web site hit counter Perfect Wave: More Essays on Art and Democracy - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Perfect Wave: More Essays on Art and Democracy

Availability: Ready to download

When Dave Hickey was twelve, he rode the surfer’s dream: the perfect wave. And, like so many things in life we long for, it didn’t quite turn out----he shot the pier and dashed himself against the rocks of Sunset Cliffs in Ocean Beach, which just about killed him.   Fortunately, for Hickey and for us, he survived, and continues to battle, decades into a career as one of Am When Dave Hickey was twelve, he rode the surfer’s dream: the perfect wave. And, like so many things in life we long for, it didn’t quite turn out----he shot the pier and dashed himself against the rocks of Sunset Cliffs in Ocean Beach, which just about killed him.   Fortunately, for Hickey and for us, he survived, and continues to battle, decades into a career as one of America’s foremost critical iconoclasts, a trusted, even cherished no-nonsense voice commenting on the all-too-often nonsensical worlds of art and culture. Perfect Wave brings together essays on a wide range of subjects from throughout Hickey’s career, displaying his usual breadth of interest and powerful insight into what makes art work, or not, and why we care. With Hickey as our guide, we travel to Disneyland and Vegas, London and Venice. We discover the genius of Karen Carpenter and Waylon Jennings, learn why Robert Mitchum matters more than Jimmy Stewart, and see how the stillness of Antonioni speaks to us today. Never slow to judge—or to surprise us in doing so—Hickey powerfully relates his wincing disappointment in the later career of his early hero Susan Sontag, and shows us the appeal to our commonality that we’ve been missing in Norman Rockwell. With each essay, the doing is as important as what’s done; the pleasure of reading Dave Hickey lies nearly as much in spending time in his company as in being surprised to find yourself agreeing with his conclusions.   Bookended by previously unpublished personal essays that offer a new glimpse into Hickey’s own life—including the aforementioned slam-bang conclusion to his youthful surfing career—Perfect Wave is not a perfect book. But it’s a damn good one, and a welcome addition to the Hickey canon.  


Compare

When Dave Hickey was twelve, he rode the surfer’s dream: the perfect wave. And, like so many things in life we long for, it didn’t quite turn out----he shot the pier and dashed himself against the rocks of Sunset Cliffs in Ocean Beach, which just about killed him.   Fortunately, for Hickey and for us, he survived, and continues to battle, decades into a career as one of Am When Dave Hickey was twelve, he rode the surfer’s dream: the perfect wave. And, like so many things in life we long for, it didn’t quite turn out----he shot the pier and dashed himself against the rocks of Sunset Cliffs in Ocean Beach, which just about killed him.   Fortunately, for Hickey and for us, he survived, and continues to battle, decades into a career as one of America’s foremost critical iconoclasts, a trusted, even cherished no-nonsense voice commenting on the all-too-often nonsensical worlds of art and culture. Perfect Wave brings together essays on a wide range of subjects from throughout Hickey’s career, displaying his usual breadth of interest and powerful insight into what makes art work, or not, and why we care. With Hickey as our guide, we travel to Disneyland and Vegas, London and Venice. We discover the genius of Karen Carpenter and Waylon Jennings, learn why Robert Mitchum matters more than Jimmy Stewart, and see how the stillness of Antonioni speaks to us today. Never slow to judge—or to surprise us in doing so—Hickey powerfully relates his wincing disappointment in the later career of his early hero Susan Sontag, and shows us the appeal to our commonality that we’ve been missing in Norman Rockwell. With each essay, the doing is as important as what’s done; the pleasure of reading Dave Hickey lies nearly as much in spending time in his company as in being surprised to find yourself agreeing with his conclusions.   Bookended by previously unpublished personal essays that offer a new glimpse into Hickey’s own life—including the aforementioned slam-bang conclusion to his youthful surfing career—Perfect Wave is not a perfect book. But it’s a damn good one, and a welcome addition to the Hickey canon.  

30 review for Perfect Wave: More Essays on Art and Democracy

  1. 4 out of 5

    Russell

    Hickey is always exciting and interesting as an observer. His stories of the American modern west and our various political-post modern-consumer messes are hilarious. He is snarky and judgmental but never devastating - it’s almost a sentimental snark. I’m comforted by his views of art and the role art can play in society.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Jackson

    Worthy companion to 'Air Guitar' and 'Pirates and Farmers.' Essays on Antonioni, West Coast Jazz, Venetian architecture, The Carpenters, Susan Sontag's journals, art fairs, surfing, etc. Worthy companion to 'Air Guitar' and 'Pirates and Farmers.' Essays on Antonioni, West Coast Jazz, Venetian architecture, The Carpenters, Susan Sontag's journals, art fairs, surfing, etc.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    This is a really strange book as it's a collection of essays that are reviews and thoughts about art, artists, and music. For those that know Dave Hickey's work this is a great collection. I approached it not knowing that it was a collection of various essays, and wasn't sure who Hickey was, but I found the essays to be either fascinating or skippable. It's sort of like buying an album because it looks good, not because you know the singer or a song they wrote. The best work in this book is when This is a really strange book as it's a collection of essays that are reviews and thoughts about art, artists, and music. For those that know Dave Hickey's work this is a great collection. I approached it not knowing that it was a collection of various essays, and wasn't sure who Hickey was, but I found the essays to be either fascinating or skippable. It's sort of like buying an album because it looks good, not because you know the singer or a song they wrote. The best work in this book is when Hickey talks about pop music. He has a real gift for discussing why a particular song is "good" (whatever that means) and why we return to it time and time again. I also really enjoyed the essays that were speculative about the end (telos) of art itself. There were many touching moments in the essays where Hickey's writing carries you to moments he's had where he's in a particular place speculating. But this only happens in a few of the essays in the book. Not everything here is great, and I'd suggest reading around in it if you are interested in art and music criticism on a very broad level. This is very "loose theory" in a sense, someone thinking about why something in art is the way it is, and referring very lightly to any serious theoretical work out there about it. Meant for light reading, it can capture you and make you think. It has beautiful moments, but it's not something that I thought really blew me away.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    Maybe not as essential as Air Guitar, one of the greatest works of cultural criticism of the last thirty years, but everything by Hickey is essential--and the essays here on West Coast Jazz, The Carpenters, and Norman Rockwell are classics. Well worth checking out.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Zach

    Dave Hickey, American Treasure. Even when I don't know what the hell he's talking about--and that's quite often, honestly--I'm listening like we're in on the same joke. Dave Hickey, American Treasure. Even when I don't know what the hell he's talking about--and that's quite often, honestly--I'm listening like we're in on the same joke.

  6. 5 out of 5

    P

    Ok, read a few, skipped a lot

  7. 4 out of 5

    Noah

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jakub Marshall

  9. 4 out of 5

    Hiroshi Kaneko

  10. 4 out of 5

    John

  11. 5 out of 5

    David Sutton

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Wolf

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mike

  14. 5 out of 5

    Brian Slattery

  15. 4 out of 5

    Leah Bailly

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ashish

  17. 5 out of 5

    Josh

  18. 4 out of 5

    Octavia

  19. 5 out of 5

    Leslie Love Stone

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ward

  21. 5 out of 5

    Torchcountry

  22. 5 out of 5

    Tom

  23. 5 out of 5

    Aldous

  24. 4 out of 5

    Paul Mannino

  25. 5 out of 5

    Buyankhishig Jamsran

  26. 5 out of 5

    David

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ewan Macfarlane

  28. 4 out of 5

    eric

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lee Satkowski

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jessie

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.