omnian priest, Mightily Oats. During the party after the ceremony, Verence tells Nanny Ogg and Agnes Nitt that the Count has informed him that the Magpyr family intend to move into Lancre Castle and take over. Due to a type of hypnotism, everyone seems to consider this plan to be perfectly acceptable. Only the youngest witch, Agnes, and the Omnian priest, Mightily Oats, seem able to resist the vampiric mind control, due to their dual personalities. Because of her ability to resist his influence, the Magpyr son, Vlad, is attracted to Agnes and makes many advances on her including trying to convince her to become a vampire. Meanwhile, Granny Weatherwax, feeling slighted by not receiving an invitation to the ceremony, has left her cottage empty and seems to be working towards a life in a cave, almost like a hermit. After they have left the hypnotic influence of the Vampires, Agnes, Nanny Ogg and Magrat attempt to convince her to help them save Lancre, but apparently without success, even after Granny is informed that her invitation was stolen by a magpie. The three witches return to Lancre to take on the Count and his family without her, but because the Magpyr family have built up a tolerance for the normal methods of defeating a vampire, such as garlic, bright light, and religious symbols, this is not so easily done. Just when it seems all is lost, Granny Weatherwax comes through the front door, soaked to the bone and swaying with exhaustion. Nanny Ogg and Magrat use Granny's assault upon the Count as a distraction to escape, leaving Granny, Agnes and Brother Oats with the Vampires. Granny is unable to get through the Count's mental defenses, and the Magpyrs feed on her, with the intention of transforming her into a vampire. ... تاریخ نخستین خوانش روز بیستم ماه جولای 2020میلادی عنوان: دیسک ورلد (جهان صفحه) کتاب بیست و سوم: کارپه جوگلوم؛ نویسنده تری پرچت؛ موضوع داستانهای نویسندگان بریتانیایی - سده 20م دیسک ورلد (جهان صفجه)، یک سری از کتابهای فانتزی هستند، که روانشاد «تری پرچت»، نویسنده ی «انگلیسی»، نگاشته ‌اند؛ داستان‌های این سری در جهانی با نام «دیسک‌ ورلد (جهان صفحه)» می‌گذرند؛ که صفحه‌ ای تخت است، و بر شانه‌ های «چهار فیل»، با هیکلهای بزرگ، قرار دارد؛ این فیل‌ها نیز، به نوبه ی خود، بر روی پشت یک «لاک‌پشت غول‌آسا»، با نام «آتوئین بزرگ» قرار دارند؛ در این سری از کتابها، بارها از سوژه های کتاب‌های نویسندگانی همچون «جی.آر.آر تالکین»، «رابرت هاوارد»، «اچ پی لاوکرافت»، و «ویلیام شکسپیر»، به گونه ای خنده دار، استفاده شده ‌است؛ از سری «دیسک ‌ورلد» بیشتر از هشتاد میلیون نسخه، در سی و هفت زبان، به فروش رفته‌ است؛ این سری در برگیرنده ی بیش از چهل رمان (تاکنون چهل و یک رمان)، یازده داستان کوتاه، چهار کتاب علمی، و چندین کتاب مرجع، و مکمل است؛ از این سری، چندین رمان تصویری، بازی کامپیوتری، نمایش تئاتر، سریالهای تلویزیونی اقتباس شده ‌است؛ روزنامه ی «ساندی تایمز» چاپ «انگلستان» از این سری به عنوان یکی از پرفروش‌ترین سری کتاب‌ها نام برده، و «تری پرچت» را، به عنوان پرفروش‌ترین نویسنده ی «انگلستان»، در دهه ی نود میلادی دانسته است؛ رمان‌های «دیسک‌ورلد» جوایز بسیاری از جمله جایزه «پرومتئوس»، و مدال ادبی «کارنگی» را، از آن خود کرده ‌اند؛ در نظرسنجی «بیگ رید»، که «بی‌بی‌سی» در سال 2003میلادی، در «انگلستان» انجام داد، چهار رمان سری «دیسک‌ورلد»؛ در فهرست یکصد کتاب برتر قرار گرفتند؛ همچنین مردمان «انگلیس»، در این نظرسنجی، چهارده رمان «دیسک‌ورلد» را، در شمار دویست کتاب برتر، دانستند؛ تا کنون، از این سری، چهل و یک رمان، به چاپ رسیده است؛ «تری پرچت» که پیش از درگذشتش؛ در ابتدای سال 2015میلادی، از بیماری «آلزایمر» رنج می‌بردند، اعلام کردند که خوشحال می‌شوند که دخترشان، «ریانا پرچت»، به جای ایشان، به ادامه ی این سری بپردازند؛ تا جلد بیست و ششم رمان این سری، رمان «دزد زمان (2001میلادی)» به دست «جاش کربی»، به تصویر کشیده شده ‌اند، اما نسخه ‌های «آمریکایی»، که انتشارات «هارپرکالینز» آن‌ها را، منتشر کرده، دارای تصاویر روی جلد متفاوتی هستند؛ پس از درگذشت «جاش کربی»، در سال 2001میلادی، نقاشی‌های روی جلد کتاب‌های بعدی این سری، بدست «پائول کربی» کشیده‌ شدند کتابهای اول و دوم: «رنگ جادو»؛ کتاب سوم: «زنان جادوگر»؛ کتاب چهارم: «مرگ»؛ کتاب پنجم: «سورسری (برگردان فارسی جادوی مرجع)»؛ کتاب ششم: «خواهران ویرد»؛ کتاب هفتم: «هرم ها»؛ کتاب هشتم: «نگهبانان! نگهبانان»؛ کتاب نهم: «اریک»؛ کتاب دهم: «تصاویر متحرک»؛ کتاب یازدهم: «مرد دروگر»؛ کتاب دوازدهم: «جادوگران خارج»؛ کتاب سیزدهم: «ایزدان خرد (خدایان کوچک)»؛ کتاب چهاردهم: «لردها و بانوان»؛ کتاب پانزدهم: «مردان مسلح»؛ کتاب شانزدهم: «موسیقی روح»؛ کتاب هفدهم: «اوقات جالب»؛ کتاب هجدهم: «ماسکراد»؛ کتاب نوزدهم: «پاهای خشت (فیت آو کلی)»؛ کتاب بیستم: «هاگفادر»؛ کتاب بیست و یکم: «جینگو»؛ کتاب بیست و دوم: «آخرین قاره»؛ کتاب بیست و سوم: «کارپه جوگلوم»؛ کتاب بیست و چهارم: «فیل پنجم»؛ کتاب بیست و پنجم: «حقیقت»؛ کتاب بیست و ششم: «دزد زمان»؛ کتاب بیست و هفتم: «آخرین قهرمان»؛ کتاب بیست و هشتم: «ماوریس شگفت‌انگیز و موش‌های آموزش‌دیده‌اش»؛ کتاب بیست و نهم: «ساعت شب»؛ کتاب سی ام: «مردان آزاد وی»؛ کتاب سی و یکم: «هنگ بزرگ»؛ کتاب سی و دوم: «کلاهی پُر از آسمان»؛ کتاب سی و سوم: «گوینگ پوستال»؛ کتاب سی و چهارم: «تود!»؛ کتاب سی و پنجم: «وینتراسمیت»؛ کتاب سی و ششم: «بدست آوردن پول»؛ کتاب سی و هفتم: «دانشگاهی‌های نادیدنی»؛ کتاب سی و هشتم: «نیمه‌شب بایست بپوشم»؛ کتاب سی و نهم: «اسنوف»؛ کتاب چهلم: «بالا آمدن مه»؛ کتاب چهل و یکم: «تاج چوپان»؛ در کتاب بیست و سوم «کنت ماگپیر»؛ و خانواده اش خون آشامهایی از «اوبروالد»، برای نامگذاری «مگرات»، دختر پادشاه «ورنس»، دعوت میشوند؛ و ...؛ تاریخ بهنگام رسانی 11/01/1400هجری خورشیدی؛ ا. شربیانی

  4. 5 out of 5

    Trish

    This 23rd Discworld novel is the last of the witches books before the appearance of Tiffany. It's kind of like a goodbye to the trio of Granny Weatherwax, Nanny Ogg and (first) Magrat (and in the meantime) Agnes Nitt / Perdita. As is known from the previous books, Magrat has left the coven and married the King of Lancre. Now, she has also given birth to a daughter. However, as in classical fairy tales, the naming ceremony goes ... well, slightly wrong. The main problem is the guest list for the na This 23rd Discworld novel is the last of the witches books before the appearance of Tiffany. It's kind of like a goodbye to the trio of Granny Weatherwax, Nanny Ogg and (first) Magrat (and in the meantime) Agnes Nitt / Perdita. As is known from the previous books, Magrat has left the coven and married the King of Lancre. Now, she has also given birth to a daughter. However, as in classical fairy tales, the naming ceremony goes ... well, slightly wrong. The main problem is the guest list for the naming ceremony of the little princess. You see, Verence is not only just a symbolic king as is tradition in Lancre, he also very much believes in reforming the place, amongst other things by introducing cooperation and extending a hand in friendship to all kinds of creatures. Unfortunately, just because he's nice doesn't mean all others are as well. Thus, he invites vampires vampyres from Überwald and we all know what happens when you invite vampires vampyres in, no matter how modern and progressive they pretend to be. In the middle of the ensuing chaos is another guest: The Quite Reverend Mightily-Praiseworthy-Are-Ye-Who-Exalteth-Om Oats, a priest of the god Om (who is remarkably similar to the Christian god). While this kind of priest loved to burn "infidels" in the past, he's a modern version and Nanny soon discovers that he's not what she feared him to be. There are a lot of great secondary characters such as Igor and his dog (introduced in one of my status updates), Lancre's chief bird wrangler and the finally introduced Nac Mac Feegles who were as glorious as I had been promised! What do you do when the odds are not in your favour, vampires vampyres are trying to take over the kingdom, and you're tired as well as outmatched and people don't seem to value you very much? You do right by them, of course. And boy, does Granny ever! I must say that this was not only a funny romp full of action and nice bends in the road, it was also a great way of ending the witches as we've come to know them. Like handing over the torch though I'm not sure the author was aware at the time of writing. I have always loved Granny, from the first book she was in, and therefore positively dance whenever she's in a story, however briefly, and to see her teaching her enemies as much as her ... not-enemies ... what is what, is simply glorious. Not that I don't value Nanny or Greebo, but it wouldn't be as fantastic an adventure without Granny (and no, the young witches both can't hold a candle to the two old ones). Anyway, apart from numerous clever puns and turns of phrases that Pratchett has become famous for, the central theme in this book is faith. And religion. Yes, there is a difference. Terry Pratchett himself was an atheist but the kind that didn't mind believers so long as they didn't mind him. With this book he shows that he had a very entertaining and almost gentle way of addressing any and all issues he has had with God and His followers, making his points not only solid in argument but the delivery of said points also very agreeable and downright charming. A wonderful addition to the series and I hope the future books about witches will be just as great.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jen/The Tolkien Gal/ジェニファー

    What happens when vampires come to the sleepy (and eccentric) town of Lancre? and Granny Weatherwax is nowhere to be found? Well, AgnesPerdita (who seems to have a form of dissociative identity disorder where Perdita takes over her body at random. As Agnes says "inside every fat girl is a thin girl waiting to come out" quite literally), Magrat (Queen and mother of a two week old baby) and Nanny Ogg (the Town Mother who likely birthed half of the Lancre population) I was so happy to read a book ab What happens when vampires come to the sleepy (and eccentric) town of Lancre? and Granny Weatherwax is nowhere to be found? Well, AgnesPerdita (who seems to have a form of dissociative identity disorder where Perdita takes over her body at random. As Agnes says "inside every fat girl is a thin girl waiting to come out" quite literally), Magrat (Queen and mother of a two week old baby) and Nanny Ogg (the Town Mother who likely birthed half of the Lancre population) I was so happy to read a book about the witches again. The audio version is phenomenal and I laughed out loud at the gym like a maniac several times. A clever, ass-kicking book with some great jokes about vampires - I mean, why do they keep metal objects that can be bent into holy symbols at their homes? The vampires in Carpe Jugulum even eat garlic to build up a resistance to it.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Steven Harbin

    Pratchett satirizes vampire myth and legend in this Discworld novel. Actually one of the grimmer Discworld novels I've read. One of the Witches of Lancre sub set of the series, with all my favorite characters from those books, Granny Weatherwax, Nanny Ogg, her cat Greebo, Magrat, Agnes-Perdita all make their appearance. I recommend this one highly, but I think you need to have read the other "Witch" novels first, that would be Equal Rites,Wyrd Sisters, Witches Abroad, Lords and Ladies, and Maske Pratchett satirizes vampire myth and legend in this Discworld novel. Actually one of the grimmer Discworld novels I've read. One of the Witches of Lancre sub set of the series, with all my favorite characters from those books, Granny Weatherwax, Nanny Ogg, her cat Greebo, Magrat, Agnes-Perdita all make their appearance. I recommend this one highly, but I think you need to have read the other "Witch" novels first, that would be Equal Rites,Wyrd Sisters, Witches Abroad, Lords and Ladies, and Maskerade. One thing I noticed in this book was that Pratchett did an excellent job of a technique that Edgar Rice Burroughs used to do very well; that is have multiple narratives going with all the characters finally converging together at the climax of the story. I couldn't put the book down near the end, wanting to see how things were (or were not) resolved.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Bradley

    On this re-read, I'm going to revise my rating a star higher. Why? Because I really enjoyed it. :) Really, what else can anyone say about reading Pratchett? That they love the quips and the little funny wisdoms and the bloody-minded humor? Well, sure, all of that is grand, but pitting Granny against vampyres that have a bit of Weatherwax wisdom is a sure-fire way to make the sparks fly. And even mythological birds are still birds. :) Stand-out scenes for me are the ones where Nanny Ogg becomes the On this re-read, I'm going to revise my rating a star higher. Why? Because I really enjoyed it. :) Really, what else can anyone say about reading Pratchett? That they love the quips and the little funny wisdoms and the bloody-minded humor? Well, sure, all of that is grand, but pitting Granny against vampyres that have a bit of Weatherwax wisdom is a sure-fire way to make the sparks fly. And even mythological birds are still birds. :) Stand-out scenes for me are the ones where Nanny Ogg becomes the "other" witch and I absolutely loved her flirtations with Igor. :) Oh, and Oats. Oats and Granny were so CUTE together. :)

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

    The reviews here are quite varied on this book, they are all obviously written by Pratchett fans however one of the problems with being a Pratchett fan is that he has SO many novels that you are bound to find a few that aren’t your taste. I personally loved this book. My favorite of Pratchett’s creations include the Witches and the Guards series. An attempt at a short summary: The King of Lancre and his new wife the former Witch Margrat have their first child, and are holding the Christening cerem The reviews here are quite varied on this book, they are all obviously written by Pratchett fans however one of the problems with being a Pratchett fan is that he has SO many novels that you are bound to find a few that aren’t your taste. I personally loved this book. My favorite of Pratchett’s creations include the Witches and the Guards series. An attempt at a short summary: The King of Lancre and his new wife the former Witch Margrat have their first child, and are holding the Christening ceremony. In The King’s usual attempt to be “Modern” he invites the Magpyrs, a family of Vampires from Uberwald. Vampires of course cannot go where not invited, so they capitalize on the invitation to take over the entire country of Lancre. The Vampire clan however, is obsessed with becoming “Modern” and is quite Yuppyish. They have made themselves immune to garlic, sunlight, religious symbols, and just about everything else that normally works against Vampires. Meanwhile Granny Weatherwax’s invitation to the Christening was stolen, so in a typical Granny fashion, she is off in a huff. The soppy priest of Om that comes to do the Christening becomes quite the major character, and the “Wee Free Men” make their first appearance. Add in Igor, the Vampire’s henchman who wishes things would go back to the way they are, and the Falconer who spends most of the tale hunting down a Phoenix and you’re in for a non-stop good time. Nanny Ogg and Agnes/Perditia Nitt are put into the position of attempting to rescue the kingdom from the Vampires without Granny. The witches are all their standard unique selves, Granny stubborn as a mule but with a heart of gold, Nanny with her wild ways and lewd comments, Margrat with her new aged ideas but strong backbone when needed, and the newest of the coven – Agnes Nitt a very big girl with a thin girl trapped inside her. Agnes becomes a major character in this book and really develops her unique personalities. The Priest of Om also becomes quite an interesting character with his on again off again faith crisis. The Wee Free Men are entertaining, but hard to read, Igor is an absolute trip. Some will say that this is a re-write of “Lords and Ladies” I personally didn’t find it so. Sure bad guys arrive and threaten Lancre, and the Witches step up to do battle in their round-about humorous ways. But then again what fantasy/sci-fi/action or horror doesn’t have bad guys showing up and good guys trying to stop them? Of Pratchett’s novels I found this one to be much darker than the others because the Vampires are quite sinister for one of his villains. Still I found this to be an amazingly humorous tale. The bickering between the witches, the family fights between the vampires, Igor’s wanting to make everything dusty and covered in spider webs and longing for the old-school days of his master, the Falconer’s obsession with trying to catch a bird he’s never seen, the Wee Free Men stealing anything they can get their hands on, and even Greebo. The pace of the book is unbelievably quick, numerous characters come and go and you’ll find yourself wondering how all of this will tie in together. But you can’t put it down. I can attest to that first hand, I read way past my bedtime to finish the book because the action never stopped long enough for me to stick in a bookmark. The humor wasn’t as non-stop as in some of his other books, but the funny parts were hysterical. I found that this book had far more meaning to it than many of the others. If you are first time Pratchett reader, I would not recommend this book as a starting place because some of the history of the witches is almost required to get full enjoyment out of this story. I can’t imagine that a first time reader would understand the concept of “Borrowing” from this book or get the humor of the “I ain’t dead” sign. This is one of my favorite of Pratchett’s novels so far.

  9. 5 out of 5

    D.L. Morrese

    I just finished re-re-re...reading this one. It's a pleasure each time. I am writing this on 18 March 2015. The incomparable Terry Pratchett died on the 12th. The news hit me much harder than I expected it would. I have spent a considerable amount of time in the Discworld Universe over the years. I kind of felt I knew Terry at some personal level after that, even though we never met. He was like a friend, a mentor, a philosophical relative... Anyway, I needed some kind of catharsis after the sad I just finished re-re-re...reading this one. It's a pleasure each time. I am writing this on 18 March 2015. The incomparable Terry Pratchett died on the 12th. The news hit me much harder than I expected it would. I have spent a considerable amount of time in the Discworld Universe over the years. I kind of felt I knew Terry at some personal level after that, even though we never met. He was like a friend, a mentor, a philosophical relative... Anyway, I needed some kind of catharsis after the sad news, so I looked at my shelves and grabbed Carpe Jugulum. The selection wasn't entirely random. In this book, Granny Weatherwax is at her prickly best. She confronts a problem more powerful than herself (Vampires...or 'Vampyres' with a 'y' to be more modern). She knows she can't beat them in any conventional sense. But Granny is no conventional witch. Her resolve and her bravery in facing what might well be, in fact is likely to be, her death are, I imagine, much like how Sir Terry faced his 'embuggerance'. It was likely to kill him, but he met the challenge with resolve, struggled on despite how difficult his debilitating disease must have made it, and continued his service to both the Discworld and our round world for as long as he could. I suppose this has been more of a tribute to the author than a book review, but I recommend this book. I recommend all of the Discworld books. They are what fiction should be— entertaining, enlightening, informative, fun, and when you need it, uplifting.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn

    Another wild tale from Discworld. This one involves the witches, Granny, Nanny, Magrat and Agnes as well as a host of vampires, an insipid priest of Om, masses of wild little blue men and an angry Igor. Magrat, now married to her handsome prince, the King of Lancre is now a mother and he has invited all and sundry, including the vampires to the castle for the christening. Once invited the vampires decide the castle is rather nice and start moving in their coffins. As usual, lots of fun and witty Another wild tale from Discworld. This one involves the witches, Granny, Nanny, Magrat and Agnes as well as a host of vampires, an insipid priest of Om, masses of wild little blue men and an angry Igor. Magrat, now married to her handsome prince, the King of Lancre is now a mother and he has invited all and sundry, including the vampires to the castle for the christening. Once invited the vampires decide the castle is rather nice and start moving in their coffins. As usual, lots of fun and witty satire as the witches and the priest take on the vampires.

  11. 5 out of 5

    YouKneeK

    Carpe Jugulum is the sixth and final book in the Witches subseries of Discworld. This has been my favorite Discworld subseries, mainly because Granny Weatherwax and Nanny Ogg have been so much fun, so I’ll miss it. This is also the first subseries I’ve completed, unless you count Ancient Civilizations which consists of two loosely-related books grouped under that heading in The Discworld Reading Order Guide. The title is a pretty good hint about the story: Carpe Jugulum, seize the throat. I’ll le Carpe Jugulum is the sixth and final book in the Witches subseries of Discworld. This has been my favorite Discworld subseries, mainly because Granny Weatherwax and Nanny Ogg have been so much fun, so I’ll miss it. This is also the first subseries I’ve completed, unless you count Ancient Civilizations which consists of two loosely-related books grouped under that heading in The Discworld Reading Order Guide. The title is a pretty good hint about the story: Carpe Jugulum, seize the throat. I’ll let you use your imagination to figure out the premise. :) This one had a good story, but it wasn’t quite as funny as some of the earlier Witches books. It did have humor, but I think it was just missing more Granny Weatherwax. She played an important part in the story, but she didn’t get much page time. On the other hand, Agnes is a fun character and she featured prominently along with Nanny, so I was happy about that. Magrat shows up a little bit too, but she’s far less annoying than she was in the earlier books. This book also contains a bit of a follow up to one of the earlier books, Small Gods, and that was fun to see. My only other comment needs to go behind spoiler tags. Don’t click if you haven’t read the book! (view spoiler)[With this being the last Witches book and with all of the false foreshadowing, I spent most of this book worried that Granny Weatherwax would be dead or something by the end. It isn’t too often that I feel any sort of real suspense when reading a Discworld book, but I did this time. I was happy that she was still alive and well by the end. (hide spoiler)]

  12. 5 out of 5

    Tanya

    After parodizing just about every other genre of fiction in one Discworld book or other, it was only a matter of time until Pratchett went for the throat of vampire literature tropes. In this twenty-third Discworld installment, and sixth in the Witches subseries, a family of vampires from Überwald is invited to the princess' naming ceremony in Lancre by King Verence, who wants to extend the hand of friendship to all types of creatures and beings. Except that Count Magpyr and his family declare t After parodizing just about every other genre of fiction in one Discworld book or other, it was only a matter of time until Pratchett went for the throat of vampire literature tropes. In this twenty-third Discworld installment, and sixth in the Witches subseries, a family of vampires from Überwald is invited to the princess' naming ceremony in Lancre by King Verence, who wants to extend the hand of friendship to all types of creatures and beings. Except that Count Magpyr and his family declare that they'll move in and take over, something everyone simply accepts, since they have fallen victim to some sort of hypnotism—all except Agnes and Mightily Oats, the Omnian priest who conducted the ceremony, because they are of "two minds". In addition, the Magpyr family are "modern" vampires who have built up a tolerance for the classic methods of vampire-disposal such as garlic, sunlight, and religious symbols, and Granny Weatherwax has decided to retire and has hidden herself away in a cave like some sort of hermit, so who's going to save the day? There were things I didn't care for in this novel because they were pretty random and served seemingly no purpose. For instance, after all that massive build-up, I have no idea what the point of the phoenix even was, and the Nac Mac Feegle, tiny and rowdy Smurf-type creatures, were completely unintelligible to me with their variation of Scottish speech, and were also a storyline I felt was only inserted so the King wouldn't be completely forgotten. There were things I loved though. The main characters in the story were all great—this is the last of the Witches books before the appearance of Tiffany Aching, and I'll miss the coven as it is, they work together so well despite their differences. With each book, I learn to love Nanny Ogg a little more, and she was one of the highlights of this one, but I'm also rather partial to Agnes/Perdita, and of course Granny is always a favorite. I loved just about everything about the vampires, especially their Frankenstein's monster inspired servant Igor, with his artificial lisp and the way he so desperately clings to the old traditional ways. I can't go into what I loved the most without spoiling the end, but this is one of the somewhat rare instances where a Discworld plot twist was delightful and even made sense! Ultimately though, I really liked this because it's essentially a book about choices. Life or death, justice or mercy, obedience or resistance... and make no mistake, some of it is heavy. There's darkness here that I haven't come across in a Pratchett book before—by page 30, Granny has performed a late-term abortion, and there are really insightful exchanges between her and the Omnian priest about faith that while funny, also contained a kernel of that thought-provoking and resonating truth I so appreciate in Pratchett's work. "The world is... different." Oats's gaze went out across the haze, and the forests, and the purple mountains. "Everywhere I look I see something holy." ————— My other Discworld reviews by sub-series (work in progress): Rincewind / Unseen University Wizards: The Colour of Magic · The Light Fantastic · Sourcery · Eric · Interesting Times · The Last Continent · The Last Hero · Unseen Academicals Witches: Equal Rites · Wyrd Systers · Witches Abroad · Lords and Ladies · Maskerade · Carpe Jugulum Death: Mort · Reaper Man · Soul Music · Hogfather · Thief of Time Gods: Pyramids · Small Gods City Watch: Guards! Guards! · Men At Arms · Feet of Clay · Jingo · The Fifth Elephant · Night Watch · Thud! · Snuff Industrial Revolution / Moist von Lipwig: Moving Pictures · The Truth · Monstrous Regiment · Going Postal · Making Money · Raising Steam Tiffany Aching: The Wee Free Men · A Hat Full of Sky · Wintersmith · I Shall Wear Midnight · The Sheperd's Crown

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay

    Part of the Pratchett reread with the SpecFic Buddy Reads group in 2019. It's time for the naming of Magrat and Verence's new baby, and they've invited everyone. Including nobility from the neighboring country of Uberwald, who happen to be vampires, eh, vampyres, and who are very happy to exploit the invitation into the country of Lancre. Meanwhile the witches of Lancre are going through their own issues now that Agnes Nitt is the new witch in town and Magrat is now a mother, which leaves Nanny O Part of the Pratchett reread with the SpecFic Buddy Reads group in 2019. It's time for the naming of Magrat and Verence's new baby, and they've invited everyone. Including nobility from the neighboring country of Uberwald, who happen to be vampires, eh, vampyres, and who are very happy to exploit the invitation into the country of Lancre. Meanwhile the witches of Lancre are going through their own issues now that Agnes Nitt is the new witch in town and Magrat is now a mother, which leaves Nanny Ogg in a position she doesn't want and Granny Weatherwax without her accustomed role. This is the last of the witches books where the witches of Lancre are the main stars. Which is a shame, because with this one it really feels like they're just getting started, although I can see the attraction of beginning again with a new character to explore these themes (Tiffany Aching is the new witch on the block in a few novels hence). Agnes/Perdita makes a great addition to the series here and it's a shame we don't see more of her interactions with the other witches. This book also sees the introduction of the wonderful Nac Mac Feegle, who get a slightly more comprehensible outing in Tiffany's series. Where this book really shines though is outspokenly-atheist Pratchett's take on religion and faith via the character of Mightily Oats, and it's a take that's honest and charitable, and above all, as with all of Pratchett's work, very human. One of my all time favorites in the whole Discworld series.

  14. 5 out of 5

    K.

    Trigger warnings: death of a dog, blood, fatphobia. 27/7/2019 Favourite things about this book? Igor. Hodgesaaargh. Perdita doing handstands. The Nac Mac Feegle. Death being Death. Did I mention Igor? I really love Igor. I also love the old Count and his sporting approach to vampirism because it's delightful. And the name Cryptopher, because obviously. 29/5/2017 This is probably still my favourite Pratchett book. HOWEVER. Rereading it this time, I couldn't help but notice JUST HOW MANY MENTIONS the Trigger warnings: death of a dog, blood, fatphobia. 27/7/2019 Favourite things about this book? Igor. Hodgesaaargh. Perdita doing handstands. The Nac Mac Feegle. Death being Death. Did I mention Igor? I really love Igor. I also love the old Count and his sporting approach to vampirism because it's delightful. And the name Cryptopher, because obviously. 29/5/2017 This is probably still my favourite Pratchett book. HOWEVER. Rereading it this time, I couldn't help but notice JUST HOW MANY MENTIONS there are of Agnes being fat. It's not always negative - sometimes it's self-deprecating humour from Agnes, sometimes it's just matter-of-fact observation. But sometimes, it grated SO MUCH and it made me cringe. So yeah. I still love it. I can't help but give it five stars. Buuuut it's definitely got problems... 14/10/2013 This book is hands down my favourite Pratchett book for reasons that I can't quite explain. I love his vampires-who've-decided-to-join-the-modern-world story, and I adore the Witches of Lancre in pretty much anything. This one, for some inexplicable reason, just seems to hit every single nail on the head for me. There's not only the Witches of Lancre, but some hilarious cameos from Death. There's an Igor, there's fantastic references to "Small Gods", there's Greebo, there's Nanny Ogg's family doing what they do best, there's Uberwald, and there's the Nac Mac Feegle. Really, what more could you want?! (Except maybe an appearance from The Watch. But we can't have everything, can we?)

  15. 5 out of 5

    SheriC (PM)

    I can’t believe I just finished the last Discworld book in the Witches series. Dammit, why isn’t there more?!? Wait, I think there’s still a couple in the Tiffany Aching stories I haven’t read yet, maybe those count? It didn’t take me long to progress through the first three of the five stages of grief. I may never reach Acceptance, though, because I am really going to miss Granny and Nanny Ogg and Magrat and Agnes/Perdita. Mostly Granny, though. I sure hope she makes some cameo appearances in t I can’t believe I just finished the last Discworld book in the Witches series. Dammit, why isn’t there more?!? Wait, I think there’s still a couple in the Tiffany Aching stories I haven’t read yet, maybe those count? It didn’t take me long to progress through the first three of the five stages of grief. I may never reach Acceptance, though, because I am really going to miss Granny and Nanny Ogg and Magrat and Agnes/Perdita. Mostly Granny, though. I sure hope she makes some cameo appearances in the other books I haven’t read yet. Carpe Jugulum was fun. So much fun that I mostly blew off watching the ALCS and stayed up waaaay past my bedtime during the work week to finish.

  16. 4 out of 5

    David Sarkies

    This one's a bit batty 29 July 2016 - Frankfurt I don't know what it is with these Terry Pratchet novels but I found it really hard to get into this one. Okay, while I do find vampire stories rather boring, and cliched, this is Pratchett, and he always seems to be able to add some new twists to the tired old stories that many of us shy away from. Okay, maybe it was because I started reading it on a plane, and continued reading it on a plane, and finished it off in Frankfurt while I was still suff This one's a bit batty 29 July 2016 - Frankfurt I don't know what it is with these Terry Pratchet novels but I found it really hard to get into this one. Okay, while I do find vampire stories rather boring, and cliched, this is Pratchett, and he always seems to be able to add some new twists to the tired old stories that many of us shy away from. Okay, maybe it was because I started reading it on a plane, and continued reading it on a plane, and finished it off in Frankfurt while I was still suffering from jetlag, but that is really no excuse not to be able to get into a book (especially since I managed to get into, and really enjoy, other books when I have been gallivanting around either Europe or South-East Asia, though that doesn't count the one that I left in a bar in Bangkok). So, as I have mentioned, this story is about vampires, and is set in the Kingdom of Lancre, which means that the witches are going to be the main characters. As we probably remember from the previous books, Magrat had married the prince, now king, and had given up her life of witchery, though she still dabbles, and has been replace by Agnas. Anyway, Magrat is having a baby, and everybody has been invited to the birthing ceremony, which includes some vampire – the Magpyrs. Okay, now that is a huge mistake, because anybody who knows anything about vampires knows that they can only enter a dwelling when they are invited, and as you have figured out by now, since they have been invited into Lancre Castle they can now enter and run amok – which is basically what they do. In fact they simply move in with Magrat and her husband not realising that anything is actually wrong (namely because they have been mind controlled). The further problem is that Granny Weatherwax has disappeared, so Agnas, and Nanny Ogg, are left, with the help of Magrat, to solve this problem. As I suggested I'm not a huge fan of vampire novels, namely because they have been overused. Okay, Pratchett does is stuff with the Magpyrs, but as I have also suggested, I didn't really find this book all that thrilling. The one interesting thing that I wish to touch upon though is the idea of the invitation. This is a very western thing because in other cultures people don't actually need an invitation to enter somebody's dwelling – they just rock up whenever they want to, and it is actually quite rude to get upset when they go barging into your house. Mind you, it is not as if I am any different from your typical westerner, namely because I would get upset if somebody rocked up at my door unannounced, came inside, and didn't leave until they wanted to – we Westerners are very private individuals (except when it comes to Facebook and Twitter, the we tell the entire world what colour socks we put on in the morning). As such, we can see how this western idea of only coming inside with an invitation has influenced our mythology, such as with vampires. Though I'm not quite sure where this whole invitation thing arose from because the Greeks, and the Romans, where very sociable people and they lived in a society when anybody and everybody simply rocked up when they wanted to. As for the Middle ages, sure, messages would be sent ahead, but you generally didn't leave anybody (especially if they were your superiors) who arrived at your castle sitting outside on their horse, in the rain – unless of course you didn't particularly like the person. As for the commoners, well, they lived in communal villages and generally didn't travel beyond the next hill, so there was no privacy there either. My only assumption is that it arose with the rise of the middle-class, and the fact that a lot of people moved into the city. This is interesting because it is the cities, which have the most people, that tends to be full of people who don't know, and don't particularly want to know, the people around them. It seems that the more people there are, the more people that there is to know, and getting to know somebody, especially if they are going to move in the next couple of years, takes effort, something that people don't really want to do. Anyway, I probably should be out and about exploring as opposed to sitting in a hotel room writing book reviews, so I will leave it at that.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Char

    I'm on the verge of a reading slump and just can't find anything that interests me. I'm turning to my old familiar stand-by: short stories. I hope it works. DNF-No Rating. I'm on the verge of a reading slump and just can't find anything that interests me. I'm turning to my old familiar stand-by: short stories. I hope it works. DNF-No Rating.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    I was in just exactly the right mood for this. And this was just exactly the right balance of satire, genuine laugh out loud humor, and sneaky pathos that I prefer in my Discworld books. But, hey, is this really the last of the Witches books? Are they in the Tiffany Aching ones? I'm gonna miss these ladies. (Even Magrat. And hey, she's not too bad now that she's a mother. Much more forceful, and less of a limp dishrag.) Firstly, this is a clever satire of vampire fiction. It was written before vam I was in just exactly the right mood for this. And this was just exactly the right balance of satire, genuine laugh out loud humor, and sneaky pathos that I prefer in my Discworld books. But, hey, is this really the last of the Witches books? Are they in the Tiffany Aching ones? I'm gonna miss these ladies. (Even Magrat. And hey, she's not too bad now that she's a mother. Much more forceful, and less of a limp dishrag.) Firstly, this is a clever satire of vampire fiction. It was written before vampires are supposed to sexy now, or whatever. So it plays off all the old standards. Coffins, enemy of the sun, allergies to garlic, staking, chopping off of heads, etc. Vampires (who are modern and now actually prefer to be called vampyres) have invaded Lancre, because King Verence (who was trying to be diplomatic) actually invited them. Pro tip: never invite a vampire anywhere. Except these vampires are smart. They've somehow managed to overcome all the old tricks. Steal their left sock? Who cares. Garlic? They will eat it and smile. Religious symbols? Do nothing. They can even stay up until noon! And they can control your miiiiinds. Well, everyone except for Agnes Nitt's. And the priest of Om, who Magrat hired to christen her new baby. Also, in this one, Granny Weatherwax has a very long, dark night of the soul. I have never gotten the hang of reviewing Discworld books. They defeat me every time. Anyway, liked this one a lot. Would definitely re-read.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Siria

    Yes, another Pratchett. I'm on a re-reading kick at the moment. Which is probably a mistake since my stack of books to be read next to my bed is currently in the region of 67. But Pratchett is one of my comfort reads, so I don't feel like apologising to myself too much. Carpe Jugulum is one of my favourites of the series. The writing and the dialogue are as sharp as ever; the characterisation of the witches is spot on; and the humour is just the right mix of wryly witty and really, really bad pun Yes, another Pratchett. I'm on a re-reading kick at the moment. Which is probably a mistake since my stack of books to be read next to my bed is currently in the region of 67. But Pratchett is one of my comfort reads, so I don't feel like apologising to myself too much. Carpe Jugulum is one of my favourites of the series. The writing and the dialogue are as sharp as ever; the characterisation of the witches is spot on; and the humour is just the right mix of wryly witty and really, really bad puns. (The vampires, for instance, live in Don'tgonearthe Castle.) The thing that really made the book for me, as is the case with all of the really good examples of the series, is Pratchett's understanding of human nature, and the pervading morality of the series. It's never something he beats you over the head with, but you come away from the book, not just entertained, but also provoked to think about things like religion and faith and modernity and what makes a person who they are. I always have to re-read the scene where Granny Weatherwax decides about twice, because, yes. Even if I don't always agree with the way Pratchett sees the world, he always delineates his views with such clarity and such precision, that I really love it. The Nac Mac Feegle are also the best thing ever. 'Snafflin' coobeasties!' I have love.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kaethe Douglas

    I've only read this one once before, and that ten years ago, so I didn't remember much, and didn't remember the Nac Mac Feegle were in it. And Greebo. Plus the whole Omnian question, and the christening. A delight, but by no means a simple one. Is there another writer who makes me feel so kindly toward other people? Dickens, Austen, Vonnegut all appeal to the same part of my brain, but none of them puts me in such charity with humanity, although Christmas Carol comes a close second. Personal copy I've only read this one once before, and that ten years ago, so I didn't remember much, and didn't remember the Nac Mac Feegle were in it. And Greebo. Plus the whole Omnian question, and the christening. A delight, but by no means a simple one. Is there another writer who makes me feel so kindly toward other people? Dickens, Austen, Vonnegut all appeal to the same part of my brain, but none of them puts me in such charity with humanity, although Christmas Carol comes a close second. Personal copy

  21. 5 out of 5

    pax

    Now this was unexpectedly one of my favorites of the whole Discworld so far! Below my two perhaps favorite citations from this one: She'd changed as soon as the others had entered. Before, she'd been bowed and tired. Now she was standing tall and haughty, supported by a scaffolding of pride. ********* 'It's not as simple as that. It's not a black and white issue. There are so many shades of grey.' 'Nope.' 'Pardon?' 'There's no greys, only white that's got grubby. I'm surprised you don't know that. And Now this was unexpectedly one of my favorites of the whole Discworld so far! Below my two perhaps favorite citations from this one: She'd changed as soon as the others had entered. Before, she'd been bowed and tired. Now she was standing tall and haughty, supported by a scaffolding of pride. ********* 'It's not as simple as that. It's not a black and white issue. There are so many shades of grey.' 'Nope.' 'Pardon?' 'There's no greys, only white that's got grubby. I'm surprised you don't know that. And sin, young man, is when you treat people as things. Including yourself. That's what sin is.' 'It's a lot more complicated than that-' 'No. It ain't. When people say things are a lot more complicated than that, they means they're getting worried that they won't like the truth. People as things, that's where it starts.' 'Oh, I'm sure there are worse crimes-' 'But they starts with thinking about people as things...'

  22. 4 out of 5

    John

    Witches and vampires and priests, oh my! It's easy for me, when I'm not reading Pratchett at the moment, to remember how much silliness his books contain, but forget what great storytelling is in there too. But boy, when I'm reading it I sure remember. This is a grand tale about some witches that live in a small kingdom on the rim of the Discworld, one of whom has married its progressive, modern king, and had a baby who's due for a christening. The king, wanting to expand the scope of his kingdom Witches and vampires and priests, oh my! It's easy for me, when I'm not reading Pratchett at the moment, to remember how much silliness his books contain, but forget what great storytelling is in there too. But boy, when I'm reading it I sure remember. This is a grand tale about some witches that live in a small kingdom on the rim of the Discworld, one of whom has married its progressive, modern king, and had a baby who's due for a christening. The king, wanting to expand the scope of his kingdom's influence, invites the rulers of the neighboring kingdoms to the christening ceremony. Unfortunately, one of those kingdoms is ruled by vampires, in particular, by a family of very modern and progressive vampires, who understand that garlic is delicious, that the effect of sunlight on them is purely psychosomatic, and that religious symbols are practically everywhere, and don't have to mean a darn thing to them. They do, however, maintain a tremendous ability to control the minds of others. Add to the mix a maybe-not-so-secure-in-his-faith priest of a religion that has rather recently switched from burning everyone that didn't agree with them, to taking their disagreements inward, leading to schism after schism. Can you guess how this turns out? It's a bit of a mess, and great fun! Apparently this is number 23 in the Discworld series. While a publisher's note at front suggests that reading the series in order might increase one's enjoyment, I found this to be thoroughly delightful, even though I'd only read the first couple before this. I recommend it almost without reservation, the reservation being that it might not be great for you if you are offended by humor at the expense of fat people, short people, old people, stupid people, modernists, traditionalists, goths, lispers, lackeys, kings, queens, Picts, peasants, or priests. But other than that it's purely charming :).

  23. 5 out of 5

    Johara Almogbel

    I have no idea how Terry Pratchett isn't more famous than JK Rowling. I love Harry Potter but that was one series that ended up getting screwed in the end while Pratchett wrote loads of books that never ever waver in quality and narrative. Also, he happens to be one of the fairest people in character invention. Strong female heros who aren't pretty or thin and quirky and perfect? Yes please. Yes. I have no idea how Terry Pratchett isn't more famous than JK Rowling. I love Harry Potter but that was one series that ended up getting screwed in the end while Pratchett wrote loads of books that never ever waver in quality and narrative. Also, he happens to be one of the fairest people in character invention. Strong female heros who aren't pretty or thin and quirky and perfect? Yes please. Yes.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    Like this book because, 1. Fat girls rule. Pratchett writes a real fat girl. 2. Vampires with bite!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Vigasia

    Granny Weatherwax agains vampires? Do they even stand a chance? Well, maybe if they'll turn her into one of them... Yet another brilliant disworld adventure with one of my favourite characters and, as always, hidden social commentary that maked the lecture even more enjoyable. Granny Weatherwax agains vampires? Do they even stand a chance? Well, maybe if they'll turn her into one of them... Yet another brilliant disworld adventure with one of my favourite characters and, as always, hidden social commentary that maked the lecture even more enjoyable.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Bee

    It's no surprise that I love Terry Pratchett. He was like a far away uncle that dotted on me with stories written just for me. But the depth of his humour and wisdom are really only blossoming in my adulthood. I remember reading this as a teenager and not particularly liking it. However now, half a lifetime later, I find that most of my favourite scenes of Granny and Nanny and the rest are all here in this hilarious book. The worst part is that all his books are SO much shorter than I remember. It's no surprise that I love Terry Pratchett. He was like a far away uncle that dotted on me with stories written just for me. But the depth of his humour and wisdom are really only blossoming in my adulthood. I remember reading this as a teenager and not particularly liking it. However now, half a lifetime later, I find that most of my favourite scenes of Granny and Nanny and the rest are all here in this hilarious book. The worst part is that all his books are SO much shorter than I remember.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Toby

    Between injuries and work and winter this took me forever to listen to whilst training, no review could possibly be valid after such a disjointed experience. Needless to say that I am fatter and less fit than when I started but I don't think that can possibly be the fault of five witches, an Omnian preacher, and a vampire invasion fleet. Or the potentialiality that this is the first book when Terry Pratchett knew about the disease that would wreck his brain, after reading him put the following w Between injuries and work and winter this took me forever to listen to whilst training, no review could possibly be valid after such a disjointed experience. Needless to say that I am fatter and less fit than when I started but I don't think that can possibly be the fault of five witches, an Omnian preacher, and a vampire invasion fleet. Or the potentialiality that this is the first book when Terry Pratchett knew about the disease that would wreck his brain, after reading him put the following words in to the mouth of his finest creation, "You tried to take my mind away from me, and that's everything to me. Reflect on that. Try to learn."

  28. 5 out of 5

    Melindam

    “Don’t trust the cannibal just ’cos he’s usin’ a knife and fork!”

  29. 4 out of 5

    Siren

    The best book in the witch-series so far. So awesome! Must read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Stoolfire

    It's always good to see Granny Weatherwax, Nanny Ogg, and Agnes/ Perdita. I have to admit though I totally had soft spot for Igor. It's always good to see Granny Weatherwax, Nanny Ogg, and Agnes/ Perdita. I have to admit though I totally had soft spot for Igor.

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