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How the Pro-Choice Movement Saved America: Freedom, Politics, and the War on Sex

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A pithy polemic bolstered by solid research, intellectual heft, and firsthand reporting, this is a book poised to change the debate over reproductive rights in this country wholesale. As activist and writer Cristina Page shows, the gains made by birth-control advocates (historically) and pro-choice organizations (currently) have formed the bedrock of freedoms few Americans A pithy polemic bolstered by solid research, intellectual heft, and firsthand reporting, this is a book poised to change the debate over reproductive rights in this country wholesale. As activist and writer Cristina Page shows, the gains made by birth-control advocates (historically) and pro-choice organizations (currently) have formed the bedrock of freedoms few Americans would choose to live without. Now, not only is the future of legal abortion far from guaranteed, in many parts of the country ready access to many forms of contraception is in jeopardy as well. And that development, Page argues, should have everyone, regardless of moral or political persuasion, deeply concerned. For these basic freedoms are not just for the freewheeling gals of "Sex and the City," but are central to the lives of working mothers and fathers from Phoenix to Duluth, churchgoers and nonbelievers alike. Page crystallizes the thoughts and attitudes of a generation of women and men whose voices are seldom heard in the political arena. How the Pro-Choice Movement Saved America is the first book to address the positive transformation our society has undergone because of our ability to plan when and if to have children. It also exposes the anti-choice movement's far-reaching-and dangerous-agenda. Fresh, bold, and stocked with counterintuitive arguments, this is a book bound to form the basis for heated conversations nationwide.


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A pithy polemic bolstered by solid research, intellectual heft, and firsthand reporting, this is a book poised to change the debate over reproductive rights in this country wholesale. As activist and writer Cristina Page shows, the gains made by birth-control advocates (historically) and pro-choice organizations (currently) have formed the bedrock of freedoms few Americans A pithy polemic bolstered by solid research, intellectual heft, and firsthand reporting, this is a book poised to change the debate over reproductive rights in this country wholesale. As activist and writer Cristina Page shows, the gains made by birth-control advocates (historically) and pro-choice organizations (currently) have formed the bedrock of freedoms few Americans would choose to live without. Now, not only is the future of legal abortion far from guaranteed, in many parts of the country ready access to many forms of contraception is in jeopardy as well. And that development, Page argues, should have everyone, regardless of moral or political persuasion, deeply concerned. For these basic freedoms are not just for the freewheeling gals of "Sex and the City," but are central to the lives of working mothers and fathers from Phoenix to Duluth, churchgoers and nonbelievers alike. Page crystallizes the thoughts and attitudes of a generation of women and men whose voices are seldom heard in the political arena. How the Pro-Choice Movement Saved America is the first book to address the positive transformation our society has undergone because of our ability to plan when and if to have children. It also exposes the anti-choice movement's far-reaching-and dangerous-agenda. Fresh, bold, and stocked with counterintuitive arguments, this is a book bound to form the basis for heated conversations nationwide.

30 review for How the Pro-Choice Movement Saved America: Freedom, Politics, and the War on Sex

  1. 5 out of 5

    Meredith Ann

    this book made me really angry. like gripping the book so hard that my knuckles turned red angry. so i think page accomplished her goal. it's a look at the measures that the anti-choice movement goes to to prevent access to contraceptives. of course, there is a talk on abortion but it's main focus is birth control (including emergency contraceptive) and condoms. i was shocked and appalled at sheer power these groups have and the lengths they go to to keep women from making choices about their ow this book made me really angry. like gripping the book so hard that my knuckles turned red angry. so i think page accomplished her goal. it's a look at the measures that the anti-choice movement goes to to prevent access to contraceptives. of course, there is a talk on abortion but it's main focus is birth control (including emergency contraceptive) and condoms. i was shocked and appalled at sheer power these groups have and the lengths they go to to keep women from making choices about their own bodies. the war isn't just on abortion - it's on sex and women's role in society. if it was up to the groups page examines, all women would just be sitting around, having babies and praising their husbands. the scariest part is that our government listens to these people and attempts to change laws to please them. the one thought running through my head while reading this was "i wish all these pro-lifers who want to save the unborn children so badly would go and adopt them" but we all know that doesn't happen. this is a book i've wanted to read for quite some time and i am happy that i did. my only complaint was that it could have been longer and incorporated stories from the pro-choice movement, of their work to keep our reproductive rights around.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Gina

    Amazing for the amount of research (pp 169-211 are citations)packed into a rather brief book. The author presents a compelling case for her viewpoint (which is clearly pro-choice) without any preachy diatribes. I guess I had no idea how far reaching George W. Bush's political appointments extend. This book not only warns of the possibility of a future in which Roe v. Wade is overturned and ALL forms of contraception (yes kids, even the condom) are pulled from the market, it also explains how this Amazing for the amount of research (pp 169-211 are citations)packed into a rather brief book. The author presents a compelling case for her viewpoint (which is clearly pro-choice) without any preachy diatribes. I guess I had no idea how far reaching George W. Bush's political appointments extend. This book not only warns of the possibility of a future in which Roe v. Wade is overturned and ALL forms of contraception (yes kids, even the condom) are pulled from the market, it also explains how this process *is* happening and will continue to happen. One more example of how religion-based politics are a force that cannot be ignored when considering threats to science and reason.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Adriel

    The author put together an excellent argument about how if the pro life movement really wanted to stop abortions, they would advocate for comprehensive sex ed and access to birth control. Instead they spend their efforts as a movement working on ways to control women's sexuality. The author put together an excellent argument about how if the pro life movement really wanted to stop abortions, they would advocate for comprehensive sex ed and access to birth control. Instead they spend their efforts as a movement working on ways to control women's sexuality.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Amelia

    The problem with books like this one is that the only people who are ever going to pick something like this off the shelf are those who already identify as pro-choice. I think the people who would most benefit from reading this are those who consider themselves to be pro-life without realizing that the issue is about much more than abortion; I think that most Americans are actually pro-choice to some degree, whether or not they realize it. This book is about the people who are not, and what will The problem with books like this one is that the only people who are ever going to pick something like this off the shelf are those who already identify as pro-choice. I think the people who would most benefit from reading this are those who consider themselves to be pro-life without realizing that the issue is about much more than abortion; I think that most Americans are actually pro-choice to some degree, whether or not they realize it. This book is about the people who are not, and what will happen if they gain control of the laws. I tend to read books like this whenever I'm feeling frustrated by everything I see in the news and need to know that I'm not crazy or alone in my thinking. But I always end up learning something that just makes me angrier. With this book, it was that if Roe vs. Wade is ever overturned, the country will actually be an even worse place to live in than it was before Roe was passed in 1973. This is because of the slew of anti-choice laws that have passed that "protect fetuses." Years ago, abortion was illegal. But if Roe were overturned now, someone who had an abortion could, in certain states, be tried for murder. If that idea pisses you off, then you're pro-choice. Mmhm.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sarah - All The Book Blog Names Are Taken

    I can't even with 'pro-lifers'. You're not pro-life, you're pro-birth, because after a baby is born, you sure don't give a fuck about their quality of life. Review to come. I can't even with 'pro-lifers'. You're not pro-life, you're pro-birth, because after a baby is born, you sure don't give a fuck about their quality of life. Review to come.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    Ahh, Bush-era progressive rage. I'm nostalgic, almost. I've had How the Pro-Choice Movement Saved America on my list for years, but reading it now is instructive. It's out of date for some excellent reasons (for example, OTC emergency contraception for teens), but still topical for others, particularly the "pro-life" movement's talent at manufacturing fake controversies about Planned Parenthood, UNFPA, and any other organization that provides critical reproductive health services. It's a lively r Ahh, Bush-era progressive rage. I'm nostalgic, almost. I've had How the Pro-Choice Movement Saved America on my list for years, but reading it now is instructive. It's out of date for some excellent reasons (for example, OTC emergency contraception for teens), but still topical for others, particularly the "pro-life" movement's talent at manufacturing fake controversies about Planned Parenthood, UNFPA, and any other organization that provides critical reproductive health services. It's a lively reminder, if you ever needed one, about how godawful the Bush years were; one dogmatic religious fanatic in the White House is all it takes to really poison the reproductive rights situation for women in America and across the world. It's hardly a revelatory manifesto, but it chronicles what's at stake if we ever let "pro-life" lies and wishful thinking go unchallenged.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jill Dunlap

    This is a good book - one that pro-lifers should also read to see what their movement is really about. It does a good job of pulling pack the curtain to reveal the whole world of evil that is the pro-life movement. But it's definitely dated now - written in 2004, so limited by the timeliness of her arguments. This is a good book - one that pro-lifers should also read to see what their movement is really about. It does a good job of pulling pack the curtain to reveal the whole world of evil that is the pro-life movement. But it's definitely dated now - written in 2004, so limited by the timeliness of her arguments.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Carly

    Interested in having sex? Feel like your sex life is none of the government's damn business? Believe that other people's beliefs have a constitutional obligation to stay out of our legislative tradition? This is a book for you. There is a real war on birth control access in this country and thinking people who live here should be outraged. I am. Interested in having sex? Feel like your sex life is none of the government's damn business? Believe that other people's beliefs have a constitutional obligation to stay out of our legislative tradition? This is a book for you. There is a real war on birth control access in this country and thinking people who live here should be outraged. I am.

  9. 5 out of 5

    mad mags

    “Pro-life”? More like “anti-sex,” “anti-woman” and “anti-human.” If HOW THE PRO-CHOICE MOVEMENT SAVED AMERICA – the title of Cristina Page’s 2006 exposé of the religious right/pro-life movement’s true agenda – sounds like liberal hyperbole, chances are that Page wrote this book just for you! While the “pro-life” movement professes to respect “all life,” to the point of holding it sacred, the movement’s actions belie this all-too-common assumption. Since the days of Roe v. Wade, pro-lifers have be “Pro-life”? More like “anti-sex,” “anti-woman” and “anti-human.” If HOW THE PRO-CHOICE MOVEMENT SAVED AMERICA – the title of Cristina Page’s 2006 exposé of the religious right/pro-life movement’s true agenda – sounds like liberal hyperbole, chances are that Page wrote this book just for you! While the “pro-life” movement professes to respect “all life,” to the point of holding it sacred, the movement’s actions belie this all-too-common assumption. Since the days of Roe v. Wade, pro-lifers have been hammering away at women’s – and men’s – reproductive rights. In addition to abortion (whether it occurs before the fertilized egg implants in the womb, the point at which those in the medical field consider that a pregnancy has begun, or in the later stages of pregnancy, which is very rare and usually done in order to save the mother’s life), the pro-life movement opposes contraception, and not just Plan B (which is not an abortifacient, but rather a high dose of The Pill). Whether the method is hormonal (The Pill, the patch, Plan B, NuvaRing, etc.) or barrier (the condom, the sponge, the cervical cap, the diaphragm, spermicide), pro-lifers oppose it. The only contraceptive method explicitly endorsed by pro-life groups, in fact, is one with dubious efficacy: natural family planning, also called the rhythm method. The pro-life groups’ anti-contraceptive stances – which oftentimes translate into political lobbying and policymaking – expose the “pro-life” movement for what it really is, namely, anti-sex and anti-woman. Sex is a natural and healthy part of (adult) life, Page argues, as is the ability to prevent unwanted pregnancies, i.e., contraception. Absent contraception, women are faced with a tough choice: undergo abortion after abortion; birth more children than they want and can reasonably care for; or forgo sex unless the sole intent is procreation (whether married or not). It’s these latter two options that the pro-life movement wishes to force on women – and not just those living in the U.S. Meanwhile, the former two scenarios represent the reality for many women: research shows that abstinence education simply doesn’t work. Women and men will continue to engage in sex, and when contraception isn’t readily available and affordable, unwanted pregnancies and abortion will result. The single best way to prevent abortion, then, is to prevent unwanted and unintended pregnancies - and yet, the pro-life movement crusades against strategies that will do just this, including comprehensive sex ed and contraception. Like I said, “Pro-life”? More like “anti-sex,” “anti-woman” and “anti-human.” Armed with a volume of research and statistics, Page demonstrates just how at odds the pro-life movement’s views are with those of mainstream America. In particular, she examines the hoopla over Plan B and the HPV vaccine; pro-life groups’ anti-condom activities; the defunding by President G.W. Bush of UNFPA; and American life pre- and post-Roe (the latter reads like a precursor to Margaret Atwood’s THE HANDMAID’S TALE). Little in HOW THE PRO-CHOICE MOVEMENT SAVED AMERICA will surprise readers who are engaged in the struggle for reproductive rights. At just 238 pages (minus 70 pages of notes and indices), this is a slim tome, especially given the subject matter. On the flip side, had Page made her review of anti-choice activities more exhaustive, HOW THE PRO-CHOICE MOVEMENT SAVED AMERICA could have easily exceeded 500+ pages – thus narrowing her audience considerably. As such, I think the author strikes a nice balance between insight and brevity. It’s a quick, easy and informative read; I polished it off in a weekend, and even learned a few new factoids, even though I’ve been following feminist blogs and organizations for years. Some of the information is by now out of date; hopefully, Page will soon release an updated paperback edition. Still, the book is a good starting point for those new to the politics of reproduction, sexuality and Constitutional rights vis-à-vis bodily privacy. Other reviewers have accused Page of “cherry-picking” quotes from pro-life websites, press releases and interviews, further arguing that these views do not represent the majority of pro-lifers’ views. A laughable observation, as this is precisely Page’s point. In the opening pages, Page points out that many laypeople who describe themselves as “pro-life” and donate money to pro-life organizations actually haven’t a clue as to these organizations’ – and thus the movement’s – true beliefs and aims, which go well beyond outlaying abortion. Thus, it’s those who oppose abortion – but respect women, men and children and enjoy sex and the right to privacy - who most need to read HOW THE PRO-CHOICE MOVEMENT SAVED AMERICA. Put simply, to be truly “pro-life” is to be “pro-choice.” http://www.easyvegan.info/2009/06/16/...

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ally

    I enjoyed this book and felt like I learned a lot. I was disabused of the idea that the pro-choice movement meant just abortion rights - they also support contraceptives and comprehensive sex education, which makes sense. I also learned more about the biological processes behind contraceptives, which I really think is important as a woman and contraceptive-user. Though I think maybe this book should've been called "Why the Pro-Life Movement Sucks Super Bad," because it was far more about how the I enjoyed this book and felt like I learned a lot. I was disabused of the idea that the pro-choice movement meant just abortion rights - they also support contraceptives and comprehensive sex education, which makes sense. I also learned more about the biological processes behind contraceptives, which I really think is important as a woman and contraceptive-user. Though I think maybe this book should've been called "Why the Pro-Life Movement Sucks Super Bad," because it was far more about how the pro-life movement is chipping away at reproductive rights (including contraceptives and comprehensive sex-ed) than about the pro-choice movement's victories. The very last chapter left me with a bad taste in my mouth: it felt a lot like fear-mongering, or at least some of her language was more intense than I felt it needed to be. Maybe it's because this book is ten years old now, so I know her stating that Roe v. Wade could soon be overturning has yet to come to pass, and while pro-lifers are obviously still trying to gut it, we're in better shape than we used to be (or at least, we're no longer subject to Bush's pro-life decisions). Or maybe it's a rallying cry, but I don't super appreciate that motivation. Overall I'm glad I've read it, but I'm not sure I'd recommend it.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    Page's book reads as a bit of a polemic at times, with her (justified) frustration at the pro-life movement seeping through into the prose. The result is a book that can probably do little to shed light on the pro-life movement for pro-lifers, restraining itself instead to an opportunity to preach to the pro-choice choir. Actually, that categorization may be unfair. How the Pro-Choice Movement Saved America does significantly more than preach to the choir; it painstakingly details for the reader Page's book reads as a bit of a polemic at times, with her (justified) frustration at the pro-life movement seeping through into the prose. The result is a book that can probably do little to shed light on the pro-life movement for pro-lifers, restraining itself instead to an opportunity to preach to the pro-choice choir. Actually, that categorization may be unfair. How the Pro-Choice Movement Saved America does significantly more than preach to the choir; it painstakingly details for the reader the details of corruption in the pro-life movement and the calculated campaigns of misinformation circulated by that movement's most powerful leaders. It dismantles the notion that the true goal of those at the heart of the pro-life campaigns (although not necessarily those misled into following) is simply to do away with abortion, observing the number of pro-child and abortion-lessening policies that the pro-life movement actively opposes. Instead, it suggests an alternate goal is at work: namely, a fundamental shift in views on sex and the role of women... a disturbing but undeniably well-supported conclusion.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Laura Anne

    This book was incredibly informative. And not only about the pro-choice versus pro-life battle that is going on in America but also the war on contraception. This book is built upon facts and events that I was naive to. It has a not commonly held outlook on the prochoice movement but it is nonetheless great to know these facts and be more aware about the legislation that has gone on in my country.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea

    Poorly argued, poorly written, obnoxiously partisan, and just generally annoying, and I'm the choir she's preaching to. I found Sue Hertz's Caught in the Crossfire, which I read at the same time, to be much more engaging, fair and timely, and it was written twenty years ago. Poorly argued, poorly written, obnoxiously partisan, and just generally annoying, and I'm the choir she's preaching to. I found Sue Hertz's Caught in the Crossfire, which I read at the same time, to be much more engaging, fair and timely, and it was written twenty years ago.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Cherie

    A Fantastic. Well-written and well-sourced. I wouldn’t have minded a slight critique of the pro-choice movement (not a critique but she makes it super positive, which I love, but maybe a bit less biased…) She points out what fucking nuts these religious morons are who are anti-choice and also, anti-family.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    I loved this book. Women's reproductive health care is my passion, and I loved Page's voice and narrative style. It was also really interesting because pro-life and pro-choice are always portrayed as divided in the langugage of abortion, but as Page points out, it really is a war of ideas, access to family planning, and control. I loved this book. Women's reproductive health care is my passion, and I loved Page's voice and narrative style. It was also really interesting because pro-life and pro-choice are always portrayed as divided in the langugage of abortion, but as Page points out, it really is a war of ideas, access to family planning, and control.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kristin

    Awesome. Greatly researched and frightening. Couples nicely with The Purity Myth.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Julia DelSignore Peoples

    This book put me over the edge. By page 11, I wanted to throw it across the room because I was so angry. My anger isn't directed toward the author or her point. My anger is directed at the idiots that think that women should not have a choice. A choice in anything, really this book goes deeper than just the abortion debate. That is only the first layer. When you look deep into the well hidden corners, you find it is much more than that. To all of you that consider yourself to be anti-abortion an This book put me over the edge. By page 11, I wanted to throw it across the room because I was so angry. My anger isn't directed toward the author or her point. My anger is directed at the idiots that think that women should not have a choice. A choice in anything, really this book goes deeper than just the abortion debate. That is only the first layer. When you look deep into the well hidden corners, you find it is much more than that. To all of you that consider yourself to be anti-abortion and therefore pro-choice, I want you to read this book. Especially if you're a female, I want you to dig deep and understand the core of the issue. I want you to know what these legislators think of you and your ability to make a choice...about when you would like to have a family, about how many children you would like to have and about how you plan to go about putting those decisions into action. What you find out just might scare you. I hope it does. And I hope you do something about it.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Adam Ross

    Contrary to what the title might suggest, this book is not about abortion. It is about contraceptives and birth control, and the worrying mutation of the anti-abortion movement into the anti-contraceptives movement. Page documents not just the undeniable benefits of contraceptives in the lives of American women, but also the undeniable harm that pro-life rhetoric and policy has done, both in America and internationally. She meticulously documents how the anti-birth control position of the pro-li Contrary to what the title might suggest, this book is not about abortion. It is about contraceptives and birth control, and the worrying mutation of the anti-abortion movement into the anti-contraceptives movement. Page documents not just the undeniable benefits of contraceptives in the lives of American women, but also the undeniable harm that pro-life rhetoric and policy has done, both in America and internationally. She meticulously documents how the anti-birth control position of the pro-life movement has resulted in more abortions, more deaths of infants and of mothers, and the increases in teenage pregnancy. The book is extensively documented and details the scientific facts of the issue. For anyone interested in contraception, this is a book to read.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Bonnie

    Amazing, thoroughly researched, and extremely well-written. I'm not sure if there's an updated version of this book, but it thoroughly captures the horrifying enormity of the influence anti-choice groups wielded during the Bush administration and the devastating effects of actions taken based on that agenda. Amazing, thoroughly researched, and extremely well-written. I'm not sure if there's an updated version of this book, but it thoroughly captures the horrifying enormity of the influence anti-choice groups wielded during the Bush administration and the devastating effects of actions taken based on that agenda.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jessie

    Compelling. Details how/why the pro-choice movement prevents more abortions than pro-life.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    Everyone should read this ASAP. I'll lend you my copy. Everyone should read this ASAP. I'll lend you my copy.

  22. 4 out of 5

    K.W. Colyard

    Why do the people who claim to be anti-abortion staunchly oppose measures --- such as access to contraceptives and comprehensive sex education --- that would allow women to avoid unwanted pregnancy, and therefore abortion? That's the question at the heart of How the Pro-Choice Movement Saved America, Cristina Page's examination of the abortion issue at the turn of the latest century. The conclusion Page draws is one feminists collectively reached decades ago: that the anti-choice crowd want to c Why do the people who claim to be anti-abortion staunchly oppose measures --- such as access to contraceptives and comprehensive sex education --- that would allow women to avoid unwanted pregnancy, and therefore abortion? That's the question at the heart of How the Pro-Choice Movement Saved America, Cristina Page's examination of the abortion issue at the turn of the latest century. The conclusion Page draws is one feminists collectively reached decades ago: that the anti-choice crowd want to control women's sexual activity and punish deviance.Some recent reviews decry How the Pro-Choice Movement Saved America as an outdated treatise in the age of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Although the birth control mandate may have increased the availability of contraceptives, women across the U.S. face more and more legislative proposals that restrict abortion and contraceptive access, including frivolous clinic requirements, longer waiting periods, religious waivers, and false information campaigns, among other ridiculous measures. What's more, the reason behind this kind of over-regulation today is ultimately the same as the one Page outlines in How the Pro-Choice Movement Saved America: a capitalization on abortion ignorance by the Religious Right.While Page's book may need to be refreshed for a post-ACA world, the core message remains relevant. Anti-choice activists continue to lie, cheat, and harass vulnerable women, and do so --- largely --- with impunity. Feminists looking to revitalize their drive, and anyone who finds themself moving further to the left, would do well to read How the Pro-Choice Movement Saved America, in spite of its minor flaws.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    This book made me angry. I've never understood the logic of pro-lifers - I get that they don't support abortion (I disagree and think they're wrong, but whatever), but why the hell would they not advocate for comprehensive sex education and wildly accessible contraceptives? Shit, if you don't want women to get abortions, make it so they aren't put in the position to need one. I know an unfortunate number of staunchly pro-life people, so I've had this conversation many times, but seeing all of th This book made me angry. I've never understood the logic of pro-lifers - I get that they don't support abortion (I disagree and think they're wrong, but whatever), but why the hell would they not advocate for comprehensive sex education and wildly accessible contraceptives? Shit, if you don't want women to get abortions, make it so they aren't put in the position to need one. I know an unfortunate number of staunchly pro-life people, so I've had this conversation many times, but seeing all of the facts that this book laid out regarding the ridiculous amount of legislation and campaigns put forth by these people made me furious. As an extremely pro-choice, sex positive feminist, I already had a pretty deep knowledge of the issues the book was addressing, yet I didn't find any of it overly redundant, namely because of how well researched it was. Pages 169-211 are citations - I was impressed with her research! I took away a star because 1.) the book was published in 2006, so reading it in 2015 means that the various statistics are starting to get outdated and 2.) I was expecting (and hoping for!) a book similar to Jessica Valenti's The Purity Myth - while on the same topic with similar facts, this book is missing the conversational, sassy commentary that Valenti is known for.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I decided to read this book because my girlfriend was reading it for research on a report she was writing about “Women’s Rights in America”. Since many people like to think or assume I'm a feminist I thought this would be a good book to see where exactly I sat at the feminist table. Although I don’t believe this book answered my questions of am I feminist or not, I can tell you that this book clearly made become more of an advocate for women and their rights. This was an amazing read. It opened I decided to read this book because my girlfriend was reading it for research on a report she was writing about “Women’s Rights in America”. Since many people like to think or assume I'm a feminist I thought this would be a good book to see where exactly I sat at the feminist table. Although I don’t believe this book answered my questions of am I feminist or not, I can tell you that this book clearly made become more of an advocate for women and their rights. This was an amazing read. It opened my eyes to so much I just never even thought to see. The book really disturbed me and made me mad, to the point where I really wanted to get up and do something. I think every woman should take an hour out of their life and read this book. See what both sides true agenda is, and then decide where they stand. I can say we’ve made great progress in American History but we still have so much more to overcome. I can’t believe that in this day and age we still have so many ignorant people walking around. Become involve and don’t allow these close minded people to set us back... Onward and upward!! Love the Women’s Right Reader

  25. 5 out of 5

    Christina

    A bit of a time capsule, How the Pro Choice Movement Saved America is a good read for anyone looking to learn a little more about anti-choice efforts both in the U.S. and abroad. For me, someone who already knows a great deal, it added to my knowledge and gave me some new causes to donate to, such UNFPA. It's pretty out of date, so I got a laugh out of the ominous tones surrounding a Bush presidency. That being said, it's a scary look at where things were in the early 2000's, and where they coul A bit of a time capsule, How the Pro Choice Movement Saved America is a good read for anyone looking to learn a little more about anti-choice efforts both in the U.S. and abroad. For me, someone who already knows a great deal, it added to my knowledge and gave me some new causes to donate to, such UNFPA. It's pretty out of date, so I got a laugh out of the ominous tones surrounding a Bush presidency. That being said, it's a scary look at where things were in the early 2000's, and where they could go with a Trump presidency. But I would suggest a more updated book if you're looking for the present situation, as a lot of the concerns Page raises are no longer major issues in the women's rights movement. It was definitely an interesting read, but not one that I would give too much thought to recommending, not with the scores of more recent options, as well as the new doc on abortion rights, TRAPPED (anyone who cares about what anti choice is doing to Southern states should watch this!!!).

  26. 5 out of 5

    Paige

    My boyfriend requested that we read this book together, which is why it took so long to finish! I didn't find it to be too dated--it did only come out in 2004, I don't think THAT much has changed in 3 years, and the changes that have happened just go along with the whole theme of the book. I knew pretty much all the information already, although there were a few things that I'm glad I learned. That said, it would have been a good, fast read if it hadn't been for the boyfriend. It was entertaining My boyfriend requested that we read this book together, which is why it took so long to finish! I didn't find it to be too dated--it did only come out in 2004, I don't think THAT much has changed in 3 years, and the changes that have happened just go along with the whole theme of the book. I knew pretty much all the information already, although there were a few things that I'm glad I learned. That said, it would have been a good, fast read if it hadn't been for the boyfriend. It was entertaining and well-researched, all her arguments were easy to understand. There were several examples or stories of crazy anti-choice organizations that could have been left out to make way for more cool information, but I guess they really did hammer the point home. I think my boyfriend enjoyed it a lot more than I did since so much of the information was new to him.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Allen

    This book has a rather ambitious title. I've been wanting to read it for a while but was a bit put-off by the title. Finally read it and sincerely enjoyed it-- although, "enjoy" is not quite the right word. There were times while reading this that I gripped the book with anger and wept for the injustice that the decisions, mostly during the Bush administration during which this book was written, resulted in for women all over the world. As a medical student, public health advocate and [non-conse This book has a rather ambitious title. I've been wanting to read it for a while but was a bit put-off by the title. Finally read it and sincerely enjoyed it-- although, "enjoy" is not quite the right word. There were times while reading this that I gripped the book with anger and wept for the injustice that the decisions, mostly during the Bush administration during which this book was written, resulted in for women all over the world. As a medical student, public health advocate and [non-conservative...] Christian living in Texas, the blatant misuse of scientific evidence that this book uncovered utterly infuriated me and I think will continue to spur me to act. I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in women's health (or public health more broadly), social issues or policy. Great read!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    Wow...what an intense book. While the book does show its age in some ways (the author refers to pending court decisions or court appointments that have long been decided), the underlying argument is still terrifyingly contemporary. After all, most of those decisions have ended up in the favor of the radical pro-life movement. As someone who's been following feminist politics for several years now, there was little about the contemporary pro-life and pro-choice movements in this book that was new Wow...what an intense book. While the book does show its age in some ways (the author refers to pending court decisions or court appointments that have long been decided), the underlying argument is still terrifyingly contemporary. After all, most of those decisions have ended up in the favor of the radical pro-life movement. As someone who's been following feminist politics for several years now, there was little about the contemporary pro-life and pro-choice movements in this book that was new to me. This book is valuable, however, because it concisely sums up dozens, if not hundreds, of disparate studies, polls, court cases and interviews into one compact volume.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    This book is a fine introduction to the pro-choice movement and the negative consequences of a world without Roe. However, the analysis is fairly shallow and if you have spent much time reading about abortion rights it will feel quite repetitive. Not to mention, the book already feels dated. She wrote it during Alito's confirmation and, while that was an important event, the court and political climate has changed substantially since then. Page's book is well-sourced and a quick read. I'd suggest This book is a fine introduction to the pro-choice movement and the negative consequences of a world without Roe. However, the analysis is fairly shallow and if you have spent much time reading about abortion rights it will feel quite repetitive. Not to mention, the book already feels dated. She wrote it during Alito's confirmation and, while that was an important event, the court and political climate has changed substantially since then. Page's book is well-sourced and a quick read. I'd suggest it as a good first book for newly minted pro-choice activists. However, there are better and more nuanced looks at the issues she covers.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mark Hainds

    I used to identify with the Pro-Life side. But I no longer wish to be associated with that label. I want to see less abortions, as do most people on both sides of this issue. The difference is that many Pro-Lifers promote policies that lead to more abortions: abstinence only education, denying the efficacy of birth-control options, restricting funding for women's health. I had begun to suspect that much of the Pro-Life movement was more interested in promoting their religious doctrines than they I used to identify with the Pro-Life side. But I no longer wish to be associated with that label. I want to see less abortions, as do most people on both sides of this issue. The difference is that many Pro-Lifers promote policies that lead to more abortions: abstinence only education, denying the efficacy of birth-control options, restricting funding for women's health. I had begun to suspect that much of the Pro-Life movement was more interested in promoting their religious doctrines than they were in reducing abortion - and Cristina Page lays it all out in black and white. It's a worthy read, if a bit infuriating.

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