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Catweazle

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Catweazle was a magician who lived in the eleventh century, but however hard he tried, his spells hardly ever worked. Then one day was different....the only trouble was that the magic had caused him to fly through Time instead of Space. Catweazle ended up at a place called Hexwood Farm, nine centuries later, where everything he saw appeared to happen by magic.


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Catweazle was a magician who lived in the eleventh century, but however hard he tried, his spells hardly ever worked. Then one day was different....the only trouble was that the magic had caused him to fly through Time instead of Space. Catweazle ended up at a place called Hexwood Farm, nine centuries later, where everything he saw appeared to happen by magic.

30 review for Catweazle

  1. 4 out of 5

    Robin

    Having loved the TV show, I was thoroughly enchanted by this book which follows the plot of the first series. It is written in a gentle style, suitable for the children for whom it was intended, but is not patronising and involves enough plays on words and double meanings to appeal to older readers too. There are also a whole raft of highly entertaining insults that deserve to be more widely used. There are some nice illustrations in my edition, which really capture Geoffrey Bayldon - the lovely Having loved the TV show, I was thoroughly enchanted by this book which follows the plot of the first series. It is written in a gentle style, suitable for the children for whom it was intended, but is not patronising and involves enough plays on words and double meanings to appeal to older readers too. There are also a whole raft of highly entertaining insults that deserve to be more widely used. There are some nice illustrations in my edition, which really capture Geoffrey Bayldon - the lovely character actor who brought Catweazle to life on screen. Whiist the series goes back to the 70s, the stories themselves are not overtly bound by that time and so I imagine that many young readers these days would also enjoy the tales. The character of the Saxon wizard Catweazle is an irascible old sod, but very endearing and the amount of folk magic weaved through this book - as with so many of Richard Carpenter's works - evinces a real love of that whole world of lore and tradition and native mysticism. I would certainly recommend this book to any pagan parents wanting a gentle and humorous way to introduce their kids to the idea of folk belief and native mysticism.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nick

    It was amazing enough that I bought a copy for myself when I was young and I still have it and read it today. The TV series was almost as good. Very few books can balance the illogic of time travel compounded with the vast cultural gulfs between cultures then and now and do it with grace and compassion for the characters. Very few time time travel stories do it as well as this one.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Suzy

    Funny story. About a year ago I was reading a history of the British folk-rock movement of the sixties, and came across a reference to a TV show called Catweazle. "That would be a great name for a cat!" I thought and wrote it on the whiteboard on my fridge, where it still remains to this day. (We didn't use it for our new kittens.) Fast forward to a few weeks ago when I was talking about Lloyd Alexander's Prydain Chronicles with a like-minded coworker, and he asked me, "Have you ever heard of Ca Funny story. About a year ago I was reading a history of the British folk-rock movement of the sixties, and came across a reference to a TV show called Catweazle. "That would be a great name for a cat!" I thought and wrote it on the whiteboard on my fridge, where it still remains to this day. (We didn't use it for our new kittens.) Fast forward to a few weeks ago when I was talking about Lloyd Alexander's Prydain Chronicles with a like-minded coworker, and he asked me, "Have you ever heard of Catweazle?" He was flabbergasted when I told him I had, and that it was in fact written on my fridge. I had to send him a picture to prove it. OK, the book. It was written after the TV show was a hit, so it had that feel to it. Each chapter was an episode. That said, the writing was good and the episodes were funny. The humor all revolved around an eccentric wizard (Catweazle) who is a failure at magic most of the time, except that one time when he is trying to escape Norman soldiers and accidentally falls through time 900 years into the future. He meets a British boy around 1970, and hilarity around the many misunderstandings ensue. It's a plot that we've seen a million times -- I Dream of Jeannie, My Favorite Martian, etc. etc. and since we are almost 50 years beyond that now, the jokes feel a little time-worn and even irrelevant. But it was still fun, especially when Catweazle spewed Medieval insults at the clueless modern-day Brits. It's an amusing take-off on the time travel trope.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Loretta

    Whilst looking for something to read, I came across this - which I'd enjoyed watching on TV as a kid. I hardly ever read YA, and this would be for younger kids, so I have no idea how children's books are written these days, or if the style has changed much. If it had been written for a YA audience, I would say there was far too much head hopping and 'tell' instead of 'show' but maybe that was more usual for children's books written back in the 1970s. Having said that, I enjoyed it. It brought ba Whilst looking for something to read, I came across this - which I'd enjoyed watching on TV as a kid. I hardly ever read YA, and this would be for younger kids, so I have no idea how children's books are written these days, or if the style has changed much. If it had been written for a YA audience, I would say there was far too much head hopping and 'tell' instead of 'show' but maybe that was more usual for children's books written back in the 1970s. Having said that, I enjoyed it. It brought back the TV series so well, I could almost see it - although maybe that was more the nostalgia than the quality of the writing. Nevertheless, I did enjoy it - it was fun.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Michael McManus

    Never read this book as a kid even though I enjoyed watching Catweazle in my youth. With the recent showing of the old series on Talking pictures TV, of which I loved, I had to buy the book. Every episode from the first series is in the book and it made me laugh out loud just like the series did. A fun read and if you have happy memories of Catweazle, then it's a must read. Now I will have to purchase the second book. Five stars indeed! Never read this book as a kid even though I enjoyed watching Catweazle in my youth. With the recent showing of the old series on Talking pictures TV, of which I loved, I had to buy the book. Every episode from the first series is in the book and it made me laugh out loud just like the series did. A fun read and if you have happy memories of Catweazle, then it's a must read. Now I will have to purchase the second book. Five stars indeed!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Y

    It is always nice reread this funny book about a timetravelling sorcerer. I always and enjoy his adventures in the twenieth century, where everybody is a wizard. At least, that is what he thinks, coming from the tenth century. Then is 'electrickery' really magic. It is always nice reread this funny book about a timetravelling sorcerer. I always and enjoy his adventures in the twenieth century, where everybody is a wizard. At least, that is what he thinks, coming from the tenth century. Then is 'electrickery' really magic.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    Got this book for my nieces. I hope they like it.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Neville Ridley-smith

    Read this one to my son and we had great fun. I remember watching the TV series in the 80's. We watched the first couple of episodes on youtube. This is one of those instances where the book adds quite a bit in terms of colour and information that you don't get in the TV show. Some of the chapters/episodes are fairly average but that's more than offset by the better ones - especially the classic one with the Telling Bone. Much hilarity. Read this one to my son and we had great fun. I remember watching the TV series in the 80's. We watched the first couple of episodes on youtube. This is one of those instances where the book adds quite a bit in terms of colour and information that you don't get in the TV show. Some of the chapters/episodes are fairly average but that's more than offset by the better ones - especially the classic one with the Telling Bone. Much hilarity.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mikael Kuoppala

    Read this multiple times as a child and have revisited it a couple of times as an adult. The concept here is very simple: bring a character from the distant past to experience modern life. An old comedic premise but it has been used in a good way here. For a young adult book, “Catweazle” is reasonably smart and clever, enough to make me forgive the goofiness of the actual plot. And the novel offers some nice depiction of everyday life through its nicely built characters.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jascha

    My dad read it to me and my brother. I liked it, it´s kind of funny. Noone belive catweazle, that he is a true magican, while he thinks, that all this mostly technical things we know from today are magic.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sarahjoy Maddeaux

    An amusing diversion. I'm still not sure how I feel about Catweazle, and the ending seemed somehow sudden and unsatisfying, but perhaps that is to pave the way for later adventures. Time to look up some old episodes of the tv programme and see how they compare. An amusing diversion. I'm still not sure how I feel about Catweazle, and the ending seemed somehow sudden and unsatisfying, but perhaps that is to pave the way for later adventures. Time to look up some old episodes of the tv programme and see how they compare.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Joshua

    Catweazle, a Saxon magician from medieval times, is accidentally transported to modern England. Here he is taken in by young "Carrot," a farm boy. Catweazle continually mistakes modern technology for magic and comedy ensues. Catweazle, a Saxon magician from medieval times, is accidentally transported to modern England. Here he is taken in by young "Carrot," a farm boy. Catweazle continually mistakes modern technology for magic and comedy ensues.

  13. 4 out of 5

    bluetyson

    isbn,original

  14. 4 out of 5

    Simon

    This novel is based on the classic children's TV series of the same name. Essentially it is a novelisation of the first season. The TV series is more entertaining, but this was well worth the read. This novel is based on the classic children's TV series of the same name. Essentially it is a novelisation of the first season. The TV series is more entertaining, but this was well worth the read.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Bettie

    .

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen Dixon

    Very funny book about an unsuccessful eleventh-century magician who manages to transport himself to the modern day.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ron

    I read and re-read this about ten times, one time after another.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nick

    I just loved this book, and the TV series, as an 11 year old. Richard Carpenter has written a few books, and writes well. Electrickery, the telling bone and other clever stuff!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Duncan Smith

    The book is OK but the real magic is in the TV version. All time classic.

  20. 4 out of 5

    PlusFour

  21. 5 out of 5

    Tina

  22. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kong

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mavis

  25. 5 out of 5

    Adam Stevenson

  26. 5 out of 5

    LEE J DENIGAN

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ylva

  28. 5 out of 5

    Pete Aldin

  29. 5 out of 5

    Grace Jarvis

  30. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne Window

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