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“I love getting lost in the world (Jeffrey Thomas) creates, and can empathize with the difficulties his characters face, because they are just so real. I envy those of you making your first acquaintance with this author.” – From the introduction by Matthew Carpenter Respected as one of today’s leading figures of weird fiction for his striking imagination, versatility, and “I love getting lost in the world (Jeffrey Thomas) creates, and can empathize with the difficulties his characters face, because they are just so real. I envy those of you making your first acquaintance with this author.” – From the introduction by Matthew Carpenter Respected as one of today’s leading figures of weird fiction for his striking imagination, versatility, and deeply emotional stories, Jeffrey Thomas here offers up fourteen searing tales. Included are the haunting and surreal "Ghosts in Amber," in which a man is compelled to visit a mysterious derelict factory that harbors chilling secrets; "Jar of Mist," which focuses on a father who, in seeking to understand his daughter’s suicide, encounters a dream-like other realm; "Those Above," which imagines an alternate Victorian society controlled by vast monstrous entities from beyond; and the title novelette "The Endless Fall," which concerns an astronaut who crash-lands on an unknown forested world where time seems to work in an alien way, and where he finds he is unfortunately not alone. “With brutal elegance and chilling subtlety, Thomas pulls his readers into his dark visions immediately from every opening line.” – Paul Di Filippo, in ASIMOV’S “Jeffrey Thomas’ imagination is as twisted as it is relentless.” – F. Paul Wilson “In time he will, in this reviewer’s opinion, be listed alongside King, Barker, Koontz, and McCammon.” – Brian Keene


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“I love getting lost in the world (Jeffrey Thomas) creates, and can empathize with the difficulties his characters face, because they are just so real. I envy those of you making your first acquaintance with this author.” – From the introduction by Matthew Carpenter Respected as one of today’s leading figures of weird fiction for his striking imagination, versatility, and “I love getting lost in the world (Jeffrey Thomas) creates, and can empathize with the difficulties his characters face, because they are just so real. I envy those of you making your first acquaintance with this author.” – From the introduction by Matthew Carpenter Respected as one of today’s leading figures of weird fiction for his striking imagination, versatility, and deeply emotional stories, Jeffrey Thomas here offers up fourteen searing tales. Included are the haunting and surreal "Ghosts in Amber," in which a man is compelled to visit a mysterious derelict factory that harbors chilling secrets; "Jar of Mist," which focuses on a father who, in seeking to understand his daughter’s suicide, encounters a dream-like other realm; "Those Above," which imagines an alternate Victorian society controlled by vast monstrous entities from beyond; and the title novelette "The Endless Fall," which concerns an astronaut who crash-lands on an unknown forested world where time seems to work in an alien way, and where he finds he is unfortunately not alone. “With brutal elegance and chilling subtlety, Thomas pulls his readers into his dark visions immediately from every opening line.” – Paul Di Filippo, in ASIMOV’S “Jeffrey Thomas’ imagination is as twisted as it is relentless.” – F. Paul Wilson “In time he will, in this reviewer’s opinion, be listed alongside King, Barker, Koontz, and McCammon.” – Brian Keene

30 review for The Endless Fall and Other Weird Fictions

  1. 4 out of 5

    Forrest

    I've known Jeffrey's work (and Jeffrey) for a very long time now, nearly twenty years. I must admit that I am one of those horrible acquaintances that pops up every few years (or more) and remembers "Oh yeah, Jeffrey. I wonder what he's up to?" Well, my timing was good, at least, this time around. I had been poking around the Lovecraft eZine website and noticed that Jeffrey had a new book out at about the same time I had wondered what he (and his brother, Scott, also an excellent writer, though o I've known Jeffrey's work (and Jeffrey) for a very long time now, nearly twenty years. I must admit that I am one of those horrible acquaintances that pops up every few years (or more) and remembers "Oh yeah, Jeffrey. I wonder what he's up to?" Well, my timing was good, at least, this time around. I had been poking around the Lovecraft eZine website and noticed that Jeffrey had a new book out at about the same time I had wondered what he (and his brother, Scott, also an excellent writer, though of a very different tone) was doing. When I saw the cover, I was absolutely smitten. I have a penchant for bizarre art, and the cover by Nick Gucker fit squarely into that crevasse of my brain that loves to dwell on pulp surrealism. It was not long after that the Lovecraft eZine podcast featured Jeffrey's new book on an episode. When I learned that the title story in this collection was based on the art of the cover, I dove for my wallet. Like any short story collection, some stories appealed more than others. But none of them are bad, not even borderline bad. Not a one. But I expect a lot from Jeffrey. So let's see how he did! "Jar of Mist" proves that weird, horrific fiction need not be unsympathetic or lacking positive emotions. This story tugs at your heart (but leaves it in your chest, even if it's broken). This was five star material. I love strangeness in my horror, but when you can tug at my soft spot while dosing out the strange, that's a winner! "The Dogs" is a nice atmospheric piece. Weird, very weird, of course, but with less emotional impact than the first story. And the assumptions that go into the suspension of disbeliefaere a tiny bit difficult to absorb, but not so jarring that it throws the reader out of the story. Four stars go to the dogs. "Ghosts in Amber" is a very strange story in which Thomas creates a palpable frisson with not only his creepy descriptions of bizarre things, but also through his evocation of the inner sense of fear, the raw feel of terror in your body. A sad story. Four stars. "The Prosthesis" is good, but not great. Well-crafted, but I didn't feel that the twist "caught" me, though the setup was perfect. Could have been much better, like really over-the-moon cool, but it sort of fizzled for me. Three stars. "The Dark Cell" is a near perfect example of effective auctorial sleight-of-hand. Oftentimes, I can tell when a writer is trying to deceive the reader, but the twist in this story caught me totally off-guard. Pun intended. You'll know what I mean when you read it. Five stars. "Snake Wine" reads like a modern update of an old pulp horror story from Weird Tales. Well told, if a little "already done". Three stars. "The Spectators" is a heartbreaker. Man, I ached for the narrator. An emotionally-effecting story with an incredible sense of loss, along with catharsis, to say the least! Five teary-eyed stars. "Bad Reception" is the most Twilight Zone-esque story in this collection so far. And seeing that Twilight Zone is my favorite TV show ever (the original TZ, that is) and that this story is very strange and very well-written and set in the atomic age, I'm giving it five stars. Speaking of TV, you might not see yours the same way after you've read this story! I really loved this story. A collection of stories that gave me the same sense of dissociation, the eerie, and a twinge of nostalgia for an apocalypse that never happened; well, such a collection would truly knock my socks off. "Sunset in Megalopolis" is a quaint, simple story about a superhero with no one left to protect. Cute enough for three stars. "Portents of Past Futures" is exceptional. A freaky-weird noir detective story with surreal overtones centering around the subject of street art. Yet another story where a static-riven TV screen serves as a key plot device (the first was "Bad Reception"), giving the whole an un-nerving sense of evil just beyond our perception, but wanting to come in front and center. Thomas at his best. Five stars! "Those Above" is as nihilistic piece as any I've read. It was great, however, I am not a big fan of steampunk. And here, the steampunk elements featured so prominently seemed over-emphasized, even shoehorned in. Perhaps this is why it was first published in Steampunk Cthulhu. I felt that the gears and brass and leather elements were so exaggerated, so forced that they were calling attention to themselves and away from the narrative. Four stars. "The Individual in Question" is a marvelous 2-page story of cosmic horror in the idiom of detective noir. I really loved this little story. So much packed into such a little space! Combine this with "Portents of Past Futures" and add a few more similar stories, and you'd have one of the best weird-detective collections available. Five stars. "The Red Machine" is an excruciating tale about a tough life and revenge. But it's not the revenge story you've come to expect. Thomas plumbs the depths of desperation in this excellent story. Five stars. The titular piece "The Endless Fall" is a beautifully-strange piece of science fiction based on the book's cover art (by artist Nick Gucker). It is an atmospheric piece about survival and its consequences in a situation where time and causality have all gone wrong. A wonderful, wonderful way to end this collection! Five stars!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Phillip Smith

    A 4.5 bumped up for this engaging collection of weird horror stories. This was my first introduction to Jeffrey Thomas and honestly, the dude's just one hell of an author. His ideas feel so varied and creative, yet never forced. I'm going to be mulling over these stories for some time. Standouts for me include "Jar of Mist," "The Dogs," "The Prosthesis," "The Dark Cell," "The Spectators," "Sunset in Megalopolis," "The Red Machine," and "The Endless Fall."

  3. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    Magnificent. Weird, enthralling, and truly memorable. An amazing collection that I never wanted to end. Full review to come. 5 out of 5 stars.

  4. 5 out of 5

    David Bridges

    Jeffrey Thomas has been one of the most reliably entertaining writers I have read, and The Endless Fall just solidifies his spot as a go-to author for dark weird fiction. Most of what I have read from Thomas, both shorts and novels have been from his Punktown universe. I love Punktown and I plan on working my way through as much of that world as possible, but I wanted to give some of Thomas' other work a chance, therefore, I picked up The Endless Fall. The opening story Jar Of Mist is a superbly Jeffrey Thomas has been one of the most reliably entertaining writers I have read, and The Endless Fall just solidifies his spot as a go-to author for dark weird fiction. Most of what I have read from Thomas, both shorts and novels have been from his Punktown universe. I love Punktown and I plan on working my way through as much of that world as possible, but I wanted to give some of Thomas' other work a chance, therefore, I picked up The Endless Fall. The opening story Jar Of Mist is a superbly written weird tale of a man trying to cope with the loss of his wife and daughter and ends up encountering a hallucinogenic mist that bends time and alters reality. It is a strong opener to a collection. The first few stories of the book give off a more occultish/ cosmic horror vibe . The second half of the collection traverses all genres horror, sci-fi, fantasy etc... I had previously read Ghost In Amber in Chapbook form when it was released through Dim Shores. I enjoyed the story when I read it then and enjoyed it again this time I read it. The Prothesis, Bad Reception, and Snake Wine are three of my favorite stories in the book. The Spectators is another story about a grieving father and some otherworldly visitors. Welcome to Megalopoils is an example of Thomas' great abilities at creating his own worlds and doctrines. The final self-titled story is great sci fi mystery that unfolds with perfect paranoid disorientation. Imagine waking up in a pod in a strange place (planet? or time?) and try to figure out what is going on. I am not trying to compare the writers, but if you are a fan of Brian Evenson's short stories, The Endless Fall, particularly the final story, will be right up your alley. The Endless Fall and Other Weird Fictions was no less entertaining that I expected it to be. Jeffrey Thomas' vivid imagination and ability to weave through various forms of dark fiction will always keep me coming back to his work, as will his attention to detail and the somber depth of his prose. If you are a fan of great weird horror fiction and you haven't read Jeffrey Thomas you are truly missing out. The good thing is Thomas is prolific and has a fair amount of work out in the world. I will continue to make my way through catalog both Punktown and non-Punktown.

  5. 5 out of 5

    S.P.

    As wildly imaginative as his stories are, initially I’m drawn into Jeffrey Thomas’ universe by recognition. A character’s guilt, desire, or confusion, or a moment of reckless ambition, serves as a lure. Something is already off kilter in the character's world, when we begin. The story might portray an unfortunate situation—a man renting an apartment following a separation; a father visiting the last residence of his deceased daughter—but soon it begins to move inexorably toward a dreamlike state. As wildly imaginative as his stories are, initially I’m drawn into Jeffrey Thomas’ universe by recognition. A character’s guilt, desire, or confusion, or a moment of reckless ambition, serves as a lure. Something is already off kilter in the character's world, when we begin. The story might portray an unfortunate situation—a man renting an apartment following a separation; a father visiting the last residence of his deceased daughter—but soon it begins to move inexorably toward a dreamlike state. There the central character’s heartfelt wish might come true, but only in the most horrific form imaginable. These stories glide from personal tragedy to the fantastic and terrifying, and it’s hard to say exactly when the crazy starts—because you’re in it before you know it. Highly recommended for the inimitable way in which Thomas combines intense imagery, moving characterizations, and a fierce commitment to the magic of storytelling.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Duane

    If you came here for Punktown, you won't be disappointed, even though there isn't any in this collection. Instead what you get are masterful short works by a writer who knows his stuff and doesn't trot out the same setpieces that some of the others do. Jeffrey Thomas' work sits at the pinnacle of the so-called "New Weird", with a healthy dose of science fiction and a soupçon of stark staring horror embedded in the speculation. I could tell you which story is my favorite, but it changes all the ti If you came here for Punktown, you won't be disappointed, even though there isn't any in this collection. Instead what you get are masterful short works by a writer who knows his stuff and doesn't trot out the same setpieces that some of the others do. Jeffrey Thomas' work sits at the pinnacle of the so-called "New Weird", with a healthy dose of science fiction and a soupçon of stark staring horror embedded in the speculation. I could tell you which story is my favorite, but it changes all the time. Just give the man your money and go read.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jon R. Meyers

    An absolutely brilliant collection! More in depth review to come...

  8. 5 out of 5

    Clint

    "Their sentience is so far-reaching, so complex, so unfathomable, that it is as though we are without sentience by comparison." I've noticed that in the past few years Jeffrey Thomas has moved away from horror a little in the direction of sci-fi/weird. Not that he was ever a pure "horror" writer, he's always stood on multiple genres and surfed with them hard and fast. He's still thrashing the waves, fear not, but his focus here is more on oddball twist endings and freaky ideas than trying to scar "Their sentience is so far-reaching, so complex, so unfathomable, that it is as though we are without sentience by comparison." I've noticed that in the past few years Jeffrey Thomas has moved away from horror a little in the direction of sci-fi/weird. Not that he was ever a pure "horror" writer, he's always stood on multiple genres and surfed with them hard and fast. He's still thrashing the waves, fear not, but his focus here is more on oddball twist endings and freaky ideas than trying to scare you. Though he still does that in some of these stories. Another thing that comes through seems to be what I guess the writer is like, though I hate to presume anything. These stories are filled with people who are pretty cynical and kind of tired of the people in the world, not really nihilists, but guys that look into the abyss and are just kind of like, "Aw, fuck it, I guess I'm going to bed." We start off with "Jar of Mist," and the first sentence in in a morgue, haha. Very cool story about a kind of magical misty stuff literally in a jar that takes people somewhere.... The description of the shop reminded me a little of Steven Millhauser, anyone like him too? He also rules. "The Dogs" is about a guy who gets to see the future of the world as it, of course, dies, via the special occult placement of strings and drawings on his wall. As a big fan of dogs, the last two sentences really pull my heart strings, hahaha! "Ghosts in Amber," was a story I'd heard about before, maybe it was published as a chapbook or something, but I hadn't read it. This story was kind of gloomy, like a lot of the others in this collection. I was left a little puzzled by this one, but it shows that, for some reason, the writer knows a lot about shoe factories. ???? "The Prosthesis" is a wonderfully fucked up story about prosthetic body parts and... babies, heh heh. Again, how does he know so much about these factories? "The Dark Cell," kind of western story, with a woman stuck in dark not-quite-solitary confinement with something that's probably a demon. Kind of Laird Barron-ish in tone. "Snake Wine" seems like it was a pretty reasonable train of thought from someone who took a look at funky Southeast Asian moonshine and thought, what the fuck is that? "The Spectators" was one of my favorites in this collection, weird, alien simulacra start appearing all over the world, apparently to watch one particular person. They absolutely interact with nothing. What the fuck. "Bad Reception" reminds me of the days when I grew up in East Texas in just precisely the wrong area to get a solid tv signal from anywhere, and I used to wonder if something was being transmitted and I just didn't get it. This story was fun and scary, it reminded me of Night Shift-era Stephen King, which is a good thing. "Sunset in Megalopolis," almost pure comic book fantasy with the typical Jeffrey Thomas alien unease thrown in. "Portents of Past Futures" is Jeffrey Thomas in noir detective mode, which I wish he'd do a lot more of. Scary story about a things murdering people who fuck with a particular mural. "Those Above" reminds me a little of another story he wrote that was probably the best story in Autumn Cthulhu, the short "After the Fall," I think that was the name. And also "The Spectators," in this volume, now that I think of it. What would the world go through if, you know, mysterious alien things just showed up, and they weren't exactly attacking, but you knew there was nothing good about them. This was a strange steampunk setting, something he doesn't do a lot, but which worked pretty well here. "The Individual in Question" is more like a scene from a story, or an idea for a bigger one. Very cool, he should expand on this. "The Red Machine," oh man this one fucking kicked ass. A woman into making oddball artwork installation type things accidentally creates a piece that actually does something. Another favorite, seems pulled straight from the same animal the best cuts of the Twilight Zone were made from. "The Endless Fall," my favorite. I can't even tell you why it's my favorite without ruining the story. But it has this sentence: "He made the decision to only eat the young man."

  9. 5 out of 5

    Robin

    Weird, sure, but also so close to where we live.

  10. 4 out of 5

    John Meszaros

    Jefferey Thomas is pretty famous in the realm of Weird fiction. Among his most popular creations is Punktown, a city on a distant planet where hundreds of extraterrestrial races try to survive amid class struggles, social alienation and gruesome body horror. The stories in The Endless Fall are not part of the Punktown Universe, though they all share many stylistic themes with that grim, starry city. Thomas’ tales are a parade of phantasmogoria. There are whispers all along the edges, hints of w Jefferey Thomas is pretty famous in the realm of Weird fiction. Among his most popular creations is Punktown, a city on a distant planet where hundreds of extraterrestrial races try to survive amid class struggles, social alienation and gruesome body horror. The stories in The Endless Fall are not part of the Punktown Universe, though they all share many stylistic themes with that grim, starry city. Thomas’ tales are a parade of phantasmogoria. There are whispers all along the edges, hints of what’s really going on. But the story leaves it to the reader to piece together the truth behind the skein. There are strong veins of Lovecraft throughout these works, but also the dream-like mysteries of Richard Lupoff or Clark Ashton Smith. Thomas’ protagonists are lost souls. Whether pushed to the edge of society, alienated form loved ones, or simply choosing to live alone and aloof, they are oarless boats slowly drifting into strange seas lit by the corpse-lights of alien dreams. The stories in this collection are: Jar of Mists A quiet tale about a bereaved father trying to understand why his estranged daughter killed herself. Was it to escape this world? Or to find another? Jar of Mists is set near the otherworldly Sesqua Valley of fellow horror author, W. H. Pugmire. the Valley is a place somewhere on the West Coast of North America, but not quite in the same time and space as the rest of our world. The Dogs A recurring theme of Thomas’ works is a character remotely viewing a nightmarish future Earth destroyed by unfathomable alien horrors. In this tale a man uses magical formulae to see the unsettling evolution of humanity’s canine companions in a world where their masters and mistresses have long ago died off. Ghosts in Amber My personal favorite story. A haunting, beautifully weird tale of cobwebs, ballooning spiderlings, abandoned factory and fossil tree resin (or maybe it’s something more). As I said, Thomas’ stories are often dream-like and give only a few hints as to what is actually happening. This story is an especially good example. There’s much more going on than the reader sees, but the full nature of that larger reality is left to the mind’s invention. The Prosthesis Thomas (that’s the name of the protagonist, not the book’s author) works in a factory that manufactures medical prosthetics- including prosthetic fetuses for women who have suffered a loss. Thomas himself lost someone himself when he was just an infant- his twin brother Mason. And lately Thomas has been smuggling supplies home from work. The Dark Cell In the 1890s a young woman named Rose is sent to prison in Yuma, Arizona for killing her abusive husband. While there, she gets into a fight with an angry, bitter girl. As punishment for causing trouble, both of them are sent to a small, cramped cell in a lightless cave beneath the prison. The pit is meant to be a place to cool off, but the darkness brings out ancient, savage things that have been held down by the light of day. Snake Wine A former boxer from Australia runs a bar and brothel in Vietnam. One day a young woman brings him a bottle of snake wine-a classic Vietnamese liquor for virility. But the creature pickled inside the bottle is like no serpent he’s ever seen. It’s pale and pink with little vestigial limbs like an amphisbaena lizard or, so he jokes, a baby dragon. The Spectator They just appeared one day. Mannequins colored black as empty space. They appeared in seemingly random places in people’s homes all across the world. Immobile, unresponsive. Watching. What are they here for? And why has one suddenly appeared in the nursery of the narrator’s long-dead daughter? Bad Reception Another tale of a lonely man getting a glimpse of the cosmic horrors of the far future. A Korean war vet starts seeing strange visions on his TV, possibly a result of the weird frequencies he’s been picking up from the plate in his head. Sunset in Megalopolis A bit of an odd duck in this anthology. A superhero from the Golden Age of Comics has been trapped by his arch-nemesis in a stasis field for thousands of years. When he is at last released, he finds himself in a bizarre Paradise inhabited by creatures that maybe, possibly, were once human long ago- though they have been modified to the point of being unrecognizable as such. Falling back into old habits, the time-displaced protagonist tries to be a hero to these beings. But their minds are so alien to his that he may be doing more harm than good. Portents of Past Futures The nude body of a young woman is found in a vacant city lot next to a series of weird street-art murals. Detective Sloane has to figure out who she was and also why she’s soaking wet when there’s no water anywhere nearby. And what does that old woman who lives across the street know? Those Above It’s been a long time since Those Above erupted from another dimension and enveloped the world in a dull gray sky of interwoven intestine-like tentacles. Hind is a worker in a factory that processes and renders bits of Those Above that fall to Earth. He makes blocks of gelatin that mortals stick their heads into at night to keep the monsters out of their dreams. He does a good job, but something about the company just doesn’t feel right. The Individual In Question The Individual in Question has endured...something. Some sort of massive supernatural event. He cannot remember what it was exactly. Only vague impressions. But the event has left him physically altered in a most unsettling way. The Red Machine Leslie is a frustrated artist working in a boring job where she gets no respect. To keep her sanity, she needs to create. At first it’s just sardonic, grisly cartoons that she hangs on the company bulletin board. But something dark is pushing around inside her. Compelling her to collect old junk- cardboard sheets, picture frames, old televisions, skulls. Compelling her to assemble them into a contraption that will give her frightening powers. The Endless Fall In the titular story an astronaut awakens in his space capsule to find he has crash-landed on a planet in the midst of deepest autumn. He can’t remember who he is or why he was even in space, let alone where he is now. Nor does he know the nature of those huge black pyramids coasting through the sky overhead.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    Here's my review from See The Elephant: Falling Towards the Weird Jeffrey Thomas will be familiar to many readers as the author of the Punktown series of stories – scratch that, Jeffrey Thomas is famous among weird and science fiction readers, RPG players, and even comic book fans, as author of the Punktown chronicles of bizarre alien, and occasionally cosmic-horrific, goings-on at that eponymous offworld meeting place for all kinds of races and beings. That’s one very well-realized and – of cour Here's my review from See The Elephant: Falling Towards the Weird Jeffrey Thomas will be familiar to many readers as the author of the Punktown series of stories – scratch that, Jeffrey Thomas is famous among weird and science fiction readers, RPG players, and even comic book fans, as author of the Punktown chronicles of bizarre alien, and occasionally cosmic-horrific, goings-on at that eponymous offworld meeting place for all kinds of races and beings. That’s one very well-realized and – of course, somewhat cyberpunk – milieu, which nonetheless gives little idea of Thomas’s true range. The fourteen recent stories in this collection range far further afield, stylistically and thematically. As Matthew Carpenter explains in his introduction, “you can start with Punktown, but as you begin a deeper exploration of Jeffrey’s oeuvre, you discover … his most consistent theme, real people caught in desperate, bizarre or terrifying circumstances. The Endless Fall could represent the descent to oblivion for the protagonists. It could also indicate the turning of the year, as a summer of promise darkens to the coldness and shadows.” As Carpenter implies, very few of the stories strike a lighter note. The garish cover may not be to everyone’s taste, but no one could accuse Lovecraft eZine Press of misleading readers as to the content. The nearest thing to a humorous tale is the superhero pastiche “Sunset in Megapolis,” though even there, the rationale and final resolution of the tale are ultimately very bleak. Some stories will be familiar from elsewhere, including the brilliant “Ghosts in Amber,” previously published in 2015 as a chapbook by Dim Shores. Most are disturbing, by and large with a definite note of cosmic horror, though for any Lovecraft fan whose expectations are based on the publisher, it’s important to point out that the only thing approaching a namecheck to another mythos in the entire collection is the evocation of W.H. Pugmire’s Sesqua Valley in the opening story, “Jar of Mist.” That tale, like many of the others, situate the weird and uncanny in a context of emotional loss, dissociation, isolation, trauma, psychic damage and deprivation. Critics could probably while away hours speculating how far the irruptions of weirdness are concretions or articulations of the emotional and social distress and disease within each story, but the imaginative and poetic continuity is obvious. Beings like the motionless obsidian Spectators, or the everpresent organic cloudbase of “colossal extrusions, boneless appendages” in “Those Above,” are quite haunting enough without any rationale. And some of the tales, like “Snake Wine,” with its Vietnamese setting, or the prison tale “The Dark Cell,” are simply straightforward, brutally well-executed, horror stories. If you need a taster of the book, Google “Jar of Mist” and “Lovecraftzine,” where that story is available for free online, but trust me, you don’t. Any reader who wants to know how far the New Weird has come in its odyssey from fringe spinoff to full-blown major genre, or how far Thomas has grown from his Punktown roots, should buy this book. Disturbed, intrigued, and moved, you may be – disappointed, you absolutely won’t. (http://www.metaphysicalcircus.com/a-r...)

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Pidhayny

    My first encounter with Jeffrey Thomas was in his earlier collection Unholy Dimensions and it absolutely did not click with me. Ultimately won over by the incredible cover art, I decided to give him a second chance with The Endless Fall. I could not have been more pleasantly surprised. The Endless Fall is a great and incredibly consistent collection of weird horror stories. The atmospheres and worlds Thomas builds in a small sample size are top-notch. There were only a couple stories that I wasn My first encounter with Jeffrey Thomas was in his earlier collection Unholy Dimensions and it absolutely did not click with me. Ultimately won over by the incredible cover art, I decided to give him a second chance with The Endless Fall. I could not have been more pleasantly surprised. The Endless Fall is a great and incredibly consistent collection of weird horror stories. The atmospheres and worlds Thomas builds in a small sample size are top-notch. There were only a couple stories that I wasn't sold on immediately after reading, but grew on me in the following days. My favorite stories of the collection were: "The Endless Fall" - A great mix of weird/horror and sci-fi wherein an amnesiac man crash lands on an autumnal planet and struggles to survive and figure out what happened to him and where he is. "Ghosts in Amber" - A man unhappy in his marriage and life investigates a mysterious abandoned factory near his house. It has a very Ligottian feel about it. "Those Above" - In a steampunk universe where enormous Lovecraftian entities known as Those Above blot out the skies, one engineer struggles to come to grips with their truth.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Greg Gbur

    Though I’ve been in a bit of a reading funk the past few months due to life, work and stress, I managed to find one thing that helped me break out of it: long airline flights. Between recent trips to Seattle and Los Angeles (which I should probably blog about), I ended up reading a lot of lovely books, including research for my upcoming cat physics book as well as some excellent fiction. I tend to stock up my kindle with a lot of books by authors I’m unfamiliar with, and one of those I tackled w Though I’ve been in a bit of a reading funk the past few months due to life, work and stress, I managed to find one thing that helped me break out of it: long airline flights. Between recent trips to Seattle and Los Angeles (which I should probably blog about), I ended up reading a lot of lovely books, including research for my upcoming cat physics book as well as some excellent fiction. I tend to stock up my kindle with a lot of books by authors I’m unfamiliar with, and one of those I tackled was Jeffrey Thomas’ The Endless Fall and Other Weird Fictions (2017), which came out in January. Read the whole review.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jason Williams

    Another great short story collection by Jeffrey Thomas. It is hard to choose among them but a few that really stood out were The Dogs, Ghosts in Amber, and the Red Machine. That being said, there are no bad or weak stories in this collection. The story that provides the title for this collection is a bit enigmatic and I would certainly love to see a longer version that provided more detail on that world and the pyramid entities. Thomas always creates characters with a depth that makes you either lo Another great short story collection by Jeffrey Thomas. It is hard to choose among them but a few that really stood out were The Dogs, Ghosts in Amber, and the Red Machine. That being said, there are no bad or weak stories in this collection. The story that provides the title for this collection is a bit enigmatic and I would certainly love to see a longer version that provided more detail on that world and the pyramid entities. Thomas always creates characters with a depth that makes you either love them, cheer for them, cringe on their behalf, or loathe them. His world building skills to create an environment around the characters is a major part of my interest in his writing.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jon Hilty

    Good collection! Earlier on, some of the stories held my interest a bit less thoroughly, with the first half of the book being a mix of three to five star material to me. From about the halfway point, starting from Sunset in Megalopolis, more consistently I found myself thinking the stories were all four or five star worthy! Another great collection overall, and while I prefer the thematically linked stories in the Punktown setting, some of these equalled those in setting and enjoyment factors.

  16. 4 out of 5

    David Haendler

    This collection takes the reader into eerie and alien worlds. Thomas excels at creating a sense of encounters with the unfathomable, with 'Jar of Mists,' 'The Endless Fall,' and 'The Individual in Question' being the most disconcerting of the lot. There is a pervading sense of awe and horror, and I like that Thomas doesn't skimp on the former. Not all of the stories clicked for me, but I'm looking forward to reading more.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Volodymyr

    The best modern weird fiction stories you can get now. A masterful continuation of works by genre titans. Don’t know much about Lovecraft, though there is a plenty of stories influenced by his style, but “The Individual in question” is obviously the piece that would be considered Kafka’s best short story, if only it was not written by Thomas.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Allan Smulling

    This was my introduction to Jeffrey Thomas's work. I found all of the short stories interesting and entertaining. I entered reading this collection expecting Lovecraftian tales of horror, but was presented with more insightful and psychological studies in the weird and strange - more Ligotti than Lovecraft, minus the baroque writing style. Thomas's writing is direct and vivid and provided a great page turning experience. I'm looking forward to reading more!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

    Jeffrey Thomas is fast becoming one of my favorite living authors. This is the first all-him collection that isn't Punktown related that I have consumed. Many of the tales defy conventional genre labels, though all are firmly of 'the weird' Stories I particularly enjoyed were 'The Dogs', 'Sunset in Megalopolis', 'Those Above', and possibly most of all, 'Red Machine.'

  20. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Hickey

    He Does It Again Jeffrey Thomas is on my Read On Sight list. He should be on yours. The Endless Fall did not disappoint; it is fierce, savage, and full of heart and love.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jim Dodge

    While the stories are well written I found the endings to be unsatisfying.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Donald

  23. 4 out of 5

    Charles Wood

  24. 5 out of 5

    Casey Rafn

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lex

  26. 5 out of 5

    Dave

  27. 5 out of 5

    SARDON

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tony Ciak

  29. 4 out of 5

    Krister

  30. 4 out of 5

    José Ángel de Dios

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