web site hit counter How to Eat Better: How to Shop, Store & Cook to Make Any Food a Superfood - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

How to Eat Better: How to Shop, Store & Cook to Make Any Food a Superfood

Availability: Ready to download

James Wong brings some welcome sanity to the world of healthy eating...its genius is his advice on how to get more nutrition from fruit and veg. It's fascinating, and better than cutting out food groups or paying for so-called superfoods. --Delicious Magazine SELECT a Braeburn apple over a Fuji and get almost double the antioxidants from a fruit that tastes just as swee James Wong brings some welcome sanity to the world of healthy eating...its genius is his advice on how to get more nutrition from fruit and veg. It's fascinating, and better than cutting out food groups or paying for so-called superfoods. --Delicious Magazine SELECT a Braeburn apple over a Fuji and get almost double the antioxidants from a fruit that tastes just as sweet. STORE strawberries on the counter, instead of in the fridge, and in just four days they will quadruple their heart-healthy compounds. COOK broccoli with a teaspoon of mustard and send its levels of cancer-fighting potential skyrocketing ten-fold. Between the rush to keep up with the latest miracle ingredient, anxiety about E-numbers and demonization of gluten/dairy/sugar (or the next foodie villain du jour) many of us are left in a virtual panic in the supermarket aisle. Tabloid headlines, 'free-from' labels and judgemental Instagram hashtags hardly help matters - so what should we be buying? How to Eat Better strips away the fad diets, superfood fixations and Instagram hashtags to give you a straight-talking scientist's guide to making everyday foods far healthier (and tastier) simply by changing the way you select, store and cook them. No diets, no obscure ingredients, no damn spiralizer, just real food made better, based on the latest scientific evidence from around the world. With over 80 foolproof recipes to put the theory into practice, James Wong shows you how to make any food a superfood, every time you cook.


Compare

James Wong brings some welcome sanity to the world of healthy eating...its genius is his advice on how to get more nutrition from fruit and veg. It's fascinating, and better than cutting out food groups or paying for so-called superfoods. --Delicious Magazine SELECT a Braeburn apple over a Fuji and get almost double the antioxidants from a fruit that tastes just as swee James Wong brings some welcome sanity to the world of healthy eating...its genius is his advice on how to get more nutrition from fruit and veg. It's fascinating, and better than cutting out food groups or paying for so-called superfoods. --Delicious Magazine SELECT a Braeburn apple over a Fuji and get almost double the antioxidants from a fruit that tastes just as sweet. STORE strawberries on the counter, instead of in the fridge, and in just four days they will quadruple their heart-healthy compounds. COOK broccoli with a teaspoon of mustard and send its levels of cancer-fighting potential skyrocketing ten-fold. Between the rush to keep up with the latest miracle ingredient, anxiety about E-numbers and demonization of gluten/dairy/sugar (or the next foodie villain du jour) many of us are left in a virtual panic in the supermarket aisle. Tabloid headlines, 'free-from' labels and judgemental Instagram hashtags hardly help matters - so what should we be buying? How to Eat Better strips away the fad diets, superfood fixations and Instagram hashtags to give you a straight-talking scientist's guide to making everyday foods far healthier (and tastier) simply by changing the way you select, store and cook them. No diets, no obscure ingredients, no damn spiralizer, just real food made better, based on the latest scientific evidence from around the world. With over 80 foolproof recipes to put the theory into practice, James Wong shows you how to make any food a superfood, every time you cook.

30 review for How to Eat Better: How to Shop, Store & Cook to Make Any Food a Superfood

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sid Nuncius

    James Wong is a properly trained, experienced scientist who really knows what he is talking about. In the field of popular dietary advice, this is by no means always the case and is very valuable attribute. He puts this knowledge over very well here in a well balanced, nicely presented and easily readable book. The book does what it claims to do: it gives advice about how to choose and cook foods to get the best dietary advantage from them. No dodgy, overblown "superfood" claims, nor "radical new James Wong is a properly trained, experienced scientist who really knows what he is talking about. In the field of popular dietary advice, this is by no means always the case and is very valuable attribute. He puts this knowledge over very well here in a well balanced, nicely presented and easily readable book. The book does what it claims to do: it gives advice about how to choose and cook foods to get the best dietary advantage from them. No dodgy, overblown "superfood" claims, nor "radical new diets" but sound scientific research and sensible suggestions based on it. Wong is also refreshingly clear about what is established fact about what compounds are found in certain foods, for example, and what is suggested but not fully established by research about any beneficial effects these may have. In a world where a tentative suggestion from incomplete research may be trumpeted as an Astonishing Breakthrough which will Transform The Way We Live, such honesty is very welcome. All the advice is sensible, although it's not all welcome, to be honest. For example, Robusta coffee beans may contain lots more possibly healthy compounds than Arabica – but they don't taste nearly so good to me, so I'll just take my chances on that one, thanks. Nonetheless, the information is there to be assessed, and the recipes to help to utilise the science are sensible and largely appetising-looking. In short, this is a nicely presented, useful book with genuinely sensible and valuable content which is easy to read and understand. It stands out in a very crowded market indeed and I can recommend it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    By the time I received this book, I was quite nervous about it. It seemed like a great idea, looking at the nutritional content of everyday foodstuffs. And the term 'clean eating' has always made me shudder, so I was up for a bit of debunking... and then, following his Twitter feed, I started to worry that this might be yet another of those smart alecky 'rude little boy' types and that I was in for a wearisome parade of his own cleverness at seeing through these stupid people. Fortunately that wa By the time I received this book, I was quite nervous about it. It seemed like a great idea, looking at the nutritional content of everyday foodstuffs. And the term 'clean eating' has always made me shudder, so I was up for a bit of debunking... and then, following his Twitter feed, I started to worry that this might be yet another of those smart alecky 'rude little boy' types and that I was in for a wearisome parade of his own cleverness at seeing through these stupid people. Fortunately that was toned down for the book and it really is just an accessible but pretty thorough look at a plethora of, mostly, fruit and veg looking at the nutritional content and how to get the good stuff effectively into your system. It's a complicated business, so there wasn't much room for ego although I am not sure how various teams of scientific researchers would feel about constantly being described as geeks, and perhaps too many slangy assumptions about what people do and don't have time for etc - which I found a bit too reminiscent of the language used by the derided wellness bloggers. I'd've liked some actual references at the back, but it looks as though for a popular book, a jolly decent job of describing the limitations of studies has been done (from small sample, to funding sources to other studies which did not replicate the findings) I was a bit twitchy about there being recipes in the book - wondering how many were actually his work. However, it has to be said that half way through the book I went off and made (and ate) one of the recipes (the black grape sorbet) which is always a good sign. There are some very weird choices in depicting some of the dishes photographically (ie putting all the raw ingredients into a dish). I was also wryly amused to see pomegranate seeds feature in a number of the recipes but no information on them in the text and several recipes for refrigerator/overnight oats. And there's quinoa! Plus he typically uses stevia as a sweetener in his recipes. But then he tells us how much he loves eating canned peach slices in heavy syrup despite their comparative limitations in terms of nutritional content. There's a lot about choosing varieties and the surprising variations in how best and how long to store and cook different foods for maximum benefit. It would be a lot to remember as you do your shopping although there are some general trends and it is not elitist. A very worthwhile read which might see worthwhile small changes.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Libby

    So far I’ve read a lot of fiction so I thought I would try something a bit different. How to Eat Better is a bit like a cook book but instead of just reeling off recipes, it features detailed and scientific explanations of how these foods help to keep you healthy and how you can maximise the health benefits of the foods you eat. Now that I’ve crossed over to the darker side of thirty, I’m a bit more mindful about what I’m putting in/on my body. Wong’s book cuts through the scaremongering and cont So far I’ve read a lot of fiction so I thought I would try something a bit different. How to Eat Better is a bit like a cook book but instead of just reeling off recipes, it features detailed and scientific explanations of how these foods help to keep you healthy and how you can maximise the health benefits of the foods you eat. Now that I’ve crossed over to the darker side of thirty, I’m a bit more mindful about what I’m putting in/on my body. Wong’s book cuts through the scaremongering and contradictory messages you read in magazines, see in the tabloid headlines and hear on the news; it simply gives you the plain, unadulterated facts about the foods you eat. His voice is the voice of calm common sense in a world of hysteria and although he uses scientific evidence throughout, he explains this with as little jargon as possible so that it is accessible to every reader. I found it reassuring to know that I’m not doing too badly on the diet front (I knew my love of sprouts would see me right) and picked up some fantastic tips on how to make the food I am already eating even better.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Some interesting facts, helpful tips & promising recipes, but as a 300p book it got quite repetitive (there are only so many times you can read 'heart-healthy polyphenols'). Worth a skim through for specific tips for different foods (e.g. Put mushrooms gills up in the sun for a couple of hrs to boost vit D, definitely something I'll be giving a go), but at the end of the day it mostly boils down to the usual advice to eat a plant rich, varied diet, and 9 times out of 10 pick the darkest colour v Some interesting facts, helpful tips & promising recipes, but as a 300p book it got quite repetitive (there are only so many times you can read 'heart-healthy polyphenols'). Worth a skim through for specific tips for different foods (e.g. Put mushrooms gills up in the sun for a couple of hrs to boost vit D, definitely something I'll be giving a go), but at the end of the day it mostly boils down to the usual advice to eat a plant rich, varied diet, and 9 times out of 10 pick the darkest colour variety for maximum benefits.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ambur Taft

    We spent a Sunday morning reading this book and very much enjoyed the science....I love a book packed full of statistics and studies from various places in the world. Although many of the facts are out and about because of fad diets and current trends it was nice to read a little more on the history of many of them....and we actually learned a few new useful bits of info as well.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Alohatiki

    This book got me excited to eat vegetables, which is no easy feat.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mandy Blackspoon

    I read the introduction to this book and instantly lost faith in the credibility of this author. His explanations and rationale on wheat alone shows how flawed his ideology is and highlights his lack of understanding and knowledge. Just like any scientists he picks the evidence that matches his ideology and ultimately what he wants to sell - simplicity! Unfortunately it’s not simple! His argument that ‘wheat has been consumed for hundreds of years and there hasn’t been an issue’ is the ignorance I read the introduction to this book and instantly lost faith in the credibility of this author. His explanations and rationale on wheat alone shows how flawed his ideology is and highlights his lack of understanding and knowledge. Just like any scientists he picks the evidence that matches his ideology and ultimately what he wants to sell - simplicity! Unfortunately it’s not simple! His argument that ‘wheat has been consumed for hundreds of years and there hasn’t been an issue’ is the ignorance that the government has force fed him/us. The wheat we eat now is manufactured to such an extent it cannot thrive without human management and since 1985 has not been even genetically comparable to the wheat we were consuming hundreds of years ago! Then his statement that all food is based on rigorous scientific research is wrong! There has never been a study that links cholesterol to heart attacks. There is no evidence that proves causation on correlation; yet the British and American Heart Association insist on stating a low fat diet is essential to prevent heart attacks. Not true!! Then think of the pharmaceutical company’s making billions from statin medication to reduce cholesterol. Which by the way cholesterol is made in your body even if you don’t consume it! So I didn’t read the rest of his book because it’s just another scientist being led by the data that is out there without asking the real questions. I’ve read the Obesity Code, Boost your Metabolism, Diet for the Mind, Wheat Belly and The anti inflammatory diet and what I’ve learnt is not all food is equal and not all food is simple! I feel embarrassed for Wong simply based on his introduction. Two stars given because like any source of information there is some helpful tips.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    An absolutely fascinating read that’s so good for you too! Everyone interested in their health should read this book. I love this book and have already changed my eating habits as a result of reading it. Knowing making simple changes to the type of lettuce you buy or how you store your fruit and veg can improve the health benefits of what you eat makes improving your diet very simple.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn

    An interesting approach to healthy eating that skews faddy diets in favour of research based advice. The advice is easy to follow as it doesn't necessarily involve major changes in what you buy and eat. Instead it shows how picking a red onion instead of a white one, or chopping veggies and letting them rest for a few hours before cooking, can cause the levels of phyto nutrients you consume to soar. The advice is not just the conventional "eat more veg" type that can be found in any magazine art An interesting approach to healthy eating that skews faddy diets in favour of research based advice. The advice is easy to follow as it doesn't necessarily involve major changes in what you buy and eat. Instead it shows how picking a red onion instead of a white one, or chopping veggies and letting them rest for a few hours before cooking, can cause the levels of phyto nutrients you consume to soar. The advice is not just the conventional "eat more veg" type that can be found in any magazine article. There are 2-3 recipes per featured ingredient, and they are mostly on the quick and easy side. Well worth reading.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Em

    Loads of great information and simple suggestions to enhance the nutritional value of our food - I've gained loads of handy take-away knowledge about selecting types of food - fruits and veggies in particular and storing items in a manner to enhance their value and potential their flavour too. I've never bought into "carbs are bad" and I confess I feel a bit exonerated after reading about the healthful benefits of potatoes, pasta and rice! Useful recipes throughout which I will be referring back Loads of great information and simple suggestions to enhance the nutritional value of our food - I've gained loads of handy take-away knowledge about selecting types of food - fruits and veggies in particular and storing items in a manner to enhance their value and potential their flavour too. I've never bought into "carbs are bad" and I confess I feel a bit exonerated after reading about the healthful benefits of potatoes, pasta and rice! Useful recipes throughout which I will be referring back to and giving one or two a try over the coming weeks.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ada

    As you can tell, I am going through a "reading lots about healthy eating" phase. This is the second book I'm reading about the matter, borrowed from the local library. It's not exactly a gripping read, as it's one of those hardback illustrated books with full-colour pictures and cute little borders on every page. I suspect many people bought it and never opened it. It is not a recipe book, however - or at least recipes are not its main focus. Wong attempts to synthesize the latest scientific stud As you can tell, I am going through a "reading lots about healthy eating" phase. This is the second book I'm reading about the matter, borrowed from the local library. It's not exactly a gripping read, as it's one of those hardback illustrated books with full-colour pictures and cute little borders on every page. I suspect many people bought it and never opened it. It is not a recipe book, however - or at least recipes are not its main focus. Wong attempts to synthesize the latest scientific studies on healthy eating. Instead of just taking the latest newspaper article about test-tube studies, he focuses mainly on systematic reviews: reporting clinical trial results, but hedging them with the qualification about their doubtful reliability.  I feel this is a very useful approach: as many of the news headlines regarding healthy eating are simply contradictory. Wong gives advice on the specific varieties of vegetables that are regarded as healthiest (ie. baby plum tomatoes contain more phytonutrients than beefsteak tomatoes) and on storage methods that are supposed to bring out the best in them- tomatoes stored on the counter contain far more healthy lycopene than those stored in the fridge. A simple rule of thumb here is that usually (there are exceptions) the darker the vegetable, the healthier it is: this applies to: salad leaves (kale is super healthy) broccoli (purple broccoli contains more nutrients) berries (blue or blackcurrant is best) grapes (black is better than red or green) sweet potatoes (purple is again best) onions (purple rules), peppers (red), mangoes (orange) cherries (Morello) apples (red: ie.  in descending order of nutrients: Braeburn, Red Delicious, Pink Lady, Royal Gala) beetroot (red)  and last but not least, wine (red) The exception to the rule is asparagus, as green seems to be healthiest there. I have also learned that jumbo oats are apparently much healthier than instant oats, which means I shall probably have to spend some time and try to find a place that sells them. All in all, part of the value of the book is reminding you about the sheer variety of vegetables and fruit available. I have promised myself to try to consume more beetroot and blackcurrants and get started on mango, plum, and pineapple.  Far from always opting for the expensive option, Wong often has tips for healthy eating on a budget. He reminds us that frozen raspberries and blueberries have the same nutritional content as fresh. The recipes are more of a mixed bag for me, though I am going to try a few of them (I am particularly curious about beetroot crisps and orange crisps). Firstly, some of the photos feature all of the ingredients separately in a pan instead of the final dish result, which confuses me. Secondly, in one of the recipes, he suggests cooking pasta in milk??? Which sounds outrageous and wrong. Maybe it's a thing, but I'm not sure I can accept it. Last, but not least, most of his recipes include nuts. I know they're super healthy, but my boyfriend is allergic... so these are not really an option for me.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ktmholm

    Wong, a botanist by trade, and co-host of the PBS TV series, “Food: Delicious Science,” here examines various fruits, vegetables and pantry staples to determine whether nutritional content is affected by cooking, storage, and/or the variety of the food. He also discusses four of what he considers today’s biggest and nutritional myths (Are ‘processed’ foods and carbs necessarily bad, and organics and local/in-season always good?), comparing aspects of each that might be partly or completely true Wong, a botanist by trade, and co-host of the PBS TV series, “Food: Delicious Science,” here examines various fruits, vegetables and pantry staples to determine whether nutritional content is affected by cooking, storage, and/or the variety of the food. He also discusses four of what he considers today’s biggest and nutritional myths (Are ‘processed’ foods and carbs necessarily bad, and organics and local/in-season always good?), comparing aspects of each that might be partly or completely true with what is basically ‘hype.’ Accompanying his analyses are 80 recipes, plus cooking and storage tips designed to get maximum nutrients out of each food. For example: Refrigerate broccoli in plastic, but store mushrooms and apples on a sunny windowsill, and berries, tomatoes and grapes outside the refrigerator. And—in most cases—go for the darkest-color variety available, so bring on purple lettuce, onions, grapes and berries (even potatoes and carrots!) to maximize the antioxidants and other phytonutrients (explained in the Introduction). (Check p. 210 for his take on the healthiest chocolate!) The only surprising thing was that although he referred to numerous scientific studies to back up his statistics, the book does not include a bibliography citing the specific studies (though his website lists citations for one of his previous books). However, the library classifies it as a cookbook, not a nutritional textbook. And he often tells the reader when “taking the easy way” to fix a dish is often the most nutritious, so I say, “be prepared to take a new look at your foods, and enjoy!”

  13. 5 out of 5

    Erik Arnesen

    I learned lots of exciting things from this books. The best parts are the recipes - with great photos - and new ideas for using fruits & vegetables. Ranking fruits and vegetables in healthiness is obviously a difficult task, and there are no clear criteria. This book focuses a lot on antioxidants/polyphenols, which may or may not be a bit simplistic. Saying that "the red variety of X has 5 times more polyphenols than the green variety" surely sounds interesting, but what this means in terms of h I learned lots of exciting things from this books. The best parts are the recipes - with great photos - and new ideas for using fruits & vegetables. Ranking fruits and vegetables in healthiness is obviously a difficult task, and there are no clear criteria. This book focuses a lot on antioxidants/polyphenols, which may or may not be a bit simplistic. Saying that "the red variety of X has 5 times more polyphenols than the green variety" surely sounds interesting, but what this means in terms of health effects is not really known.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Locky

    An original and interesting nutrition book with some recipes to boot. James Wong does a good job of explaining health benefits of vegetables and fruits from a scientist's standpoint and how to get the most bang for your buck in regards to preparing your food - for example, leaving your mushrooms on a windowsill in the sun for a couple hours before cooking can increase their vitamin D content up to 100 fold. Highly recommended for anyone with an interest in nutrition to compliment other specialist An original and interesting nutrition book with some recipes to boot. James Wong does a good job of explaining health benefits of vegetables and fruits from a scientist's standpoint and how to get the most bang for your buck in regards to preparing your food - for example, leaving your mushrooms on a windowsill in the sun for a couple hours before cooking can increase their vitamin D content up to 100 fold. Highly recommended for anyone with an interest in nutrition to compliment other specialist writings.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Julie-anna Child

    A very helpful book written by a scientist summarizing how to maximize the benefits of the plant based food we commonly eat. He has stated the sizes of the study groups the research is based on so the reader can clearly see how well proven, or not the information is. The lay out of the page makes the information and comparisons visually clear. It dispels myths about some forms of mass processed food. It will change the way I prepare food for the better...Another wonderful book by James Wong.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Gail Baker

    Loved this book!!👍 All the information was laid out simply & in a very accessible way with easy to follow instructions. Great recipes and tips on the best cooking & storage methods to preserve the quality of the nutrition in all the foods mentioned. Also, loved the fact that James identifies which varieties in the food groups are nutritionally superior! I would recommend this book whether you are new to seeking nutritional understanding or already well versed.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sade Alhadad

    Everybody needs this book I consider myself to know a lot about food, diets, cooking etc. Clearly not! James Wong has opened my eyes to a plethora of new information about how to choose, store and cook my food to get the most out of it. Amazing book and it will become my new bible regarding eating for health. A book that I will return to time and time again. Highly recommended.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Piers

    Interesting stuff, describing how the way you select, store and prepare different foods can substantially alter their nutritional content. Wong also takes pains to tell you how strong the evidence is for any particular claim, allowing you to make up your own mind on whether certain changes to your food habits are worth pursuing on a personal level.

  19. 5 out of 5

    JoJo

    It was excellent to see fact based nutrition written in a way that can be absorbed by non-specialists. The inclusion of information on storage and cooking options was very helpful. Even had good recipes. I would recommend this to people who don't want just fads and diets but want a life-long healthy diet. It was excellent to see fact based nutrition written in a way that can be absorbed by non-specialists. The inclusion of information on storage and cooking options was very helpful. Even had good recipes. I would recommend this to people who don't want just fads and diets but want a life-long healthy diet.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Joanne

    This book is full of great information. I’ll use a lot of this information when buying fruits and veggies. A couple of gripes with this book. It needed an editor....a few spelling mistakes, and in the recipe for chickpeas, it called for a can of corn rather than chickpeas!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Greencoffeepot

    Really interesting book, lots of great information and some tasty recipes. Would have been 4 stars if there had been a reference list - strange that there wasn’t one considering this book claims to be based on real science.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Irina Korytov

    VERY well written, a pleasure to read Well written, witty and full of wonderful and useful information. So much to learn and to remember to make my family eating better. Really enjoyable with tons of humor.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Christa Eker

    Really fascinating and rather eye opening. I've dipped into this book several times since finishing it's certainly gets it's use with all the fresh produce we have in Turkey but I want more. more ingredients, more recipes. Really fascinating and rather eye opening. I've dipped into this book several times since finishing it's certainly gets it's use with all the fresh produce we have in Turkey but I want more. more ingredients, more recipes.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Denise

    Easy to read, easy to use. I like the way the food is pictured: good, better, best. It's not about good or bad food, but getting the best nutrients from the food you're eating. Has really nice recipes too, some new ways to use familiar ingredients. Easy to read, easy to use. I like the way the food is pictured: good, better, best. It's not about good or bad food, but getting the best nutrients from the food you're eating. Has really nice recipes too, some new ways to use familiar ingredients.

  25. 5 out of 5

    David Baird

    Nice book full of advise to get the most out of your fruit and veg. Very detailed and overall an interesting read

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mouza

    very informative.. and visual

  27. 5 out of 5

    Susie Wallace

    Great simple recipes and nutritional advice Enjoyed this book for its scientific approach and simple recipes. Good balance of nutritional advice and recipes. Three more words.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Toffeeapple

    Very interesting, especially leaving the pith in peppers. I hope to recall a lot more!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sophie

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Vegetables are amazing!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    Very informative! Great detailed information on the foods we eat .

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.