web site hit counter The Gender Games: The Problem with Men and Women, from Someone Who Has Been Both - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Gender Games: The Problem with Men and Women, from Someone Who Has Been Both

Availability: Ready to download

Why we are all being messed up by gender, and what we can do about it. 'It's a boy!' or 'It's a girl!' are the first words almost all of us hear when we enter the world. Before our names, before we have likes and dislikes - before we, or anyone else, has any idea who we are. And two years ago, as Juno Dawson went to tell her mother she was (and actually, always had been) a Why we are all being messed up by gender, and what we can do about it. 'It's a boy!' or 'It's a girl!' are the first words almost all of us hear when we enter the world. Before our names, before we have likes and dislikes - before we, or anyone else, has any idea who we are. And two years ago, as Juno Dawson went to tell her mother she was (and actually, always had been) a woman, she started to realise just how wrong we've been getting it. Gender isn't just screwing over trans people, it's messing with everyone. From little girls who think they can't be doctors to teenagers who come to expect street harassment. From exclusionist feminists to 'alt-right' young men. From men who can't cry to the women who think they shouldn't. As her body gets in line with her mind, Juno tells not only her own story, but the story of everyone who is shaped by society's expectations of gender - and what we can do about it. Featuring insights from well-known gender, feminist and trans activists including Rebecca Root, Laura Bates, Gemma Cairney, Anthony Anaxagorou, Hannah Witton, Alaska Thunderfuck and many more, The Gender Games is a frank, witty and powerful manifesto for a world where what's in your head is more important than what's between your legs.


Compare

Why we are all being messed up by gender, and what we can do about it. 'It's a boy!' or 'It's a girl!' are the first words almost all of us hear when we enter the world. Before our names, before we have likes and dislikes - before we, or anyone else, has any idea who we are. And two years ago, as Juno Dawson went to tell her mother she was (and actually, always had been) a Why we are all being messed up by gender, and what we can do about it. 'It's a boy!' or 'It's a girl!' are the first words almost all of us hear when we enter the world. Before our names, before we have likes and dislikes - before we, or anyone else, has any idea who we are. And two years ago, as Juno Dawson went to tell her mother she was (and actually, always had been) a woman, she started to realise just how wrong we've been getting it. Gender isn't just screwing over trans people, it's messing with everyone. From little girls who think they can't be doctors to teenagers who come to expect street harassment. From exclusionist feminists to 'alt-right' young men. From men who can't cry to the women who think they shouldn't. As her body gets in line with her mind, Juno tells not only her own story, but the story of everyone who is shaped by society's expectations of gender - and what we can do about it. Featuring insights from well-known gender, feminist and trans activists including Rebecca Root, Laura Bates, Gemma Cairney, Anthony Anaxagorou, Hannah Witton, Alaska Thunderfuck and many more, The Gender Games is a frank, witty and powerful manifesto for a world where what's in your head is more important than what's between your legs.

30 review for The Gender Games: The Problem with Men and Women, from Someone Who Has Been Both

  1. 5 out of 5

    Simon

    Part memoir and part social study and commentary Juno Dawson's The Gender Games is a fantastic, engaging and thought inducing look at gender, sex, sexuality and all the things in between that cause so much kerfuffle. I found it brilliantly direct, it made me understand something's I'd been puzzled about and left me feeling empowered as a person. I want it to do that for anyone who reads it. And you should read it, whatever you gender, sex or sexuality. Part memoir and part social study and commentary Juno Dawson's The Gender Games is a fantastic, engaging and thought inducing look at gender, sex, sexuality and all the things in between that cause so much kerfuffle. I found it brilliantly direct, it made me understand something's I'd been puzzled about and left me feeling empowered as a person. I want it to do that for anyone who reads it. And you should read it, whatever you gender, sex or sexuality.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    In short: I loved every second of this. I adored the warmth, the humour, the pop culture reference, and how very very positive this was. I listened to the book as read by the author and I can only recommend this. Juno Dawson brings an absolute wonderful joy to this memoir that I just really needed. Compared to other memoirs I read in my month of reading mostly memoirs, this was lighthearted and fun. This does not mean that Juno Dawson does not have a lot to say, which she does, brilliantly so. Sh In short: I loved every second of this. I adored the warmth, the humour, the pop culture reference, and how very very positive this was. I listened to the book as read by the author and I can only recommend this. Juno Dawson brings an absolute wonderful joy to this memoir that I just really needed. Compared to other memoirs I read in my month of reading mostly memoirs, this was lighthearted and fun. This does not mean that Juno Dawson does not have a lot to say, which she does, brilliantly so. She just refuses to use a narrative of sadness for her own journey and I am glad. Coming out stories are not always awful and that gives me hope. I agree with a lot of Juno Dawson’s thoughts on gender – and that felt nice because I am often the most radical in my social circle. I wasn’t at university (not by a long shot) but back in my small town and with in-laws who are very much of the opinion that boys and girls are fundamentally different and that girls should always wear pink (I am exaggerating, of course, but only a little) I do sometimes feel a bit weird. So listening to somebody who so very eloquently has similar thoughts was absolutely lovely. I am around the same age as Juno Dawson and as such really appreciated a lot of her pop culture references a whole lot; I mean I was always going to love a book that references Buffy, the Vampire Slayer. I just had so much fun listening to this. Please do check this one out if you haven’t already.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kaitlin

    This is a book I picked up on audiobook after hearing my friend Lauren talk about it. I was quite keen to find out more about Trans issues and being Trans, and I thought this sounded like it would be a great start point. Not only this, but the audiobook is actually narrated by the author herself and I love when the author narrates their own story as I think it really brings out the emotion. Juno's story is probably not too dissimilar from many other UK-based trans people. I really liked seeing t This is a book I picked up on audiobook after hearing my friend Lauren talk about it. I was quite keen to find out more about Trans issues and being Trans, and I thought this sounded like it would be a great start point. Not only this, but the audiobook is actually narrated by the author herself and I love when the author narrates their own story as I think it really brings out the emotion. Juno's story is probably not too dissimilar from many other UK-based trans people. I really liked seeing the perspective of someone who lives in the same country and, although Juno was born in a male body and therefore had male-privilege, I do think growing up our life experiences are more similar than someone who was from, say, USA etc. I found that there were many parts of the British culture which Juno referenced from her childhood when she was James, that I could relate to, and then when Juno spoke about her life as Juno later on and discussed the cons/pros of being a woman, again I felt I could relate. What I liked about this book is that it's not just the personal story of Juno, but also her discovery of Feminism, Identity, Gender and much more. There's a whole load of mine-fields when it comes to political correctness and misconception over these topics, and Juno artfully describes her own experience with these, which was fascinating and eye-opening. In the end, I think this is certainly a book worth reading and a story worth uncovering and I really do hope that more of these books start to be produced mainstream so that others who are trans or have gender-dysmorphia can find them. I also hope that those of us who are cis find these sorts of books too and we can understand more about the journey so we don't demean or undermine people's lived experiences. It's well worth a read. 4*s from me.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Keeleigh

    Let me be clear, I don't think this is a badly written book. I think this is one of those "It's not you, it's me." situations. Juno Dawson's approach to this topic is funny and approachable and I find myself agreeing with her a lot. I just really didn't gel with the overly familiar tone, the chatty, matey thing. I also felt a bit like she was preaching to the converted in a lot of cases and if I'm reading nonfiction it's because I'm trying to learn something new. I think this book is perfect for Let me be clear, I don't think this is a badly written book. I think this is one of those "It's not you, it's me." situations. Juno Dawson's approach to this topic is funny and approachable and I find myself agreeing with her a lot. I just really didn't gel with the overly familiar tone, the chatty, matey thing. I also felt a bit like she was preaching to the converted in a lot of cases and if I'm reading nonfiction it's because I'm trying to learn something new. I think this book is perfect for teens questioning their own identity and sexuality and would be incredibly informative and supportive to them, but for me, I've read quite widely about gender, feminism and rape culture so it felt like a very shallow discussion on these topics for me. To summarise, excellent author with a unique voice that sadly didn't mesh with me. Would recommend to teens or adults that wish to begin exploring gender.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    Been sitting on this review for two months now, trying to land on a star rating, and how to articulate what I wanted to say. Ultimately, this is a good book that is part memoir and part feminist/social text about being transgender (with a focus on the UK), with some intersectional feminist ideas thrown in. It's also written in a very colloquial, humorous style that is very much not the norm for these kinds of books. This is what threw me, because I couldn't decide if the familiar/jokey tone help Been sitting on this review for two months now, trying to land on a star rating, and how to articulate what I wanted to say. Ultimately, this is a good book that is part memoir and part feminist/social text about being transgender (with a focus on the UK), with some intersectional feminist ideas thrown in. It's also written in a very colloquial, humorous style that is very much not the norm for these kinds of books. This is what threw me, because I couldn't decide if the familiar/jokey tone helped or hurt the book, because it wasn't what I was expecting. I guess I was expecting you know, serious words for serious themes or some such rot. In the end, I think it's both, but it helped far more than it hurt. (This is obviously completely subjective.) Ultimately, I think the tone helps with the overall design of the book, which is aimed not just at trans readers but for everybody else as well. It's meant to be humanizing and disarming, and I think that works. (There were just a few instances where I thought the joke went a bit far and cut into the points she was making. Then again, I'm sensitive to this because a friend of mine is always the one to take a joke too far. It's funny, and it's funny, and then it crosses the line and you want to hide your face, roll your eyes, that kind of thing.) The Gender Games is a 2017 book by transgender author Juno Dawson. Though things have changed quite a bit in the cultural conversation surrounding gender, this book is still very relevant. Perhaps even more so right now, as a certain formerly beloved British author has been throwing her ignorant, uniformed views into the public conversation and making waves. Juno mentions in the book, and I have heard it elsewhere, that the single most important thing to people being understanding of trans issues is knowing a trans person. I certainly became much more aware after having multiple trans friends, online and off, because if someone you care about cares about something, the natural impulse is for you to care, too, and to be informed. For people who don't have anyone trans in their life, Juno (we are on a first name basis now because this book gets very personal) has written this book instead. Hopefully some of them will pick it up. She does two things here: Telling the story of her life as it relates to Gender (which she personifies throughout the book), and using the opportunities presented by her story to explicate the ideas of Gender, sexuality, and other feminist and social issues, in plain language in a way that most people would be easily able to understand. She uses her real life stories or those of people she's met or interviewed to provide examples. In that way, it's a text that discusses intellectual, nearly academic, issues but in a very down to earth way. The main thesis of the book is that "we have all been fucked by Gender," which is a social construct, aka something completely made up by humans and therefore malleable, but which most of us inexplicably treat like hard and fast live or die rules. She takes full advantage of her perspective, having lived the first part of her life as a gay white effeminate man (with all the complex privileges and disadvantages that come with all her intersecting identities), and then later in life suddenly experiencing the view from the other side of the gender spectrum. Because of her familiar tone, the book did at points feel messy, but overall this was a very intelligent and compassionate exploration (both personal and cultural) of Gender in today's social context. And she is funny, and has a very unique voice as a writer. As with anyone possessing a unique style, YMMV. This would also be a good starting point if you know someone with a good sense of humor who wants to know more about trans people and trans experiences, or if you just want to read someone funny talking about gender and sexuality.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lia

    It was really good but there were some minor things that bothered me so I don't want to give it 5 stars. I would definitely recommend this if you are interested in reading about feminism from a different perspective or am interested in trans issues. It was really good but there were some minor things that bothered me so I don't want to give it 5 stars. I would definitely recommend this if you are interested in reading about feminism from a different perspective or am interested in trans issues.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Shelly

    Well I'm going to have to go for a second go, but YES, this was brilliant!!! I listened to the audiobook (also read by Juno Dawson) who's voice is compelling. It's wonderful, thought provoking and will leave you thinking for days. I was touched by the honesty and no bullshit, take of Juno mind. The audiobook is a delight as Juno is a pleasure to listen to and has a very emotive voice. I giggled and talked to the audiobook out lout, it felt interactive. Like a good sit down and chin wag with a mate a Well I'm going to have to go for a second go, but YES, this was brilliant!!! I listened to the audiobook (also read by Juno Dawson) who's voice is compelling. It's wonderful, thought provoking and will leave you thinking for days. I was touched by the honesty and no bullshit, take of Juno mind. The audiobook is a delight as Juno is a pleasure to listen to and has a very emotive voice. I giggled and talked to the audiobook out lout, it felt interactive. Like a good sit down and chin wag with a mate about life and the state of the world. Covering topic from Gender, NHS, Rape Culture, Patriarch and Privilege. I was moved by Juno's repeated admittance that she, (growing up as a gay, white, man) had certain privilege, that other do not. But was not without discrimination herself. I would love for this book to be read in schools, yes it has a chapter on sex, but it is not lurid. It is informative and emotional. Seriously, read it, listen to it, devour it! A brilliant book and (as cliche as it may sound) an important one at that

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sophie

    This book was amazing! A great mix of Juno's experience transitioning from man to woman and her thoughts on gender issues and feminism. I loved that it was funny and sarcastic at times, but also that she let her emotion and anger shine through when talking about infuriating subject and behaviours. I didn't know anything about the trans culture (and still don't know much to be honest), but this book was eye-opening and a great and quick read. This book was amazing! A great mix of Juno's experience transitioning from man to woman and her thoughts on gender issues and feminism. I loved that it was funny and sarcastic at times, but also that she let her emotion and anger shine through when talking about infuriating subject and behaviours. I didn't know anything about the trans culture (and still don't know much to be honest), but this book was eye-opening and a great and quick read.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Noina

    4.5 stars This book is great ! Part memoir, part social commentary, it makes a lot of good points and is—of course—as inclusive as may be. Juno Dawson is very aware of her relatively privileged situation as a white and wealthy trans woman, and doesn't "talk for all trans women". It made me think about a lot of aspects I had never thought about prior to listening to this—for example, how we shouldn't talk about a fetus's or child's gender, because it is impossible to know until the child grows up a 4.5 stars This book is great ! Part memoir, part social commentary, it makes a lot of good points and is—of course—as inclusive as may be. Juno Dawson is very aware of her relatively privileged situation as a white and wealthy trans woman, and doesn't "talk for all trans women". It made me think about a lot of aspects I had never thought about prior to listening to this—for example, how we shouldn't talk about a fetus's or child's gender, because it is impossible to know until the child grows up and can talk about its inner life.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Moonbook

    I really enjoy it

  11. 4 out of 5

    Joy Finlayson

    One of my books of the year. So important, inspirational and insightful!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ireene

    It’s such a fun read. Wasn’t expecting it as the subject is serious, but it just oozes positivity. Definitely a must read!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Louise

    Juno made some really interesting points and this was thought provoking.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Michael mister.is.me

    An interesting Read. This book delivers a very good part-chatty memoir and part-introduction to gender and trans issues within society. Throughout the book it really made me think and want to go and read further into academic gender studies and look into some of social and political issues contemporary society raised within Dawson's book. An interesting Read. This book delivers a very good part-chatty memoir and part-introduction to gender and trans issues within society. Throughout the book it really made me think and want to go and read further into academic gender studies and look into some of social and political issues contemporary society raised within Dawson's book.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Dabarai

    I enjoyed the book a lot, but there were instances when I disagreed with the author, especially parts about magazine analysis motherhood. Also, I wish I'd understand all references to the pop culture or people mentioned.. In this respect I'm so clueless! I enjoyed the book a lot, but there were instances when I disagreed with the author, especially parts about magazine analysis motherhood. Also, I wish I'd understand all references to the pop culture or people mentioned.. In this respect I'm so clueless!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Cassidy (Reminders of the Changing Time)

    Review available at http://bit.ly/2N5xC1b Review available at http://bit.ly/2N5xC1b

  17. 4 out of 5

    Liv

    I really enjoyed this book. I have only recently stumbled across Juno Dawson as an author as I heard on a podcast about her new book Meat Market which is a book I intend to read. However, I knew nothing about Juno at this point and only when stumbling across this book (as I was very intrigued by the title), did I find out that Juno was a trans woman. I think she offers lots of interesting observations, arguments and particularly on the points of gender, childhood and the way as a society we enga I really enjoyed this book. I have only recently stumbled across Juno Dawson as an author as I heard on a podcast about her new book Meat Market which is a book I intend to read. However, I knew nothing about Juno at this point and only when stumbling across this book (as I was very intrigued by the title), did I find out that Juno was a trans woman. I think she offers lots of interesting observations, arguments and particularly on the points of gender, childhood and the way as a society we engage with gender did she make some really important points. I don't agree with her views on women's magazines offering good things as I think they are still far too focused on celeb culture, stereotypes, diets, image etc. However, overall I think everything Juno writes about is really important. The book worked really well as both a memoir/feminist text on gender and sexuality. I learnt a lot about trans women and the LGBTQ+ community and it made me realize I don't really read/listen/watch many things related to the LGBTQ+ community and has made me interested to find more cultural things. Would recommend to everyone interested in gender, feminism and personal memoirs.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Peter Michael O’Donnell

    Very much enjoyed this “accidental memoir” come social commentary. Juno raises important, thought inducing points on gender, sexuality and feminism (amongst other issues) in an accessible way with pop cultural references thrown in for good measure (Sex & The City, Rupaul’s Drag Race, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, The Spice Girls, Labyrinth and Bridget Jones to mention a few). The warm humorous writing tone (unusual for a book on this topic) was very much endearing and enjoyed. I do think in some part Very much enjoyed this “accidental memoir” come social commentary. Juno raises important, thought inducing points on gender, sexuality and feminism (amongst other issues) in an accessible way with pop cultural references thrown in for good measure (Sex & The City, Rupaul’s Drag Race, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, The Spice Girls, Labyrinth and Bridget Jones to mention a few). The warm humorous writing tone (unusual for a book on this topic) was very much endearing and enjoyed. I do think in some parts a bit more expansion of details into arguments and points would have have been welcomed (for me anyway) In my opinion this book is an enjoyable read and a great introduction (for anyone) looking to broaden their knowledge into transgender issues.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Fynn

    Why we are all being messed up by gender, and what we can do about it. 'It's a boy!' or 'It's a girl!' are the first words almost all of us hear when we enter the world. Before our names, before we have likes and dislikes - before we, or anyone else, has any idea who we are. And two years ago, as Juno Dawson went to tell her mother she was (and actually, always had been) a woman, she started to realise just how wrong we've been getting it. Gender isn't just screwing over trans people, it's messin Why we are all being messed up by gender, and what we can do about it. 'It's a boy!' or 'It's a girl!' are the first words almost all of us hear when we enter the world. Before our names, before we have likes and dislikes - before we, or anyone else, has any idea who we are. And two years ago, as Juno Dawson went to tell her mother she was (and actually, always had been) a woman, she started to realise just how wrong we've been getting it. Gender isn't just screwing over trans people, it's messing with everyone. From little girls who think they can't be doctors to teenagers who come to expect street harassment. From exclusionist feminists to 'alt-right' young men. From men who can't cry to the women who think they shouldn't. As her body gets in line with her mind, Juno tells not only her own story, but the story of everyone who is shaped by society's expectations of gender - and what we can do about it. Featuring insights from well-known gender, feminist and trans activists including Rebecca Root, Laura Bates, Gemma Cairney, Anthony Anaxagorou, Hannah Witton, Alaska Thunderfuck and many more, The Gender Games is a frank, witty and powerful manifesto for a world where what's in your head is more important than what's between your legs. . . The Gender Games by Juno Dawson shows you her life before she Transitioned and how her life started through the coming outs and as she Transitioned. Juno doesn't just talk about her transition and her life in this book she shows us two different worlds one how humanity treats cis white men and how humany treats cis white/black woman. She talks about feminism and how everybody should be a feminist. . . In my opinion I loved this book and gave it 5/5 ⭐. It was fun reading it and I'm a huge fab of Juno Dawsons Books.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I knew Juno Dawson because of her Dr Who stories first, but she's also an advocate for feminism and trans rights (alongside being really funny, too). This book is a memoir of her experience being brought up as a boy and living as a gay man before realising she was trans, as well as a wider discussion about how gender norms fuck us all over. It's very very good, please read it. I knew Juno Dawson because of her Dr Who stories first, but she's also an advocate for feminism and trans rights (alongside being really funny, too). This book is a memoir of her experience being brought up as a boy and living as a gay man before realising she was trans, as well as a wider discussion about how gender norms fuck us all over. It's very very good, please read it.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Beatrizmallow

    Fun, relatable, real, sad, informative and necessary.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Joana Felício

    Should be a mandatory read. It is honest, funny and incredibly candid. I adored it!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Teresa (tqlikesbooks)

    4.5 stars

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jas

    I loved this book and totally agreed with everything Juno Dawson wrote. I liked how she described gender as a bogeyman and all of her other ideas. Everyone should read this book!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Clare

    Juno Dawson could punch me in the face and I'd say thank you. Juno Dawson could punch me in the face and I'd say thank you.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Stefania

    Juno Dawson is a great non-fiction writer! I'm not into YA and have not read any of her novels, but I simply LOVED The Gender Games! I chose the audiobook as my Audible book of the month (and this is a great honour since I get just one per month) which was narrated by Juno herself, and I wasn't disappointed. She is so fun, clever and witty, and this is probably the best audiobook I have read/listened to. She didn't just read her book, it was like listening to a podcast, or even better chatting w Juno Dawson is a great non-fiction writer! I'm not into YA and have not read any of her novels, but I simply LOVED The Gender Games! I chose the audiobook as my Audible book of the month (and this is a great honour since I get just one per month) which was narrated by Juno herself, and I wasn't disappointed. She is so fun, clever and witty, and this is probably the best audiobook I have read/listened to. She didn't just read her book, it was like listening to a podcast, or even better chatting with a friend on the phone. I would think "Oh, it's dinner time, I'll call my friend Juno and see what she has to say!", and she was always very entertaining. Many times I burst out laughing while walking on the streets or sitting on the bus! The downside of this is that it'll take me a while to get rid of the Yorkshire accent that is stuck in my head. This book is a mix between a memoir of Juno's relationship with gender and an essay on the topic of gender. I agree with her on almost any point she makes. Gender is bad for anyone: not just for LGBTQ people, but also for cis women, and (unexpectedly) for cis men! She discusses patriarchy, rape-culture, stereotypes and society's expectations of what men and women should look like and behave. So why 4 stars if I loved it? Well, even though she refers to the existence of non-binary and gender-fluid people more than once, most of the times she talks about man-woman, or man-woman-trans, as the only set of options available when you define your identity. Although this book could be really useful for cis or LGBT kids that are struggling to find their identity or simply should become decent human being that don't stare at a trans woman on the train, I don't think this is helping much the Q in LGBTQ. The point of discussing how bad gender is for everyone is that gender is fluid, and nobody needs to choose a label for themselves. You don't have to be either a straigh woman or a straight man or a gay woman or a gay man (which seem to be the only options for Juno at the beginning of the book). You don't have to tell the world whether you are a man, a woman or a trans (which is another set of options later in the book). I am 100% sure this is unintentional: Juno does a great job at stressing out that discrimination is a battle for everyone and of everyone, and we should fight it regardless of our sex, gender, sexual orientation, race, class, religion, football team. She is well aware that many people suffer from different discriminations from what she experienced as a gay man and she experiences now as a trans woman. I am just sorry that she missed the chance to made this point about fluidity of gender more clear, but I am very much looking forward to her next non-fiction books and to meet her in person in a few weeks at her Edinburgh presentation of her new novel Clean!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kerry

    My son was asking some questions about transgender people that I was unable to answer. Just as I was thinking about where I might find him some resources, I saw this book highly recommended on a booktube video. Thinking it might be a good place to start, I requested it from the library. And when it arrived, I started reading it myself. This is a personal story. This is Juno's story - and her story so far. She quickly points out that she can only tell her story and no-one else's. She is candid and My son was asking some questions about transgender people that I was unable to answer. Just as I was thinking about where I might find him some resources, I saw this book highly recommended on a booktube video. Thinking it might be a good place to start, I requested it from the library. And when it arrived, I started reading it myself. This is a personal story. This is Juno's story - and her story so far. She quickly points out that she can only tell her story and no-one else's. She is candid and honest, but not explicit. It is a book about how socially-defined gender roles and expectations control so much of all our lives, and hers more so than most. I highly recommend it to anyone interested in gender issues, and one person's journey to find her true self - a journey she is fully aware is far from finished. This is not a salacious or titillating book about a weird subject. If that's your position on gender and transgender people, go away. This is not a book for you and the author doesn't need you staring at her and making judgements. She has been generous enough to share her story and I am grateful to read it. But really, I don't know that it matters all that much what this almost fifty year old cis-gender person thinks. If it reaches one gender non-conforming young person who needs it, that's far more important.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kate Henderson

    So I read this book in the summer of 2017 but I decided to listen to the audio book. Loved this book even more after listen to Juno read her book via audible. Loved it!! Need more books like this!!!!!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Daisy

    "I dare to dream of a world where people can dress, speak and behave how they want, free from mockery, derision, judgement, harassment and danger. This is what I want. Who’s with me?" What an insightful read. In this book, Dawson explores the experience of being a "woman" and being a "man" in our society, drawing on memories of her own life, and also examining information from culture, statistics and other people's stories. All of this is told through a narrative which I think is ref "I dare to dream of a world where people can dress, speak and behave how they want, free from mockery, derision, judgement, harassment and danger. This is what I want. Who’s with me?" What an insightful read. In this book, Dawson explores the experience of being a "woman" and being a "man" in our society, drawing on memories of her own life, and also examining information from culture, statistics and other people's stories. All of this is told through a narrative which I think is reflected perfectly in the book's cover - fun, colourful and modern. The title (a play on The Hunger Games) is one of many references to popular culture, famous people and political happenings, planting this work firmly in the contemporary world. I think it would be impossible to come away from this book not rethinking at least one aspect of your life or the world around you. It's thought-provoking in a big way. I consider myself a very accepting and open-minded person, and I've never had any kind of problem with people being transgender, but I must admit I didn't fully understand it. I still don't fully - in the way that no cisgender person truly can - but this book opened my eyes to so many experiences I knew nothing about before, and it allowed me to listen and relate to a real transgender person, instead of just hearing about them as this mystical group of people. Quite early on in the book, I found myself confronting a huge insecurity I hadn't even known I had, because of this quote, where an old classmate of Juno's sends her a message: "'My 4-year-old son tells me he wants to be a lady like me when he grows up, and I tell him that's fine. He can be whatever he wants to be to be happy in his own skin. […]' If every mother and father shared her attitude, just think how much lovelier the world would be." I've been in this same situation many times, with my younger sister telling me she wanted to be a boy. However, my response used to always be... well, a kind of disappointment, I guess. "Why would you want to be a boy? Girls are awesome! We're just as good as boys!" Having read this book, it is so blindingly clear to me that this is a restrictive and transphobic thing to say. If girls are as good as boys, surely the opposite is true? Am I so insecure in my gender identity that I'm not OK with somebody else changing theirs? Why should I get defensive about something that is not my choice to make and which doesn't affect my life in any way - apart from to make someone I care about feel happier in their own skin? I knew before reading this that everybody deserves the right to feel content in their gender. But this book has helped me realise that it's unfair that we're all just assigned one mold or the other at birth. Your identity - including your gender identity - should be up to YOU, and nobody else, to decide. Little sis, if you decide to become little bro (or anything else) someday, I support you! Another thing that this book helped me understand was the idea of gender being restrictive. As someone who has always been labelled a girl and has been generally happy with that, I can have no idea of how imprisoning it must feel to be labelled a gender that you do not identify with. I used to wonder, "Why do people change their gender, because surely you can be whoever you want as a man or a woman?" Now I see this as naive. Yes, in a perfect world, maybe there would be no gender and we could all just be humans, not men or women. But the truth is that there is a conception of gender in our society, and it does affect all of us, even if we don't realise it. If a boy wants to wear a dress, is that as easy for him as it would be for a girl? If a woman wants to date/sleep with lots of people, would a man be met with the same stigma for doing so? If you want more examples, this book provides plenty. "I know that by saying 'I didn't feel like a man,' it seems like I'm actually saying, 'I didn't like stereotypes of masculinity,' and that is true. However, I can only speak from experience and it went much further, much deeper than that. My negativity towards traditionally masculine pastimes pales in comparison to how positively I feel towards traditionally feminine things. My transition isn't a rejection of masculinity, it's embracing a state I feel far more attuned to. How I am now doesn't even feel like trying, I am simply being. Every day I was a man felt like a day I was failing. […] To me, being a woman feels as instinctual as breathing. Juno Dawson is the perfect person to write this book not just because of her experiences on both ends of the gender spectrum, but also because of the funny and compassionate voice she narrates the book with. This isn't a sluggish, impersonal non-fiction tome. It's challenging and surprising and freaky but through it all, hopeful. I never felt like things were dumbed down, but equally everything was so patiently explained that this book is accessible to anyone, with all our varying experiences with gender, I think. It feels almost like a conversation, like Dawson is just chatting to you about her experiences and the knowledge she's gathered – especially with the audiobook, narrated by the author herself. We aren't after your slice of the pie – we want our own slice, thank you very much. If all the fucking pie wasn't going to the one percent we'd have plenty to go around. Despite the light tone this book is mostly told in, it can still be a difficult read at times. Even though it's interspersed with as much positive truth as negative, I still struggled to motivate myself some days to listen to a book about what's wrong with how we're all behaving. In a less doom-and-gloom way, I also found some parts of Juno's personal story less interesting or relatable than others, and some parts made me quite uncomfortable. This is of course unavoidable in an autobiographical piece, and I like how the imperfections of real life weren't skated over. Just to warn you though - it isn't all prancing lambs and lgbt rainbows. Hopefully that doesn't discourage you from reading the book anyway. Sometimes the things that are hard to talk about are the things that need addressing most. You know, I think I'll leave the author to convince you why this book will add value to your life... “We must also be mindful that the value of a trans person goes beyond stories about their “journey”. Trans stories have often been limited to the inner world of the trans individual. While that's important, I am interested in how I interact with the world, and how the world interacts with me. I am a journalist, and a bestselling author, and I have more to offer society than a glorified make-over story.” “The pink section contained a lot of dolls and babies These puppets stimulate creative, nurturing, role-playing games. Excluding boys from this style of play, I think, has far-reaching consequences. Don't we want boys to become fathers? To hold and cuddle and nurture their infants? Don't we want boys to learn that 50% of parenting is their responsibility? Do we not also think that by not exposing little boys to dolls, we are perpetuating the myth that only women look after children? This myth, of course, is also establishing a clear destiny for all little girls, whether they like it or not. If you're a girl, you're meant to want babies: they are for you. No dolls or babies on the non-pink side. Lots and lots of masked superheroes and soldiers, but they are for killing eachother, not caring for. I accept those toys also encourage creative role play, but certainly not with nurture in mind.” “Even family-favourite Lego has succumbed to Gender. In the non-pink section, you can buy a Lego Airport for £69. In the pink section, you can buy a Lego 'Friends' Airport for £79. The only difference (you've guessed it) is that the Lego Friends airport is pink. It is an AIRPORT! Thesedays, as a woman, I only ever fly from pink airports, while shaving my legs with pink razors and writing with pink BIC pens. [...] It was at this point, regrettably, that I burned the store to the ground.” “I believe at any given point in history, messages about how you should look have been transmitted. Boticelli's Venus was easy, breezy and beautiful in 1480. Michaelangelo's David was ripped – if disappointingly hung – in 1504. […] Da Vinci's Mona Lisa looked like a magazine cover in 1517. If there is a difference between modern times and the Renaissance, it's the acceleration of the way images of beauty travel. In 1480, no one was able to Google “Venus Boticelli” in under five seconds. No one was flicking through Mona Lisa's Instagram account and double-tapping five selfies a day [..]. Since the advent of the internet, we are now bombarded with images from advertisers in a way we simply haven't been until now.” “[..] it should be obvious that when it comes to men and women, one of those houses is on fire (women's rights) and the other is not (men's rights). It's fairly clear that the firefighters should tackle the burning building first. I, as a feminist, want things to be immediately better for women, and also for men in the long term, once the fire is extinguished on female inequality. [..] However much individual men are suffering (and of course they are), societally and globally, women are still overwhelmingly getting the shittier end of the stick.” “Seriously, my friend's daughter is constantly misgendered because she favours clothes with dinosaurs on. Everyone knows all dinosaurs were boys, and that's why they're now extinct.” “Think of what we could achieve if time and space were given over to emotional well-being on the timetable. If there was one fewer Maths or English lesson a week, we could tackle sexism, rape culture, consent, extremism, gender, internet safety, first aid, depression and anxiety, sexual health, contraception, inequality, social justice and so much more. And you know what? Young people would love it.”

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Jones

    Full review can be found at http://racheyragdoll.blogspot.co.uk/2... When it was announced that Juno would be releasing a non fiction book focusing on gender, I knew I had to read it! I've probably mentioned this a hundred times before, but I adore Juno's YA fiction books. Although I was initially interested in the topic of this new book that seemed a lot more adulty than any of her other books, I am not a big reader of non fiction. My recent non fiction reads have been by famous youtubers steppi Full review can be found at http://racheyragdoll.blogspot.co.uk/2... When it was announced that Juno would be releasing a non fiction book focusing on gender, I knew I had to read it! I've probably mentioned this a hundred times before, but I adore Juno's YA fiction books. Although I was initially interested in the topic of this new book that seemed a lot more adulty than any of her other books, I am not a big reader of non fiction. My recent non fiction reads have been by famous youtubers stepping out into the literary world, most often aimed at a young teenage audience, so I instantly knew I was stepping out of my comfort zone by reading this one. Although I have lived quite a sheltered life, thanks to the Internet, I have seen enough shit on Tumblr and in fan fiction that this book didn't send me screaming and crying in the opposite direction. Even though we are used to seeing young, innocent protagonists in Juno's books, this one is definitely only suitable for older teenagers and adults. I feel as if this books target audience is women (both trans and cis) in the 18-30 age category, and as I fall somewhere in the middle of this, I found myself relating to many of the issues that came up. Although your average “meninist” will insist that gender inequality doesn't exist, rape culture, the wage gap, being cat called in the street, amongst many other things proves that it does. I, along with many other women, have experienced drawbacks of being the “weaker sex” first hand, and I found some of the issues that were brought up extremely relatable. Although Juno had some very valid opinions, and I agreed with her opinions on the majority of the issues she brought up, there was one thing that was briefly mentioned that I felt was going a little too far. Although, like Juno, I am not a parent and therefore my opinions on parenting are no more or less valid than hers, I disagreed with her view that expecting parents shouldn't tell people the sex of their baby. Although I think “gender reveal” parties are ridiculous, I understand that expecting parents would be excited to share the babies sex, as it is the only information they have about their unborn child. I think this is a personal preference for each parent, and just because a parent decides to share what the babies sex is, it doesn't make them a bad person that's conforming to gender roles and forcing a gender on the baby. As Juno explained, sex and gender are two different things. Babies have no idea what gender is, and it's not going to matter to the baby if their parents dress them in pink, blue or yellow. It clearly is important to teach people that sex and gender don't always co-exist, and to not tell children they have to play with gender specific toys, but I feel as if it's unfair to take the excitement of revealing their babies sex away from a parent if it's what they want to do. Despite tending to avoid non fiction, I really enjoyed reading this book. It was a real eye opener into Juno's life as a transgender woman, and all the shit that transgender people have to go through so that they can live their lives in a body that they feel comfortable in, and how we still have a long way to go to stop transphobia. I really admire Juno for sharing such a personal story with us in an attempt to educate us, and ultimately teach us that women, no matter if we're black, white, cis, transgender, straight, heterosexual etc, should come together and support each other.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.