web site hit counter Catriona (Illustrated) + Free Audiobook - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Catriona (Illustrated) + Free Audiobook

Availability: Ready to download

[THIS KINDLE BOOK QUALITY IS GUARANTEED: It has been carefully edited with a fully interactive content.] Catriona (also known as David Balfour) is an 1893 novel written by Robert Louis Stevenson as a sequel to his earlier novel Kidnapped (1886). It tells the further story of the central character, David Balfour. BONUS : • Biography of Rudyard Kipling ABOUT THE PUBLISHE [THIS KINDLE BOOK QUALITY IS GUARANTEED: It has been carefully edited with a fully interactive content.] Catriona (also known as David Balfour) is an 1893 novel written by Robert Louis Stevenson as a sequel to his earlier novel Kidnapped (1886). It tells the further story of the central character, David Balfour. BONUS : • Biography of Rudyard Kipling ABOUT THE PUBLISHER: Rutilus classics publishes great works of literature at an affordable price. Our books have been carefully edited with a fully interactive content.


Compare

[THIS KINDLE BOOK QUALITY IS GUARANTEED: It has been carefully edited with a fully interactive content.] Catriona (also known as David Balfour) is an 1893 novel written by Robert Louis Stevenson as a sequel to his earlier novel Kidnapped (1886). It tells the further story of the central character, David Balfour. BONUS : • Biography of Rudyard Kipling ABOUT THE PUBLISHE [THIS KINDLE BOOK QUALITY IS GUARANTEED: It has been carefully edited with a fully interactive content.] Catriona (also known as David Balfour) is an 1893 novel written by Robert Louis Stevenson as a sequel to his earlier novel Kidnapped (1886). It tells the further story of the central character, David Balfour. BONUS : • Biography of Rudyard Kipling ABOUT THE PUBLISHER: Rutilus classics publishes great works of literature at an affordable price. Our books have been carefully edited with a fully interactive content.

30 review for Catriona (Illustrated) + Free Audiobook

  1. 5 out of 5

    Henry Avila

    David Balfour (also known as Catriona) is a sequel to the great classic Kidnapped though not as good, it still delivers excitement . Young David after many adventures arrives finally in Edinburgh, Scotland to receive his fortune, he hopes. However being 1751 a few years after the Jacobite rebellion of 1745, tension permeates, every man in the territory is under suspicion and especially Mr. Balfour, who is still a wanted person, by the English...what can he do? The eighteen -year -old needs help David Balfour (also known as Catriona) is a sequel to the great classic Kidnapped though not as good, it still delivers excitement . Young David after many adventures arrives finally in Edinburgh, Scotland to receive his fortune, he hopes. However being 1751 a few years after the Jacobite rebellion of 1745, tension permeates, every man in the territory is under suspicion and especially Mr. Balfour, who is still a wanted person, by the English...what can he do? The eighteen -year -old needs help desperately, someone to prove he's innocent but how , to a murder charge.... First get the inheritance and with literally a bag of money in hand, he unexpectedly yet joyfully meets Catriona Drummond (hence the title). Granddaughter of the notorious Rob Roy in the streets of the glorious city, the capital of the Scottish nation, he naturally falls in love at first sight with the pretty girl. You can guess if she returns the sentiment, yes you guessed right. Catriona's uncle had helped David escape the Red Coats, in his incredible harrowing journey with Alan Breck Stewart, across rugged Scotland. Her father is James More (James MacGregor Drummond, Rob Roy's son) , not his real name people used many aliases back then you can imagine why. Mr. More is in a bad situation in jail, also there Alan Breck Stewart (James of the Glens ) going on trial soon for killing an important man, in fact the same case as David's. Political events have made Stewart's conviction vital for the British, they don't care whether he shot Colin Campbell Glenure the dead man or not. Glenure's clan, wants revenge and the English need their support in bringing peace here to this often distressed land. A lawyer cautions the fugitive not to turn himself in to the authorities, without being free of charges. Like the ancient adage, a fool and his money are soon parted. Of course nobody listens to an attorney and the boy doesn't either , naturally . Still he visits the powerful Lord Advocate Mr.Prestongrange, who seems more interested in the arrest of Alan Breck, then of him. Let loose, but shortly afterwards captured by smugglers and held for ransom, a big pile of money they say, he is back on another isle off the Scottish coast. Mr. Balfour has doubts, the real reason he believes is that he won't be a witness in the trial of Alan Breck Stewart, a man not known for his goodness, yet he is Catriona's uncle and at least not the murderer of Glenure...David somehow, has to and needs to escape from these criminals, testify in court, before it's too late , see his friend Alan again and get that man out of Scotland...His future happiness depends on this impossible task... Good follow up to the original by the talented, maybe even the genius of Robert Louis Stevenson.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey Keeten

    “‘You deal with me very frankly, and I thank you for it,' said I. 'I will try on my side to be no less honest. I believe these deep duties may lie upon your lordship; I believe you may have laid them on your conscience when you took the oaths of the high office which you hold. But for me, who am just a plain man--or scarce a man yet--the plain duties must suffice. I can think but of two things, of a poor soul in the immediate and unjust danger of a shameful death, and of the cries and tears of h “‘You deal with me very frankly, and I thank you for it,' said I. 'I will try on my side to be no less honest. I believe these deep duties may lie upon your lordship; I believe you may have laid them on your conscience when you took the oaths of the high office which you hold. But for me, who am just a plain man--or scarce a man yet--the plain duties must suffice. I can think but of two things, of a poor soul in the immediate and unjust danger of a shameful death, and of the cries and tears of his wife that still tingle in my head. I cannot see beyond, my lord. It's the way I am made. If the country has to fall, it has to fall. And I pray God, if this is wilful blindness, that He may enlighten me before too late.’” This book, originally published as Catriona, is the sequel to Kidnapped, and the plot of this book picks up right at the point that Kidnapped leaves off. David Balfour is doing his best to set the record straight on the Appin Murder of a Campbell, but it soon becomes apparant that his factual statement is only muddying the waters of a case that has already been decided. James Stewart must swing. The Campbells work closely with the English, while the Stewarts are still doing their level best to reduce the stranglehold of England on Scotland. It only makes sense that, if a Campbell be lying in his own blood, a Stewart must have been the instigator of his death. It doesn’t really matter which Stewart hangs for it, so why not have the one that is most a thorn in the side of England swing from the gibbet. ”’Andie,’ said I, laying my hand upon his knee, ‘this Hielandman’s innocent.’ ‘Ay, it’s a peety about that,’ said he. ‘But ye see in this world, the way God made it, we canna just get a thing that we want.’” David is young enough to still believe that justice will prevail, that fairness is still the basis of the law, but he soon discovers that the system is designed to help those in power to keep control of the rest of us. He even is kidnapped and held on an island until his testimony will no longer be relevant to the trial. He’s lucky he doesn’t receive a deep probing strike in the kidneys for his trouble. David meets Catriona Drummond, the daughter of another arrested Scot who is going by the name of James More. David is smitten by her, and the trials and tribulations of the second half of the book revolve around his uncertain relationship with her. Catriona’s father is a rogue, a manipulator, a man in constant need of funds. David and Catriona end up in Holland, her without a red cent and he unable to leave her to her fate. David suggests that she be his sister so they can rent a place together without creating a scandal. Her father, when he arrives, is less concerned about her reputation as he is about liberating some of David’s money for his own uses. Stevenson employs the classic boy meets girl, boy wins girl, boy loses girl plot device. We know that they must end up together, but there are certainly times during the novel when I was unsure how that could possibly be accomplished. Stevenson had his own problems with a woman, his future wife Fanny. He met Fanny in Europe, she returned to San Francisco, he followed her despite being ill and convinced her to divorce her husband to be with him. I can only imagine the emotional uncertainty he was under through the whole process. Certainly, David suffers numerous psychological setbacks in his pursuit of his true love. Alan Breck Stewart also shows up for part of the book. He is Balfour’s stalwart companion in Kidnapped and is still trying his level best to keep his feet from swinging over the ground under an English gibbet. Unfortunately, this novel does not have the action that Alan is such a part of in the first book. I do think that Stevenson misses one opportunity to add some spice to this novel. At one point, Catriona devises a scheme to free her father from prison, and Stevenson chooses to have that happen offstage. I would have dearly loved to have had Stevenson describe the sequence of events as they were happening. Stevenson, as he does in all of his novels, weaves in some Scottish expressions to the plot like whilly whas, hag-rode, and byke of wasps. I really liked this one: ”But he has need of a long spoon when he sups with the de(v)il.” Or how about this one: ”’Catriona,’ said Alan, ‘ye’ll have to excuse me, my dear; but there’s nothing less than my fine bones upon the cast of it, and I’ll have to break this seal.’” At points, Stevenson’s brogue is so thick I have to read a sentence a few times to catch what he be saying. Though I’m sure it will make some readers uncomfortable, he is doing his best to place the reader not only in Scotland but in 18th century Scotland. This isn’t as exciting a book as Kidnapped, but I’m still glad to have read the end of Balfour’s story, and getting reacquainted with Alan Breck Stewart was also a treat. J. M. Barrie mentioned in one of his letters with Stevenson that he hoped that Stevenson had left Alan alive and well. It is nice to think of the possibility that Alan Breck can still emerge from over the crest of the steep hill and descend the heather the moment that we need him most. If you wish to see more of my most recent book and movie reviews, visit http://www.jeffreykeeten.com I also have a Facebook blogger page at:https://www.facebook.com/JeffreyKeeten and an Instagram account https://www.instagram.com/jeffreykeeten/

  3. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

    The second half of David Balfour’s story (often known as “Catriona,” the alternate title), which is the tale of what happens next. There’s a great deal more that David has to go through before he will be able to claim his heritage in peace. Content: profanity Lots of Scotch dialect in this one.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rob

    Having read this through, I now see why so many of Stevenson's faithful panned this book. It's predecessor, Kidnapped, was a 'story for boys', an action tale in the tradition of Sir Walter Scott. One thing I've always noticed about Kidnapped, though, is that it's also a Comedy of Manners. David Balfour continually fails to understand his uncle, Allen Breck, and a vast host of others because they don't behave the way he expects. Stevenson has especial fun, I think, with the fact that nearly all o Having read this through, I now see why so many of Stevenson's faithful panned this book. It's predecessor, Kidnapped, was a 'story for boys', an action tale in the tradition of Sir Walter Scott. One thing I've always noticed about Kidnapped, though, is that it's also a Comedy of Manners. David Balfour continually fails to understand his uncle, Allen Breck, and a vast host of others because they don't behave the way he expects. Stevenson has especial fun, I think, with the fact that nearly all of these characters are Scottsmen, which outsiders probably lumped into one huge, cultural pile, whereas Stevenson continues to show the difference between Highlander and Lowlander. Of course, he also shows the difference between those who believe the fine ideas they spout and those who simply spout them and then behave as they will, something David has trouble grasping at times, too. Catriona continues in this vein, but almost completely abandons action, save for two, possibly three rather brief sequences, and plunges completely into the Comedy of Manners. It's a rather good one, too—many of the characters are a bit 'stage' although some or not, but David has to learn to navigate worldviews with which he still, after all his lessons in the previous novel, has some problems. The relationship between Catriona and David, especially when they get to the Netherlands, is all Manners and mistakes, right up 'til end, when Alan rescues matters after making perhaps the penultimate statement about the core problem in any CoM: "But that’s the strange thing about you folk of the college learning: ye’re ignorat, and ye cannae see ’t. Wae’s me for my Greek and Hebrew; but, man, I ken that I dinnae ken them - there’s the differ of it." It's a lovely Comedy of Manners, and anyone who likes them will, I think, like this novel. Anyone who expects the near-constant peril of Kidnapped will likely be disappointed.

  5. 4 out of 5

    K.

    Rereading R. L. Stevenson. It's way fun. This one is not as good as David Balfour #1 "Kidnapped." It's a fun story, but it's much harder to read if you're not Scottish. Tons of Scots words. It's fun to try to decipher meaning, but so many of the words are actually just real Scots words that I have no knowledge of. Thank goodness for the glossary in the back if one cares that much. Did enjoy, but the story isn't as compelling as "Kidnapped." Did LOVE this passage, it's hilarious.... -- CHAPTER XIII— Rereading R. L. Stevenson. It's way fun. This one is not as good as David Balfour #1 "Kidnapped." It's a fun story, but it's much harder to read if you're not Scottish. Tons of Scots words. It's fun to try to decipher meaning, but so many of the words are actually just real Scots words that I have no knowledge of. Thank goodness for the glossary in the back if one cares that much. Did enjoy, but the story isn't as compelling as "Kidnapped." Did LOVE this passage, it's hilarious.... -- CHAPTER XIII—GILLANE SANDS I did not profit by Alan’s pilotage as he had done by his marchings under General Cope; for I can scarce tell what way we went. It is my excuse that we travelled exceeding fast. Some part we ran, some trotted, and the rest walked at a vengeance of a pace. Twice, while we were at top speed, we ran against country-folk; but though we plumped into the first from round a corner, Alan was as ready as a loaded musket. “Has ye seen my horse?” he gasped. “Na, man, I haenae seen nae horse the day,” replied the countryman. And Alan spared the time to explain to him that we were travelling “ride and tie”; that our charger had escaped, and it was feared he had gone home to Linton. Not only that, but he expended some breath (of which he had not very much left) to curse his own misfortune and my stupidity which was said to be its cause. “Them that cannae tell the truth,” he observed to myself as we went on again, “should be aye mindful to leave an honest, handy lee behind them. If folk dinnae ken what ye’re doing, Davie, they’re terrible taken up with it; but if they think they ken, they care nae mair for it than what I do for pease porridge.” -- Other quotes of note: "My education spoke home to me sharply; I was never brought up on sugar biscuits, but on the hard food of the truth. I knew that he was quite unfit to be a husband who was not prepared to be a father also; and for a boy like me to play the father was a mere derision." -- "But prayer is not very difficult, and the hitch comes in practice."

  6. 4 out of 5

    Dianna

    No, this isn't as good at Kidnapped. I fully admit to being a sap in saying that I enjoyed it, for it isn't the high-flying adventure story that the first book is - at all. No, here we have Davie in loooooooove. I do think though that this book is still best for the connections it has to Kidnapped - whether it be David doing right by the people who helped him before, or the rare and wonderful appearances of Alan Breck. And yet, even in this somewhat strained circumstances, I still liked him - an No, this isn't as good at Kidnapped. I fully admit to being a sap in saying that I enjoyed it, for it isn't the high-flying adventure story that the first book is - at all. No, here we have Davie in loooooooove. I do think though that this book is still best for the connections it has to Kidnapped - whether it be David doing right by the people who helped him before, or the rare and wonderful appearances of Alan Breck. And yet, even in this somewhat strained circumstances, I still liked him - and her, as well.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    I have mixed feelings about this book. It felt very little like Kidnapped. There isn't nearly the adventure. Yet, David is still a very lovable person who wants to do what is right no matter what situation he finds himself in. There was also quite a bit of language in this story This audio version from Librivox wasn't well done, but it was free. I have mixed feelings about this book. It felt very little like Kidnapped. There isn't nearly the adventure. Yet, David is still a very lovable person who wants to do what is right no matter what situation he finds himself in. There was also quite a bit of language in this story This audio version from Librivox wasn't well done, but it was free.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Deborah O'Carroll

    Considering how popular Kidnapped is, and a classic at that, I’m extremely surprised how few people seem to know about and/or have read the sequel! Kidnapped is one of my favorites due to the Scottishness and the friendship between Davy and Alan Breck Stewart (not to mention the character himself). But in my mind, I consider Kidnapped and the sequel to be the same story, just chopped in half. David Balfour (or, the title it was published under in England I believe, Catriona, referring to the her Considering how popular Kidnapped is, and a classic at that, I’m extremely surprised how few people seem to know about and/or have read the sequel! Kidnapped is one of my favorites due to the Scottishness and the friendship between Davy and Alan Breck Stewart (not to mention the character himself). But in my mind, I consider Kidnapped and the sequel to be the same story, just chopped in half. David Balfour (or, the title it was published under in England I believe, Catriona, referring to the heroine of the story) picks up directly after Kidnapped ends, like… literally the same day if I remember right. It deals with Davy’s adventures afterward, including some wrapping up stuff from the first book, Davy meeting a singular young woman and their story, and Alan even returns for a couple more adventures in the book. It’s sometimes odd and I have a feeling while I’m reading it that most of the story goes over my head, likely because it was written so long ago and Stevenson and authors like that were so genius, but I still really enjoy it and consider it Kidnapped: Part 2, myself. It’s a shame more people haven’t read it because more Davy and Alan is awesome, not to mention it’s neat that Davy finally finds love. I mean, all the movie adaptions like to slip a girl into the Kidnapped story, so why not just read further to find it? ;) But it’s more epicness and Scottishness and Alan so what is not to love?? (Mostly Alan.) (Because Alan.)

  9. 4 out of 5

    Morgan Gallagher

    It's pronounced 'Katrina' btw. 'Catriona' is the sequel to 'Kidnapped', and, in fact, the story starts exactly where Kidnapped finishes off the story of David Balfour's involvement with the Appin murder. In that, it's less than a sequel as that part of the narrative is more social and political intrigue and description of David's character, than it is an action-adventure novel. In fact, it turns into a very finely drawn romance. The description of Edinburgh, its environs at the time, and the run t It's pronounced 'Katrina' btw. 'Catriona' is the sequel to 'Kidnapped', and, in fact, the story starts exactly where Kidnapped finishes off the story of David Balfour's involvement with the Appin murder. In that, it's less than a sequel as that part of the narrative is more social and political intrigue and description of David's character, than it is an action-adventure novel. In fact, it turns into a very finely drawn romance. The description of Edinburgh, its environs at the time, and the run to the sea, and the incarceration on Bass Rock, is beautifully drawn. I live close by, and found the historic touches and references, absorbing. The use of Scots language might be problematic to many, 'tho, and I'd advise non-natives to read it in a version with a good appendix for background explanation. I had to refer to Google a couple of times. The second half of the novel is a romance, drawn with such a fine hand on the mores of the day, that it would do Jane Austin credit. And from the male perspective to boot! It's an enchanting tale, and the depth of character, narrative, social and political history is stunning. I'd love to see it adapted for moving image properly. It would make a great series, given the amount of small folks lives inter-mingled with greater moments in history. Just don't watch the movie from the 1970s with Michael Caine! It's nothing like either book!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Leslie

    I was disappointed by this sequel to Kidnapped. A big part of that is due to the large amount of Scots dialect used in this novel (which was at times even worse in the audiobook edition as at least the Kindle book had footnotes on some of the obscure terms!). For example, "The solan keekit doon into Tam's face, and there was something unco in the creature's ee. Just the ae keek it gied, and back to the rope. But now it wroucht and warstl't like a thing dementit. There never was the solan made th I was disappointed by this sequel to Kidnapped. A big part of that is due to the large amount of Scots dialect used in this novel (which was at times even worse in the audiobook edition as at least the Kindle book had footnotes on some of the obscure terms!). For example, "The solan keekit doon into Tam's face, and there was something unco in the creature's ee. Just the ae keek it gied, and back to the rope. But now it wroucht and warstl't like a thing dementit. There never was the solan made that wroucht as that solan wroucht; and it seemed to understand its employ brawly, birzing the saft rope between the neb of it and a crunkled jag o' stane." Huh??! I also found the adventure in this one less compelling and more far-fetched.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kelsey Bryant

    This story picks up immediately where Kidnapped left off. Unfortunately, David and Alan have to separate, so we don't see much of Alan and therefore miss out on a lot of their fun camaraderie. When they are together, the story shines with the first book's luster, so I wish there had been more scenes with them together. But David's story takes its own interesting twists as he gets embroiled in a political scandal and learns how to navigate society, becoming more of a man in the process. We're als This story picks up immediately where Kidnapped left off. Unfortunately, David and Alan have to separate, so we don't see much of Alan and therefore miss out on a lot of their fun camaraderie. When they are together, the story shines with the first book's luster, so I wish there had been more scenes with them together. But David's story takes its own interesting twists as he gets embroiled in a political scandal and learns how to navigate society, becoming more of a man in the process. We're also introduced to another endearing character: Catriona, the sweet and brave daughter of a morally questionable Highlander.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Helen

    It would seem that Stevenson was badgered to write a sequel to Kidnapped and finally gave in. It is told, as Kidnapped was, in the first person and David really does go on and on about what he should do or say and how he feels and why. Apparently he has never spoken to girls before and has no idea as to how their minds work, but I think that is partly because Stevenson doesn't really understand them. Catriona comes across as a very Victorian miss with a chip on her shoulder and Miss Barbara Gran It would seem that Stevenson was badgered to write a sequel to Kidnapped and finally gave in. It is told, as Kidnapped was, in the first person and David really does go on and on about what he should do or say and how he feels and why. Apparently he has never spoken to girls before and has no idea as to how their minds work, but I think that is partly because Stevenson doesn't really understand them. Catriona comes across as a very Victorian miss with a chip on her shoulder and Miss Barbara Grant, Prestongrange's daughter is very strange and flighty. It is difficult to write a novel about recent times and 1750 was only a hundred years before Stevenson was writing so he had to be careful about what he had historical people do and say. The Appin trial was clear in everyone's minds so David couldn't be allowed to upset the event with his testimony. I'm not sure why he connected David to the McGregors, a wild and nasty bunch by all accounts, but I suppose that added a sort of frisson to the story. Aside from the romance, which is really what the book is about, a sort of "How I Met Your Mother" narration, we find out what happened to Alan Breck, to James of the Glens, and to David as far as the estate of Shaws goes. What we don't find out is what happened to David as far as his living went. He was studying law in Leydon but it doesn't sound as if he finished any course there so what did he become? He wasn't the sort to just live off his principal, so what did he do? Study in Scotland? Did he become an advocate or what? Stevenson just drops the narration as if he was just tired of the whole thing, which he may have been. I enjoyed it alright, although there were times when Catriona just infuriated me and David too. One very personal note.This copy is from Scribner's Illustrated Classics series, the series from which I read Robin Hood and The Story of Roland and several others. They're beautiful books with unforgettable illustrations, especially the Wyeth ones, full of romance and uplifting aspirations. It was like revisiting my childhood to read this and brought back memories of my father reading Robin Hood to us.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sud666

    It seems that in modern fiction and even in classical literature the old adage of a sequel not living up to the original is mostly true. I truly enjoyed "Kidnapped" and thought it was a great adventure story. Apparently, RLS felt the need to further expand on David Balfour's adventures and we have "David Balfour" or "Catorina" as it was originally known. It is essentially two stories that intertwine. In the first part, which takes place immediately after the events of the first novel, David gets m It seems that in modern fiction and even in classical literature the old adage of a sequel not living up to the original is mostly true. I truly enjoyed "Kidnapped" and thought it was a great adventure story. Apparently, RLS felt the need to further expand on David Balfour's adventures and we have "David Balfour" or "Catorina" as it was originally known. It is essentially two stories that intertwine. In the first part, which takes place immediately after the events of the first novel, David gets mixed up in a trial. He has evidence that the indicted are innocent but has come afoul of British/Scottish politics. This causes David to get kidnapped yet again. This story is not bad, though it never really matches the first. The second story is not to my liking. It details his adventures after returning from his second kidnapping as he indulges in some epic stupidity with his not terribly bright soon to be wife-Catorina. The problem is her father is a scummy piece of work and she is unable, or unwilling, to admit this rather obvious fact. Thus moronic adventures such as her attempting to travel Europe with two shillings and no working knowledge of any other language than English...yeah she's not the brightest Scotland has to offer. This story is boring and kind of a mess. Thus this is a 3 star story bogged down by the unfortunate "love" story which is mostly a debacle. I'll stick to the first, and far more enjoyable, novel.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Rrshively

    I read this book because I couldn't leave Davie of Kidnapped dumped by the linen company with no explanation and no solution to many of his problems. It seemed as if Kidnapped had abruptly stopped in the middle of a story. I am probably the only person in the world who likes this book better than Kidnapped. I like stories nicely drawn up to an ending; I think I like love stories better than adventure; and I just plain enjoyed the story. I must admit that I didn't understand some of the Scottish I read this book because I couldn't leave Davie of Kidnapped dumped by the linen company with no explanation and no solution to many of his problems. It seemed as if Kidnapped had abruptly stopped in the middle of a story. I am probably the only person in the world who likes this book better than Kidnapped. I like stories nicely drawn up to an ending; I think I like love stories better than adventure; and I just plain enjoyed the story. I must admit that I didn't understand some of the Scottish dialect and that some of the legal aspects of the first of this book left me a little at sea. At any rate, here is a person to endorse this book. However, do not read this until you have read Kidnapped first.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    This is the distant follow up to Kidnapped and finds Balfour travelling to Scotland where he meets and falls for the lovely Catriona while trying to free a man charged with murder. In doing so he manages to get himself kidnapped (again!) before heading off on more travels with plenty of misdeeds and betrayal. Stevenson shows not only his skill at weaving a good adventure tale but also his skills at developing a romantic angle that doesn't overtake or overwhelm the sense of adventure and carefree This is the distant follow up to Kidnapped and finds Balfour travelling to Scotland where he meets and falls for the lovely Catriona while trying to free a man charged with murder. In doing so he manages to get himself kidnapped (again!) before heading off on more travels with plenty of misdeeds and betrayal. Stevenson shows not only his skill at weaving a good adventure tale but also his skills at developing a romantic angle that doesn't overtake or overwhelm the sense of adventure and carefree living that dominates his work. This is again a story for younger adults but taps into the changing views regarding love and romance. A great little read.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Henry Douthwaite

    Kidnapped was fantastic. A rip-roaring thriller of its time across the highlands of Scotland. This, it's successor, is almost the opposite regarding genre. It's a love story with some minor thrilling moments dotted here and there. I did enjoy it and glad I read it, but it was slow and took it's time and the lead character - David - became very frustrating, almost a simpleton in moments. In the first book, we went through his experiences with him and in this we despaired at his arrogance and stup Kidnapped was fantastic. A rip-roaring thriller of its time across the highlands of Scotland. This, it's successor, is almost the opposite regarding genre. It's a love story with some minor thrilling moments dotted here and there. I did enjoy it and glad I read it, but it was slow and took it's time and the lead character - David - became very frustrating, almost a simpleton in moments. In the first book, we went through his experiences with him and in this we despaired at his arrogance and stupidity. I can see why Kidnapped is so well thought of and has had plenty of films made of it and I only read this due to it being mentioned at the end of the edition I read.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

    While the plot is made more complicated by the narrator's perspective, the characters encountered are wonderful. I especially loved the character of Lady Barbara. She's the wit of the book. While the plot is made more complicated by the narrator's perspective, the characters encountered are wonderful. I especially loved the character of Lady Barbara. She's the wit of the book.

  18. 5 out of 5

    antiquarian reverie

    Robert Louis Stevenson's "Catriona" is the direct continuation of "Kidnapped" though published 7 years later. What is David to do about the Appin murder? David knows that the men accused are innocent and the story tells of the political hold and corruption that tries to keep his testimony from reaching the public. Reading this story reminds me especially of the present times, when politics is not looking at the truth but manipulating to what the powers to be is the best for the general good, it Robert Louis Stevenson's "Catriona" is the direct continuation of "Kidnapped" though published 7 years later. What is David to do about the Appin murder? David knows that the men accused are innocent and the story tells of the political hold and corruption that tries to keep his testimony from reaching the public. Reading this story reminds me especially of the present times, when politics is not looking at the truth but manipulating to what the powers to be is the best for the general good, it has been happening since the beginning of time. 💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢SPOILER ALERT💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢💢 I did not read this edition but from a Delphi Collection of his works which included the brief synopsis. "This novel is a sequel to Kidnapped (1886) and was first published in 1893. It is sometimes referred to by its alternative title: David Balfour. The novel begins where Kidnapped left off, tying up some unresolved plotlines in the original novel and continuing David’s story, including his quest for his rightful inheritance and his love affair with Catriona MacGregor, a relation of the famous Rob Roy. The first part of the story concerns David’s attempts to secure justice for James Stewart, after he is charged as an accessory in the Appin Murder (the events of which play an important part in the first novel). The second part of the novel is related to David’s relationship with Catriona and their domestic life in Holland. " "For the life of man upon this world of ours is a funny business. They talk of the angels weeping; but I think they must more often be holding their sides as they look on; and there was one thing I determined to do when I began this long story, and that was to tell out everything as it befell. " I was so upset when David after all his attempts to save James from being hanged were all for not. I was thinking that Miss Grant might end up with David, especially after Catriona left with her father, so I was pleasantly surprised when they married at the end. David travels to see Prestongrange who is the advocate and has the main control of the Appin murder, David thinks it is clear cut that if he testifies he can save James and Alan Stewart from hanging. Alan is waiting for passage back to France with David's help and the secret is kept but after Alan leaves, James More's men take David prisoner on a rock island and is unable to escape until it is too late. Still hoping David comes after the verdict is given but he still tries to save James with a pardon request, it was denied and Prestongrange as well as others were part of this cover up and tell false stories to win their political desires. while visiting the advocate, he is introduced to the Grant's daughters, this is when a friendship takes place and Miss Grant helps David and Catriona by fostering them, since both are in love yet neither really are quite sure the other loving them. I was glad David was able to see the corrupt ways for his eyes are opened. Catriona, father leaves her unattended as David who loves her must keep her safe, living like brother and sister until James More arrives. Many misunderstandings during their stay in Holland, which finally end after it becomes clear that James More's criminal background has David telling his love to Catriona, and marrying her. Alan makes his appearance near the end and is almost sent back to Scotland, for James More looks to profit on his capture but this is thwarted by a sword fight which is stopped by Catriona.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Stuart Dean

    Direct sequel to Kidnapped, starting mere days after the last page of that book. It's in two sections, with the first being an adventure/court drama. David again involves himself in Scottish politics and is naturally once again in danger because of it. His naivety is placed on display as he is outmaneuvered again and again by sly political persons. Even involving him once again being kidnapped. The intrigue of the court drama is very interesting, but much of this part of the book is near indecip Direct sequel to Kidnapped, starting mere days after the last page of that book. It's in two sections, with the first being an adventure/court drama. David again involves himself in Scottish politics and is naturally once again in danger because of it. His naivety is placed on display as he is outmaneuvered again and again by sly political persons. Even involving him once again being kidnapped. The intrigue of the court drama is very interesting, but much of this part of the book is near indecipherable due to the liberal usage of the Scottish accent, even more than was present in the first book. The second part is a love story. David meets a young Scottish lass and is immediately besmitten. What follows is months of teenage drama as the two young fools refuse to tell each other of their true feelings and argue much of the time. Everything is made the more problematic by the mores of the times, as it is entirely inappropriate for David to spend any time at all alone with the girl lest her reputation be irrevocably harmed. The return of Alan Breck saves the day as he is by far the best character in either book. At least this part of the book is mostly in English so there's that. Not a bad book, but it's easy to see why Kidnapped is a classic and this book is only known to the truest fans of Robert Louis Stevenson.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Pritam Chattopadhyay

    This book is the sequel to Kidnapped. It prolongs the story of David. On account of his friend, the outlaw Alan, David gets profoundly involved in Highland politics. At great jeopardy to his own life, he tries his best to secure the discharge of Alan's cousin James Stewart of the Glens. James, by the way, has been fallaciously accused of the murder of Colin Campbell. David, however, fails to save James from the hangman’s noose. While in Edinburgh, David falls in love with Catriona. She is a brav This book is the sequel to Kidnapped. It prolongs the story of David. On account of his friend, the outlaw Alan, David gets profoundly involved in Highland politics. At great jeopardy to his own life, he tries his best to secure the discharge of Alan's cousin James Stewart of the Glens. James, by the way, has been fallaciously accused of the murder of Colin Campbell. David, however, fails to save James from the hangman’s noose. While in Edinburgh, David falls in love with Catriona. She is a brave Highland girl who helps her father James More, a rebel, to escape from prison by taking his place there. Public sympathy induces the Lord Advocate to release her and Miss Grant, his eldest daughter, advances the love affair. Alan escapes to France and David goes to Holland to study Law at Leyden. Catriona who travels by the same ship to join her father in Europe is separated from her friends and is sheltered by David. Both being young it is a most fragile situation for David. They live together as brother and sister until the girl's father arrives. He is a mean beggarly scoundrel, who tries to sell Alan to the English. He is, however, thwarted, and David marries Catriona in Paris and returns home. Since his uncle Ebenezer Balfour is now dead he comes into complete possession of his property.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Richard Thompson

    When Stevenson is in top form, he can write as well in the adventure genre as anyone on the planet, and when a thrilling plot with good characters is related with a Scottish burr the result is entrancing. So I loved Kidnapped, Treasure Island and The Master of Ballantrae. Not so much Black Arrow or Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. This one came out somewhere in the middle. David Balfour is the same honorable innocent here that we got to know in Kidnapped, but he has necessarily grown up a bit, and this When Stevenson is in top form, he can write as well in the adventure genre as anyone on the planet, and when a thrilling plot with good characters is related with a Scottish burr the result is entrancing. So I loved Kidnapped, Treasure Island and The Master of Ballantrae. Not so much Black Arrow or Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. This one came out somewhere in the middle. David Balfour is the same honorable innocent here that we got to know in Kidnapped, but he has necessarily grown up a bit, and this time romance is mixed in with kidnapping, chicanery and more of the same type of action that made the first book of the series so good. The legal manueverings that make up much of the first part of the book were interesting and the romance was decent, but these parts of the story were only B+. Stevenson really shines when the story veers back into kidnapping, harrowing escapes, and the threat of guns and black knives. Still though, I thought that the best part of the book was the portrayal of the horrible James More, who his daughter, Catriona, clings to and loyally defends despite his obvious shortcomings. He is a blowhard, a sponger and liar from start to finish. I cringed every time he came on the scene, and yet I had to respect his daughter's unswerving loyalty in the face of these defects until he finally drives her to the breaking point. Each of More's faults stands in diametrically opposed contrast to a corresponding virtue of David Balfour, and so the faults and virtues of each of these men are underscored by the contrast with the virtues and faults of his opposite number.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    Robert Louis Stevenson warns us at the start that we might be disappointed by this sequel to Kidnapped; and in all honesty, I was. As pretty much everyone who has reviewed it has noted, this is more of a novel of manners than of adventures, and though it has its charms, it's a bit of a letdown. As poor David Balfour struggles to court his beloved Catriona, I kept wondering why he didn't make a play for Alison Hastie, the plucky gal in Kidnapped who helped him and Alan Breck Stewart in their time Robert Louis Stevenson warns us at the start that we might be disappointed by this sequel to Kidnapped; and in all honesty, I was. As pretty much everyone who has reviewed it has noted, this is more of a novel of manners than of adventures, and though it has its charms, it's a bit of a letdown. As poor David Balfour struggles to court his beloved Catriona, I kept wondering why he didn't make a play for Alison Hastie, the plucky gal in Kidnapped who helped him and Alan Breck Stewart in their time of need and who has a brief cameo here. But poor David is smitten with Catriona and there's no arguing with that I suppose. Alan himself puts in a few appearances at key points to give things a boost and Davie even manages to get himself kidnapped (again!) and sent to a desolate prison on the crag of rock called the Bass, but the stakes seem lower somehow and he never seems to be in any real danger. Regarding the audiobook: the late, lamented, David Case's narration is superb as always, and my disappointment at the book is more than made up for by hearing him read it.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Esther Steiner

    Well, here’s a sequel to Kidnapped that keeps one wondering if Alan Breck will ever truly escape a hanging in England! But with David helping negotiate for his life with the various lawyers he meets, Alan would seem to have more of a chance. But David learns that one can’t make deals easy, and gets himself kidnapped again until freed by a new friend. As David tries to be a witness of Alan’s innocence of the murder with which he is accused, he finds himself an enemy in James More...who tries to s Well, here’s a sequel to Kidnapped that keeps one wondering if Alan Breck will ever truly escape a hanging in England! But with David helping negotiate for his life with the various lawyers he meets, Alan would seem to have more of a chance. But David learns that one can’t make deals easy, and gets himself kidnapped again until freed by a new friend. As David tries to be a witness of Alan’s innocence of the murder with which he is accused, he finds himself an enemy in James More...who tries to sell Alan to the English to fill his own purse. James More’s daughter, however, is of a different mind altogether. David and her soon escape with the help of Alan, and the last chapter ends upon the duel of Alan and James More. All this while Alan has been on French soil seeking refuge, and by the end of the tale, David and James More’s daughter, Catriona, also join him. Slow at the start of the tale, but I wouldn’t let that keep you from reading the whole. By the end of the fifth chapter or so I was feeling like I was ready to sail with Alan to assist with his escape myself!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Owen Rataj

    A fairly underwhelming continuation for David Balfour. Stevenson even states on the first page "It is the fate of sequels to disappoint...", so I can't say that I wasn't warned. This book lacked so much. Similarly to its predecessor, Kidnapped, I understand that Catriona is now well over a century old, and hence the styles of writing and story telling are different (not to mention culture, etc.). And yet, whilst this isn't an adventure book like the last, it's turned into something far worse. So A fairly underwhelming continuation for David Balfour. Stevenson even states on the first page "It is the fate of sequels to disappoint...", so I can't say that I wasn't warned. This book lacked so much. Similarly to its predecessor, Kidnapped, I understand that Catriona is now well over a century old, and hence the styles of writing and story telling are different (not to mention culture, etc.). And yet, whilst this isn't an adventure book like the last, it's turned into something far worse. Some awfully attempted love story, which I just did not care to try to understand. The actions and relations of the characters to one another, I found, just did not make sense - even when taking different eras and romanticism into account. At times I was loathe to turn the page and continue on, yet I pushed through and got the final unsurprising result which I was expecting.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kari Trenten

    Not as good as Kidnapped, nor did offer the closure to that book I hoped it would, although it did open up a wider world of civilization, scheming, and politics to David Balfour. I particularly didn’t enjoy the romance between David and Catriona. I often wished to slap one or both of them. Some of the gender presumptions made me grit my teeth, remind myself of the time this book was written, only to recall that Jane Austen’s novels were written around the same time, and I usually enjoyed the rom Not as good as Kidnapped, nor did offer the closure to that book I hoped it would, although it did open up a wider world of civilization, scheming, and politics to David Balfour. I particularly didn’t enjoy the romance between David and Catriona. I often wished to slap one or both of them. Some of the gender presumptions made me grit my teeth, remind myself of the time this book was written, only to recall that Jane Austen’s novels were written around the same time, and I usually enjoyed the romances in them. The most fun parts of this involved Miss Grant teasing both David and Catriona, providing a welcome measure of humour. I enjoyed David’s relationship with Alan far more than the budding one with Catriona, although that receded into the backstory. All together, this was an interesting read which I don’t regret, but I wasn’t particulary gripped by it.

  26. 4 out of 5

    nisie draws

    Alot less crazy Scottish hijinks and adventures. Alot more politics and speechifying :/ Less bromance in favor of het-romance :/ I was actually dissapointed at the end when David & Catriona got together because were so miserable living together that I can't see them overcoming their communication issues and being able to have a happy or healthy relationship. I'm also sad that most of Catriona's badassness was relegated to the sidelines and subplots, and diminished by David perceiving her as so "nai Alot less crazy Scottish hijinks and adventures. Alot more politics and speechifying :/ Less bromance in favor of het-romance :/ I was actually dissapointed at the end when David & Catriona got together because were so miserable living together that I can't see them overcoming their communication issues and being able to have a happy or healthy relationship. I'm also sad that most of Catriona's badassness was relegated to the sidelines and subplots, and diminished by David perceiving her as so "naive" and "innocent."

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jan-Joost Bouwman

    Not as good as the first part of the adventures of David Balfour, but still quite enjoyable. It is a bit more moralistic and at times melodramatic. And I didn't care about the lengthy discussions between David and Prestongrange. I did enjoy the part where David was being held on Bass Rock and his subsequent release/escape and the part on the boat to the Netherlands and what happened there. The death of James More was a bit unexpected, and I would have like to see more of Alan Breck in this book. Not as good as the first part of the adventures of David Balfour, but still quite enjoyable. It is a bit more moralistic and at times melodramatic. And I didn't care about the lengthy discussions between David and Prestongrange. I did enjoy the part where David was being held on Bass Rock and his subsequent release/escape and the part on the boat to the Netherlands and what happened there. The death of James More was a bit unexpected, and I would have like to see more of Alan Breck in this book. I did like the notion that David was telling the story to his children. Very HIMYM.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Wisconsin Alumni

    Barry Menikoff MS’62, PhD’66 Editor From the editor: First printing of R. L. Stevenson’s sequel to Kidnapped from the autograph ms. at the Houghton Library, along with color plates from the original oils by N. C. Wyeth. “The Loneliness of David Balfour,” a 20K introductory essay; plus Notes; Glossary; and Gazetteer complete the book (Stanford University Press). This is the final volume in my trilogy on Stevenson and Scotland.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Janhmmn

    I read this book as it's a sequel to the more famous Kidnapped. I have to be honest, it was quite hard going, the characters were somewhat two-dimensional, especially the eponymous Catriona and the plot was a bit vague. But we finished it and have learned some new words and a little bit more history. Maybe Robert should have gone into the lighthouse business like his father wanted after all. I read this book as it's a sequel to the more famous Kidnapped. I have to be honest, it was quite hard going, the characters were somewhat two-dimensional, especially the eponymous Catriona and the plot was a bit vague. But we finished it and have learned some new words and a little bit more history. Maybe Robert should have gone into the lighthouse business like his father wanted after all.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Albert Meier

    Not as thrilling as Kidnapped, yet a delight in its own right. We meet some interesting folks as our hero tries to clear his name, free a man wrongly accused, preserve the liberty of his best friend and pursue the lass who has won his heart. The dialect can be a wee bit difficult at times, but while I may not have understood every word, I generally got the gist of each sentence.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.