web site hit counter The Burr Conspiracy: Uncovering the Story of an Early American Crisis - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Burr Conspiracy: Uncovering the Story of an Early American Crisis

Availability: Ready to download

A multifaceted portrait of the early American republic as seen through the lens of the Burr Conspiracy In 1805 and 1806, Aaron Burr, former vice president of the newly formed American republic, traveled through the Trans-Appalachian West gathering support for a mysterious enterprise, for which he was arrested and tried for treason in 1807. This book explores the political a A multifaceted portrait of the early American republic as seen through the lens of the Burr Conspiracy In 1805 and 1806, Aaron Burr, former vice president of the newly formed American republic, traveled through the Trans-Appalachian West gathering support for a mysterious enterprise, for which he was arrested and tried for treason in 1807. This book explores the political and cultural forces that shaped how Americans made sense of the uncertain rumors and reports about Burr’s intentions and movements, and examines what the resulting crisis reveals about their anxieties concerning the new nation’s fragile union and uncertain republic. Burr was said to have enticed some people with plans to liberate Spanish Mexico, others with promises of land in the Orleans Territory, still others with talk of building a new empire beyond the Appalachian Mountains. The Burr Conspiracy was a cause célèbre of the early republic―with Burr cast as the chief villain of the Founding Fathers―even as the evidence against him was vague and conflicting. Rather than trying to discover the real intentions of Burr or his accusers―Thomas Jefferson foremost among them―James E. Lewis Jr. looks at how differing understandings of the Burr Conspiracy were shaped by everything from partisan politics and biased newspapers to notions of honor and gentility. He also traces the enduring legacy of the stories that were told and accepted during this moment of uncertainty. The Burr Conspiracy offers a panoramic and multifaceted portrait of the United States at a time when it was far from clear to its people how long it would last.


Compare

A multifaceted portrait of the early American republic as seen through the lens of the Burr Conspiracy In 1805 and 1806, Aaron Burr, former vice president of the newly formed American republic, traveled through the Trans-Appalachian West gathering support for a mysterious enterprise, for which he was arrested and tried for treason in 1807. This book explores the political a A multifaceted portrait of the early American republic as seen through the lens of the Burr Conspiracy In 1805 and 1806, Aaron Burr, former vice president of the newly formed American republic, traveled through the Trans-Appalachian West gathering support for a mysterious enterprise, for which he was arrested and tried for treason in 1807. This book explores the political and cultural forces that shaped how Americans made sense of the uncertain rumors and reports about Burr’s intentions and movements, and examines what the resulting crisis reveals about their anxieties concerning the new nation’s fragile union and uncertain republic. Burr was said to have enticed some people with plans to liberate Spanish Mexico, others with promises of land in the Orleans Territory, still others with talk of building a new empire beyond the Appalachian Mountains. The Burr Conspiracy was a cause célèbre of the early republic―with Burr cast as the chief villain of the Founding Fathers―even as the evidence against him was vague and conflicting. Rather than trying to discover the real intentions of Burr or his accusers―Thomas Jefferson foremost among them―James E. Lewis Jr. looks at how differing understandings of the Burr Conspiracy were shaped by everything from partisan politics and biased newspapers to notions of honor and gentility. He also traces the enduring legacy of the stories that were told and accepted during this moment of uncertainty. The Burr Conspiracy offers a panoramic and multifaceted portrait of the United States at a time when it was far from clear to its people how long it would last.

30 review for The Burr Conspiracy: Uncovering the Story of an Early American Crisis

  1. 5 out of 5

    Vic Lauterbach

    This incredibly detailed work tells the story of a media frenzy that played out at 19th-century speed in letters, newspapers and speeches. Meticulously researched, this is the definitive analysis of a major political event now largely forgotten. Whether that event stemmed from a treasonous plot against the United States remains a mystery. The main elements of this story eerily echo recent events. Multiple investigations failed to prove any crime was committed, and no one was punished. What actua This incredibly detailed work tells the story of a media frenzy that played out at 19th-century speed in letters, newspapers and speeches. Meticulously researched, this is the definitive analysis of a major political event now largely forgotten. Whether that event stemmed from a treasonous plot against the United States remains a mystery. The main elements of this story eerily echo recent events. Multiple investigations failed to prove any crime was committed, and no one was punished. What actually happened became less important than what people wanted to believe happened. Burr is a fascinating figure whose character and actions, real or imagined, polarized the polity and society of his day. The most interesting aspect of this book is the insight it provides into how Americans viewed their young nation, both its promise and the perils it faced. Their hopes and fears are surprisingly familiar despite of two centuries of separation from us. The only weakness of this history is its sometimes numbing thoroughness. Some judicious skimming is advised, and with that, I highly recommend it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Chris Miller

    Oh, my! What a read. This maybe the best coverage of all the books I have read on Burr (with the possible exception of Isenberg with her views on newspaper coverage driving the ‘plot.’ What Lewis has attempted and exceeded at doing is trying to place the events of 186-1807 in the minds of the people of that time. He plows alot of the same ground as others but offers insights that force us to deal with our biases and opinions. I would recommend this book to any student of the era, the court syste Oh, my! What a read. This maybe the best coverage of all the books I have read on Burr (with the possible exception of Isenberg with her views on newspaper coverage driving the ‘plot.’ What Lewis has attempted and exceeded at doing is trying to place the events of 186-1807 in the minds of the people of that time. He plows alot of the same ground as others but offers insights that force us to deal with our biases and opinions. I would recommend this book to any student of the era, the court system, the presidency, or is just interested in rip-roaring history. For someone new to Burr, I would recommend they start with Abernethy {The Burr Conspiracy} or Stewart {American Emperor} (more or less anti-Burr) and Isenberg {Fallen Founder} or Lomax {Aaron Burr, 2 volumes} (pro-Burr,) to give them a general background. This is a scholarly work. His footnotes are complete, in depth and informative. His bibliography is almost a must read for the period. Outstanding!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lucy Moulton

    Don't worry, this book is "only" 461 pages, the rest being footnotes, etc. I diligently read the whole thing and still have no idea what happened. It is an act of bravery to dedicate so much time to discussing a topic that there is so much uncertainty about. It isn't particularly accessible in style, it is more scholarly and less "readable " than someone like Eric Larson. It also could have done with more summaries and context. For example, Wilkinson is pretty important and I am sure somewhere hi Don't worry, this book is "only" 461 pages, the rest being footnotes, etc. I diligently read the whole thing and still have no idea what happened. It is an act of bravery to dedicate so much time to discussing a topic that there is so much uncertainty about. It isn't particularly accessible in style, it is more scholarly and less "readable " than someone like Eric Larson. It also could have done with more summaries and context. For example, Wilkinson is pretty important and I am sure somewhere his first name was given, but I will be darned if I can find it, and we are never reminded of it again. It doesn't explain what happened as much as it explains why we don't know what happened.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rix

    This sells itself as an account of the events surrounding the Burr conspiracy, but it's so much more concerned with what the average American's experience of the trial would have looked like, and honestly it's better for it. A fascinating account that's light on details of the big plot itself but has so much to say about methods of communication and how information was shared and what public opinion was doing while the trial went down. Really great, I recommend for anyone interested in more than This sells itself as an account of the events surrounding the Burr conspiracy, but it's so much more concerned with what the average American's experience of the trial would have looked like, and honestly it's better for it. A fascinating account that's light on details of the big plot itself but has so much to say about methods of communication and how information was shared and what public opinion was doing while the trial went down. Really great, I recommend for anyone interested in more than just the bare bones of history

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jeffery James

    A very unique lens through which to analyze the Burr Conspiracy. Rather that a straight history of Burr's actions and trial, Lewis looks at the way Burr's contemporaries viewed the entire affair through many ideological, regional, economic, and political lenses. It's almost misleading to say the book was about the Burr conspiracy. Rather it's about how the events surrounding Burr's actions affected Americans across a wide spectrum. This book serves as a great companion piece to Joanne Freeman's, A very unique lens through which to analyze the Burr Conspiracy. Rather that a straight history of Burr's actions and trial, Lewis looks at the way Burr's contemporaries viewed the entire affair through many ideological, regional, economic, and political lenses. It's almost misleading to say the book was about the Burr conspiracy. Rather it's about how the events surrounding Burr's actions affected Americans across a wide spectrum. This book serves as a great companion piece to Joanne Freeman's, "Affairs of Honor" which focus exclusively of how the era's "Men of Honor" handled conflict.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Carlos Rodriguez

    Long winded a whole chapter on how people communicated during the period and on and on and on. I love the subject of the book, but it appears to me that in an effort to make the book more intellectual the author opted for redundancy, repetition and simpleton arguments.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Graham Polando

    Made it about a quarter of the way through--obviously impeccably researched, but a bit too dry.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Rachael

  9. 4 out of 5

    Eugene Procknow

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lucas Garcia

  11. 5 out of 5

    Shawn Slattery

  12. 4 out of 5

    Anna

  13. 5 out of 5

    Laurence

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mayra

  15. 4 out of 5

    Marv

  16. 4 out of 5

    Maynard Handley

  17. 5 out of 5

    JL

  18. 5 out of 5

    Paul Vogelzang

  19. 5 out of 5

    Tyler Stewart

  20. 4 out of 5

    Xavier J Mejido

  21. 5 out of 5

    emilio squillante

  22. 5 out of 5

    John Windt

  23. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Johnson

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

  25. 5 out of 5

    Wade Charlton

  26. 4 out of 5

    Joe Bax

  27. 5 out of 5

    Liz

  28. 4 out of 5

    Abby

  29. 4 out of 5

    Remy Smith

  30. 5 out of 5

    Evan

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.