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On Life and Living Elisabeth Kübler-Ross, M.D., is the woman who has transformed the way the world thinks about death and dying. Beginning with the groundbreaking publication of the classic psychological study On Death and Dying and continuing through her many books and her years working with terminally ill children, AIDS patients, and the elderly, Kübler-Ross has brought On Life and Living Elisabeth Kübler-Ross, M.D., is the woman who has transformed the way the world thinks about death and dying. Beginning with the groundbreaking publication of the classic psychological study On Death and Dying and continuing through her many books and her years working with terminally ill children, AIDS patients, and the elderly, Kübler-Ross has brought comfort and understanding to millions coping with their own deaths or the deaths of loved ones. Now, at age seventy-one facing her own death, this world-renowned healer tells the story of her extraordinary life. Having taught the world how to die well, she now offers a lesson on how to live well. Her story is an adventure of the heart -- powerful, controversial, inspirational -- a fitting legacy of a powerful life.


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On Life and Living Elisabeth Kübler-Ross, M.D., is the woman who has transformed the way the world thinks about death and dying. Beginning with the groundbreaking publication of the classic psychological study On Death and Dying and continuing through her many books and her years working with terminally ill children, AIDS patients, and the elderly, Kübler-Ross has brought On Life and Living Elisabeth Kübler-Ross, M.D., is the woman who has transformed the way the world thinks about death and dying. Beginning with the groundbreaking publication of the classic psychological study On Death and Dying and continuing through her many books and her years working with terminally ill children, AIDS patients, and the elderly, Kübler-Ross has brought comfort and understanding to millions coping with their own deaths or the deaths of loved ones. Now, at age seventy-one facing her own death, this world-renowned healer tells the story of her extraordinary life. Having taught the world how to die well, she now offers a lesson on how to live well. Her story is an adventure of the heart -- powerful, controversial, inspirational -- a fitting legacy of a powerful life.

30 review for The Wheel of Life: A Memoir of Living and Dying

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sheri

    I find it very difficult to give a review of this book. I tore through it at a crazy pace and found a lot of truth in it. As a parent who lost a child to cancer, Dr Kubler-Ross has always been a voice I have respected and appreciated since his death. Her words and work have been pathways of healing for so many of us. Most of the book is interesting and informative. I found myself pondering her writing with pen in hand, at times underlining or marking passages that particularly spoke to me and of I find it very difficult to give a review of this book. I tore through it at a crazy pace and found a lot of truth in it. As a parent who lost a child to cancer, Dr Kubler-Ross has always been a voice I have respected and appreciated since his death. Her words and work have been pathways of healing for so many of us. Most of the book is interesting and informative. I found myself pondering her writing with pen in hand, at times underlining or marking passages that particularly spoke to me and often with tears in my eyes. There is just so much truth in this book. However, in the second half of the book the nature of it changes completely. I can only describe it as bizarre as this very educated, insightful, rather amazing woman takes her intellect and delves into a spiritual world that everything in me categorizes as fantasy. It put me in a bit of a conundrum, as I so wish to see and hear her as the expert she truly is when it comes to death and dying, yet she believes she can talk to Jesus through a table. Her contact with "fairies" and "spirit guides" throw a curve into her thoughts that point to an unconventionality that nothing in me can stand behind. I force myself not to dismiss it outright simply out of respect for all the other great things she achieved with her mind, but it is with significant struggle. Honestly she sounds a bit nutty in her latter years. In all, it was an easy read, interesting and enjoyable. She certainly lived an unconventional life, one that lead to the publishing of information on death, dying and grieving that others have failed to touch on with nearly as much truth. It was worth reading.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    oh dear! This autobiography-memoir of a Swiss doctor and researcher into the process of dying started out mildly interesting as Ms. Kubler grows up, became fascinating in the middle chapters as Dr. Ross's medical career finds its focus, occasionally took a turn towards the truly inspiring and profound, as one would expect from someone who works with and shows great compassion for dying persons of all ages and social situations.....(by this point I have started to recommend it to friends, and mar oh dear! This autobiography-memoir of a Swiss doctor and researcher into the process of dying started out mildly interesting as Ms. Kubler grows up, became fascinating in the middle chapters as Dr. Ross's medical career finds its focus, occasionally took a turn towards the truly inspiring and profound, as one would expect from someone who works with and shows great compassion for dying persons of all ages and social situations.....(by this point I have started to recommend it to friends, and marvel at her stamina, determination, and the energy she is able to find to continually be of service to people who are having a difficult time in life....even though there are occasionally disturbing hints that she is rather full of herself). Then toward the middle, the book took an odd turn - it was rather shocking and didn't fit the tone of what came before, but I thought well, ok if that one thing happened to her, I'll swallow that and move on even though I don't believe it. Then another odd passage came along, and by page 260 the author had completely and totally gone off the deep end! (At this point I am actually embarrassed to be seen reading this book on the train! ) At the point that she starts to have these supernatural experiences which get more and more unbelievable until I am left feeling sorry for her husband Manny and understand why he eventually had no choice other than to divorce her. Eventually losing any capacity for skepticism, she starts seeing fairies in pictures, moving tables, attending seances where a naked man in a turbin is channeling spirits and then claiming to find these spirit in her bed with her! It was all so weird and unexpected when the book shifted gears into this bizarre supernatural mode.....I thought it would take another radical turn back to reality..... I kept expecting her to realize at some point that she had been duped by the channelers in Escondido, but that doesn't seem to be forthcoming, and my patience as a reader to be fed one strange tale after another has run thin. I just cannot finish this book. Sadly, the latter part of the book makes it hard to accept this writer as a credible source of information on anything. That is a pity, because there are probably many truths and valuable insights that she found out during the earlier years of her career (pre-fairy). I am left with the impression of a tough, stubborn doctor with a big heart and a great intellectual curiosity who did brave, interesting, and valuable work until she herself somehow lost her grip on reality. It would be interesting to know what later (non-fairy-seeing) researchers who continued working in the field she pioneered have found out since then, to check how much of her scientific work is accepted today.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Anietra

    This book was recommended by a friend and I rejected it. He was so adamant that I should read it that he gave it to me as a late bday gift. It's one of the most meaningful gifts I've received. This book is not just a memoir of the phenomenal life of Elizabeth Kubler Ross but it's a guide. A guide to how one should live their life. Shared by the woman who was an expert on death and dying, her greatest discovery - death means nothing if you live your life to the fullest. PLEASE read this book! This book was recommended by a friend and I rejected it. He was so adamant that I should read it that he gave it to me as a late bday gift. It's one of the most meaningful gifts I've received. This book is not just a memoir of the phenomenal life of Elizabeth Kubler Ross but it's a guide. A guide to how one should live their life. Shared by the woman who was an expert on death and dying, her greatest discovery - death means nothing if you live your life to the fullest. PLEASE read this book!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ken

    This is a fascinating and wonderfully written memoir by a truly fascinating woman who is not only a psychiatrist deeply committed to understanding not only death but life with the curiosity of a Mystic, but the passion of an Activist. I would heartily recommend this to anyone deeply curious to know more about human life and it's meaning. I am a physician and surgeon who has been told he is a psychiatrist as well. I am passionate about matters of the soul, and this was a rich experience of Psyche, This is a fascinating and wonderfully written memoir by a truly fascinating woman who is not only a psychiatrist deeply committed to understanding not only death but life with the curiosity of a Mystic, but the passion of an Activist. I would heartily recommend this to anyone deeply curious to know more about human life and it's meaning. I am a physician and surgeon who has been told he is a psychiatrist as well. I am passionate about matters of the soul, and this was a rich experience of Psyche, the soul... hers and many other's.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Helen

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. What an interesting woman! I found the first part of her life fascinating. I have read other people's comments and I do not agree that she was arrogant. She accomplished many things and one must remember she probably had to work much harder as a woman working in the 60's and 70's in her field. She describes seeing butterflies drawn in the barracks in Maidanek, Poland before people were sent in the gas chamber and how Golda, a young woman told her that their is a Hilter in all people. She definit What an interesting woman! I found the first part of her life fascinating. I have read other people's comments and I do not agree that she was arrogant. She accomplished many things and one must remember she probably had to work much harder as a woman working in the 60's and 70's in her field. She describes seeing butterflies drawn in the barracks in Maidanek, Poland before people were sent in the gas chamber and how Golda, a young woman told her that their is a Hilter in all people. She definitely was courageous to do all she did as a young woman which set the pace to her study on death and dying. She talks how death and dying was a taboo subject among her colleagues but time and again patients wanted honesty and wanted to be around people when they were dying and not alone. Her descriptions of people's near experiences of death is similar to another book I have read. Who knows why she befriended a couple who channelled spirits, why she began to believe in fairies and such later on in her life. Perhaps she was looking for something that science couldn't explain. Regardless she was an incredible woman and the book is truly worth reading.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kristin

    Started reading for a psych project, kept reading because I really need to pass that psych project... What a fascinating woman - though I'm not sure I would have enjoyed knowing her! I think I would feel incredibly guilty for not living life as fully, or finding and devoting myself to a cause as single-mindedly, as she did. Also, to be honest, I might have lost patience with some of her New Age-ier ideas. She packed a lot of experiences into her 78 years and whether you agree or disagree with her Started reading for a psych project, kept reading because I really need to pass that psych project... What a fascinating woman - though I'm not sure I would have enjoyed knowing her! I think I would feel incredibly guilty for not living life as fully, or finding and devoting myself to a cause as single-mindedly, as she did. Also, to be honest, I might have lost patience with some of her New Age-ier ideas. She packed a lot of experiences into her 78 years and whether you agree or disagree with her philosophies on thanatology (the study of death and dying) and spirituality, it's still a really interesting read. The tone of the book hints at self-promotion, but I don't think that's quite right (I mean, she's no Donald Trump...). It's hard to tell because sometimes we (pick your appropriate demographic) are so conditioned to downplay our accomplishments and sideline our needs. Maybe reading an autobiography of someone who focuses so much on the importance of learning to love oneself -- and perhaps practices it more than we find acceptable -- is odd and uncomfortable.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sandy

    Elisabeth Kubler-Ross - we all know her from the five stages of grief. But what a life she lived! So much experience packed into a life! Her memoir is honest and open. She writes about her early years--including the good times and the traumas, her work with every kind of patient--from a country doctor in Switzerland to a psychiatric ward in NYC to her life's work with terminally ill patients. Readers will hear her frustration with the US medical beauracracy as well as her entry into the 1980s So Elisabeth Kubler-Ross - we all know her from the five stages of grief. But what a life she lived! So much experience packed into a life! Her memoir is honest and open. She writes about her early years--including the good times and the traumas, her work with every kind of patient--from a country doctor in Switzerland to a psychiatric ward in NYC to her life's work with terminally ill patients. Readers will hear her frustration with the US medical beauracracy as well as her entry into the 1980s Southern California New Age scene. Throughout the book, she shares her beliefs about life, death, and life after death (some of which may have you wondering about her sanity). In her final chapter, she is ready to die herself, so she addresses the reader directly with a summary of the wisdom she gained from her life experiences and from the experiences of her beloved patients. I was intrigued, entertained, and most importantly, inspired to love more--and as much as possible provide others and myself a "good death" when the time comes. She touched so many lives.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

    Good book but when she began discussing spirit guides and seeing ghosts, it lost it's appeal to me. Good book but when she began discussing spirit guides and seeing ghosts, it lost it's appeal to me.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Adrianne

    This memoir was much like what some of the reviewers previously said. It started off strong, and then, for me, it lost momentum towards the end a bit. This is partly due to Kübler’s claims of having a connection to the afterlife. Not saying that can’t be, but her way of thinking is definitely a far stretch for me. This is her memoir though, not mine. What kept me reading this book was her passion to keep pushing for good. She was determined to succeed in life. So much so she became a physician, a This memoir was much like what some of the reviewers previously said. It started off strong, and then, for me, it lost momentum towards the end a bit. This is partly due to Kübler’s claims of having a connection to the afterlife. Not saying that can’t be, but her way of thinking is definitely a far stretch for me. This is her memoir though, not mine. What kept me reading this book was her passion to keep pushing for good. She was determined to succeed in life. So much so she became a physician, and a great one at that. She is responsible for hospice—which has greatly changed the way we care for people in their last days. So important. She also had a passion to care for people dying of AIDS in the 1980s. A time when no one wanted to step foot in the room with these patients. Really, she played an instrumental role in educating and changing the way healthcare providers communicate and treat all of their sick and dying patients. That’s huge. I definitely recommend this book for the reader who is looking to find out more about Kübler’s life versus the subject of life and death. It’s a great snapshot of all that’s she’s done or tried to accomplish at least. It shows where her heart was and is now, after all that’s she’s been through. Ending, I will say that after reading this, I do feel more comfortable about death itself, and I left with a few good reminders about how to live in the now. So for me, it was definitely worth the read.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Callie

    What a crazy book! She is a character! ...starts out with all her service experiences in Europe, adventures and you are thinking this woman is like another Mother Theresa, then her work on death and dying--she's a very venerable and compassionate doctor (she is the one who first described the grieving process shock, denial, bargaining, depression, acceptance)--then she gets into near death experiences--she was a pioneer in that field as well, and I'm still with her and THEN all of a sudden she's What a crazy book! She is a character! ...starts out with all her service experiences in Europe, adventures and you are thinking this woman is like another Mother Theresa, then her work on death and dying--she's a very venerable and compassionate doctor (she is the one who first described the grieving process shock, denial, bargaining, depression, acceptance)--then she gets into near death experiences--she was a pioneer in that field as well, and I'm still with her and THEN all of a sudden she's taking pictures of fairies and attending seances and talking to ghosts. HOLY COW! She's all over the map, but I was never bored and I was often surprised. She was definitely a very open-minded woman, forceful, opinionated, an inspiration. Of course, this is HER take on things...I'd like to hear her husband's perspective...See if she is for real...

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Love

    Powerful! Elisabeth Kubler-Ross has joined my pantheon of heros. Her courage, compassion, integrity, and will power was very inspiring. I don't consider myself a cry-er but this book had the water works in full effect. Regardless of whether or not you believe her paranormal experiences, this women always followed her heart and overcame seemingly insurmountable odds. Powerful! Elisabeth Kubler-Ross has joined my pantheon of heros. Her courage, compassion, integrity, and will power was very inspiring. I don't consider myself a cry-er but this book had the water works in full effect. Regardless of whether or not you believe her paranormal experiences, this women always followed her heart and overcame seemingly insurmountable odds.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Vallis Thompson

    I absolutely loved this book. I had previously read a biography, Quest: The Life of Elisabeth Kübler-Ross by Derek L.T. Gill, which I also loved. I became famliar with EKR back in the 70's and knew her to be the On Death and Dying lady, who brought to the world the understanding of various stages one goes through when one learns of one's imminent death, but I had no idea she was so amazingly spiritual. I learned something of this in the biography but so much more in this book, The Wheel of Life. I absolutely loved this book. I had previously read a biography, Quest: The Life of Elisabeth Kübler-Ross by Derek L.T. Gill, which I also loved. I became famliar with EKR back in the 70's and knew her to be the On Death and Dying lady, who brought to the world the understanding of various stages one goes through when one learns of one's imminent death, but I had no idea she was so amazingly spiritual. I learned something of this in the biography but so much more in this book, The Wheel of Life. In the biography, which I also highly recommend, I learned what an amazingly compassionate, caring, hard working and driven woman she was. An amazing human being. But in this autobiography I learned so much more about her incredible connection to the spiritual side of human life. If you have a spiritual awareness of any description do not be put off by the naysayers here who say she comes across as a bit of a nut. She was an incredibly intelligent medical specialist, first an MD and then a specialist psychiatrist, for decades before she developed her highly attuned spiritual side. I found this a fascinating and beautiful book and I'm so sorry I've finished it. I will keep it and treasure. Thank you Universe for the beautiful life of Elisabeth Kubler-Ross.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Cassandra Cantrell

    Required Reading for the Living Demonstration of a grace filled life. The author shows us what courage looks like in day to day life. She also demonstrates a flow to living once we let go of fear.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Wendy

    Totally beyond ridiculous. If this book brings someone a sense of peace, I guess that's great, but it's loaded with the most bullshit-sounding naive wishful thinking I ever laid eyes on. Fairies? Fairies! She includes evidence for fairies. Need I say more? Kubler-Ross was an amazingly kind human-being and had I known her personally, I probably would have adored her. Professionally however... she wrote about FAIRIES... I don't know what she died from, but this book provides evidence that the poor Totally beyond ridiculous. If this book brings someone a sense of peace, I guess that's great, but it's loaded with the most bullshit-sounding naive wishful thinking I ever laid eyes on. Fairies? Fairies! She includes evidence for fairies. Need I say more? Kubler-Ross was an amazingly kind human-being and had I known her personally, I probably would have adored her. Professionally however... she wrote about FAIRIES... I don't know what she died from, but this book provides evidence that the poor woman had a brain tumor or a lesion or something. This psychiatrist lost her marbles and this book deepened my belief that mental illness knows no boundaries more than anything having to do with an afterlife. Fairies... enough said.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Janice

    I consider myself pretty open minded, but with all due respect to Dr. Kubler-Ross' many years of service and advancement to terminally ill children, the elderly, AIDS patients, in addition to her remarkable achievement of throwing open the doors to a more natural, realistic, cultural view of death and dying, I found her spirituality and 'cosmic consciousness' pure hokum. I consider myself pretty open minded, but with all due respect to Dr. Kubler-Ross' many years of service and advancement to terminally ill children, the elderly, AIDS patients, in addition to her remarkable achievement of throwing open the doors to a more natural, realistic, cultural view of death and dying, I found her spirituality and 'cosmic consciousness' pure hokum.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tee Minn

    What a life. I want to read what she read after this as it isn't her last book. What a life. I want to read what she read after this as it isn't her last book.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Vidal

    Elizabeth kubler-Ross had and will always be my hero.

  18. 5 out of 5

    S.

    This book went in a surprisingly surreal direction. The spirit guide stuff weirded me out, but maybe it was real.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Madeline Puckett

    Sometimes a book falls into your hands at the exact right moment. That was my experience with Elisabeth Kubler-Ross's memoir. I had never read her famous book about the five stages of grief, On Death and Dying - in fact I had not known she was the architect behind the five stages - so I came to this memoir with no idea who this woman was and what she accomplished with her life. Love and compassion are a consistent theme throughout, and she has the life experience to give portent to these message Sometimes a book falls into your hands at the exact right moment. That was my experience with Elisabeth Kubler-Ross's memoir. I had never read her famous book about the five stages of grief, On Death and Dying - in fact I had not known she was the architect behind the five stages - so I came to this memoir with no idea who this woman was and what she accomplished with her life. Love and compassion are a consistent theme throughout, and she has the life experience to give portent to these messages. As both a physician and a citizen of the world, she constantly comes back to the importance of treating other humans with compassion. The biggest help a doctor could give a patient was to be a good, caring, sensitive, loving human being. This message is juxtaposed by her stubborn, driven, take-charge persona. Through her tone in writing, you can tell that Kubler-Ross is a serious and blunt person who gets shit done. The first half of the book - and her life - is inspiring. She writes with a great deal of self awareness about her family and Swiss childhood, relief work around Europe following WWII, journey becoming a physician, and groundbreaking work in psychiatry in the United States for both patients and future physicians. The second half of the book delves deeper into her spiritual journey around death and dying, and life after death. This led to some both some beautiful insights and some very curious happenings. Kubler-Ross begins to tell us about her experiences with a married couple from California, Martha and her husband, who Kubler-Ross refers to as B. This is when things start to get…I would say "crazy", but that seems to discredit the entire sequence of events that follows. I know very little about channeling, spirits, the afterlife…but what seems to become clear to everyone except Elisabeth Kubler-Ross is that B. and his wife are not all that they seem. The second half of the book is a wild ride: spirits, energies, ghosts, attempted murder, sexual assault allegations….I couldn't stop reading, and I couldn't believe that such an intelligent, fascinating woman had fallen prey to such wild manipulation. My questions - what happened to B. and his wife? what happened to Reverend Gaines? - took me down a rabbit hole of articles about sexual assault, spiritual realms, and the science behind seances...it was very disturbing and disappointing to see that nothing came of the sexual assault allegations against B. It appears he is dead, now. She leaves us with a rather depressing end, both to her book and to her life. I haven't yet seen the documentary made about her, but I read that is focuses on her disappointment in the corrupted American medical system that failed to provide her adequate care at the end of her life. However, I chose to focus on the elements of this memoir that inspire hope in the world, and faith in humanity. I would be interested to know what my friends who are now physicians and healthcare workers think of this memoir. Everything is bearable when there is love. My wish is that you try to give more people more love. The only thing that lives forever is love.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Pauline McGonagle

    I respect the real changes in care for the dying that this author has made possible thoughout her medical career and her life story memoirs are both fascinating and an insight into European history from the 1930s. She has also been instrumental in bringing the important phases of shock through to acceptance that people go through with death and grief. She did seem to have incredible opportunities as a young person to get hands-on medical experience for which she obviously had natural talent and a I respect the real changes in care for the dying that this author has made possible thoughout her medical career and her life story memoirs are both fascinating and an insight into European history from the 1930s. She has also been instrumental in bringing the important phases of shock through to acceptance that people go through with death and grief. She did seem to have incredible opportunities as a young person to get hands-on medical experience for which she obviously had natural talent and ability. It does beg the question though, how in this day's world of medical ethics and safe-guarding- anyone would ever get such access or have such contacts to be given that kind of responsibility with no qualifications at all. Her determination and stubborn self-belief are admirable and the first half of the book highlights what she had to sacrifice to get through her medical degree. Her family's side of the story would be interesting. As ever, with public figure who achieve immense amounts in their lives- her family had to do without what she gave to others. There were chunks of the book that threw a spanner in the works: her propensity (for all her wisdom) to fall for cranks and fake mediums; the comments about feminism that were not complimentary and her descriptions of ghostly encounters. These were hard to swallow. Shame that the fairy photos all went up in smoke in the house fires... surely there must be some out there somewhere if we are to be convinced...... If I had woken up with a spirit guide in the bed next to me I would not have got a stroke some time later, but a heart attack on the spot! I can;t help wondering what her opinion would be on the current pandemic and what she would have to say about social distancing and the dying; in some ways there are predictions of global pandemics in her work but I wonder how she would advise us to deal with this particular threat of contamination from close contact and the end of life care that she proposes.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Araceli

    [2.5 stars] At first, the book was excellent. I loved Elisabeth story, I cried with the bunny story, I admired her for the help she offered at the end of WWII (Also, walking through countries? That's so bad-ass!) and for not giving up in her dream of becoming a doctor. I was about to recommend this book to anyone (if someone had asked) because it was that good! *** SPOILERS *** Then came the problematic things. It all started in part III - "The Buffalo". Elisabeth met a man named Jay B, who had th [2.5 stars] At first, the book was excellent. I loved Elisabeth story, I cried with the bunny story, I admired her for the help she offered at the end of WWII (Also, walking through countries? That's so bad-ass!) and for not giving up in her dream of becoming a doctor. I was about to recommend this book to anyone (if someone had asked) because it was that good! *** SPOILERS *** Then came the problematic things. It all started in part III - "The Buffalo". Elisabeth met a man named Jay B, who had the ability to channel spirits (but it had to be in the dark and in the dark only, if not then the spirits would go away). This whole thing looked bad, I don't really know how Elisabeth didn't notice! The man was obviously a scam. She did realized that (SEVERAL YEARS LATER), but not after some sexual abuse allegations against him (and she didn't left nor fired him!! Because some bullshit spirit told her soon she would prove her faith!) and she didn't left either when a friend of her was harassed by him. I get those were different times, but this woman believed in afterlife, treated AIDS patients, and (according to her book) respected gay people, I can't believe she tolerated that bullshit. She only fired him after he tried to kill her ( allegedly). She also had a weird story were a woman stopped her to show her a photo of a fairy? and she believed her ?? AND THE STORY ABOUT HER TALKING TO JESUS THROUGH A TABLE. OK sis. Maybe it was because she was dying when she wrote the book? I don't know. OK. So, I really liked the book before all that spirits thing. I was kinda relieved after reading those stories about people who died but came back, saying death is peaceful. I was really sad to read how she was treated when she got sick, and in those last years. You would think that after spending all of her life helping people, she would have been helped too.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

    Elizabeth Kubler-Ross's life story reads like a novel. She had more ups and downs, misfortunes and comebacks than most people could survive. She was scrappy; a survivor and activist working tirelessly to help others, most especially the terminally ill. Here, towards the end of her life, she looks back and acknowledges some of her mistakes while pointing out how the misfortunes sent her in a different, better direction. Her medical career spanned the 1950's - 80's, and she highlights some of the a Elizabeth Kubler-Ross's life story reads like a novel. She had more ups and downs, misfortunes and comebacks than most people could survive. She was scrappy; a survivor and activist working tirelessly to help others, most especially the terminally ill. Here, towards the end of her life, she looks back and acknowledges some of her mistakes while pointing out how the misfortunes sent her in a different, better direction. Her medical career spanned the 1950's - 80's, and she highlights some of the atrocities that occurred in the name of medicine that she worked to change. She became very popular with her five stages of grief and traveled full-time around the world giving lectures and seminars at the expense of her marriage and family. As well, her interest in near-death experiences and the afterlife caused her to be taken in for a time by a charlatan from California who claimed to communicate with the spirits of the dead. During this period she sacrificed her professional credibility. Notwithstanding, her life story and conclusions are a worthwhile read.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Rosbel

    This is a tough book to review, I was really intrigued and read it in just a couple of days... I admire Elisabeth's life, and how she grew up and made decisions while still figuring out who she was / what she wanted to be. I also believe in many of her ideas, especially about serving, love and living life to its fullest. However many aspects and beliefs of her adult life are just hard to understand, and I'm not sure I want to... so I just keep the positive, for some reason this book reached my h This is a tough book to review, I was really intrigued and read it in just a couple of days... I admire Elisabeth's life, and how she grew up and made decisions while still figuring out who she was / what she wanted to be. I also believe in many of her ideas, especially about serving, love and living life to its fullest. However many aspects and beliefs of her adult life are just hard to understand, and I'm not sure I want to... so I just keep the positive, for some reason this book reached my hands and I do believe it makes no harm!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Adriana

    Beautiful. An autobiography of a woman who dedicated her life to research life, love and death. Whether one believes it or not, it brings a little bit of happiness to those who have unexpectedly lost someone. In my case, it has helped me to try to understand the sudden departure of my mother, who taught me from the day I was born to see fairies, believe in dragons and embrace even unwanted adventures as a hobbit would do. Only love is real, and this book helps some of us to keep on going on its Beautiful. An autobiography of a woman who dedicated her life to research life, love and death. Whether one believes it or not, it brings a little bit of happiness to those who have unexpectedly lost someone. In my case, it has helped me to try to understand the sudden departure of my mother, who taught me from the day I was born to see fairies, believe in dragons and embrace even unwanted adventures as a hobbit would do. Only love is real, and this book helps some of us to keep on going on its search. I recommend it for those who are living something like this.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Patricia Barlow-Irick

    As a student of thantology, I have always been a fan of Kübler-Ross, but I was not aware of this book. The story of her upbringing and development amazed and humbled me. The story of her foray into the woo-woo world of New Age shysters was cringe-inducing. In the end, it reminded me of how difficult it is to walk on a balanced path between the forces of objective and subjective reality. Both sides are ready to suck you in and demand your allegiance. It makes you examine your own paradigm.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    I really enjoyed this! Of course Elisabeth Kübler-Ross is famous for the stages of grief, and she is just a fascinating person-- from rehabilitating post WWII towns to assisting AIDS patients during the worst of that pandemic. She also got pretty spiritual during her life, and has profound lessons on death and living a full life. I listened to a condensed version as an audiobook and would highly recommend.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lynn

    I agree with another recent reviewer that the second half of the book seems out of character as this "very educated, insightful, rather amazing woman takes her intellect and delves into a spiritual world". Her journey through the understanding of death and dying was inspirational, yet she believes "she can talk to Jesus through a table". Her contact with "fairies" and "spirit guides" did not sit right with me for someone who had such a strong scientific background. I agree with another recent reviewer that the second half of the book seems out of character as this "very educated, insightful, rather amazing woman takes her intellect and delves into a spiritual world". Her journey through the understanding of death and dying was inspirational, yet she believes "she can talk to Jesus through a table". Her contact with "fairies" and "spirit guides" did not sit right with me for someone who had such a strong scientific background.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Susana Bargiela

    Remarkable woman. But I find it impossible to believe in all the paranormal experiences she claimed she had. I had the feeling she lost her focus a bit as years went by. I don't believe in fairies and I don't believe in mediums, ghosts or spirit guides showing up on pictures. Otherwise, she was a fighter and a very strong woman and her story is really amazing. Remarkable woman. But I find it impossible to believe in all the paranormal experiences she claimed she had. I had the feeling she lost her focus a bit as years went by. I don't believe in fairies and I don't believe in mediums, ghosts or spirit guides showing up on pictures. Otherwise, she was a fighter and a very strong woman and her story is really amazing.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Divya

    This book isn’t meant for everyone. You have to be familiar with EKR’s work before understanding where her motivations came from. A one of a kind human with human imperfections yet a solid philanthropic heart and soul. Strangely destiny or karma did not do her favors and her end was no different than that of any other wretched human soul. One begins to wonder.....

  30. 4 out of 5

    Isadora Gonçalves

    One of the best books I have ever read. More than a Psychiatrist, Elisabeth Kubler Ross tells us in this book the stories and challenges she has been through during her life, to become the great human being she was. Family, personal decisions, war, medicine, losing everything... Amazing strong story, very inspirational.

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