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The Bromeliad Trilogy

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In a world whose seasons are defined by Christmas sales and Spring Fashions, hundreds of tiny nomes live in the corners and crannies of a human-run department store. They have made their homes beneath the floorboards for generations and no longer remember -- or even believe in -- life beyond the Store walls. Until the day a small band of nomes arrives at the Store from the In a world whose seasons are defined by Christmas sales and Spring Fashions, hundreds of tiny nomes live in the corners and crannies of a human-run department store. They have made their homes beneath the floorboards for generations and no longer remember -- or even believe in -- life beyond the Store walls. Until the day a small band of nomes arrives at the Store from the Outside. Led by a young nome named Masklin, the Outsiders carry a mysterious black box (called the Thing), and they deliver devastating news: In twenty-one days, the Store will be destroyed. Now all the nomes must learn to work together, and they must learn to think -- and to think BIG. Part satire, part parable, and part adventure story par excellence, master storyteller Terry Pratchett’s engaging trilogy traces the nomes’ flight and search for safety, a search that leads them to discover their own astonishing origins and takes them beyond their wildest dreams.


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In a world whose seasons are defined by Christmas sales and Spring Fashions, hundreds of tiny nomes live in the corners and crannies of a human-run department store. They have made their homes beneath the floorboards for generations and no longer remember -- or even believe in -- life beyond the Store walls. Until the day a small band of nomes arrives at the Store from the In a world whose seasons are defined by Christmas sales and Spring Fashions, hundreds of tiny nomes live in the corners and crannies of a human-run department store. They have made their homes beneath the floorboards for generations and no longer remember -- or even believe in -- life beyond the Store walls. Until the day a small band of nomes arrives at the Store from the Outside. Led by a young nome named Masklin, the Outsiders carry a mysterious black box (called the Thing), and they deliver devastating news: In twenty-one days, the Store will be destroyed. Now all the nomes must learn to work together, and they must learn to think -- and to think BIG. Part satire, part parable, and part adventure story par excellence, master storyteller Terry Pratchett’s engaging trilogy traces the nomes’ flight and search for safety, a search that leads them to discover their own astonishing origins and takes them beyond their wildest dreams.

30 review for The Bromeliad Trilogy

  1. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    This book is technically written for children, but honestly, I have trouble believing that a lot of 5th-8th graders will get the satire in here. I would say that this is *appropriate* for children, but that it is a great book for readers of all ages. If you're looking for a laugh and enjoy British humor, then this is laugh-out-loud funny and I highly recommend it. Basically, these three short novels tell the story of a group of gnomes trying to live their tiny lives in a big world. In the first b This book is technically written for children, but honestly, I have trouble believing that a lot of 5th-8th graders will get the satire in here. I would say that this is *appropriate* for children, but that it is a great book for readers of all ages. If you're looking for a laugh and enjoy British humor, then this is laugh-out-loud funny and I highly recommend it. Basically, these three short novels tell the story of a group of gnomes trying to live their tiny lives in a big world. In the first book, a group of gnomes living in a department store believe that the store is the entire world and there is no "outside." The world was created by Arnold Brothers, Est. 1905. Then a couple of outsiders make their way into the store and inform them that they need to leave because the store will be demolished in 21 days. There are religious wars and ideological battles. This is a parody of religion, science, group mentality, and a general social commentary. It can be enjoyed on a basic level, as a cute story and a good laugh, or you can look for deeper meanings and, IMO, enjoy it even more.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    Well, f*** this. I had written a lengthy review, but clicked outside the box and *poof*, gone! All for nothing. Every book is a page-turner, reads very fluently and certainly wasn't written for children. Well, maybe, but I doubt they fully understand Pratchett's humour, his take on life, religion vs science, politics, equal rights, migration, and more. His classic themes are woven into the story, which is actually one big story cut in three. It's about nomes, little people. Not pixies, no. You hav Well, f*** this. I had written a lengthy review, but clicked outside the box and *poof*, gone! All for nothing. Every book is a page-turner, reads very fluently and certainly wasn't written for children. Well, maybe, but I doubt they fully understand Pratchett's humour, his take on life, religion vs science, politics, equal rights, migration, and more. His classic themes are woven into the story, which is actually one big story cut in three. It's about nomes, little people. Not pixies, no. You have nomes on the Outside and nomes n the Store, founded by Arnold Bros. (est. 1905). The latter is a sort of god for the Store nomes. The Store is their world, with the planet and the lights being the sky, the stars, the sun. Seasons are determined by sales periods with their respective slogans. The Store nomes have occupied every department, which works like a nation: own rules, own leader, ... They do have an abbot for the religious position, just like humans have a pope, for example. Store nomes have never seen the sun, never felt the rain. The Outside nomes are very much accustomed to the real seasons and weather types. Women have no rights, aren't even allowed to learn to read, as this could overheat their brains. In contrast, the Floridians (nomes of Florida, also the name of some fruit juice, apparently) are lead by a female. Contrast in male-female domination and rights. One day, a large group of Outside nomes come into the Store to join their Inside fellows, whom they've never met, by the way. And so the adventure begins: where will they stay? Who will guide and educate them into the world of the Store? Another theme: migration. In this day and age, even more actual than ever, even if the books were written about 30 years ago. As the Store is to close forever, suddenly both nome populations must work together for their survival. What can you expect? Pure entertainment. Playing with the English language (signs, slogans, names, products, ... everything is taken literally or twisted around). Space-travel. More respect for little people. A more humanistic view on life. A lighter Pratchett, when it comes to convictions. To me, it's much later that he became more determined in his "beliefs". Anyway, in short: The Bromeliad is one of Pratchett's finest works. If you can, get the omnibus, otherwise get the three books (Truckers, Diggers, Wings) themselves. In the same vein, I can recommend his other book on little people: The Carpet People, as you can read here. ---------- Some details about the books, including spoilers: (view spoiler)[The first book, also as the cover shows, has something to do with trucks. Nomes have to leave the Store, as it will be demolished. Everything Must Go, a sign taken literally, even if it means something else. But nomes have a way of taking things literally. Or rather, Pratchett has shown how skilled he was in the English language. Playing with words - be them signs, slogans, names, places, ... - is one very important ingredient in this series. Religion is key here: To the Store nomes and especially their leaders and abbot, there is no Outside, only the Store is what matters and is real, is divine. So, yes, trucks. Nomes become truckers, as they see no alternative but to "borrow" a truck to leave the Store, when news comes that the Store will be closed forever. How they manage it? Through collaboration and coordination, and a lot of trial and error. But that's nomes for you. The second book deals with the nomes having arrived at a quarry with some shed nearby, where they can hide/store the books and food they brought along. Not long afterwards, humans re-opn the quarry. But luckily there's Jekub, a digging machine, to come to the rescue and with which, after a fierce battle, our nomes manage to flee. Meanwhile, Masklin, Gurder and Angalo are at the airport for Grandson, 39, whom they've seen in a newspaper article, regarding the launching of a new satellite by the corporation that also owns Arnold Bros. (est. 1905). As there's no real leader with Masklin and co. being gone, one of the more religious Store nomes fills that void: Nisodemus. But not for long, as our nomes have to fight and flee for their lives. The Outside nomes and more precisely Masklin, had a black box called Thing. Thing can send out signals, communicate with other computers and devices, and can translate nomish into human and vice versa. Nomes have always avoided humans, for fear of being turned into pixies or maybe even lose their lives, although the Outside nomes were more afraid of being eaten by wolves and alike. The third book, 'Wings', focuses on the contact with space - Thing said the nomes were once dropped on Earth by a spaceship and he was going to call upon the ship to bring the nomes hme again, hence the 3 aforementioned nomes needing to be at the launch of the satellite. It's also in this book that human contact (with especially Grandson, 39) is established. Not for long, as a ship was summoned and driven/flown by Angalo (who loves driving machines). Gurder, a Store nome, had to review his belief, his worldview, now that he had spent a considerable amount of time Outside and had seen Grandson, 39, a "deity" until then. And would you know? There were not only more nomes out there - Floridians -, but Grandson, 39, had always wanted to believe nomes existed and now saw his belief confirmed. The belief was thus reciprocal. Isn't this sweet? Gurder now saw it as his new life-goal to inform the remaining nomes of the world - not everyone could be rescued by the spaceship, basically only the two populations of the books: the Outside nomes and the Store nomes - how to live among humans. Oh yes, the bromeliad itself, the flower that holds water and is home to a certain frog species... it survives till the end, is even used as a metaphor about life. (hide spoiler)]

  3. 4 out of 5

    Paul Barnes

    Quite frankly, I see no reason why I should ever find myself in conversation with someone who HASN"T read this trilogy.....go read it! An absolute must-have for children aged 12-13, but immensely enjoyable at all ages, loaded with Pratchett's ever so deceptive wisdom, and precisely observed human folly. The story revolves around a civilisation of Nomes that have lived for generations in a department store, who do not believe that anything exists outside the store 'world'. But one Nome learns that Quite frankly, I see no reason why I should ever find myself in conversation with someone who HASN"T read this trilogy.....go read it! An absolute must-have for children aged 12-13, but immensely enjoyable at all ages, loaded with Pratchett's ever so deceptive wisdom, and precisely observed human folly. The story revolves around a civilisation of Nomes that have lived for generations in a department store, who do not believe that anything exists outside the store 'world'. But one Nome learns that the store is soon to be demolished, and he must convince these people that a) The world is ending b) They aren't as important as they think c) They can all survive if they make some sacrifices and hard choices A satisfying read on so many levels - if you are not moved by the plight of the tree frogs in the final book, then you very probably are a horrible person.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Eric Witchey

    I love the way Terry Pratchett takes on large issues in a small way in this series. When an author can show how organized religion limits personal spiritual development, how personal perspective keeps us from seeing the world around us, how limits to our language limit our ability to think and comprehend, and how love and community can overcome all of these things... Well, then I have to salute that author. And, once again, I salute Terry Pratchett, who uses small people to demonstrate huge issu I love the way Terry Pratchett takes on large issues in a small way in this series. When an author can show how organized religion limits personal spiritual development, how personal perspective keeps us from seeing the world around us, how limits to our language limit our ability to think and comprehend, and how love and community can overcome all of these things... Well, then I have to salute that author. And, once again, I salute Terry Pratchett, who uses small people to demonstrate huge issues. Most importantly, I applaud his ability to explore such weighty issues while keeping me laughing at his characters, his world, myself, and my world. Thank you for this little escape from the real world and the way it took me for a wonderful ride before it delivered me back to a larger, more real world.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Cygny

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. First off I read the Bromeliad trilogy written by Terry Pratchett, Truckers, Diggers and Wings. Truckers was my favourite book, getting to know the Nomes and the way they lived in the Store and how they saw humans (and Arnold Bros (est. 1905)) :P I liked Diggers least because three of my favourite characters hardly participated in it (but were thankfully fully present in Wings). I did like the way the ladies came up for themselves though :P And finally in Wings the whole voyage they take and the First off I read the Bromeliad trilogy written by Terry Pratchett, Truckers, Diggers and Wings. Truckers was my favourite book, getting to know the Nomes and the way they lived in the Store and how they saw humans (and Arnold Bros (est. 1905)) :P I liked Diggers least because three of my favourite characters hardly participated in it (but were thankfully fully present in Wings). I did like the way the ladies came up for themselves though :P And finally in Wings the whole voyage they take and their coming home. The thing which struck me was how the Nomes thought they were so different from humans but in so many ways they are so much the same, the way they interact among each other and what is important to them. It's so much like Pterry to make a world which seems so different at first glance but is really just a (bit distorted) mirror of our own society.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Damon

    Not funny in universally appealing way but endearing. This trilogy got better towards the ending.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sophie Crane

    I grew up reading Terry Pratchett, and this is a fantastic book full of lots of humour and adventure. The book itself has a really nice design and is well made.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tracey

    I was perusing the library's catalog last week & noticed they had a Pterry book I hadn't read yet: The Bromeliad Trilogy: Truckers, Diggers, and Wings. In the first of the 3 books, we meet Masklin, the putative leader of a small band of Nomes, trying desperately to survive in the English countryside. Only 4 inches high, but stockily built, they have evaded human attention (more or less) for many, many years. His tribe hitchhikes on a truck and ends up at The Store - which is inhabited by thousan I was perusing the library's catalog last week & noticed they had a Pterry book I hadn't read yet: The Bromeliad Trilogy: Truckers, Diggers, and Wings. In the first of the 3 books, we meet Masklin, the putative leader of a small band of Nomes, trying desperately to survive in the English countryside. Only 4 inches high, but stockily built, they have evaded human attention (more or less) for many, many years. His tribe hitchhikes on a truck and ends up at The Store - which is inhabited by thousands of their compatriots. Naturally, there's a culture clash, but when The Thing (a mysterious artifact that Masklin's tribe has guarded for generations) comes to life and tells them the Store is to be demolished in a few weeks' time, they must band together. The second and third books deal with their further adventures after escaping the store and discovering their true heritage. Once again, Terry Pratchett covers some meaningful topics in the guise of entertainment: fear of The Other and insular viewpoints vs. being aware that there's something bigger out there for you to explore; as well as class struggles and the Religious vs. the Scientific. He pokes fun at all of these (sometimes gently, other times not so much) as he shows that they all must find a middle ground for society to truly succeed. The story behind the trilogy's name (not explained until the second book) is a lovely parable. I found myself thinking of Mary Norton's Borrowers, but the Nomes are much more realistic and a lot more fun for adults to read about. Recommended to fans of The Little People who have a sense of humor.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin

    This is a children's novel (most of my favorite books are children's books). A bunch of nomes.... try to find their way home. There are lots of great barbs towards religion (some of the nomes live in a giant Store, and semi-worship "Arnold Bros (est. 1905)". They have religious wars over whether or not there is anything outside of the store - the main argument of the "store only" faction being that The Store has "Everything Under One Roof", so.. duh - nothing else outside! Their arch nemesis is This is a children's novel (most of my favorite books are children's books). A bunch of nomes.... try to find their way home. There are lots of great barbs towards religion (some of the nomes live in a giant Store, and semi-worship "Arnold Bros (est. 1905)". They have religious wars over whether or not there is anything outside of the store - the main argument of the "store only" faction being that The Store has "Everything Under One Roof", so.. duh - nothing else outside! Their arch nemesis is Prices Slashed, who wanders the hallways at night, with his horrifying beam of light! But.. it's cute, and it's funny, and I'll probably finish the trilogy by the end of the week.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Stuart Gomm

    if your just coming to learn who Terry Pratchett is i must say you have to start here if you like theses then you will have no problem with disc world. honestly once you finished the books you will be like wow must read them again i give this a massive 10/10 but i have to say my mother in law got me in to it and now im Pratchett crazy

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kerry & naomi

    Note: Pratchett originally published Truckers, Diggers, and Wings as three separate volumes. The omnibus volume is titled The Bromeliad. A bromeliad is a flower that grows on the tops of trees in the South American rain forest. Water accumulates in the flowers and tiny frogs live there. The swim around, mate with other frogs, lay eggs, do what frogs do, and die and the life cycle renews itself with the next batch of tadpoles. We’d call it a microcosm. So what does a bromeliad have to do with nomes Note: Pratchett originally published Truckers, Diggers, and Wings as three separate volumes. The omnibus volume is titled The Bromeliad. A bromeliad is a flower that grows on the tops of trees in the South American rain forest. Water accumulates in the flowers and tiny frogs live there. The swim around, mate with other frogs, lay eggs, do what frogs do, and die and the life cycle renews itself with the next batch of tadpoles. We’d call it a microcosm. So what does a bromeliad have to do with nomes (minus the g)? Everything. For thousands of years, nomes have lived on Earth, hiding in the walls and floors, the bushes and scrub brush. Their sense of time is much faster than humans who are slow and clumsy to them (and very big), and speak like records on the wrong speed (though one would think that nomes sound like records on too high a speed for the human ear). Thousands of nomes have lived in The Store, Arnold Bros. (est. 1905). They have food and clothing, books (though few nomes can read), central air and heat, and even religion. The nomes in The Store never go Outside. They no longer believe that an Outside even exists, just Arnold Bros. (est. 1905), who built The Store for them. The Store nomes don’t believe what is so readily apparent to the reader: they live in a microcosm. The Plot Outside nomes come to The Store with their Thing (a sophisticated computer). The Store nomes have trouble believing in Outside, and believing that these nomes came from beyond the confines of The Store where “Everything Is Under One Roof.” The Thing announces that The Store will be demolished in a matter of days and the nomes must go. Rather reluctantly go, they do, with a couple of emergent leaders: Masklin and Grimma, two Outside nomes, Gurder, the abbot, Dorcas, the engineer, and Angalo, a young nome who likes machines. The nomes leave The Store and settle in a quarry about five miles away. Eventually though, they come to the realization that they must leave the quarry also--the quarry is no longer safe for them since humans keep invading. Dorcas and Grimma are left to deal with the humans that come closer and closer to discovering the nomes every day, battling starvation, and ultimately escaping the quarry. In the meantime, the Thing tells Masklin that nomes aren’t originally from earth, but from somewhere else in the universe. Masklin, Gurder and Angalo begin a quest to find a way to the nomes’ spaceship, parked on the moon (what’s a fantasy novel without a quest?). The trio meets other nomes in their quest and realizes that the world is a lot bigger than they had previously thought. The Point And that’s the point. Don’t many of us live in our own little microcosms, completely unaware of the rest of the world, or in this case, the universe? I’ve come into contact with the provincial attitudes of Pratchett’s nomes so many times. When I went off to college in Arkansas, two thousand miles away from my hometown, I was amazed by how many students were from that state and still live there. When I returned to my hometown for my ten-year high school reunion, most of my classmates actually lived in town or within driving distance. Travel is one way, possibly the most traditional, to break out of our microcosms, to experience new things. Learning in all forms is another. Now we have the internet to reach out to people of different cultures and backgrounds with telephones and satellites. Another theme that appears, toward the end of the book, theorizes that humans are lonely. We are lonely here on our planet, isolated from everything else in a vast sea of nothingness, and that’s why we’ve invented pixies and leprechauns and Star Trek and have experts in extraterrestrial life when we’ve never come in contact with it. We want our microcosm to be a part of something greater. The Writing Terry Pratchett is his usual dry-witted self in The Bromeliad. Though this book is not nearly as hysterically funny as the Discworld series, The Bromeliad holds it own while Pratchett skewers conventional thought once again. (Another of Pratchett’s favorite themes seems to be the equality of women and The Bromeliad is no exception. After all, if women are taught to read, their heads might explode. Too bad he’s British or Terry Pratchett would have my vote for President, or at the very least, President of NOW.) Conclusion Like most of Pratchett’s writing, this book has two levels: the first is merely for entertainment and diversion, completely suitable for children and adults alike. The second level is the one that makes us think about “the way things are” in our microcosms, on the off-chance that we just might ask a couple of questions, or look over the tip of the petal and discover other frogs living in other flowers on top of other trees.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Eule Luftschloss

    The (g)nomes have to leave their home, all ten of them, as the ressources decline and they can't find enough food for everybody. They climb onto a lorry and hope that it will bring them to a place where they can live. The lorry brings them to a department store, and what do you know - there live other nomes! The nomes are the intelligent people here, though some of them have their suspicions about the humans, who may sound weird and mooing but look disturbingly similiar to themselves - only so muc The (g)nomes have to leave their home, all ten of them, as the ressources decline and they can't find enough food for everybody. They climb onto a lorry and hope that it will bring them to a place where they can live. The lorry brings them to a department store, and what do you know - there live other nomes! The nomes are the intelligent people here, though some of them have their suspicions about the humans, who may sound weird and mooing but look disturbingly similiar to themselves - only so much bigger. This was not what I expected it to be, and that's the fault of the German translation who uses "Nomen" for the nomes - which means noun. The name of the trilogy is Nomenklature which is a grammatical term. Don't know how they work with it, as I waited all these years to read the original version. It was fun. Not as silly as Discworld, but still. I had planned on reading the third book next week, after the Magical Readathon's Hogsmeade Trip, but realised I can't leave them after reading two thirs of the story and finished it yesterday.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sue

    I love Pratchett he always has a way of describing our world but with another element. This time it’s nomes who find each other, one set living in a department store the others the outsiders who find their way into the store and this where the adventures begin. This book is all three stories together and I think my favourite was wings the last in the series as it takes all the concepts built in the first two and brings them together for a fast paced and thoughtful journey for the nomes and reade I love Pratchett he always has a way of describing our world but with another element. This time it’s nomes who find each other, one set living in a department store the others the outsiders who find their way into the store and this where the adventures begin. This book is all three stories together and I think my favourite was wings the last in the series as it takes all the concepts built in the first two and brings them together for a fast paced and thoughtful journey for the nomes and reader too. It will make you think how you view the world and your little piece of home and your place in it. As always Terry Pratchett delivers in a good story with a thought provoking side. Read it you won’t be disappointed

  14. 5 out of 5

    J.Aleksandr Wootton

    Funny, clever, adventurous, and provocative. A pseudo-allegory about struggling from provincial superstitions toward rationalism, wrapped up in a highly entertaining and comedic quest/adventure story, that strikes me as unparalleled even with twenty additional years of reading behind me. It's got elements of Asimovian or Clarke-esque sci-fi anthropology, tropes from post-apocalyptic group survival stories, and of course, Pratchett's signature absurdist wit and gift for imparting plausibility whe Funny, clever, adventurous, and provocative. A pseudo-allegory about struggling from provincial superstitions toward rationalism, wrapped up in a highly entertaining and comedic quest/adventure story, that strikes me as unparalleled even with twenty additional years of reading behind me. It's got elements of Asimovian or Clarke-esque sci-fi anthropology, tropes from post-apocalyptic group survival stories, and of course, Pratchett's signature absurdist wit and gift for imparting plausibility where there ought to be none. Looking forward to reading these again.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ari Bruening

    Lots of smile-worthy moments and even a few out-loud chuckles.

  16. 5 out of 5

    J Neely

    Like a lot of project this is a fun and easy read. A great distraction right now

  17. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    Pratchett has a way to make me laugh at the stupidest things, that is why I love him so much. So this time it was Nomes. Nomes in a human world that think Arnold Bros (est. 1905) is the greatest thing since sliced bread. But let's do this by parts, rating a whole trilogy as a whole is hard. TRUCKERS Can I say how much I love this part? Book 1 always ends up being my favourite in trilogies, and this one deserves 5 stars. The fact that I can laugh at something so simple as 'Road Works Ahead' is brill Pratchett has a way to make me laugh at the stupidest things, that is why I love him so much. So this time it was Nomes. Nomes in a human world that think Arnold Bros (est. 1905) is the greatest thing since sliced bread. But let's do this by parts, rating a whole trilogy as a whole is hard. TRUCKERS Can I say how much I love this part? Book 1 always ends up being my favourite in trilogies, and this one deserves 5 stars. The fact that I can laugh at something so simple as 'Road Works Ahead' is brilliant. The characters are amazing, the Nome world is hilarious (both sides of it), and the Store is a blast. Plus the Truck. That has got to be one of the best part I've ever read. DIGGERS More or less. It was fine, not as fun as the first, and since it's the middle book it tends to leave bits open for the last one. However I did like the turn of events, but it looks a little like the first so it feels like a déjà vu. WINGS it picked up the pace again, and the story of Masklin's journey that got cut off from 'Diggers'. We learn so much more about Nomes, probably a little too much, enough to shock the Abbot. XD And we also learn about little frogs living in a flower. And their world that includes one word for everything. I like how it wraps up things, how characters evolve in the natural course of the book. It's a nice closure.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jorge Rosas

    A fantastic and very funny trilogy, with a satyr of human society and an unexpected plot twist in the first book, the power struggle in the second and the “do the impossible” thing in the third one. It was laugh after laugh. Friendly three books with lots of fun! Truckers: I was a confused at the beginning on what was happening until they finally arrive at the Store, the story got me there with the concept of little people living in it and the kind of lives and culture you can develop with that so A fantastic and very funny trilogy, with a satyr of human society and an unexpected plot twist in the first book, the power struggle in the second and the “do the impossible” thing in the third one. It was laugh after laugh. Friendly three books with lots of fun! Truckers: I was a confused at the beginning on what was happening until they finally arrive at the Store, the story got me there with the concept of little people living in it and the kind of lives and culture you can develop with that sort of surroundings. Diggers All of that thing how do you call it? Nature, that doesn´t fell natural at all. A satyr of modern culture used to easy life and ignorance of what nature is. When you thing that the plot is going one way, Pratchett surprises you with a plot twist and then again, the final crescendo was so amazing! and after that the other thing that happens wow! Wings Happening at the same time of the second part of Diggers, I consider it the funniest of the three finally we have character development for one of the important ones, and it´s fantastic! You even get some sort of soundtrack and UFO fan service in a way that contributes to the plot and the fun, although I was left with a feeling … just like with a Japanese way of ending histories.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Phillip

    The bulk of most people's lives are spent interpreting what the norm is and then adjusting their actions and attitudes to deal with it. Then, on occasion, some revelatory incident tugs the carpeting out from underfoot, yanks the bunny slippers off our toes and we are forced to deal with (or ignore) a new definition of what is real (which ultimately can be as volatile as the previous definition was). This human plight is illustrated with pithy charm and adroit humor as Terry Pratchett introduces The bulk of most people's lives are spent interpreting what the norm is and then adjusting their actions and attitudes to deal with it. Then, on occasion, some revelatory incident tugs the carpeting out from underfoot, yanks the bunny slippers off our toes and we are forced to deal with (or ignore) a new definition of what is real (which ultimately can be as volatile as the previous definition was). This human plight is illustrated with pithy charm and adroit humor as Terry Pratchett introduces a small band of country nomes (the prototype of gnomes)to a society of city nomes. The encounter provides a fertile field for political, societal, religious, scientific and even lingual satire. A joy to read, especially if you can devour all three volumes ~ 1) Drivers, 2) Diggers, 3) Wings ~ in tandem.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte

    Does what Pratchett does best: use a fantastic (in both senses of the word) story to reflect real-world issues. Also, puns. So the basic premise is this: there's tiny little aliens on our world called nomes. Only they've been here for so long they've forgotten they're aliens. And because they're so tiny, they think the whole world is limited to the small patch they inhabit. During the course of the books, the nomes keep being forced to move, and in moving, they are forced to reconsider their worl Does what Pratchett does best: use a fantastic (in both senses of the word) story to reflect real-world issues. Also, puns. So the basic premise is this: there's tiny little aliens on our world called nomes. Only they've been here for so long they've forgotten they're aliens. And because they're so tiny, they think the whole world is limited to the small patch they inhabit. During the course of the books, the nomes keep being forced to move, and in moving, they are forced to reconsider their world view. In this Pratchett manages to combine the philosophical and the humorous. There's nomes who've lived in a warehouse for so long that they think the warehouse encompasses the whole universe, and that the Arnold Bros. (est. 1905)from the shop's name is actually their god. It's funny while making you think at the same time. And that's Pratchett.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jay D

    An epic journey for the nomes, both literally and philosophically. I really enjoyed the story of Masklin and his people. I was epecially fond of Dorcas and Angalo, there are some great characters here!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Meredith

    It's hard not to like a series of books based on the premise that gnomes come from outer space, let alone one that links that idea to tiny bromeliad-dwelling frogs venturing beyond their tiny flower to the larger world beyond. These books are a bit slower moving than Pratchett's Discworld novels but still full of Pratchett's excellent observations about human nature, questions about religion, and spatial awareness. Pratchett can write an ending like no one else (narratively satisfying, indeed), It's hard not to like a series of books based on the premise that gnomes come from outer space, let alone one that links that idea to tiny bromeliad-dwelling frogs venturing beyond their tiny flower to the larger world beyond. These books are a bit slower moving than Pratchett's Discworld novels but still full of Pratchett's excellent observations about human nature, questions about religion, and spatial awareness. Pratchett can write an ending like no one else (narratively satisfying, indeed), and the ending of the second book is exquisitely rendered. All in all worth the read, especially the second book.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jillian

    The Bromliad features a party of tiny nomes who stumble upon hundreds of their type in the store, who they try to save when their home will be demolished. I enjoyed this book because it is interesting, a new concept, and overall an enjoyable read. I would recommend this book to people who enjoy danger, sci-fi ( at the most unanticipated points), and metaphors.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Cristobo De

    Very funny. Perhaps my favourite Pratchett book. The fragments from the Bible of the Mall were the funniest of all.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ellie

    All lovers of nomes & smal people have to read Pratchett's Bromeliad Trilogy. It's awfully clever and amusing and full of some of the wittiest puns I've ever read :) A must! All lovers of nomes & smal people have to read Pratchett's Bromeliad Trilogy. It's awfully clever and amusing and full of some of the wittiest puns I've ever read :) A must!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Sims

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The Bromeliad Trilogy is a book I really enjoyed reading, for those who don't know what this book is about. This book is a trilogy of three books of the nomes journey to survive the world of humans while also finding their true home. Truckers starts with a group of outside nomes finding a store of nomes and helping them leave the store before it's demolished. Digger is about the nomes trying to survive and protect their home from humans, and Wings is about some nomes that go and find a way to fi The Bromeliad Trilogy is a book I really enjoyed reading, for those who don't know what this book is about. This book is a trilogy of three books of the nomes journey to survive the world of humans while also finding their true home. Truckers starts with a group of outside nomes finding a store of nomes and helping them leave the store before it's demolished. Digger is about the nomes trying to survive and protect their home from humans, and Wings is about some nomes that go and find a way to find their home. I love this book for many things, I love the comedy that is displayed especially when they try to understand human nature. The characters show some really well change through the whole trilogy without having characters stop to a point were they no longer change. And how the nomes have different perspective of the human world than humans do. Overall this book is really fun to read and I would read it again.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Dominic De Souza

    I can't remember how many times I read, and reread, this hilarious and incisive series. It was so good that my brothers and I fell asleep listening to the 2nd casette of 'Diggers' every night for years. We'd lost the other ones. It's been years now, and in looking back at the arc of the stories, I can see the underlying theme that I missed behind the hilarity of the gnomes scuttling beneath the floorboards and scrabbling for purpose in an outsized world. It's a commentary on the role of religion I can't remember how many times I read, and reread, this hilarious and incisive series. It was so good that my brothers and I fell asleep listening to the 2nd casette of 'Diggers' every night for years. We'd lost the other ones. It's been years now, and in looking back at the arc of the stories, I can see the underlying theme that I missed behind the hilarity of the gnomes scuttling beneath the floorboards and scrabbling for purpose in an outsized world. It's a commentary on the role of religion, and the pressures of an analytical view of the world clashing with an prejudiced priesthood. While a one-eyed view on the topic, he's certainly not without merit and experience on it. I think it's still one of the best series ever, and when my daughter is old enough we'll read it together. I guarantee I know every inflection for every word in all the books.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Noodles

    Tedious. That would be my one word review. It's my second Pratchett book, I didn't like the other one either. So I guess his style just isn't for me. It feels like Douglas Adams on a really off day. Which is fine, I never have to read another one, and can leave them for other people who do like them. Everyone's happy then! Nothing about this worked for me. The 'nome's eye' view of the human world was a drag to hear. I wasn't that bothered about any of the characters. The story was vaguely interest Tedious. That would be my one word review. It's my second Pratchett book, I didn't like the other one either. So I guess his style just isn't for me. It feels like Douglas Adams on a really off day. Which is fine, I never have to read another one, and can leave them for other people who do like them. Everyone's happy then! Nothing about this worked for me. The 'nome's eye' view of the human world was a drag to hear. I wasn't that bothered about any of the characters. The story was vaguely interesting. If three books were condensed into a novella it might be a fun read. There are some lovely little turns of phrase here and there. A few philosophical ideas about religion and our limited view of life (the bromeliad of the title) in there, but they seem really laboured and obvious. It just wasn't my thing, really. Tony Robinson read the audio book, and he was brilliant.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Nonethousand Oberrhein

    Little people, huge problems A trilogy about people and what makes them tick: the origin of religion, the necessity of inquisitiveness, the burden of learning… these are a few of the themes Pratchett develops with wit and humour, setting the action in the modern world, with characters scaled 1:10 of “normal humans”. As the saga unfolds, the plot does not complexify (fortunately!) with the same speed as the horizon expands (physically and figuratively) in front of the characters. This allows the d Little people, huge problems A trilogy about people and what makes them tick: the origin of religion, the necessity of inquisitiveness, the burden of learning… these are a few of the themes Pratchett develops with wit and humour, setting the action in the modern world, with characters scaled 1:10 of “normal humans”. As the saga unfolds, the plot does not complexify (fortunately!) with the same speed as the horizon expands (physically and figuratively) in front of the characters. This allows the delivery of a narrative at the same time entertaining and pedagogical, fulfilling the promise of a children book that is more than welcomed in the hands of more aged readers. Yet again another quotable work by Sir PTerry!

  30. 5 out of 5

    JP

    Some of the best work he ever did. Vicious satire of society, religion, and above all general human smallmindedness. But its bottomless anger is delivered with endless empathy for the people it pillories, and it's packaged in a deliriously entertaining vehicle, spiced with genuine laugh-at-the-page moments of story and straight-from-the-author's-mouth bits of practical philosophy. More accessible than his other work in that it doesn't rely on series-long running gags, settings, and characters - Some of the best work he ever did. Vicious satire of society, religion, and above all general human smallmindedness. But its bottomless anger is delivered with endless empathy for the people it pillories, and it's packaged in a deliriously entertaining vehicle, spiced with genuine laugh-at-the-page moments of story and straight-from-the-author's-mouth bits of practical philosophy. More accessible than his other work in that it doesn't rely on series-long running gags, settings, and characters - it's set right here in the modern day world. Possibly alone in Terry Pratchett's entire body of work, it develops a consistent metaphor for the message it's trying to deliver. And in spite of how bleakly he views us, that message is an upbeat one that we can - we will - be better.

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