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SOUTHERN BASTARDS meets American Gods in a high-stakes fantasy series that masterfully blends high-octane action and jaw-dropping worldbuilding. In GOD COUNTRY, readers meet Emmett Quinlan, an old widower rattled by dementia. Emmett isn't just a problem for his children--his violent outbursts are more than the local cops can handle. When a tornado levels his home--as well a SOUTHERN BASTARDS meets American Gods in a high-stakes fantasy series that masterfully blends high-octane action and jaw-dropping worldbuilding. In GOD COUNTRY, readers meet Emmett Quinlan, an old widower rattled by dementia. Emmett isn't just a problem for his children--his violent outbursts are more than the local cops can handle. When a tornado levels his home--as well as the surrounding West Texas town--a restored Quinlan rises from the wreckage. An enchanted sword at the eye of the storm gives him more than a sound mind and body, however. He's now the only man who can face these otherworldly creatures the sword has drawn down to the Lone Star State... In GOD COUNTRY salvation is a double-edged sword. Collects GOD COUNTRY #1-6


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SOUTHERN BASTARDS meets American Gods in a high-stakes fantasy series that masterfully blends high-octane action and jaw-dropping worldbuilding. In GOD COUNTRY, readers meet Emmett Quinlan, an old widower rattled by dementia. Emmett isn't just a problem for his children--his violent outbursts are more than the local cops can handle. When a tornado levels his home--as well a SOUTHERN BASTARDS meets American Gods in a high-stakes fantasy series that masterfully blends high-octane action and jaw-dropping worldbuilding. In GOD COUNTRY, readers meet Emmett Quinlan, an old widower rattled by dementia. Emmett isn't just a problem for his children--his violent outbursts are more than the local cops can handle. When a tornado levels his home--as well as the surrounding West Texas town--a restored Quinlan rises from the wreckage. An enchanted sword at the eye of the storm gives him more than a sound mind and body, however. He's now the only man who can face these otherworldly creatures the sword has drawn down to the Lone Star State... In GOD COUNTRY salvation is a double-edged sword. Collects GOD COUNTRY #1-6

30 review for God Country

  1. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    Well. I thought I would like it more, but it certainly wasn't bad. It seemed (to me) to have a Norse vibe to it even though space gods (or something like that) were fighting with Emmet and his new BFF, a sentient sword god who keeps him from relapsing into dementia. <--which is a really cool premise. And I liked it. I did. There's lots of shit exploding, plenty of tugs on the old heartstrings, and a decent underlying moral to the story. I'm not really sure why I didn't fall in love with it like so m Well. I thought I would like it more, but it certainly wasn't bad. It seemed (to me) to have a Norse vibe to it even though space gods (or something like that) were fighting with Emmet and his new BFF, a sentient sword god who keeps him from relapsing into dementia. <--which is a really cool premise. And I liked it. I did. There's lots of shit exploding, plenty of tugs on the old heartstrings, and a decent underlying moral to the story. I'm not really sure why I didn't fall in love with it like so many of my friends did, but there was just something missing that kept it from being a spectacular read. I can see the brilliance of this graphic novel but I just can't feel it in my bones, if that makes any sense? However, I would definitely encourage anyone who is interested in this (or just Donny Cates, in general) to give it a try and see what they think for themselves.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    An old dude with Alzheimer’s somehow has a Final Fantasy-type giant magical sentient sword that cures his horrible disease while he holds it – but a space wizard villain something wants it back for reasons. Stupid fighting ensues! God Country is a pretty boring comic. Too much of it is clichéd and derivative. The narrator has this down-home Southern-drawl-style way of speaking because the story’s set in Texas and I guess that’s just how everyone down there talks? It put me in mind of Sam Elliott An old dude with Alzheimer’s somehow has a Final Fantasy-type giant magical sentient sword that cures his horrible disease while he holds it – but a space wizard villain something wants it back for reasons. Stupid fighting ensues! God Country is a pretty boring comic. Too much of it is clichéd and derivative. The narrator has this down-home Southern-drawl-style way of speaking because the story’s set in Texas and I guess that’s just how everyone down there talks? It put me in mind of Sam Elliott’s narrator in The Big Lebowski or any Cormac McCarthy character (the book opens with a quote from Blood Meridian). The characters are very roughly sketched out – Emmett is basically a crappier version of Jason Aaron’s Old Thor over at Marvel while the villain is simply Generic Bad Guy - while their motivations were either vague and nebulous or non-existent, making it hard to be invested in anything that was happening. The fantasy is unremarkable and the storyline of “Emmett and Giant Sword Fight Stuff” was instantly forgettable and dreary. Emmett’s introduction where we see the terrible effects of Alzheimer’s was attention-grabbing and different though there’s barely any exploration of the illness afterwards and in the end its inclusion feels pointlessly contrived. The finale between Emmett and his son Roy tried for an emotional gut-punch that it never earned but I appreciated that it wasn’t as corny as it could’ve been. A trite, tedious comic with weak writing and art, I couldn’t be doing with God Country and I wouldn’t recommend it to anyone.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Michael Finocchiaro

    This was an OK comic: old guy with Alzheimer's gets this big ass sword that cures him but the god who owns the sword wants it back...well, it is kind of predictable after that. The characters are relatively superficial (arguably, the most interesting character is the sword itself), even if the art is pretty good. Not sure what all the fuss was about on this one.. This was an OK comic: old guy with Alzheimer's gets this big ass sword that cures him but the god who owns the sword wants it back...well, it is kind of predictable after that. The characters are relatively superficial (arguably, the most interesting character is the sword itself), even if the art is pretty good. Not sure what all the fuss was about on this one..

  4. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    In a remote part of Texas, Roy is trying to juggle between taking care of Emmet, his father suffering from Alzheimers, and his wife and young daughter. He's failing at both when a tornado appears and leaves a demon and the God of Swords behind. Emmit picks up the sword and instantly gets his memories back. However, the sword's creator will stop at nothing to get the sword back. Emmit puts his family through hell to keep the sword as he battles gods hellbent on getting the sword back. The Good: Th In a remote part of Texas, Roy is trying to juggle between taking care of Emmet, his father suffering from Alzheimers, and his wife and young daughter. He's failing at both when a tornado appears and leaves a demon and the God of Swords behind. Emmit picks up the sword and instantly gets his memories back. However, the sword's creator will stop at nothing to get the sword back. Emmit puts his family through hell to keep the sword as he battles gods hellbent on getting the sword back. The Good: The story is engaging and fast paced. It had me leaping through the pages to find out what happened. The Bad: The story is over. Can't see how they'd make a second volume. The Ugly: Geoff Shaw's art is dark and sloppy, reminiscent of a less talented Sean Murphy or Matteo Scalera. Received an advance copy from Image and Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Donovan

    "Long time ago, out in West Texas, there was this storm..." What a brilliant deep fried fantasy! I've never read anything like it. There's action, drama, depth, and fantastical artwork. And god battles in Texas? Bring it on! What's it about? Emmett Quinlan has Alzheimer's and a dangerous temper. Out of nowhere he gets Valofax, the God of Blades and talking sword, and suddenly he's a badass god! Then there's war, a journey to hell, and a legion of attacking demons in good ol' Texas. And it's damn f "Long time ago, out in West Texas, there was this storm..." What a brilliant deep fried fantasy! I've never read anything like it. There's action, drama, depth, and fantastical artwork. And god battles in Texas? Bring it on! What's it about? Emmett Quinlan has Alzheimer's and a dangerous temper. Out of nowhere he gets Valofax, the God of Blades and talking sword, and suddenly he's a badass god! Then there's war, a journey to hell, and a legion of attacking demons in good ol' Texas. And it's damn fun! Nice work, Donny Cates. Did you catch that Duff Beer cameo? Awesome! Geoff Shaw's artwork is amazing. It's sketchy and detailed and sharp. And he has that ambiguous yet definitive way of drawing fantasy elements that just immerses you in these other worlds. This effect is perfectly complemented by Jason Wordie's masterful colors. They're rich and vivid! Overall I was really impressed. Pretty sure it's a one shot so it's low risk, it's cheap, unique, well written, and amazingly illustrated.

  6. 4 out of 5

    GrilledCheeseSamurai (Scott)

    There's a 12 ft. tall talking sword in this book. SOLD! I was really surprised with this one. I guess my expectations were pretty low...and holy hell were they ever blown out of the water. This one fired on all cylinders for me. The art was awesome. There were splash pages scattered throughout the volume that left my jaw hanging and overall I really dug it. The color of the book worked well too. The story - which I wasn't really expecting anything from, really impressed me. I cared about the charac There's a 12 ft. tall talking sword in this book. SOLD! I was really surprised with this one. I guess my expectations were pretty low...and holy hell were they ever blown out of the water. This one fired on all cylinders for me. The art was awesome. There were splash pages scattered throughout the volume that left my jaw hanging and overall I really dug it. The color of the book worked well too. The story - which I wasn't really expecting anything from, really impressed me. I cared about the characters, their relationships with one another, and I really felt Emmet's struggle wanting to hang onto his family and not lose his identity to alzheimer's. What a dirty ass disease. There were some feels too in the book that got me right in the heart. And the ending. Nailed it. So often I feel like these shorter mini-series flop out on the endings. This one I really dug. It was wrapped up perfectly, IMO. *Shrugs* Who'da thunk it? I really wasn't all that hype for this one and spank my ass if I didn't really enjoy it. Did I mention there is a 12-foot talking sword? Yeah. I really liked that part.

  7. 5 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    Donny Cates is just killing it. Even at his worst the work he does is still solid. Much respect for this guy. So what's God Country about? Well, you can read the description on any review or right above here. So let me tell you what it really is about. This old dude gets a sword from the sky and kills a demon. Then the god who had the sword comes down to talk to him. They don't see eye to eye and then the god returns home. Once there popa god says we must take the sword back and sends his other Donny Cates is just killing it. Even at his worst the work he does is still solid. Much respect for this guy. So what's God Country about? Well, you can read the description on any review or right above here. So let me tell you what it really is about. This old dude gets a sword from the sky and kills a demon. Then the god who had the sword comes down to talk to him. They don't see eye to eye and then the god returns home. Once there popa god says we must take the sword back and sends his other son to retrieve it. And from there a lot of killing, kidnapping, and fights go on. Good: So above you'd probably think this is a gigantic fighting comic. And in some ways it is. And the fights are big and fucking epic. However, it's the family moments, the heartfelt moments, that really hit hard. The art is also great, the fights are stunning, and the designs are pretty interesting. Bad: The second half gets a little heavy in itself, trying too much at once, and felt a bit too rushed. I really dug the shit out of this. While not as good as Redneck or Babyteeth I'd still say it's a damn good time. People, check this out if you haven't yet! A 4 out of 5.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Zedsdead

    A tornado delivers a 12-foot talking sword to a mean old Alzheimer's-stricken Texas coot, restoring his mind but incurring the wrath of the god who forged the blade. I thought this was going to be a Jesusland critique along the lines of Southern Bastards. Not even close. God Country sets out as a thoughtful examination of dementia, its dehumanizing effects on its victim and its tragic consequences for family. It ends as a fight to the death between an old fat guy with a sentient weapon, and a A tornado delivers a 12-foot talking sword to a mean old Alzheimer's-stricken Texas coot, restoring his mind but incurring the wrath of the god who forged the blade. I thought this was going to be a Jesusland critique along the lines of Southern Bastards. Not even close. God Country sets out as a thoughtful examination of dementia, its dehumanizing effects on its victim and its tragic consequences for family. It ends as a fight to the death between an old fat guy with a sentient weapon, and a snide god patriarch who views humans as vermin. God Country 's best moments are its conversations. A war god speaking kindly to a little girl; a son given an unexpected opportunity to connect with his disapproving father...and being rebuffed; the tension between a man who wants to care for his sick dad and a woman justifiably terrified of her violent, unpredictable father-in-law. The battles in God Country are just noise.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Alright comics nerds, this was my first taste of Donny Cates. Y’all have been hyping him for the last year or two, how good is he? Reading this story, of one old man’s battle against inevitable, I was constantly asking myself, “what is this a parable of? What’s the point of this story - the lesson we will be expected to take away? Is it sacrifice? Strength? Noble acquiescence? Or raging against the dying of the light?” I imagined myself writing my first story - wondering what ending I’d be aiming Alright comics nerds, this was my first taste of Donny Cates. Y’all have been hyping him for the last year or two, how good is he? Reading this story, of one old man’s battle against inevitable, I was constantly asking myself, “what is this a parable of? What’s the point of this story - the lesson we will be expected to take away? Is it sacrifice? Strength? Noble acquiescence? Or raging against the dying of the light?” I imagined myself writing my first story - wondering what ending I’d be aiming at, and how I think I’d get there any more artfully than all the practised writers who’ve come before me? Was it this doubt-ridden for Donny while he was writing this story, inhabiting these simple characters? Or did he have a brilliant moment of clarity, and just had to keep his eye on it, like a sailor heading for a storm-ridden lighthouse? I’m not really sure if this was just a personal fable of a parent of Donny’s and how he is coping with the loss, or if it’s meant to be everyone’s tale and Donny’s just playing at omniscient narrator. It felt a little distant for me - slightly sloppy/scritchty art, thin characters with not much in the way of a personal journey to hang my interest on. I feel like I’m observing someone else’s slightly awkward therapy sessions, and I dunno whether I’m supposed to admire the *craft* that do many creators were willing to praise on the back of the book or if I can let myself go, “hmm”. It wasn’t the worst I’ve read, it was definitely a nice break from the endless mythology building of most comics tales I read...but it doesn’t make me want to read more like it. I’m pretty much indifferent.

  10. 4 out of 5

    47Time

    Arzheimer's is a nasty condition. Losing memories of your loved ones must be painful. A magical artifact repairs Emmett's mind, allowing him to remember his wife, son and granddaughter. He displays a serious human weakness when faced with the prospect of giving it back, though. Even with the indestructibility and immense strength it gives him, he does not want to let go of his memories even though he risks the well-being of both his family and the family of the sword's owner. The god that create Arzheimer's is a nasty condition. Losing memories of your loved ones must be painful. A magical artifact repairs Emmett's mind, allowing him to remember his wife, son and granddaughter. He displays a serious human weakness when faced with the prospect of giving it back, though. Even with the indestructibility and immense strength it gives him, he does not want to let go of his memories even though he risks the well-being of both his family and the family of the sword's owner. The god that created it wants it back and he is just as stubborn as Emmett is. Both are in their twilight years and are worried about what they leave behind, something to be remembered by. Emmett Quinlan has Alzheimer's disease, so his son Roy decides to move his family in his father's house as he doesn't want to send him to an old folks home. The old man's verbal violence puts too much stress on his wife Janey who takes her daughter Deena and heads back home. They are stopped by a massive tornado and a 20-foot dark creature. Right as it attacks Deena, Emmett saves her using a huge sword named Valofax which fell from the sky. The story may seem simplistic so far, but the focus on legacy, family and loved ones, determination, together with some epic battles should keep anyone turning the pages. The ending is worth it. (view spoiler)[The sword gives Emmett his mental faculties back and he is determined to not give it up no matter what. Aristus, god of war, blood and honor, demands the sword back for his father Attum, but Valofax chooses to remain with Emmett. Yes, the sword speaks and its choice seems to be in spite of Attum, its creator. Valofax also protects Emmet and his family from the god Balegrim and Aristus's attacks. Emmett completely loses control in his anger, but is stopped by his family. He decides to end it all by going to Attum's realm, a world barely kept whole by Attum's sheer will. The fight between Emmett and Attum risks to unfocus the latter's enchantments which keep the world from being swallowed up by the void. Emmett is wounded severely by Attum and dies in Roy's arms. Attum also kills his own son for trying to stop him. Roy uses Valofax to teleport away before Attum can claim the sword and, without its power, the latter is unable to stop the void from destroying his world. Roy returns to his family and the story of the sword and the events surrounding it is told from generation to generation in his family. This becomes the legacy that Emmett always wanted to leave behind. (hide spoiler)]

  11. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Quann

    I thought this one was a perfectly middle of the road graphic novel. A demented man from Texas gains a giant, magical, speaking, video-game looking sword that returns to him his mind whole. The concept is pretty interesting at face value, but fails to live up to the promise of its premise pretty quickly. The sword, as it turns out, is actually the property of a race of space-gods who bear a passing resemblance to the cast of Marvel's Thor or DC's Fourth World characters. If you guessed that the g I thought this one was a perfectly middle of the road graphic novel. A demented man from Texas gains a giant, magical, speaking, video-game looking sword that returns to him his mind whole. The concept is pretty interesting at face value, but fails to live up to the promise of its premise pretty quickly. The sword, as it turns out, is actually the property of a race of space-gods who bear a passing resemblance to the cast of Marvel's Thor or DC's Fourth World characters. If you guessed that the gods want their sword back, then you can imagine the conflict that follows. All in all, the book feels bland despite the fireworks you'd expect from such a conflict. Shaw does a terrific job with the talking-heads scenes, but fails to deliver really exciting, kinetic action. As so much of the story depends on the reader developing an emotional attachment to the characters, it's a real shame that more time wasn't given to character moments. Or, that more powerful dialogue wasn't packed into the book. I expected more urban fantasy than I got and I suppose that let me down.

  12. 5 out of 5

    RG

    Really cool fantasy drama novel. Father who suffers from Alzheimer's ends up with a powerful sword that cures him only when holding this powerful sword. I large quest into realms and fighting Gods is whats in store. Deals with family/love, father/son relationships, mental illness and remembering the past. Its one and done, cant see a second Vol at all. The artwork didnt really work for that well. Kinda looked a little rushed. Really cool fantasy drama novel. Father who suffers from Alzheimer's ends up with a powerful sword that cures him only when holding this powerful sword. I large quest into realms and fighting Gods is whats in store. Deals with family/love, father/son relationships, mental illness and remembering the past. Its one and done, cant see a second Vol at all. The artwork didnt really work for that well. Kinda looked a little rushed.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    It's a damned shame there isn't a rating higher than five stars. This is, by far, the single most beautiful story I've read in quite some time. The art is almost as busy as the pace is fast, but with a fairly simple through-line in the plot it never feels difficult to follow. The voice of the narrator caught my attention first. The country dialect lulls you into a sense of older, more simple times. Which is, of course, a complete contrast to the actual story which, once it begins, almost never gi It's a damned shame there isn't a rating higher than five stars. This is, by far, the single most beautiful story I've read in quite some time. The art is almost as busy as the pace is fast, but with a fairly simple through-line in the plot it never feels difficult to follow. The voice of the narrator caught my attention first. The country dialect lulls you into a sense of older, more simple times. Which is, of course, a complete contrast to the actual story which, once it begins, almost never gives you a chance to breathe. Oh, sure, you get a page or two of calm between storms, but it's mostly full speed ahead from page one. If you have a love for stories in general, read this. If you like a good fairy tale, read this. If you love your family, read this. Read this.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Karl

    This has been a tea and graphic novel day. I binged Isola this morning and now this one. Isola had gorgeous art with subpar writing while God Country was a satisfying read from an art and writing perspective. Geoff Shaw creates frenetic, violent images that suit his battle scenes. They’re sloppy but entirely appropriate. Cates is stellar. I’ve never read his mainstream stuff but I might seek out Redneck and Babyteeth based on the recommendations of the guys in my comic shop. On that note, I gave This has been a tea and graphic novel day. I binged Isola this morning and now this one. Isola had gorgeous art with subpar writing while God Country was a satisfying read from an art and writing perspective. Geoff Shaw creates frenetic, violent images that suit his battle scenes. They’re sloppy but entirely appropriate. Cates is stellar. I’ve never read his mainstream stuff but I might seek out Redneck and Babyteeth based on the recommendations of the guys in my comic shop. On that note, I gave the manager a list of my favourite writers and artists and his staff created a list of recommendations for me that included this book based on my love of Jason Aaron ‘s Southern Bastards. This book is just as gritty and desperate as that series.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    Great artwork and story idea but it seemed too rushed to be a great story. If this could have had more time to develope this could have been better.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Václav

    (3,6 of 5 for a story about old man god-killer and his talking sword) I liked it. It has a similar vibe as Murder Falcon (but it's not as kick-ass as MF), very nice art and Donny Cates can do cool stories. But it was not that awesome as I would expect. The story is a bit of a cliche even if Donny (successfully) tried to polish it a bit. God Country is fun, touching and action-driven. I enjoyed reading that even when it didn't meet my expectations. (3,6 of 5 for a story about old man god-killer and his talking sword) I liked it. It has a similar vibe as Murder Falcon (but it's not as kick-ass as MF), very nice art and Donny Cates can do cool stories. But it was not that awesome as I would expect. The story is a bit of a cliche even if Donny (successfully) tried to polish it a bit. God Country is fun, touching and action-driven. I enjoyed reading that even when it didn't meet my expectations.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Juffer

    Not ashamed to admit, I cried just a tad. This is an excellent book. Perhaps some people are turned off because it’s not what they’re expecting. It’s a book about life and death. The real kind. It’s about the loyalty of Family. It’s about love and heartache. Joy and the willingness to sacrifice everything. All myths and legends come from people’s emotions. The hard to explain is explained away by gods doing miraculous things.... often in human image. Heroes are given almost impossible tasks; most often Not ashamed to admit, I cried just a tad. This is an excellent book. Perhaps some people are turned off because it’s not what they’re expecting. It’s a book about life and death. The real kind. It’s about the loyalty of Family. It’s about love and heartache. Joy and the willingness to sacrifice everything. All myths and legends come from people’s emotions. The hard to explain is explained away by gods doing miraculous things.... often in human image. Heroes are given almost impossible tasks; most often they are tasked with going to Hell. I think that’s why I enjoyed this book so much. It followed a subtle paradigm that fit with all heroes and myths. However, this hero just happened to be an old man with Alzheimer’s who loved his family. Everyone is and can be a hero given the right opportunity. God Country is well written, incredibly drawn, colored, lettered and edited. It’s a phenomenal book. It’s one of those books I’ll be reading again, then again... then again.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Geub

    well that was really amazing. when you pick it up you think it's a story about a stubborn old guy, magic swords and vengeful gods. but it's not. it's much more than that. it's a story about family and dealing with old age and builds from that. brought a few tears to my eyes so I'd say this comic book is worth every penny. read it, you won't regret it. well that was really amazing. when you pick it up you think it's a story about a stubborn old guy, magic swords and vengeful gods. but it's not. it's much more than that. it's a story about family and dealing with old age and builds from that. brought a few tears to my eyes so I'd say this comic book is worth every penny. read it, you won't regret it.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jesús

    An inoffensive, sentimental story about mortality and fatherhood, told in the form of a fable or myth. There’s nothing really wrong with it, but there’s also nothing especially right about it either. Something to read, put on a shelf, and forget about.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    Emmett Quinlan, suffering from Alzheimer's, makes his family' life miserable until he becomes the owner of a magical sword that 'cures' him. The premise alone is worth reading the book. Dementia in all its forms is one of the scariest things in the world to me. While there are battles with gods and hordes of Balegrim's death minions, it's the fight to not lose your ability to think and remember that made the biggest impact on me. Emmett is a truly believable man of his generation (his reply to hi Emmett Quinlan, suffering from Alzheimer's, makes his family' life miserable until he becomes the owner of a magical sword that 'cures' him. The premise alone is worth reading the book. Dementia in all its forms is one of the scariest things in the world to me. While there are battles with gods and hordes of Balegrim's death minions, it's the fight to not lose your ability to think and remember that made the biggest impact on me. Emmett is a truly believable man of his generation (his reply to his son's pouring out his heart to him is "Your mother hugged you too much"). He still cares, but it's almost impossible for him to show this. The art is not too my taste - too dark and sketchy - but it does a good job of conveying the story. I've liked this author's 'Babyteeth' graphic novel as well as this one so I have a favorable opinion of his work.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Derek Royal

    I began reading this series when it was first released, but then after the first few issues I let it go -- or didn't get to it -- and decided to wait for the trade. I enjoyed this miniseries well enough, but I don't feel as enthusiastic about it as many people do. In fact, I've heard a number of comics readers/critics/reviewers sing the praises of Donny Cates, saying that 2017 was his year. Maybe. But I've just not been as bowled over by Cates's work as others apparently are. For example, Rednec I began reading this series when it was first released, but then after the first few issues I let it go -- or didn't get to it -- and decided to wait for the trade. I enjoyed this miniseries well enough, but I don't feel as enthusiastic about it as many people do. In fact, I've heard a number of comics readers/critics/reviewers sing the praises of Donny Cates, saying that 2017 was his year. Maybe. But I've just not been as bowled over by Cates's work as others apparently are. For example, Rednecks was interesting, but it wasn't the be all end all. Buzzkill from further back was okay. And I didn't go out of my way to read the AfterShock title, Babyteeth. However, I did enjoy The Paybacks.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Hisham

    What is one willing to sacrifice to keep hold of the things they love? A question asked and answered brilliantly in God Country, when we see the lengths that Emmett will go to for his family and to keep hold of his memories of them.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Hayley

    MORE!!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Juan

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I personally felt this story was very touching and a little more emotional than I would have expected. With the main character being stricken with dementia, it seems easily touching for families with similar circumstances to identify with this story. Unfortunately, I fall under this category. It just so happens that both of my parents are diagnosed with early stage dementia. Emmet, the main character of this story, has advanced and violent dementia. After he has gained the strength of the sword I personally felt this story was very touching and a little more emotional than I would have expected. With the main character being stricken with dementia, it seems easily touching for families with similar circumstances to identify with this story. Unfortunately, I fall under this category. It just so happens that both of my parents are diagnosed with early stage dementia. Emmet, the main character of this story, has advanced and violent dementia. After he has gained the strength of the sword and learned about his condition, it becomes emotional to see him basically fight solely with the purpose of wanting to retain his mind and memory. By all means, this is what I wish I could do with my parents... find a way to help keep them in the moment. Despite what appears to be going on, what Emmet fights for the most is to be with his family and be at peace with them. The underlining theme, for me, is family. This is clear even when it comes to both sons of the Elder God. I was upset to learn that this was only a mini-series. I suppose it is possible that the story can continue to move foreword due to critical acclaim but we wont know at this point. Even if this stands as a one arc story only, I feel the story was strong, emotional, and well written enough to warrant encouraging others to pick this up as a trade paperback.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Terry

    Cates, Donny (text) & Geoff Shaw & others (illus.). God Country. Vol. 1. Image. Aug. 2017. 168p. ISBN 9781534302341. pap. $16.99. Rated: M/Mature. EPIC FANTASY Cates (The Paybacks) pens a Weird West tale worthy of Joe R. Lansdale in this collected edition of the series’ six-issue run. Roy Quinlan thinks he can care for his angry, Alzheimer’s stricken father, Emmett, even after the old man has a violent encounter with the law. At the risk of pushing his wife and daughter away, Roy refuses to remo Cates, Donny (text) & Geoff Shaw & others (illus.). God Country. Vol. 1. Image. Aug. 2017. 168p. ISBN 9781534302341. pap. $16.99. Rated: M/Mature. EPIC FANTASY Cates (The Paybacks) pens a Weird West tale worthy of Joe R. Lansdale in this collected edition of the series’ six-issue run. Roy Quinlan thinks he can care for his angry, Alzheimer’s stricken father, Emmett, even after the old man has a violent encounter with the law. At the risk of pushing his wife and daughter away, Roy refuses to remove his father from their homestead. Before the family can fracture, a supernatural tornado destroys the ranch, depositing an oversized magical talking sword into Emmett’s hands. As long as he wields the sword, he is free from his debilitating disease, but refusing to relinquish the sword to the dark force that created it pushes the Quinlans from drama into horror. Cates’s high-concept tale is grounded by one family’s struggle with aging and loss, while Shaw, Jason Wordie, and John Hill’s dynamic illustrations depict both rural Texas and the fantastic realm from which Valofax, the 12-foot-long god of swords, hails. Verdict: Recommended for readers who enjoy epic fantasy in rural settings. [Graphic Novels from Cates & Co. and Wertz | Xpress Reviews By LJ Reviews on August 31, 2017]

  26. 4 out of 5

    Peter Derk

    I mostly read this because a good friend told me it made him weep. Which is something that happens to me A LOT these days. Movies, mostly. Some of the sappiest, cheesiest shit, some really manipulative nonsense and BAM, waterworks. Maybe it's just getting older? I don't know. It's part of why I'm pretty hard on lousy movies. Because it's easy to sucker me in. I don't really try to think ahead and solve the plot, so you don't have to get too fancy. I cry from basically nothing, so you don't have to I mostly read this because a good friend told me it made him weep. Which is something that happens to me A LOT these days. Movies, mostly. Some of the sappiest, cheesiest shit, some really manipulative nonsense and BAM, waterworks. Maybe it's just getting older? I don't know. It's part of why I'm pretty hard on lousy movies. Because it's easy to sucker me in. I don't really try to think ahead and solve the plot, so you don't have to get too fancy. I cry from basically nothing, so you don't have to be awfully clever to get some emotion from me. It's just that when a movie doesn't do anything for me, I think, "Damn, guys. If you couldn't fool me, surprise me, make me laugh, or make me cry, you didn't get a whole lot done in the last couple hours." God Country didn't set me off to weeping the way it did my friend. It's hard to say why. But it's a good story, it's simple (considering there's a bunch of gods and a sentient sword involved), and it's pretty hard to hate. Read it and weep. If that's your thing.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    This is sort of a dark reimagining of Marvel's Thor with a weapon of the gods coming into the possession of a mere mortal. In this case that mortal is pissed off elderly Texan with Alzheimer's who has a thing or two to say to gods who'd come between him, his memories and his family. This borderline two-star book won me over by sheer attitude and a persistent reverence for the Lone Star State. This is sort of a dark reimagining of Marvel's Thor with a weapon of the gods coming into the possession of a mere mortal. In this case that mortal is pissed off elderly Texan with Alzheimer's who has a thing or two to say to gods who'd come between him, his memories and his family. This borderline two-star book won me over by sheer attitude and a persistent reverence for the Lone Star State.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    This is read-through 6 or 7, actually. I don't record all instances. But...Cates is coming to my local comic book shop next week and I needed to read again. Something about Emmett's voyage speaks to me. This is read-through 6 or 7, actually. I don't record all instances. But...Cates is coming to my local comic book shop next week and I needed to read again. Something about Emmett's voyage speaks to me.

  29. 5 out of 5

    andrew y

    I'm in a slim minority but I didn't find this unique or memorable I'm in a slim minority but I didn't find this unique or memorable

  30. 4 out of 5

    OmniBen

    (Zero spoiler review) Here I am again, the second Donny Cates story I have read, although this one, unlike The Ghost Fleet, came with a much higher reputation. One of the best one shot comics around, or at least that's what I was told. As you can tell by the score, I can't exactly agree with such an assessment. I don't know if Donny Cates just doesn't know how to write an ending? I don't know if the guy seems magnetically drawn to intentionally disappointing and frustrating the reader with his bl (Zero spoiler review) Here I am again, the second Donny Cates story I have read, although this one, unlike The Ghost Fleet, came with a much higher reputation. One of the best one shot comics around, or at least that's what I was told. As you can tell by the score, I can't exactly agree with such an assessment. I don't know if Donny Cates just doesn't know how to write an ending? I don't know if the guy seems magnetically drawn to intentionally disappointing and frustrating the reader with his bland, cliched endings over vague narration? Seriously, it reeks of every Hollywood hack who ever slapped some sugary emotional rhetoric over an unspectacular conclusion. I don't know why I always dig his first issue, but end up monumentally let down by the end. I don't know why the guy gets as much credit as he does? If this book is his magnum opus, then consider me well and truly off the Donny Cates bandwagon, if in fact, I ever was onboard in the first place. The story opens up nicely enough. Characters are established, the plot seems to be traveling along nicely, and I'm genuinely enjoying myself. I can feel an emotional pay off coming at the end, if Cates manages to keep it all kicking along smoothly. Unfortunately, it isn't long before it all starts going off the rails, and its right around the time the fantasy elements of the story rear their less than stellar heads. As the story descends further and further into this quasi superhero story, it moves further and further from the quaint little tale about a family coming to terms with a relative with dementia, into some wholly ridiculous and unbelievable tale. Yes, it would have been a totally different story without the science fiction, although, for me at least, it was only the more grounded aspects of the story that drew me in. If Cates could have either kept the tale earthbound, or worked a hell of a lot harder at a better science fiction story, we may be looking at a higher score, but we're not. Even still, I would have been far more forgiving, had the emotional pay off I was promised materialised, and left me a little choked up, a little reflective, a little happier for having pushed through. Instead, it was the final nail in this story's coffin. Shaw's art is mostly sublime throughout, and kept me turning the pages even when the story was dying right before my eyes. I'm not sure what else he's done, although I hope there are a few more hidden gems with his penciling on them. Same goes for Wordie, the colourist. These two have covered themselves in far more glory than Cates has, here. In closing, despite me giving it a bit of a pasting, this isn't a terrible book. Though it's terrible when compared to the expectations I was given. Now that may not entirely be the books fault, although the blurb on the back certainly isn't underselling it, although then again, does it ever? The search continues for something by Donny Cates I actually like. 2.75/5 OmniBen.

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