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But My Brain Had Other Ideas: A Memoir of Recovery from Brain Injury

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When Deb Brandon discovered that cavernous angiomas--tangles of malformed blood vessels in her brain--were behind the terrifying symptoms she'd been experiencing, she underwent one brain surgery. And then another. And then another. And that was just the beginning. The book also includes an introduction by Connie Lee, founder and president of the Angioma Alliance. Unlike o When Deb Brandon discovered that cavernous angiomas--tangles of malformed blood vessels in her brain--were behind the terrifying symptoms she'd been experiencing, she underwent one brain surgery. And then another. And then another. And that was just the beginning. The book also includes an introduction by Connie Lee, founder and president of the Angioma Alliance. Unlike other memoirs that focus on injury crisis and acute recovery, But My Brain Had Other Ideas follows Brandon's story all the way through to long-term recovery, revealing without sugarcoating or sentimentality Brandon's struggles--and ultimate triumph.


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When Deb Brandon discovered that cavernous angiomas--tangles of malformed blood vessels in her brain--were behind the terrifying symptoms she'd been experiencing, she underwent one brain surgery. And then another. And then another. And that was just the beginning. The book also includes an introduction by Connie Lee, founder and president of the Angioma Alliance. Unlike o When Deb Brandon discovered that cavernous angiomas--tangles of malformed blood vessels in her brain--were behind the terrifying symptoms she'd been experiencing, she underwent one brain surgery. And then another. And then another. And that was just the beginning. The book also includes an introduction by Connie Lee, founder and president of the Angioma Alliance. Unlike other memoirs that focus on injury crisis and acute recovery, But My Brain Had Other Ideas follows Brandon's story all the way through to long-term recovery, revealing without sugarcoating or sentimentality Brandon's struggles--and ultimate triumph.

30 review for But My Brain Had Other Ideas: A Memoir of Recovery from Brain Injury

  1. 4 out of 5

    Literary Soirée

    “But My Brain Had Other Ideas” is a poignant and inspiring triumph by Deb Brandon and a 2017 USA Best Book Awards Finalist in Autobiography/Memoir. It describes Deb’s battle with cavernous angiomas — tangles of malformed blood vessels in her brain — that required multiple surgeries and a long arduous recovery with lasting deficits. The author, a highly esteemed mathematician, dragon-boater and weaver, is brutally honest, her story sobering as it underscores the devastating long term effects of b “But My Brain Had Other Ideas” is a poignant and inspiring triumph by Deb Brandon and a 2017 USA Best Book Awards Finalist in Autobiography/Memoir. It describes Deb’s battle with cavernous angiomas — tangles of malformed blood vessels in her brain — that required multiple surgeries and a long arduous recovery with lasting deficits. The author, a highly esteemed mathematician, dragon-boater and weaver, is brutally honest, her story sobering as it underscores the devastating long term effects of brain injury. That she has recovered to the degree she has is a testament to her courage and spirit. Highly, highly recommended! 5/5

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nele

    I received an ARC through Netgalley, which didn't influence my opinion on the book. Though I would like to say thanks. 3.5 or 4 stars. I'm still debating on the matter. I found this a very moving portrait of a disease, and it shows the strength it takes to overcome a disease. Your mind has to be strong. I did find the text somewhat chaotic and a bit all over the place, but I can see why that is. It must have been a very confusing time for the author and her memories are all jumbled up. She's tryin I received an ARC through Netgalley, which didn't influence my opinion on the book. Though I would like to say thanks. 3.5 or 4 stars. I'm still debating on the matter. I found this a very moving portrait of a disease, and it shows the strength it takes to overcome a disease. Your mind has to be strong. I did find the text somewhat chaotic and a bit all over the place, but I can see why that is. It must have been a very confusing time for the author and her memories are all jumbled up. She's trying to make sense of it all. I don't normally read this kind of books, because I like to stay away from bad news, but I'm really glad I did read it. It gave me a new perspective on life.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    Call me a stickybeak (I call it curious / deeply interested) but I love memoirs. I want to understand the emotional context of situations that would otherwise be completely foreign to me. Medical memoirs occupy a bit of a tricky spot in the memoir market because they usually appeal predominantly to people who are experiencing a similar thing - it makes sense to read about other people's experience to make sense of your own. While you'll usually find me in the 'misery memoirs' section, I do occasi Call me a stickybeak (I call it curious / deeply interested) but I love memoirs. I want to understand the emotional context of situations that would otherwise be completely foreign to me. Medical memoirs occupy a bit of a tricky spot in the memoir market because they usually appeal predominantly to people who are experiencing a similar thing - it makes sense to read about other people's experience to make sense of your own. While you'll usually find me in the 'misery memoirs' section, I do occasionally stray and Deb Brandon's But My Brain Had Other Ideas is such an example. When Deb Brandon - mathematician, dragon-boater, weaver - discovered she had cavernous angiomas, tangles of blood vessels in her brain that are also described as 'distant cousins of aneurysms', she underwent multiple brain surgeries and years of rehabilitation. Her memoir documents her diagnosis, her surgeries and the challenges of living with an acquired brain injury (ABI). Brandon's story begins with a series of terrifying symptoms - Without warning, the universe explodes. I cannot see. I cannot hear. My entire world has become pain. The pain has no orientation - it has no location, it has no direction, it has no measure. I am pain. Her diagnosis triggered an existential crisis. More than once at the beginning of her rehabilitation, Brandon wished she was dead. Frustrated by her limitations and constant fatigue, and still managing chronic pain, she felt that she couldn't go on. Although she doesn't identify a particular turning point, she does go into detail about how understanding sensory overload (and the fact that she wasn't going crazy, it was just her brain circuitry 'jamming') made the difference - All the sounds, sights, and smells blend together, forming a pulsating mass in constant motion, continually deforming, buckling, bulging. Random bits and pieces strike at you forcefully... Your brain cannot keep up; you cannot focus on anything long enough to make sense of it. But hypersensitivity has a flip side - ...those damaged sensory input filters also let the world into my life in a rainbow of bright colours. They enable me to immerse myself in my surroundings and to absorb details I used to gloss over. The thing that constantly fascinates me is that memories, emotions and knowledge - all this stuff that has no 'physical' form - is bound up in brain tissue in such a mysterious way (which is why I never get tired of reading about neuroplasticity). Brandon writes about how her behaviour changed after the surgeries, noting that the effectiveness of the system of filters we construct over our life determines our behaviour in a variety of situations - The bloody brain damaged my filtration system... It seems as if the surgeries tore gaping holes... through these holes, strong emotions, impassioned speeches, or crude language pour into the world. My main quibble with this book is my usual one for memoirs - it's what's left out that I want more of. In this case, Brandon's marriage broke down during her rehabilitation but is only mentioned briefly. I wonder how her 'strong emotions filter' managed during that emotionally challenging time? Likewise, she mentions having her children genetically tested for cavernous angiomas (it can be genetic) but not the outcome of those tests - her children have a right to privacy but again, genetic testing is an enormously emotionally taxing process and understanding how Brandon negotiated that would have been interesting. 3/5 Interesting for interested readers. I received my copy of But My Brain Had Other Ideas from the publisher, She Writes Press, via NetGalley, in exchange for an honest review.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Pookie Sekmet

    This feels like an important book. The way the author describes the various symptoms of brain injury will surely help people to manage their own condition or that of their loved ones who might have similar injuries. I too have had brain injury and I found this book to be helpful. Not only that, but the book is beautifully written and even manages to be funny here and there. I had a little bit of trouble with continuity, especially at the beginning, when I wasn’t sure of the exact sequence of the This feels like an important book. The way the author describes the various symptoms of brain injury will surely help people to manage their own condition or that of their loved ones who might have similar injuries. I too have had brain injury and I found this book to be helpful. Not only that, but the book is beautifully written and even manages to be funny here and there. I had a little bit of trouble with continuity, especially at the beginning, when I wasn’t sure of the exact sequence of the events described, but this part did provide more of an impressionistic and poetic experience. Maybe if I had been holding hard-copy instead of an e-book, I would have been able to track the sequencing more easily. The author has an amazing ability to describe the inner experience of the various symptoms. I loved how she took her time to bring us with her as she had the sensory overloads, or the seizures (her doctors should not have allowed her to drive!), or the headaches, or the depression. She makes it clear that her behaviors, that some people might describe as behavioral, had a 100% physical basis, but at the same time she doesn’t ask for our sympathy for her (extensive and deep) suffering and trauma. Instead she is unfailingly generous as she tells us all she knows about these symptoms and how she, with true grit, fought to build a meaningful life in spite of them. Her recovery is gradual over many years, with each stage hard-won. I, too, feel that I am clawing my way towards wellness, so this long-fought battle, laid out like a mathematical proof, resonated deeply with me. We learn a lot about her friends, children, colleagues, and dragon boat teammates (what exactly is a dragon boat?), and I wanted to know more about the evolution of her relationship with her husband, but of course any memoir is selective as to subject. I just felt that since she called him lumbering and complained about some of his behaviors, she owed us at least a sentence or two about their divorce. But this is a minor quibble. This was a wonderful and very strong book. I really enjoyed it.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Debi Lantzer

    As part of the BookSparks Magic of Memoirs Tour 2017, I've been provided with several memoirs to read and share with all of you.  Today's post is on the book, But My Brain Had Other Ideas by Deb Brandon. Deb Brandon shares her story to educate others and to bring attention to a disease called Cavernous Angioma. Cavernous angiomas are vascular lesions comprised of clusters of abnormally dilated blood vessels. This condition has a very heavy impact on one's body and the way their lives become a dai As part of the BookSparks Magic of Memoirs Tour 2017, I've been provided with several memoirs to read and share with all of you.  Today's post is on the book, But My Brain Had Other Ideas by Deb Brandon. Deb Brandon shares her story to educate others and to bring attention to a disease called Cavernous Angioma. Cavernous angiomas are vascular lesions comprised of clusters of abnormally dilated blood vessels. This condition has a very heavy impact on one's body and the way their lives become a daily struggle for a normal life. Ms. Brandon underwent three surgeries, rehabilitation and depression. She shares the chronicle of her life journey and the things she and her family had to overcome emotionally. Prior to reading Deb Brandon's memoir, I had not heard of this medical condition and I'm betting you haven't either.  Through this book I was better able to understand what people with brain injuries have gone though, and I hope that I will be more compassionate in the future.  This memoir was another very interesting story that was well written and educational. I especially loved the following "motto" for living that I found on Ms. Brandon's website that clearly shows her life as a survivor: LIVING IN BRILLIANT COLORS IN THE AFTERMATH OF BRAIN SURGERY I received a complimentary paperback copy of this book from the publishers and BookSparks as part of the Magic of Memoir Blog Tour (#MagicofMemoir) in exchange for this post.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Hupe

    Thank you JKS Communications and the author for a copy of the book! I have not had the opportunity to review an audiobook in some time. But My Brain Had Other Idea: A Memoir of Recovery from Brain Injury by Deb Brandon is narrated by Helen Lloyd. This memoir is about the author’s journey with brain injury. She has a condition called cavernous angiomas which are malformed blood vessels in the brain. This causes her to have seizures and other painful medical events. However, when she started havin Thank you JKS Communications and the author for a copy of the book! I have not had the opportunity to review an audiobook in some time. But My Brain Had Other Idea: A Memoir of Recovery from Brain Injury by Deb Brandon is narrated by Helen Lloyd. This memoir is about the author’s journey with brain injury. She has a condition called cavernous angiomas which are malformed blood vessels in the brain. This causes her to have seizures and other painful medical events. However, when she started having symptoms they were not only painful but horrifying. The book begins right after her brain surgery. After going through that surgery, everyone believed there would be an improvement. Not for Deb Brandon. This is just the beginning of a long road of struggle and recovery. This condition sounds utterly terrifying and I commend the author for talking about her struggles. Throughout it all, she continues to work and spend time with her family. The moments when the symptoms set in, readers can feel the authors anxiety and fear. The description is extremely detailed. However, the pacing is a bit slow. There is a lot of internal dialogue about everything around her. The narrator does a great job reading this story. Her voice is clear and enunciates well. When the author describes her fear, the narrator does a great job of showcasing that fear in her voice. Overall, I rate this audiobook 4 out of 5 stars!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Pam Greenhouse

    Deborah Brandon's writing and journey are both remarkable and extraordinary. I could have read the book in one sitting but took my time to savor it, if one can say that about such a very hard life-changing situation. This book is poetic and brilliant. Two things struck me about the larger impact of Deborah's bloody brain: 1) Deb's brain injury resulted in not only the daily and more global hardships one would imagine but has created the deep appreciation for life that sometimes comes with surviv Deborah Brandon's writing and journey are both remarkable and extraordinary. I could have read the book in one sitting but took my time to savor it, if one can say that about such a very hard life-changing situation. This book is poetic and brilliant. Two things struck me about the larger impact of Deborah's bloody brain: 1) Deb's brain injury resulted in not only the daily and more global hardships one would imagine but has created the deep appreciation for life that sometimes comes with surviving tragedy - she lives her life so consciously, so deeply, with joy, and in full color. 2) Rather than feeling bitter towards those who haven't faced such enormous challenges, Deborah expresses a level of compassion towards others that leaves me in awe. Highly recommended reading for others who have faced brain injury or for anyone interested in the human condition and a beautifully written memoir of how one woman -- a talented mathematician, dragon-boat racer, and tapestry artist/expert -- has faced a life-altering challenge with great courage, honesty, reflection, perseverance, and generosity of spirit. But My Brain Had Other Ideas: A Memoir of Recovery from Brain Injury

  8. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

    Wow. Author, Deb Brandon is a survivor. This is the first time that I have heard the words "cavernous angiomas". After reading what the author experienced through her ordeal with three brain surgeries, I would not wish this on anyone. This is how much of an eye opening experience that someone with cavernous angiomas deals with...you are one of the lucky ones if you can have brain surgery. It was refreshing to read this book. Deb was very open sharing her journey. I felt like I got to know who De Wow. Author, Deb Brandon is a survivor. This is the first time that I have heard the words "cavernous angiomas". After reading what the author experienced through her ordeal with three brain surgeries, I would not wish this on anyone. This is how much of an eye opening experience that someone with cavernous angiomas deals with...you are one of the lucky ones if you can have brain surgery. It was refreshing to read this book. Deb was very open sharing her journey. I felt like I got to know who Deb is as a person who is smart, talented, fighter, mother, and who loves poetry. She is not defined by the fact that she had three brain surgeries. This was very evident when there was a part in this book where after Deb was finally released from the hospital and she was shopping with her husband and someone commented how they wanted a husband like that because Deb's husband was being attentive, yet Deb's husband turns and tells the person that Deb had brain surgery. I felt like Deb being appalled and wanting to disappear. Yet, it was at this same time that I was reminded that no matter what condition someone may be experiencing or had experienced, they are still a person with feelings and that they are not defined by that condition.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

    Deb Brandon shares her story to educate and call attention to Cavernous Angioma. Cavernous angiomas are vascular lesions comprised of clusters of abnormally dilated blood vessels. What that description doesn't tell you, but Deb does, is the impact that condition has on the body and the daily struggle to lead a relatively normal life. After three surgeries, rehab, and battling depression, Deb clearly chronicles her journey and the emotional toll that all of it had on her and her family. The descr Deb Brandon shares her story to educate and call attention to Cavernous Angioma. Cavernous angiomas are vascular lesions comprised of clusters of abnormally dilated blood vessels. What that description doesn't tell you, but Deb does, is the impact that condition has on the body and the daily struggle to lead a relatively normal life. After three surgeries, rehab, and battling depression, Deb clearly chronicles her journey and the emotional toll that all of it had on her and her family. The descriptions of the paralyzing effects of her experiences in a crowd situation are absolutely mesmerizing. Her fear is clearly evident and at the same time, her determination to recover and continue teaching as a professor in the Mathematical Sciences Department at Carnegie Mellon University is inspiring. #MagicofMemoir @BookSparks Reviewed at http://pennyformythoughts-nona.blogsp....

  10. 4 out of 5

    Barbara Donsky

    Deb Brandon’s riveting memoir, But My Brain Had Other Ideas, is a harrowing and remarkable introduction to the world of cavernous angioma, a blood vessel disorder marked by tangles in the brain. It’s a survivor’s tale of living in a world far removed from the ordinary—a world filled with constant anxieties, small bleeds in the brain, life-threatening hemorrhages, seizures, misdiagnoses, multiple surgeries, interminable headaches, balance issues, and the constant dread of losing one’s memory. I w Deb Brandon’s riveting memoir, But My Brain Had Other Ideas, is a harrowing and remarkable introduction to the world of cavernous angioma, a blood vessel disorder marked by tangles in the brain. It’s a survivor’s tale of living in a world far removed from the ordinary—a world filled with constant anxieties, small bleeds in the brain, life-threatening hemorrhages, seizures, misdiagnoses, multiple surgeries, interminable headaches, balance issues, and the constant dread of losing one’s memory. I would highly recommend this book to anyone who has suffered a brain injury, as it would be reassuring to know they are not alone, that someone has suffered greatly, as they have, and has gone on to overcome the obstacles. Similarly, occupational therapists, social workers, physicians and nurses, friends and families all stand to benefit. I couldn’t put it down.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kristine

    But My Brain Had Other Ideas by Deb Brandon is a free NetGalley ebook that I read in early October. After misdiagnoses and inconclusive EEG readings, the author undergoes a brain hemorrage and accompanying seizures, and is in need of a lumbar drain, then a reinsertion of her own spinal fluids (much like blood plasma), then an extra surgery beyond expected (brain stem et. al.) Prior to this, Brandon weaves and knits (while watching TV, like me) as a profession and her spare time, but has a new-fou But My Brain Had Other Ideas by Deb Brandon is a free NetGalley ebook that I read in early October. After misdiagnoses and inconclusive EEG readings, the author undergoes a brain hemorrage and accompanying seizures, and is in need of a lumbar drain, then a reinsertion of her own spinal fluids (much like blood plasma), then an extra surgery beyond expected (brain stem et. al.) Prior to this, Brandon weaves and knits (while watching TV, like me) as a profession and her spare time, but has a new-found talent for poetry in addition to mercuric moods and pervading sensory overload. The times that I felt a need to hop through into the book to help her out was during her in-the-moment description of hallucinations mid-seizure and a litany of questions and tests, as well as coordination exercises for visual and memory accuity.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    A fascinating and well-written account about dealing with brain surgery, rehab and life afterwards. The author does a good job in explaining her medical condition (cavernous angiomas) which either should be operated on to reduce risk of brain bleeds - or shouldn't be operated on as it is too dangerous - obviously, the author has the surgery. She certainly emphasizes the need for support and clear medical information. She also does, I think, a good job of writing about her son and daughter (young A fascinating and well-written account about dealing with brain surgery, rehab and life afterwards. The author does a good job in explaining her medical condition (cavernous angiomas) which either should be operated on to reduce risk of brain bleeds - or shouldn't be operated on as it is too dangerous - obviously, the author has the surgery. She certainly emphasizes the need for support and clear medical information. She also does, I think, a good job of writing about her son and daughter (young teenagers when the condition is first diagnosed) - their reactions, the impact on their lives - while still respecting their privacy (and that of her ex-husband too.) I left with the question - how in the world can a mathematician be an outstanding writer too?

  13. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    This book was a fascinating portrait of what recovering and adjusting to a traumatic brain injury looks like. Nothing is sugar-coated here and the plain-speaking memoir ends up being riveting because of it. I gobbled this book up in a single day, a testament to both how she was able to draw me into the story and how easy it was to read. At times the timeline seemed to kind of jump around, which is the only reason why I didn't give it 5 stars. The chapters titles went by years, but there were anec This book was a fascinating portrait of what recovering and adjusting to a traumatic brain injury looks like. Nothing is sugar-coated here and the plain-speaking memoir ends up being riveting because of it. I gobbled this book up in a single day, a testament to both how she was able to draw me into the story and how easy it was to read. At times the timeline seemed to kind of jump around, which is the only reason why I didn't give it 5 stars. The chapters titles went by years, but there were anecdotes that went outside those boundaries. Before reading this book, I knew that TBI were difficult to recover from, but I had no idea how intense some of the symptoms could be. The author does a fantastic job at describing what life is like, bringing the reader along on her journey.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sara Diane

    I got this from NetGalley to preview. This one sounded interesting--I've known a few people who have had brain surgery and a few who have had TBIs, so I was curious to hear Ms. Brandon's story and see how well it was told. The telling is a bit fractured--but considering what Ms. Brandon has gone through, it both reflects the damage but also helps the reader relate. The writing was clear, the narrative easy to follow, and it was interesting. There was nothing overly stellar about the book, and I wo I got this from NetGalley to preview. This one sounded interesting--I've known a few people who have had brain surgery and a few who have had TBIs, so I was curious to hear Ms. Brandon's story and see how well it was told. The telling is a bit fractured--but considering what Ms. Brandon has gone through, it both reflects the damage but also helps the reader relate. The writing was clear, the narrative easy to follow, and it was interesting. There was nothing overly stellar about the book, and I won't read it again, but it was worth the time spent.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Heather Cumiskey

    If you ever wondered what goes on in a person’s mind, this one is for you. Brandon’s powerful memoir invites you to inhabit the author’s mind, body, and secret fears in the dangerous and unpredictable world of cavernous angiomas. Beautifully written and funny, BUT MY BRAIN HAD OTHER IDEAS is a story of friendship, marriage and family, and the sweetest unconditional love we discover when we need it the most.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Charlene

    This book written by Math Professer Deb Brandon of Carnegie Mellon University describes Ms. Brandon's experience when struck by cavernous angioma, or bleeding brain. That the book was written at all testifies to the character of Professor Brandon. That the book sings with clarity absorbing a reader's full attention on every page, creating a step by step vicarious experience which sits at the heart of memoir demonstrates Prof Brandon as a most accomplished writer. This book written by Math Professer Deb Brandon of Carnegie Mellon University describes Ms. Brandon's experience when struck by cavernous angioma, or bleeding brain. That the book was written at all testifies to the character of Professor Brandon. That the book sings with clarity absorbing a reader's full attention on every page, creating a step by step vicarious experience which sits at the heart of memoir demonstrates Prof Brandon as a most accomplished writer.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Brenda

    Interesting story about the impacts of brain injury and cavernous angionomas The author suffered from cavernous national which led to bleeding in her brain. Her story of what that means to her life is remarkable. The way its written is a little hard to read because the timeline jumps around, but it an interesting story.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Diane Pomerantz

    I found the author's descriptive writing to be so real and how easily it lured me into her experience ... I felt that I was in the hospital with her. Partly it because of my own medical history and neurological experiences that I could easily understand her experience and the sense of unreality that her condition caused.but I am impressed by the author's poetic talents. I found the author's descriptive writing to be so real and how easily it lured me into her experience ... I felt that I was in the hospital with her. Partly it because of my own medical history and neurological experiences that I could easily understand her experience and the sense of unreality that her condition caused.but I am impressed by the author's poetic talents.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Riann

    I was provided a free digital copy of this book by Netgalley.com in exchange for an honest review A very inspiring story of the author's ongoing recovery from brain injury. It really opened my eyes to the far reaching effects of brain injury. The author's grit and determination to triumph over the challenges she faces and to never give up shines throughout her story. I was provided a free digital copy of this book by Netgalley.com in exchange for an honest review A very inspiring story of the author's ongoing recovery from brain injury. It really opened my eyes to the far reaching effects of brain injury. The author's grit and determination to triumph over the challenges she faces and to never give up shines throughout her story.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lynn McLaughlin

    This book is so well written that I actually felt as though I was walking with the author. Deb Brandon's story is truly inspirational, honest and true testament to her strength. Her challenges span many years, yet she finds ways to overcome and adapt. Loved it! This book is so well written that I actually felt as though I was walking with the author. Deb Brandon's story is truly inspirational, honest and true testament to her strength. Her challenges span many years, yet she finds ways to overcome and adapt. Loved it!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Cat.

    Far too many copy-editing errors for me. I only got through the first 3 chapters before I couldn't tolerate the mistakes. Too bad; it was an interesting view of what happens when the brain starts exploding. Far too many copy-editing errors for me. I only got through the first 3 chapters before I couldn't tolerate the mistakes. Too bad; it was an interesting view of what happens when the brain starts exploding.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Markelle Harden

    Deb does an incredible job of describing the frustration, trials, and changes that occur with brain disorders. If you have a loved one with a brain injury or disorder, this book will give you an up close and personal glimpse of what they are experiencing.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Eloise

    Great read!! **Review to Follow**

  24. 4 out of 5

    Bibliofiendlm

    Full review: https://tinyurl.com/y9ltveep Full review: https://tinyurl.com/y9ltveep

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    This was a very interesting read, and the author was generous in sharing her experience. If you like the medical memoir genre, this is definitely worth your time.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Albert

    read it quickly. Very good read. Great for all readers.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kesney Fontes

  28. 5 out of 5

    Rosie

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ciera

  30. 4 out of 5

    Megan Wohler

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