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Dark Horse Comics took the industry by storm with its release of Aliens, a comics series that for the first time captured the power of film source material and expanded its universe in a way that fans applauded worldwide. Now, the first three Dark Horse Aliens series — Outbreak, Nightmare Asylum and Female War — are collected in a value-priced, quality-format omnibus, feat Dark Horse Comics took the industry by storm with its release of Aliens, a comics series that for the first time captured the power of film source material and expanded its universe in a way that fans applauded worldwide. Now, the first three Dark Horse Aliens series — Outbreak, Nightmare Asylum and Female War — are collected in a value-priced, quality-format omnibus, featuring nearly 400 story pages in full color. Written by screen and television scribe Mark Verheiden (The Mask, Battlestar Gallactica) and illustrated with consummate skill by Mark A. Nelson, Den Beauvais and Sam Kieth, Aliens Omnibus Volume 1 is an essential piece of the Aliens mythos and a great entry point into the storied Dark Horse Aliens library.


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Dark Horse Comics took the industry by storm with its release of Aliens, a comics series that for the first time captured the power of film source material and expanded its universe in a way that fans applauded worldwide. Now, the first three Dark Horse Aliens series — Outbreak, Nightmare Asylum and Female War — are collected in a value-priced, quality-format omnibus, feat Dark Horse Comics took the industry by storm with its release of Aliens, a comics series that for the first time captured the power of film source material and expanded its universe in a way that fans applauded worldwide. Now, the first three Dark Horse Aliens series — Outbreak, Nightmare Asylum and Female War — are collected in a value-priced, quality-format omnibus, featuring nearly 400 story pages in full color. Written by screen and television scribe Mark Verheiden (The Mask, Battlestar Gallactica) and illustrated with consummate skill by Mark A. Nelson, Den Beauvais and Sam Kieth, Aliens Omnibus Volume 1 is an essential piece of the Aliens mythos and a great entry point into the storied Dark Horse Aliens library.

30 review for Aliens Omnibus, Vol. 1

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    The first 3 Aliens miniseries made by Dark Horse. These were made before Alien 3 was a thing so Newt and Hicks are still alive. Later editions renamed them Billie and Wilks. Editorially, this collection is a bit of a mess because the names shift back and forth, but as long as you know that it's not really that much of an issue. Because of latter Aliens movies, there would be considered Legends stories to use a Star Wars term. Aliens: Outbreak - ★★ For all that eventually happens in this, it's real The first 3 Aliens miniseries made by Dark Horse. These were made before Alien 3 was a thing so Newt and Hicks are still alive. Later editions renamed them Billie and Wilks. Editorially, this collection is a bit of a mess because the names shift back and forth, but as long as you know that it's not really that much of an issue. Because of latter Aliens movies, there would be considered Legends stories to use a Star Wars term. Aliens: Outbreak - ★★ For all that eventually happens in this, it's really boring. The first 2/3rds is just monotonous prologue about how evil corporations are. James Cameron already covered that in Aliens. There are some bold moves at the end but instead of focusing on that, it's mostly off-page which is disappointing. Due to Alien 3 coming out after this was published, Hicks and Newt's names were changed to Wilks and Billie in later printings. Aliens: Nightmare Asylum - ★★★★★ So much better than the first volume. Hicks and Newt (or Wilks and Billie, if you prefer) come across an insane general who thinks he can breed Xenomorphs to fight for him. Parts of this story are really messed up but fit in perfectly with the larger Aliens universe. Denis Beauvais's painted art is both gorgeous and horrific. Aliens: Earth War - ★★★★ Ripley finally makes her return. The story is out there as they go to the Xenomorph homeworld to gather some kind of Alien Empress and bring her back to Earth. Verheiden gets a bit stuck in the trap of paralleling the events of the first two movies. Sam Keith's art is great. It can still be a bit cartoonish when it comes to humans but he draws some fantastic Aliens and their homeworld. Aliens: Theory of Propagation - ★★ Just a recap of how Xenomorphs behave. It's not much more than filler. Aliens: The Alien - ★★★ The Alien is a proper conclusion to Earth War where the President of Earth negotiates with the Engineer for the Earth.

  2. 4 out of 5

    L. McCoy

    Alright so Aliens (the second in the movie series) is one of my favorite horror films and one of my favorite sci-fi films! I was excited to read this collection of comics and well... they’re not bad but not quite favorites. What’s it about? I can’t really say too much without spoilers. Let’s just say it starts off as a strange, futuristic space story but of course being Alien, it gets much darker. I’d say go into this mostly blind, I mean, ya already know it’s an Alien story. Pros: The story is pret Alright so Aliens (the second in the movie series) is one of my favorite horror films and one of my favorite sci-fi films! I was excited to read this collection of comics and well... they’re not bad but not quite favorites. What’s it about? I can’t really say too much without spoilers. Let’s just say it starts off as a strange, futuristic space story but of course being Alien, it gets much darker. I’d say go into this mostly blind, I mean, ya already know it’s an Alien story. Pros: The story is pretty interesting and not quite what I’d expect from an Alien comic. That being said it’s unexpected in a cool way. Anyone who knows Aliens knows to expect some bad-ass, exciting action scenes! This book definitely gives us some! The horror stuff is pretty cool as I expected it would be. The plot of this comic isn’t too awfully predictable which is a good thing. So I always thought that the xenomorphs are cool monsters. The design is creepy and cool at the same time and their abilities make them more intimidating than most other villains and monsters so yeah, I like them. (Note: this photo is not from the comic. Also a note, when looking for a cool xenomorph image to include in this review I discovered there’s apparently a disturbing amount of sexual fan-art of this thing... and only one of the examples I saw was good, another example might give me nightmares because oh hell no) Cons: The characters are kinda meh, I didn’t really care too much for any of them. No comic relief? I know it’s meant to be serious but even the films usually have some good comic relief stuff (Hudson was great) so I guess I ended up expecting but not getting it here so there’s a minor disappointment. This comic has some cheesy stuff. Not fun cheesy but just dumb cheesy. I didn’t like the ending. Mixed thoughts: The artwork. I would say most of it is pretty good but there are still quite a few iffy pages. Overall: I was torn between giving this a 3-star review or a 4-star review. I’m going with 4 because while there are some problems and I wouldn’t call this particularly great, I would say I still liked it. Don’t expect a masterpiece but Alien fans will likely have fun with it! 4/5

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    As a big fan of the original Alien, Aliens, Alien3 & Alien ressurection I was pleasantly surprised when I found two Aliens omnibus books with the comics inside that went further were the movies left me with a taste for more adventures. The first two stories are about Newt & Hicks on earth, and of course after the release of Alien3 that storyline was out of the question. But instead as taking it as an alternative timeline the publishers decided to rename the characters and fit them into the Alien- As a big fan of the original Alien, Aliens, Alien3 & Alien ressurection I was pleasantly surprised when I found two Aliens omnibus books with the comics inside that went further were the movies left me with a taste for more adventures. The first two stories are about Newt & Hicks on earth, and of course after the release of Alien3 that storyline was out of the question. But instead as taking it as an alternative timeline the publishers decided to rename the characters and fit them into the Alien-verse. Too bad they were kinda sloppy when referring to some space marines out of James Cameron Aliens movie. Anybody who saw the movies knew anyhow that they were still Newt and Hicks, and those are probably among the readers of these comics as well, so I think they should not have bothered with changing. People would not have minded anyhow with a decent foreword. The first stories are once again about the stupidity and shortsightness of mankind through industry and military. So what else is new in these stories and movies. This time the Aliens visit Earth and anybody can guess what the end result will be. In that sense Alien3 the movie came up with a better idea, even Alien4 the movie has a better basis story-idea. Anyhow Alien mayhem galore and with story 3 Ripley returns, scifi coolest and worst treated heroine ever. And it explains why she was not aboard when the spaceship retuned to Earth. And the mission Ripley went on was again the idiocy of man in thinking that they could master the Alien. Which leads to the story that happens after her return from that mission and a new one concerning an Alien and a way to end it all. Which leads to the ultimate solution of why it all happened and Earth did fall and shows us the Ultimate Puppetmaster. The whole omnibus is essential a different timeline based upon the story of Aliens and was visualised before Alien3. The whole omnibus should have been treated by Darkhorse as a alternative timeline instead of making it matter with changing names, which is in essence stupid towards the fans that would read this, as they recognise it all for what it is. Namely a great set of Alien stories that all together make for great reading.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Theaker

    These stories follow on from the second film, Aliens. The first two stories, Outbreak and Nightmare Asylum, tell the ongoing adventures of Newt and Hicks, while Ripley turns up for the third main story, Female War. Unfortunately, once Alien3 was released further adventures for Newt and Hicks were obviously out of the question. So Dark Horse decided to "fix" the problem by rereleasing the books and changing the names of the protagonists to Billie and Wilks, who just happened to have had all the s These stories follow on from the second film, Aliens. The first two stories, Outbreak and Nightmare Asylum, tell the ongoing adventures of Newt and Hicks, while Ripley turns up for the third main story, Female War. Unfortunately, once Alien3 was released further adventures for Newt and Hicks were obviously out of the question. So Dark Horse decided to "fix" the problem by rereleasing the books and changing the names of the protagonists to Billie and Wilks, who just happened to have had all the same adventures as Newt and Hicks - this volume collects those edited versions. It's a very clumsy solution, and it creates a feeling of unreality throughout the book, because it's always at the back of your mind that the characters are not really who they say they are - not least when they meet up with Ripley and she talks about their special bond! I realise that Dark Horse have to go with the wishes of the licensors, but as a reader I can't help thinking it wasn't really worth all that trouble just to keep Alien3 in continuity. The stories themselves are good, giving us what we always expected from the Aliens sequels and only just about got at the end of the fourth - the aliens arriving on Earth. The results are as devastating as might be expected. One strange thing about the aliens in the comics is that they are demonstrated to commmunicate telepathically, even across interstellar distances. I don't think that's something you can see in the movies, but it does give the writers the opportunity to develop plotlines more complex than "man finds bug, bug stomps man". Lastly, one caption in the book may be of interest to some critics of AVP2: "We didn't see the underlying pattern behind their evolutionary process - the way every facet of their existence was geared toward propagation. The queens matured at whatever rate their survival dictated." That's why the aliens in AVP2 don't hang about inside their hosts - there isn't time!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    This has been sitting on my bookshelf for awhile. I was a little afraid to revisit Dark Horse Comics' original Aliens series. When I was growing up, I was a complete freak for the movie Aliens. The way some kids are with Star Wars? That's the way I was with Aliens, ever since my parents let me stay up late and watch an "edited for television" version of the movie on CBS when I was a kid. Something about the tone of the movies, the gory/scary factor, the relationships... I was completely sold on This has been sitting on my bookshelf for awhile. I was a little afraid to revisit Dark Horse Comics' original Aliens series. When I was growing up, I was a complete freak for the movie Aliens. The way some kids are with Star Wars? That's the way I was with Aliens, ever since my parents let me stay up late and watch an "edited for television" version of the movie on CBS when I was a kid. Something about the tone of the movies, the gory/scary factor, the relationships... I was completely sold on the universe. If I remember correctly, I had a solid two years of enjoying Aliens and the DH comics before Alien 3 came out and completely mucked with these books. See, the original Dark Horse series starred Hicks and Newt, two of the supporting characters from Aliens... and it was, in my memory, pretty fantastic. Mark Verheiden expanded on the second Alien movie in a realistic, interesting way, using what we already knew about the mythos and sprinkling in new ideas that treated the property with a lot of respect. In all honesty, I could never actually find these books in my local comic book store- I would longbox dive for 'em when my father would take me to comic stores in New York City. I've never read the series all the way though before I picked up this collection and I was worried that it wouldn't hold up to the comic stories I have in my memory. This is tough to review because the stories are still good. This volume has three terrific stories that are WAY better than any Alien movie made after Jim Cameron. However... these are not the same stories I remember. I guess in an attempt to bring these old stories into continuity with the current franchise, the names of all the main characters have been changed. Hicks is now Wilks. Newt is now Billie. It sucks that 20th Century Fox couldn't just leave these stories as is, even if they contradict Alien 3... but what REALLY sucks is what a horrible job this collection does MAKING those corrections. On Page 10, you have Wilks/Hicks referencing his friends Drake, Frost, and Vasquez. Drake, Frost, and Vasquez are from Aliens. If they had changed THOSE names as well as the main characters name... well then OK. It would make sense. As it stands right now, that mistake makes the collection neither fish nor foul: they expect readers to forget about exactly what happens in Aliens, but they're still referencing Aliens! There are little mistakes like this throughout, but probably the worst on is on page 295, where they've got the Wilks character talking about the spaceship Sulaco... while a projection says that the ship he served on was called Kent. It's like someone was trying to make corrections, but didn't do it all the way. It sucks that I can't recommend this. I can recommend that, if you're a fan of Aliens, that you do a bit of back issue bin diving yourself and find the original floppy copies of this story. It's worth the search. Can't say that you should pick this up though.

  6. 4 out of 5

    aPriL does feral sometimes

    The Aliens Omnibus #1 contains: -Outbreak -Nightmare Asylum -Female War The storyline in these Dark Horse comics is different from the one established in the Ridley Scott movies. It ignores the movies Alien 3 and Alien: Resurrection. The action mostly takes place on Earth and on the aliens’ home planet, with some flashbacks to another alien/human bloodbath on a planet called Rim. There is sort of alt-plot pseudo-mother/daughter plotline involving a woman called Billie and another little girl called The Aliens Omnibus #1 contains: -Outbreak -Nightmare Asylum -Female War The storyline in these Dark Horse comics is different from the one established in the Ridley Scott movies. It ignores the movies Alien 3 and Alien: Resurrection. The action mostly takes place on Earth and on the aliens’ home planet, with some flashbacks to another alien/human bloodbath on a planet called Rim. There is sort of alt-plot pseudo-mother/daughter plotline involving a woman called Billie and another little girl called Amy instead of Scott’s original plotline which involved the characters of Newt and Ridley. Newt is briefly introduced and then fades after Ridley and Newt are rescued alive from their pod in the beginning of ‘Female War’. It all is a tad confusing if, gentle reader, you have seen at least the original four Scott movies. Also, in this comic book Ridley is a sexy curvaceous (D-cup minimum) black-ops babe prepared to do battle in her see-through underwear or with military garb hanging off strategically from various girl parts. If I remember correctly, Sigourney Weaver, the actress who played Ripley, is more of a slender greyhound than like someone with lots of built-in handholds. In book one, ‘Outbreak’, a Coast Guard patrol ship circling Earth finds an abandoned derelict. Usually, the crew is supposed to secure the abandoned ship and then blast it away from Earth. Instead they find an alien on board. Mayhem and spraying blood ensues. The Earth government decides to send a military squad to the aliens’ home planet to get an alien for study and for a weapons program. Bionational, a private weapons company, hires an ex-military psychopath to follow the government ship and kill the government crew. Bionational is trying to get an exclusive patent on the alien for its own life form technology program. The military squad on the government ship are completely clueless about aliens and about the evil Bionational ship following them. If that wasn’t enough, an Earth cable television preacher has an alien statue he worships. He hears ‘her’, the queen, whispering to him. Apparently the Queen is telepathic, or something. But this preacher is definitely on the wrong side whether he hears the Queen or not. Book one and two introduce characters and the several battle lines which open up between alien and human forces. As usual, the military leaders and the government seriously underestimate the aliens. Ripley eventually shows up in book three, ‘Female War’. She is enlisted to fight aliens and to help what is left of Earth. There are a bunch of new characters introduced in each collection, but most are brutally killed by the aliens. My advice is do not get attached. The artwork is good, but the story is a little too complex with plot threads and it is entirely boilerplate. For some reason, I could not stop looking at the drawings of the aliens’ heads, either. I keep thinking, “What do those alien skulls remind me of? It will come to me....”

  7. 5 out of 5

    Maria

    Probably not the best thing to read during my lunch break considering the Aliens story line but it made my lunch enjoyable :) As a fan of the Alien franchise, I was always thinking that the story line of Hicks and and Newt was worthy of more than what Alien 3 did and so I was thrilled to know that there was a comic regarding them but this Omnibus version has them under new names of Wilkes and Blue, which I don't wan to know why they did it when this is clearly Hicks and Newt as the story line pro Probably not the best thing to read during my lunch break considering the Aliens story line but it made my lunch enjoyable :) As a fan of the Alien franchise, I was always thinking that the story line of Hicks and and Newt was worthy of more than what Alien 3 did and so I was thrilled to know that there was a comic regarding them but this Omnibus version has them under new names of Wilkes and Blue, which I don't wan to know why they did it when this is clearly Hicks and Newt as the story line provides names and places from the Aliens film so some panels I felt were a bit sloppy because of this alternative to the names. A good forward at the beginning probably would have helped this but overall a good read.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Shaun

    Very strong work here, most produced before Alien 3 and then altered after its release (Newt and Hicks became Billie and Wilks) to fit in with established film continuity. As a sequel to Alien 3, this material is confusing, since Ripley is still alive and the book never explains how she knows Billie and Wilks, and there are several instances where they forgot to change the names in "Female War," so that Ripley calls Billie "Newt." Honestly it would have been less confusing if they'd just left th Very strong work here, most produced before Alien 3 and then altered after its release (Newt and Hicks became Billie and Wilks) to fit in with established film continuity. As a sequel to Alien 3, this material is confusing, since Ripley is still alive and the book never explains how she knows Billie and Wilks, and there are several instances where they forgot to change the names in "Female War," so that Ripley calls Billie "Newt." Honestly it would have been less confusing if they'd just left the names in place and considered this an alternate path than the one taken by Alien 3. If I didn't already know the history of these stories, I would have been at sea. I think the novelization of this story by Steve Perry made all of this make a little more sense, if I remember it correctly.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Emmett

    A hefty tome, indeed. This brings together 3 different comic runs: Outbreak, Nightmare Asylum, & Female War. Being a fan of the Alien films, I was excited to read these, but it's a bit of a mixed bag. Outbreak: story 3/art 1 Nightmare Asylum story 4/art 4.5 Female War: story 3/art 3 A hefty tome, indeed. This brings together 3 different comic runs: Outbreak, Nightmare Asylum, & Female War. Being a fan of the Alien films, I was excited to read these, but it's a bit of a mixed bag. Outbreak: story 3/art 1 Nightmare Asylum story 4/art 4.5 Female War: story 3/art 3

  10. 4 out of 5

    Brian Switek

    Many Halloweens ago, my cousin Mike gave me the four issue run of ALIENS: Earth War. Since X-Men and Spider-Man were about as intense as my comic reading got, I was shocked. But in a good way. The gift opened my interest in both Dark Horse and stories darker than those of the mainstream heroes. So I admit part of my rating is from nostalgia. The stories themselves are uneven both in art and narrative - from the almost confusingly-chaotic "Outbreak" to the gorgeously-illustrated and surprisingly-c Many Halloweens ago, my cousin Mike gave me the four issue run of ALIENS: Earth War. Since X-Men and Spider-Man were about as intense as my comic reading got, I was shocked. But in a good way. The gift opened my interest in both Dark Horse and stories darker than those of the mainstream heroes. So I admit part of my rating is from nostalgia. The stories themselves are uneven both in art and narrative - from the almost confusingly-chaotic "Outbreak" to the gorgeously-illustrated and surprisingly-compelling "Nightmare Asylum". I imagine Ripley, "Wilks", and "Billie" wouldn't feel the same, but it was good to revisit with these early incarnations of the Alien again.

  11. 5 out of 5

    TheCultureVulture

    If you've never dipped your toe into the Alien franchise I'd highly recommend the first two films Alien and Aliens, this three story series with Wilks and Billie as semi replacements for Hicks and Newt and the Alien Isolation video game for a hell of a good time multimedia experience. If you've never dipped your toe into the Alien franchise I'd highly recommend the first two films Alien and Aliens, this three story series with Wilks and Billie as semi replacements for Hicks and Newt and the Alien Isolation video game for a hell of a good time multimedia experience.

  12. 4 out of 5

    ☣Lynn☣

    2.5 stars The first two books were ok and the last one was bloody awful.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Letande D'Argon

    I had high expectations for this. If you've read my reviews of the original Aliens comic series, you know how unfortunate those were. The original comics were black and white, but when Dark Horse decided to re-release them in color, they've changed the names of Newt and Hicks to make their comic co-exist with the latest movie in the series. Which was Alien 3 at the moment. It doesn't sound like a big change and American companies did it a lot with Japanese media back in the days, but since the s I had high expectations for this. If you've read my reviews of the original Aliens comic series, you know how unfortunate those were. The original comics were black and white, but when Dark Horse decided to re-release them in color, they've changed the names of Newt and Hicks to make their comic co-exist with the latest movie in the series. Which was Alien 3 at the moment. It doesn't sound like a big change and American companies did it a lot with Japanese media back in the days, but since the story of the comics included in this collection was heavily based on Newt and Hicks, the change killed the whole meaning and turned the comics (which weren't that good to begin with) into a ridiculous mess. So, when they've announced that there'll be an omnibus, I expected them to finally make the things right. I mean, the times when movie canon thing was important were long gone. There was already some thoughts about what will become Prometheus, there was already that awful Alien vs. Predator movie... Nobody cared about proper canon anymore. It was a mess. And, obviously, the original Alien 3 problem was in past. So, it was a perfect moment for a proper re-release. In color, but with the original names. But guess what? Dark Horse decided to play lazy. This omnibus is a compilation of those awful re-releases with changed names. Is it nice to have on your shelf? Sure, it looks awesome. But when you begin to actually read it... it's the same exact screwed up thing. So, honestly, if you want the real deal in your collection, go for the original intact issues. Those don't look as cool as this omnibus, but at least you'll get the real story, not this butchered mess.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    One of the joys of these first three Aliens series, back in the day, is that they continued the story of the Aliens (1986) movie. To be specific, they were the story of Newt and Hicks and what happened next, and they're rather marvelous for the tragic arc that they imagined for these heroes. Unfortunately, more Aliens movies were produced. Even more unfortunately, they invalidated these stories. But just read this as if Aliens^3 and Aliens Resurrection and the rest didn't occur. Billie is Newt. One of the joys of these first three Aliens series, back in the day, is that they continued the story of the Aliens (1986) movie. To be specific, they were the story of Newt and Hicks and what happened next, and they're rather marvelous for the tragic arc that they imagined for these heroes. Unfortunately, more Aliens movies were produced. Even more unfortunately, they invalidated these stories. But just read this as if Aliens^3 and Aliens Resurrection and the rest didn't occur. Billie is Newt. Wilks is Hicks. Enjoy. Outbreak (Aliens 1). As you'd expect, this story has some fun military action, as Hicks goes after the Aliens with a vengeance. It's a well-told military story. However what makes this story truly great is what's going on back on Earth. Verheiden balances corporate evil with xenomorphic evil, producing something deeper than the on-screen alien stories. Even better, Verheiden isn't afraid to make really big plot moves. My only complaint is that at times the multi-threaded story gets just a bit muddy. Still, this is fundamentally the start of a great storyline that was never matched by the later big-screen replacements, and that's why Dark Horse's Aliens were so popular for a time [5/5]. Nightmare Asylum (Aliens 2). This is a much smaller story than the first Aliens, but in many ways that's too its advantage. Verheiden puts Wilks (Hicks) and Billie (Newt) into a horrible environment and lets us see if they're able to survive. One of the joys of this particular story is that the idea of controlling the aliens to fight aliens is a very believable extension of the main premise of the line. We also get the story of an Earth overrun in the background and absolutely gorgeous painted art by Dennis Beauvais, making this all around an excellent volume [5/5]. Female War (Aliens: Warth War). This is an unfortunately disappointing end to the Aliens trilogy of comics from Dark Horse. It's biggest problem is its reintroduction of Ripley. Yes, she's an important character from the Aliens movies, but her appearance forces the retreading of a lot of ground, and Verheiden unfortunately decides to complicate things even more by filling in the gaps in her history between Aliens and now. This gets even more problematic with the decision of these comics to rename Newt and Hicks in the reprints, so now suddenly we get her history with the real characters and her present-day with the renamed characters, which wouldn't make a lot of sense if you didn't know what was up. As for the rest of the story? We get a bunch of nameless marines who have none of the character of the Aliens crew or even the marines from the first volume of this series. Then we get what should be a dramatic visit to the the Aliens home planet that has none of its grandeur, and finally an ending which is pretty much a deus ex machina that's hard to care about. Basically, Verheiden jammed the plot to the deficit of everything else. And the art feels really inappropriate. It's sketchy and unrealistic. [2/5] Of the shorts that finish out the volume, "A Theory of Alien Propagation" is OK, while "The Alien" is a brilliant coda to the series.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jordan Anderson

    Aliens Omnibus, vol.1 is, obviously the comic/graphic novel equivalent of the collected novels series put out by Titan books. Because of that, I found the 3 main comics to be readable, and somewhat enjoyable as a rainy day afternoon read (which, coincidentally, it just happened to be such an afternoon this particular day). However, Had I not read the actual novels by Steve Perry, I’m pretty sure my enjoyment would not have been as high. You see, the comics are disjointed and don’t make a lot of s Aliens Omnibus, vol.1 is, obviously the comic/graphic novel equivalent of the collected novels series put out by Titan books. Because of that, I found the 3 main comics to be readable, and somewhat enjoyable as a rainy day afternoon read (which, coincidentally, it just happened to be such an afternoon this particular day). However, Had I not read the actual novels by Steve Perry, I’m pretty sure my enjoyment would not have been as high. You see, the comics are disjointed and don’t make a lot of sense. Scenes jump around with reckless abandon. Panel placement is bizarre at times. The illustrations are ridiculously inconsistent, and really suffer during the “Female War” story arc. Even the lettering is a mess. The good thing about reading the comic version of these stories, though, is that it adds a lot more depth. Verheiven adds more backstory to both Billie and Wilks, and, thankfully, cuts down on a lot of the sappy, 1980s action tropes that we’re so prevalent in Perry’s stories. And, even with the varying consistency of the art, actually seeing the xenos chew into people made for some low brown fun.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    I love the Alien movies and was really interested to see how things would be handled in this form. It is done very well and makes for a good read. The art work is nicely done and brings the people as well as the aliens to life in a vivid way. The characters were all new but based on those from the second movie except Ripley who they could not do without. Each story is a self contained book but still feeds into the next. You must read it to appreciate it and if you are an Aliens fan or simply a f I love the Alien movies and was really interested to see how things would be handled in this form. It is done very well and makes for a good read. The art work is nicely done and brings the people as well as the aliens to life in a vivid way. The characters were all new but based on those from the second movie except Ripley who they could not do without. Each story is a self contained book but still feeds into the next. You must read it to appreciate it and if you are an Aliens fan or simply a fan space creatures or science fiction, then it is a must read. No need to even give a little breakdown, its aliens, you know what is going to happen.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Roberts

    I remember reading these a long time back. Loved the continuation of the story from Aliens. Obviously the movies threw all this out so they changed names and made it a way confusing mess. And the third installment of this series had some of the most terrible artwork, I remember thinking that twenty plus years ago and it is still just terrible. I will read more because it is fun to go down memory lane.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    My boyfriend lent me this book. We are both very into the Alien franchise and I must say that this omnibus is pretty fantastic. The art is cool and while the first stories are rather formulaic, it definitely gets better as the omnibus goes. I am greatly looking forward to reading the next volumes!!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Phil

    This volume collects the first three story arcs in Dark Horse Comics' classic Aliens series. The first two parts, Outbreak and Nightmare Asylum, are absolute classics that made a greater, more positive contribution to the Aliens canon than several of the films. The third part, Earth War (here titled Female War), is a much weaker story, however. Set after the second movie, Outbreak follows the further exploits of Corporal Dwayne Hicks and Newt. Hicks' trauma and unanswered questions about his prev This volume collects the first three story arcs in Dark Horse Comics' classic Aliens series. The first two parts, Outbreak and Nightmare Asylum, are absolute classics that made a greater, more positive contribution to the Aliens canon than several of the films. The third part, Earth War (here titled Female War), is a much weaker story, however. Set after the second movie, Outbreak follows the further exploits of Corporal Dwayne Hicks and Newt. Hicks' trauma and unanswered questions about his previous mission has led him to have a rocky career in the Colonial Marines, prone to drunken brawls. With Ripley nowhere to be seen, young Newt ends up involuntarily committed to an insane asylum, spending much of her time in a drugged daze. When Hicks finds himself drawn into a mission involving a trip to the alien home world, he breaks Newt out of confinement and smuggles her aboard his ship, hoping that the both of them can find closure despite the deadly circumstances. As always, however, the company has a different agenda. I first read Outbreak circa 1991, collected into graphic novel format and purchased at a mall Waldenbooks. I was a devout Marvel kid, and had never read anything much darker than some Punisher and the original Eastman & Laird Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles comics. These early Aliens comics came as sort of a shock to my preteen system. The black and white art was moody and grim, and although I was a fan of the movies I wasn't accustomed to seeing this much detailed gore in my comic books. I was a little unsettled by the Aliens comics, but I also found them incredibly compelling. I would spend hours practicing my own xenomorph illustrations based on the artwork from the comics. Thirty years later, Outbreak still holds up. Hicks and Newt were renamed Wilks and Billie in reprints when both characters were perfunctorily killed off in the opening credits of Alien 3 in 1992, but the story works best as a sort of alternate timeline and I therefore mentally filled in the original character names whenever the retconned ones came up in the text. The artwork in the omnibus has been colorized, which diminishes some of the stark impact of the original black and white, but it's still a fantastic-looking series. For me, if Outbreak was the appetizer, Nightmare Asylum was the main course. With Earth overrun by aliens, Hicks and Newt find themselves unwilling guests on an orbiting space station run by a ruthless Colonial Marine officer obsessed with the idea of weaponizing his growing stock of xenomorphs and using them to reconquer Earth. The premise of the story—the attempt to tame and weaponize the aliens—is a natural fit for the Aliens universe, and echoes of it later turned up in Alien: Resurrection. Unlike Outbreak, the Nightmare Asylum artwork was color from the very beginning, and incredibly vivid color at that. For a franchise that tends towards dark tones, the effect was striking. Nightmare Asylum remains a great looking miniseries. The omnibus includes with Earth War, here retitled Female War. Ripley, heroine of the movies, returns, but her introduction feels strange with the renaming of Hicks and Newt. Why are they so happy to see her? Why does she care for them? Just ignore it and blame Alien 3 for the awkwardness. This time, the story involves yet another return to the alien home world, this time to pick up a "Queen Mother" xenomorph that manages to look far less imposing than the cinematic alien queen. The xenomorphs are psychically connected and it's hoped that by dropping her on Earth they can get all the aliens to flock to her and then conveniently nuke them all in one massive strike. While the first two story arcs were important parts of my youthful comic collection, I always left the Earth War graphic novel on the Waldenbooks shelf unpurchased. The artwork always struck me as so ugly, and such a major step down from Nightmare Asylum. I bought this omnibus because I finally wanted to read Earth War as an adult, with a more sophisticated palate. Unfortunately, younger me was right not to spend his precious allowance money on this particular installment in the series. The artwork still felt ugly and poor to me, and despite sharing the same writer as the previous series both the plot and characterization seemed to take a step down. The newly introduced Colonial Marines are characterization-free, the premise is kind of goofy, and the whole operation is taken care of with surprising ease. Compared to the first two volumes, Earth War felt muddled and rushed. Despite ending on a tremendously weak note, this omnibus contains some excellent comics that add a great deal of flavor and excitement to the Aliens universe. Wholeheartedly recommended to fans of the movies.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ann D-Vine

    The blame for every major problem with this volume can fall squarely at the feet of 20th Century Fox. I don't hate Alien 3 - I'm probably kinder to the Alien franchise on the whole than most are - but killing Newt and Hicks, off-screen, for seemingly little reason other than mere convenience, put Dark Horse in a corner. These comics were a "sequel" to Aliens, and, with its protagonists now canonically dead, Dark Horse went on by renaming them. Hicks is now Wilks, and Newt is now Billie. Okay. Ea The blame for every major problem with this volume can fall squarely at the feet of 20th Century Fox. I don't hate Alien 3 - I'm probably kinder to the Alien franchise on the whole than most are - but killing Newt and Hicks, off-screen, for seemingly little reason other than mere convenience, put Dark Horse in a corner. These comics were a "sequel" to Aliens, and, with its protagonists now canonically dead, Dark Horse went on by renaming them. Hicks is now Wilks, and Newt is now Billie. Okay. Easy enough. Except in the third story arc, Ripley returns - and starts referring to Newt and Billie interchangeably. So it doesn't even really help to separate these adventures from the canonical timeline. They might as well have made no changes at all, for all the good it did. Ignoring that (if you can), these comics are spectacular. Rousing, high-concept sci-fi horror, illustrated and written with the kind of deft touch the Alien franchise seems to always inspire in its ancillary material, this volume nary has a weak point. Usually these Dark Horse omnibuses have a clunker or two - the nature, I'm aware, of collected editions of this scope - but these stories all hold up, they're all clearly given care and attention to detail, and a passion for storytelling in this universe. Which frankly makes the decision to switch out the characters even more ridiculous. Every element in these comics is layered with such precision that changing the fundamentals (like, who the protagonists are, KIND OF A BIG DEAL) sees the rest topple over like a tower of playing cards. A testament, then, to the artists and writers, who did such a good job that the sweeping retcon is felt mostly intangibly for the first two thirds of the book. The story eventually takes such huge diversions from where the Alien film franchise would later go, that I do wonder if Dark Horse themselves eventually began to regret what they'd done here. Hell, Fox gave Gearbox Software the reigns to a canonical story between film one and two in the video game flop Aliens: Colonial Marines; it occurs to me that the retcon may have been a product of outright naivety. I'm lead to believe that these Aliens comics were among the first "sequel" film spin-off comics ever made with this level of oversight, and they certainly paved the way for countless franchises, not the least of which Star Wars, that gave absolute freedom to authors and creators to play in these fictions without limit. Alien 3 wasn't just something that would contradict the comic continuity, it was a new problem entirely for a project along these lines, and it strikes me that Dark Horse was making the kind of decisions no-one had actually had to make before. So, I do get it. I might even forgive it. The result, though, remains palpable and unfortunate. So, classic comics, in every sense of the word, spoiled (albeit only slightly at first) by editorial and corporate meddling, all in service of a film no-one really seems to like all that much in hindsight. A damn shame, but, caveats aside, still worth reading for Aliens completionists. In all fairness, I would go so far as to say these are downright great comics. I just can't over-emphasise how disappointing it all ultimately feels - despite the quality of creative work shining desperately through the fog.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Victoria

    A great collection for someone familiar with the series...Not so much for newcomers. Of course, the art, writing, and general...concept leave a lot to be desired but in a universe as small as the Alien one, I'm willing to deal with some ridiculously-dated comic art for more content. The collection is a great and handy way to keep the series together and in order; frankly the entire Alien: Omnibus series is a lifesaver and I wish it was still in print instead of the stupid "The Essential Alien" c A great collection for someone familiar with the series...Not so much for newcomers. Of course, the art, writing, and general...concept leave a lot to be desired but in a universe as small as the Alien one, I'm willing to deal with some ridiculously-dated comic art for more content. The collection is a great and handy way to keep the series together and in order; frankly the entire Alien: Omnibus series is a lifesaver and I wish it was still in print instead of the stupid "The Essential Alien" comic TPBs they're putting out now. If someone's a hardcore enough of a fan to want to read the backlog, trust me, they're a hardcore enough fan to want all of it, not just the shiny bits. Now as to why I say this particular edition isn't the best for newbies...It's not the original edition of the first Alien comics. They were originally presented in black and white, and the characters of Wilkes and Billie were Hicks and Newt--hence why in Female War, Ripley talks about how much she cares about Wilkes, and how she wishes she could have been their for Billie. The early Alien comics were, much like early Star Wars or Star Trek comics, not art by any stretch of the imagination and entirely unaware of how important they'd be later on, or if not important than at least iconic. Also, the "Space Jockey," elephant-trunked aliens that were locked in a revenge battle with the xenomorphs we've seen replaced in Prometheus by Giger (yes, Giger had more to say about Prometheus than he did Aliens or Alien 3) and Scott with the Engineer race instead. There's a ton of fan guides out there, and some really nifty "theories," head canons, thoughts, mini essays, and even jokes about how most of the Alien comics and films (including the first AVP) can all technically be considered canon at once with a few minor tweaks. Also, the timeline for Amy Ripley is a hot mess, but other than Isolation I've been so let down by how Fox and Dark Horse have treated the character I've actually been reading fanfic to fill in the holes of her story line, but that's entirely beside the point. TL;DR great convenient volume for established fans, but not exactly a welcoming start for someone looking to just jump into the franchise for the first time.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Garvey

    Collecting together the Dark Horse graphic novels 'Outbreak', 'Nightmare Asylum' and 'Female War', and short, useful, narrative-driving pieces 'Theory of Alien Propagation' and 'The Alien', this is a hefty, if frustratingly uneven book that veers wildly between essential reading and deep disappointment. The first story, 'Outbreak', is spectacular. Fast-moving, gory, brilliant at capturing the cold, vicious, dystopian, paranoid essence of both Alien and Aliens, the writing (by Mark Verheiden) and Collecting together the Dark Horse graphic novels 'Outbreak', 'Nightmare Asylum' and 'Female War', and short, useful, narrative-driving pieces 'Theory of Alien Propagation' and 'The Alien', this is a hefty, if frustratingly uneven book that veers wildly between essential reading and deep disappointment. The first story, 'Outbreak', is spectacular. Fast-moving, gory, brilliant at capturing the cold, vicious, dystopian, paranoid essence of both Alien and Aliens, the writing (by Mark Verheiden) and the artwork (by Mark A. Nelson) are both excellent. Outbreak explains how corporate madness leads to the aliens taking over Earth in a believable, gripping way that fits perfectly with the first two films. Sadly, it's downhill from there. 'Nightmare Asylum' brings us some great set pieces, some variable but still interesting artwork by Dan Beauvais and, in General Spears, the most unbelievably slow-witted antagonist imaginable. Spears' plan, to train his alien specimens to fight the aliens on Earth is literally the dirt worst bit of villainy I can recall in well over thirty years of reading and watching fiction. Yet, somehow, 'Female War' is even worse. Finally, Ripley returns (technically she returned on the last page of Nightmare Asylum) but, in Sam Keith's crudely over-exaggerated artwork, looks like a different human being in almost every panel. But the artwork isn't the only thing to blame. Verheiden's script is cluttered, messy, dull and unsatisfying. Honestly, this story was a struggle to get through. Finally, the two short pieces are hit and miss. The Verheiden/Nelson combination is excellent in 'Theory of Alien Propagation' but the John Arcudi scripted 'The Alien' ends things on a bit of a flat note. My advice? Read 'Outbreak' and 'Theory of Alien Propagation' and fill in the blanks yourself.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Crypto Punk

    So the Dark Horse comics take on the Alien series continues right where the second movie left off. While I havent bothered to watch the third or fourth films in the series, I am told that the comic diverges completely from them. The story, split into three parts here, surely does hold a lot of potential. Early on, it show hints of moving beyond the 'space bug kills pesky humans' format by touching on subjects like corporate greed, cult mentality and a neo liberal future. But that's pretty much a So the Dark Horse comics take on the Alien series continues right where the second movie left off. While I havent bothered to watch the third or fourth films in the series, I am told that the comic diverges completely from them. The story, split into three parts here, surely does hold a lot of potential. Early on, it show hints of moving beyond the 'space bug kills pesky humans' format by touching on subjects like corporate greed, cult mentality and a neo liberal future. But that's pretty much all there is to it - hints of what could have been much more complex story. It sure is fun for what it is and that being a fast paced action heavy comic set across worlds. To that end, it makes for a fairly entertaining, if a bit mindless read. The quality of the artwork varies wildly between the three parts. When I got to the second part and saw a significantly more attractive art style, I had hoped it would continue for the final part as well. But alas, it devolves to a style which in my opinion is the lowest point of the book. This is not going to convert anyone who didn't like the alien franchise into fans and nor does it even attempt to. But as a product of the late 80s/ early 90s comic book industry, it's not too bad either

  24. 5 out of 5

    Cody S. Green

    I've been a fan of the Aliens series ever since I was a young child, and saw the first film on late night Television in the early 2000's. With that being said, I have to say that for the most part, this book was a little disappointing. I feel that the writer focused way too much on the inner governmental affairs of the characters, and corruption of military (what a surprise!) rather than one on one interaction between the humans and the Aliens. I will give it a few points for it's incorporation I've been a fan of the Aliens series ever since I was a young child, and saw the first film on late night Television in the early 2000's. With that being said, I have to say that for the most part, this book was a little disappointing. I feel that the writer focused way too much on the inner governmental affairs of the characters, and corruption of military (what a surprise!) rather than one on one interaction between the humans and the Aliens. I will give it a few points for it's incorporation of other creatures that inhabited the same planet, including even the "other" being that they encounter and converse with. I truly wanted to like this book, but again, a good 90% of it is just the main protagonist blabbing away about memories of her past, and how corrupt the galactic government or "corporation" or whatever it was is. I did really like what small percent of monster action we witnessed. I really would love to see the Aliens and the protagonists explore other planets and alien races as well. I liked the book, but will I read it again in the future? Probably not. Will I continue on with the series? Perhaps!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Philip Higgins

    Much though I love the films, I was disappointed by this collection. The artwork for two of the three stories was crude & dated - I struggled to identify characters in the first and the third was even worse: childlike scrawls, save the Barbie type portraits of Ripley & Newt/"Billie". I'm no Germaine Greer, but why take a heroine like Ripley and turn her into some bland sexualised doll? The aliens are rendered pretty faithfully but they even got the guns wrong (inexcusable!) The middle story draw Much though I love the films, I was disappointed by this collection. The artwork for two of the three stories was crude & dated - I struggled to identify characters in the first and the third was even worse: childlike scrawls, save the Barbie type portraits of Ripley & Newt/"Billie". I'm no Germaine Greer, but why take a heroine like Ripley and turn her into some bland sexualised doll? The aliens are rendered pretty faithfully but they even got the guns wrong (inexcusable!) The middle story drawn by Den Beauvois was much better - great colouring and detail with the hardware spot on. There were some interesting ideas overall - I didn't see the android twist coming in the second story and it was nice to see a different pre-Prometheus take on the "pilot" alien from the original film. The 'alien apocalypse' idea was OK but would there really be a cult dedicated to the xenomorph - even in America? The tortured pretentious commentary grew a bit tiring and two of the stories feature (totally different) alien homeworlds. Glad I only paid £1.99p for the digital version.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    Honestly the only reason I give this 3 stars instead of 2 is because I'm a sucker for this early 90s Dark Horse art-style which peaks with Nightmare Asylum. Otherwise the Verheiden-trilogy collected here (Outbreak, Nightmare Asylum, Female War) is a complete mess storywise, especially the last part. It was probably chaotic even before they retconned certain characters to fit with Alien3 which came out after the trilogy, but with this edited re-release, Female War is like a fanfic-y fever dream w Honestly the only reason I give this 3 stars instead of 2 is because I'm a sucker for this early 90s Dark Horse art-style which peaks with Nightmare Asylum. Otherwise the Verheiden-trilogy collected here (Outbreak, Nightmare Asylum, Female War) is a complete mess storywise, especially the last part. It was probably chaotic even before they retconned certain characters to fit with Alien3 which came out after the trilogy, but with this edited re-release, Female War is like a fanfic-y fever dream where the author lost all his sense of restraint and coherence. The best part of the collection is the Theory of Alien Propagation one-shot, which is a well-rounded macabre nature documentary. I would only recommend this to completionists, otherwise skip right to the second volume and maybe read the Aliens: The Alien one-shot which is a prequel to and establishes the status quo for later stories.

  27. 5 out of 5

    GodzillaGus

    Awesome. This is the story Alien fans are super curious about. So, going into this one should have seen the movies. This was supposed to be the sequel to Aliens. Had Hicks and Newt survived, this would be their story. However, it isn't. For better or worse, Alien 3 was released forcing a retcon. It was pretty fun imagining these characters as them though the story but it's not something one should get caught up on while reading this because the events of the story did in fact happen in the time, Awesome. This is the story Alien fans are super curious about. So, going into this one should have seen the movies. This was supposed to be the sequel to Aliens. Had Hicks and Newt survived, this would be their story. However, it isn't. For better or worse, Alien 3 was released forcing a retcon. It was pretty fun imagining these characters as them though the story but it's not something one should get caught up on while reading this because the events of the story did in fact happen in the time, just not by Hicks or Newt. Instead by Wilks and Billie. Included here are some answers to certain questions about the aliens themselves that hardcore fans want to know. The lore is well mixed into the story arc. So, a perfect score for a complete story arc, good enough art (Nightmare Asylum had the best), and lore with the basic answers we all want to know. Enjoy the nightmares.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Elliott Frank

    I've long been told that Darkhorse's early Alien books were some of the best fiction in the franchise, save the first two films. After finally reading Verheiden's run, I'm pretty sure that most of those doing the telling are thoroughly blinded by nostalgia. It wasn't the worst comic I've ever read, but it certainly didn't live up to the hype. The central characters are so obviously stand-ins for those from the film and there are large sections that seem like Verheiden wanted to write a completely I've long been told that Darkhorse's early Alien books were some of the best fiction in the franchise, save the first two films. After finally reading Verheiden's run, I'm pretty sure that most of those doing the telling are thoroughly blinded by nostalgia. It wasn't the worst comic I've ever read, but it certainly didn't live up to the hype. The central characters are so obviously stand-ins for those from the film and there are large sections that seem like Verheiden wanted to write a completely different sci-fi story and shoehorned it into the Alien's setting out of creative desperation. I could be wrong. This book could have been in a class of its own when it was written, and I just read it in the wrong time and place. That said, I can't recommend it to anyone but the most devoted fans of the franchise.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

    So this starts out with characters that are obviously meant to be Hicks and Newt from the second movie, and yet their names are changed and Newt (now Blue) is all grown up. From there it just gets wierder with another colony being overrun and a research station somewhere, and the the aliens loose on Earth and it all goes to hell in a handbasket. It really wasnt a bad graphic novel and was fairly interesting although I tad bit hard to follow at times. I just couldnt get over who the hell these cha So this starts out with characters that are obviously meant to be Hicks and Newt from the second movie, and yet their names are changed and Newt (now Blue) is all grown up. From there it just gets wierder with another colony being overrun and a research station somewhere, and the the aliens loose on Earth and it all goes to hell in a handbasket. It really wasnt a bad graphic novel and was fairly interesting although I tad bit hard to follow at times. I just couldnt get over who the hell these characters were supposed to be and why they changed thier names. That kept hanging out in the back of my head and drove me nuts. I finally just lost interest and didnt care about the people or the story anymore. Abandoned at about the halfway mark.

  30. 4 out of 5

    AverageJoe

    Good dark take on the Alien universe .Story was ok but it delivers Xenomorphs .I've found with these Alien books I tend to like the more original aspects of them like the Alien worshiping cult .Unfortunately not much develops with that and its more about the after math with Hicks and Newt .So right there you should know this is not in cannon with the Alien films. I kinda wish elements of this had become the actual sequel to Aliens .Love the art. Worth the read if your looking for dark science fi Good dark take on the Alien universe .Story was ok but it delivers Xenomorphs .I've found with these Alien books I tend to like the more original aspects of them like the Alien worshiping cult .Unfortunately not much develops with that and its more about the after math with Hicks and Newt .So right there you should know this is not in cannon with the Alien films. I kinda wish elements of this had become the actual sequel to Aliens .Love the art. Worth the read if your looking for dark science fiction . Not sure how I felt about that ending though lol.

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