web site hit counter Turkey Trot Murder - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Turkey Trot Murder

Availability: Ready to download

It’s late autumn in Tinker’s Cove, Maine, and the last surviving flowers on Lucy Stone’s porch have fallen victim to the first frost of the season. But as the part-time reporter learns, this cold November morning will claim more than potted plants . . .   Besides the annual Turkey Trot 5K on Thanksgiving Day, Lucy expects the approaching holiday to be a relatively uneventf It’s late autumn in Tinker’s Cove, Maine, and the last surviving flowers on Lucy Stone’s porch have fallen victim to the first frost of the season. But as the part-time reporter learns, this cold November morning will claim more than potted plants . . .   Besides the annual Turkey Trot 5K on Thanksgiving Day, Lucy expects the approaching holiday to be a relatively uneventful one—until she finds beautiful Alison Franklin dead and frozen in Blueberry Pond. No one knows much about Alison, except that she was the daughter of wealthy investor Ed Franklin and struggled quietly with drug addiction. Police blame her death on an accidental overdose, but Lucy can’t understand what terrible forces could lead a privileged woman to watery ruin . . .   Alison’s funeral service is just as puzzling. Many believe Ed’s young—and very pregnant—new wife, Mireille, divided the family, leaving Alison to wither on the vine. Did Mireille truly adore her stepchild as Ed claims, or did she pit father against daughter for personal gain?   As a state of unrest descends on Tinker’s Cove, Lucy is thrown into a full-scale investigation. Now, in a race against time, Lucy must beat the killer to the finish line—or she can forget about stuffing and cranberry sauce . . .


Compare

It’s late autumn in Tinker’s Cove, Maine, and the last surviving flowers on Lucy Stone’s porch have fallen victim to the first frost of the season. But as the part-time reporter learns, this cold November morning will claim more than potted plants . . .   Besides the annual Turkey Trot 5K on Thanksgiving Day, Lucy expects the approaching holiday to be a relatively uneventf It’s late autumn in Tinker’s Cove, Maine, and the last surviving flowers on Lucy Stone’s porch have fallen victim to the first frost of the season. But as the part-time reporter learns, this cold November morning will claim more than potted plants . . .   Besides the annual Turkey Trot 5K on Thanksgiving Day, Lucy expects the approaching holiday to be a relatively uneventful one—until she finds beautiful Alison Franklin dead and frozen in Blueberry Pond. No one knows much about Alison, except that she was the daughter of wealthy investor Ed Franklin and struggled quietly with drug addiction. Police blame her death on an accidental overdose, but Lucy can’t understand what terrible forces could lead a privileged woman to watery ruin . . .   Alison’s funeral service is just as puzzling. Many believe Ed’s young—and very pregnant—new wife, Mireille, divided the family, leaving Alison to wither on the vine. Did Mireille truly adore her stepchild as Ed claims, or did she pit father against daughter for personal gain?   As a state of unrest descends on Tinker’s Cove, Lucy is thrown into a full-scale investigation. Now, in a race against time, Lucy must beat the killer to the finish line—or she can forget about stuffing and cranberry sauce . . .

30 review for Turkey Trot Murder

  1. 5 out of 5

    Luffy

    I was caught off guard by two things. First, that the story takes place in Tinker's Cove. Secondly, that the author had fresh ideas. Well, to amend that, let's say that the author refurbished her old ideas. The resulting book was very nice to read. I won't be waxing lyrical about Turkey Trot Murder. Leslie Meier does the simple things simply, yet efficiently. I was glad of meeting my favorite characters of Lucy Stone's family. But now they are only 3 people living in the familial house. The other I was caught off guard by two things. First, that the story takes place in Tinker's Cove. Secondly, that the author had fresh ideas. Well, to amend that, let's say that the author refurbished her old ideas. The resulting book was very nice to read. I won't be waxing lyrical about Turkey Trot Murder. Leslie Meier does the simple things simply, yet efficiently. I was glad of meeting my favorite characters of Lucy Stone's family. But now they are only 3 people living in the familial house. The other kids have flown from their nest. Since the turn of the 20th century, mystery or thriller books have had more than one victim, or casualty, per book. This trend is still alive and kicking. It follows, it makes sense to have this format. Yet the murderer's motives in the book are flimsy. That is the only reason why the book didn't gain 5 stars.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Berit☀️✨

    3 stars with some turkey and stuffing🦃 I pick this book up wanting a fun holiday read with some fantastic characters and a fun mystery..... that is why I pick up cozy mysteries, it’s a fun little getaway, usually filled with some fun quirky characters and a fluffy mystery.... I did get some interesting characters and the fun setting of the small town in Maine.... The mystery was also very interesting, and kept me guessing, I always love trying to solve the mystery... The problem I had with this boo 3 stars with some turkey and stuffing🦃 I pick this book up wanting a fun holiday read with some fantastic characters and a fun mystery..... that is why I pick up cozy mysteries, it’s a fun little getaway, usually filled with some fun quirky characters and a fluffy mystery.... I did get some interesting characters and the fun setting of the small town in Maine.... The mystery was also very interesting, and kept me guessing, I always love trying to solve the mystery... The problem I had with this book was I felt as it was shoving social issues down my throat.... I don’t really mind the book addressing the opioid epidemic, but to do it over and over and over again, was just too much.... in addition to this there was a strong presence of racism, not that any of the main characters were racist, however there were quite a few secondary characters, and I just got sick of hearing about it real quick! I realize the author was trying to show us how ridiculous these characters are, but in doing that it really turned me off from the book, they were such caricatures and so hateful, and quite honestly quite unexpected in a cozy mystery.... I read cozy mysteries as an escape, NOT to have somebody’s political agenda thrown at me... even if I agree with it.... i’ve never read anything from this author, and I probably never will again, even if this book was just a turkey, I was definitely not all that impressed....

  3. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    The plot of this 24th addition to the 'Lucy Stone' series incorporates two topics prevalent in the news today: immigration and drug use. The amateur sleuth in these stories, Lucy Stone, is a wife, mother, and reporter for the 'Pennysaver' newspaper in her home town of Tinker's Cove, Maine. In the course of her work Lucy observes both of the above issues affecting her community. The book can be read as a standalone. ***** Lucy Stone is out jogging with her dog Libby, preparing for the Turkey Trot R The plot of this 24th addition to the 'Lucy Stone' series incorporates two topics prevalent in the news today: immigration and drug use. The amateur sleuth in these stories, Lucy Stone, is a wife, mother, and reporter for the 'Pennysaver' newspaper in her home town of Tinker's Cove, Maine. In the course of her work Lucy observes both of the above issues affecting her community. The book can be read as a standalone. ***** Lucy Stone is out jogging with her dog Libby, preparing for the Turkey Trot Race scheduled for Thanksgiving morning, when she spots a body in Blueberry Pond. The deceased is identified as college student Alison Franklin, daughter of local billionaire Ed Franklin. Ed is well known in Tinker's Cove for several reasons: he built a huge, ostentatious mansion that clashes with the town's ambiance; his beautiful trophy wife is pregnant; he's head of the community's 'Board of Health'; and he's an outspoken xenophobe who doesn't like 'Mexicans.' Alison's death is a shock to the local residents, who speculate that opioid use was responsible for the accident. However, Alison's toxicology screens haven't come back, and Lucy isn't convinced the girl was a user.....or that her death was an accident. Nevertheless, Alison's father publicly lambastes Mexican drug pushers for killing his daughter. Moreover, when three Latino youths are arrested for selling drugs in Tinker's Cove, Ed sponsors a conspicuous billboard showing the boys' mug shots - with the caption "America for Americans." Ed also harasses Rey Rodriguez, a California television chef/cook book author who recently moved to Tinker's Cove. Rey, who's descended from Spaniards who came to America before the pilgrims, is about to open an upscale restaurant called 'The Cali Kitchen'...... …….which will be managed by his son Matt. Bigoted Ed refers to Rey's family as 'unwanted Mexicans' and - citing (phony) regulations about dishwater effluent - says the eatery has to use paper plates. Rey's attorney is confident that Ed's restrictions won't hold up, and preparations continue to open the classy restaurant. Shortly afterwards, a group calling itself "America for Americans" holds a raucous demonstration at The Cali Kitchen, shouting and throwing rocks.....with Ed looking on from his SUV. In the midst of the hubbub, someone is shot to death, and Matt Rodriguez becomes a suspect. In a side plot, Lucy observes regular drug sales in a parking lot near her jogging path. Planning to write an article, Lucy stakes out the spot with her camera.....and sees a young man named Hank - who went to college with her daughter - making a buy. Lucy confronts Hank about the drugs and the police about the pusher. Though the story contains two deaths - as well as illegal drug sales - it's not structured as a typical mystery. There's very little detective work, either by Lucy or the police. Instead, a 'lightbulb moment' leads Lucy to the truth about what happened to Allison and Ed, which (to me) is cheating. I have two more quibbles with the book. First, when Lucy looks into rehab facilities for Hank, she learns that they're hard to get into and very expensive. However - almost miraculously - a spot becomes available; money is found; and Hank is happy to go. This isn't realistic, and probably doesn't reflect reality for most drug addicts. Second, Ed Franklin's blatant xenophobia is overdone. Ed's frequent, obnoxious rants against Mexicans are meant to show how 'wrong-thinking' he is.....but there's a LOT of this mean-spirited blather. To be fair, in an interview the author noted that her novels explore current topics that catch her attention. In this book the things that inspired Leslie Meier were President Trump's 'personality' (nuff said); and how ubiquitous the drug trade has become. I think long-time fans of the Lucy Stone series would like this book, which contains well-liked, familiar characters. New readers, however, might want to start with a different volume. You can follow my reviews at https://reviewsbybarbsaffer.blogspot....

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kat

    Lucy and Libby the lab (who seriously is one of my favorite characters in the series for the way she’s constantly sitting by while everyone is cooking, waiting for human food) are out for a run one morning when they discover a person has fallen through the thin ice at Blueberry Pond. But was it an accident, a suicide, or did something more insidious occur? Complicating matters is the fact that (view spoiler)[ the deceased father is a wealthy man who wants to assert power over the town council. T Lucy and Libby the lab (who seriously is one of my favorite characters in the series for the way she’s constantly sitting by while everyone is cooking, waiting for human food) are out for a run one morning when they discover a person has fallen through the thin ice at Blueberry Pond. But was it an accident, a suicide, or did something more insidious occur? Complicating matters is the fact that (view spoiler)[ the deceased father is a wealthy man who wants to assert power over the town council. There’s a drug problem in Tinker’s Cove, a racism problem in Tinker’s Cove, and dead bodies keep appearing. (hide spoiler)] This one had some heavier subject matter and not as much holiday themed material as other holiday books. Still, it had an interesting mystery to solve and I always enjoy the Lucy Stone books. Please excuse typos/name misspellings. Entered on screen reader.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Diane Hernandez

    Disappointing entry in the Lucy Stone series. After 23 books, I realize that an author may get tired of a genre or a set of characters.  I give Ms. Meier credit for trying to update the setting by adding current events.  However, the white supremacists in this novel are just ethnic stereotypes that sound suspiciously similar to Trump supporters.  That choice may offend some readers.  In addition, I felt like I was being hit over the head with the numerous references to the opioid epidemic.  I get Disappointing entry in the Lucy Stone series. After 23 books, I realize that an author may get tired of a genre or a set of characters.  I give Ms. Meier credit for trying to update the setting by adding current events.  However, the white supremacists in this novel are just ethnic stereotypes that sound suspiciously similar to Trump supporters.  That choice may offend some readers.  In addition, I felt like I was being hit over the head with the numerous references to the opioid epidemic.  I get it.  Opioids are baaaad. Unfortunately, now my head hurts so much that I need to take some opioids (just kidding). The quick resolution of the plot had so many coincidences that it was totally unbelievable. I have to say that I wouldn’t recommend this book to anyone.  If you like cozy mysteries, please read any other book by this author.  I guarantee it will be better than the Turkey Trot Murder and many of the other cozy mysteries currently being marketed. However, I have to reluctantly (because I love the other books in the series) give 1 star for this one. Thanks to the publisher, Kensington Books, and netgalley for an advanced review copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. Read this and other book reviews on my blog, dianereviewsbooks.com.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lena H.

    DNF I've read every book in this series. Leslie Meier was never good at creating likeable characters. Lucy's a doormat, her husband is a controlling ape, and her children are ungrateful miscreants. But in early books there were some interesting side characters and decent storylines and she managed to make it work. Lately her books seem to be nothing but bizarre political platforms peopled by disgusting caricatures of the worst stereotypes she could drum up across the entire spectrum. There's too DNF I've read every book in this series. Leslie Meier was never good at creating likeable characters. Lucy's a doormat, her husband is a controlling ape, and her children are ungrateful miscreants. But in early books there were some interesting side characters and decent storylines and she managed to make it work. Lately her books seem to be nothing but bizarre political platforms peopled by disgusting caricatures of the worst stereotypes she could drum up across the entire spectrum. There's too much hate in this for me to handle.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Betsy

    DNF. Ms. Meiers seems intent on injecting more and more current events into her books. It was the greedy 1 %ers a few books ago and racism and the opiate epidemic with this book. While important issues, I read cozies in order to step outside of what is happening in the world. Sadly, it is time to move on from this series.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    Lucy Stone is training for Tinker Cove's annual Thanksgiving Day Turkey Trot when she stumbles across the body of Alison Franklin facedown in the partially frozen pond. Is it murder, suicide, or accidental overdose? Lucy is determined to get to the bottom of the story. In addition to the death of Alison, opioid addiction and anti-immigrant hatred are rearing their ugly heads in this lovely Maine town, and Lucy must do everything she can to protect her family. Incredibly well-written (as usual, M Lucy Stone is training for Tinker Cove's annual Thanksgiving Day Turkey Trot when she stumbles across the body of Alison Franklin facedown in the partially frozen pond. Is it murder, suicide, or accidental overdose? Lucy is determined to get to the bottom of the story. In addition to the death of Alison, opioid addiction and anti-immigrant hatred are rearing their ugly heads in this lovely Maine town, and Lucy must do everything she can to protect her family. Incredibly well-written (as usual, Ms. Meier!!!) and fast-paced, this cozy mystery will keep the reader up well into the wee hours of the night because they won't be able to put it down. Loved it, and highly recommend! A+++

  9. 5 out of 5

    Carla Johnson-Hicks

    If you have never read a Lucy Stone Mystery, this one will work as a standalone story. The amateur sleuth in these stories, Lucy Stone, is a wife, mother, and reporter for the 'Pennysaver' newspaper in her home town of Tinker's Cove, Maine. Lucy and her husband are empty-nesters but with it being Thanksgiving, her children and grandson are back for a visit. When there are a couple of murders in town, a young woman and her father, Lucy is tasked by her boss to get the scoop. That, of course, sets If you have never read a Lucy Stone Mystery, this one will work as a standalone story. The amateur sleuth in these stories, Lucy Stone, is a wife, mother, and reporter for the 'Pennysaver' newspaper in her home town of Tinker's Cove, Maine. Lucy and her husband are empty-nesters but with it being Thanksgiving, her children and grandson are back for a visit. When there are a couple of murders in town, a young woman and her father, Lucy is tasked by her boss to get the scoop. That, of course, sets Lucy on a course to investigate the crimes. The plot of this story incorporates two topics prevalent in the news today: immigration and drug use. In the course of her work Lucy observes both of the above issues affecting her community. The one thing that I didn't like about this story was the fact that Lucy's job took precedence over her family and the holidays, which was a bit disconcerting for me. The culprit was a bit unexpected, but understandable. A quick holiday story that is what I have come to expect in this series.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    Good book but more political than most. My top suspect did turn out to be guilty.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Elaine

    Fantastic! Couldn't put it down, had to read in one sitting! I have never read a book by Leslie Meier before this one and also have only read a few cozy mysteries in my lifetime. I occasionally watch some cozy mysteries on Hallmark channel and I believe this would make an excellent movie! This book is so timely! The theme of Thanksgiving, as an important national American holiday, fits so well with the other themes Meier addresses in her murder mystery. While the investigation of a young adult's Fantastic! Couldn't put it down, had to read in one sitting! I have never read a book by Leslie Meier before this one and also have only read a few cozy mysteries in my lifetime. I occasionally watch some cozy mysteries on Hallmark channel and I believe this would make an excellent movie! This book is so timely! The theme of Thanksgiving, as an important national American holiday, fits so well with the other themes Meier addresses in her murder mystery. While the investigation of a young adult's death takes the forefront, larger societal issues are at play throughout. The opiate epidemic and immigration, both connected to racism, take the lead, while misogyny, police brutality, classicism, and neo-nationalism follow-up, as issues felt and reacted to throughout the story. These socio-political issues aren't merely mentioned, they are addressed and unavoidable. The reader is shown how they are prevalent in every aspect of our living in modern America. One can't avoid the cultural context we have constructed as a society. This story is bold and direct at confronting these issues. We are given the view of millennials, boomers, and gen-xers through the characters, seeing how none of these generations are static in their actions and beliefs (we are even given a view of the generation before the boomers with the character, Miss Tilley - I'm not sure what they're called). All are put on the spot to "take a side" and take a stand on problems in their Maine community, located near enough to major cities, like Boston and NYC, and the nearby college of the fictional town. I love this book and highly recommend it. My only criticism is that it wrapped up a little suddenly.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Trisha

    "Did he actually call me a big frog?" This was another silly cozy mystery. The mystery was pretty good but the who done it felt a little forced. But this is, by far, the most politically charged cozy mystery I've ever read. It broached the topic of racism and rampant fear around immigration and "border control." It also vented frustrations about a poorly funded medical community for both addicts and recovery and mental health. It was interesting to see all these topics tackled in one book and I'm "Did he actually call me a big frog?" This was another silly cozy mystery. The mystery was pretty good but the who done it felt a little forced. But this is, by far, the most politically charged cozy mystery I've ever read. It broached the topic of racism and rampant fear around immigration and "border control." It also vented frustrations about a poorly funded medical community for both addicts and recovery and mental health. It was interesting to see all these topics tackled in one book and I'm not sure I liked having it all thrown in to one but it definitely added a few interesting and funny parts!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

    I didn't like this book as much as usual, possibly because it was filled with talk about drug abuse and racial discrimination. Which of course are real things that happen, but I just wasn't really in the mood for it. While Lucy is preparing to run in the annual Turkey Trot Race, she comes across a body in a frozen pond. It's a young girl, and everyone is positive she was doing drugs. When her father, who was promoting riots about the Mexican people in Tinker's Cove was shot and killed, Lucy trie I didn't like this book as much as usual, possibly because it was filled with talk about drug abuse and racial discrimination. Which of course are real things that happen, but I just wasn't really in the mood for it. While Lucy is preparing to run in the annual Turkey Trot Race, she comes across a body in a frozen pond. It's a young girl, and everyone is positive she was doing drugs. When her father, who was promoting riots about the Mexican people in Tinker's Cove was shot and killed, Lucy tries to tie the two things together.

  14. 4 out of 5

    RO G'ma

    Turkey Trot Murder is the 24th installment in Leslie Meier’s Lucy Stone Mystery series. The storyline is well plotted and the characters well developed and relatable. There’s a lot going on in this book and there are lots of twists, and turns involving multiple murders, a bombing, and general turmoil in this small town to keep the reader engaged. Ms. Meier not only addresses the sensitive issues of drug addiction and racism that is so prevalent in our country, but also the generosity and forgive Turkey Trot Murder is the 24th installment in Leslie Meier’s Lucy Stone Mystery series. The storyline is well plotted and the characters well developed and relatable. There’s a lot going on in this book and there are lots of twists, and turns involving multiple murders, a bombing, and general turmoil in this small town to keep the reader engaged. Ms. Meier not only addresses the sensitive issues of drug addiction and racism that is so prevalent in our country, but also the generosity and forgiveness most people have in their hearts but is all too often not practiced. Lucy Stone lives in Tinker’s Cove, Maine and is a mother, wife, and part-time reporter, feature writer, and copy editor for the Pennysaver, a weekly newspaper. She’s entering the town’s annual Turkey Trot 5K on Thanksgiving Day and while training one morning, she discovers a frozen body in Blueberry Pond. The body is identified as Alison Franklin, the daughter of wealthy investor Ed Franklin, and the authorities originally believe her death may be drug related, but Lucy believes she was murdered. Ed is outspoken, pushy, and one hundred percent a racist. His new wife, Mireille, is around Alison’s age and very pregnant. Both Ed and Mireille are devastated by the murder. Ed begins campaigning against immigrants, the drugs he believes they are responsible for, and strongly objects to Rey Rodrigues, a Latino restaurant owner from California, opening Cali Kitchen, which will feature a sophisticated fusion menu. Ed is found murdered in his car and later, Lucy’s husband, Bill, who is the restaurant’s contractor for the building renovations, is injured when someone blew up the building. Lucy has always been relentless in her endeavor to uncover truths and is determined to find out if all these sad events are related. I received an Advance Reader Copy of this book from NetGalley and voluntarily reviewed it.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Hicks

    This is book 24 in a series. I used to love this series and anxiously awaited the next one. After the last few books I believe it’s time this author stops and either writes a new series or quits altogether. Ms Meier is clearly a disgruntled liberal and has turned her books into a political “crap fest” while I still enjoyed the main characters (it’s like visiting old friends) and she’s one of very few authors who actually age her characters each year. We’ve seen the four Stone children be born, r This is book 24 in a series. I used to love this series and anxiously awaited the next one. After the last few books I believe it’s time this author stops and either writes a new series or quits altogether. Ms Meier is clearly a disgruntled liberal and has turned her books into a political “crap fest” while I still enjoyed the main characters (it’s like visiting old friends) and she’s one of very few authors who actually age her characters each year. We’ve seen the four Stone children be born, raised and now with the exception of Zoe, they’re all gone off to live their own lives. Which is kinda sad because the family dynamic of the stories always added something great. However adding the topics of opioid addiction, racism and immigration into her story just comes off as “preachy” and making the main “villain” to basically be an exact replica of the President was a tad much. Instead of naming him Ed Franklin I’m surprised his name wasn’t something like Ronald Grump!! 🙄 as much as I like the characters of Tinkers Cove, it may be time to let this series go 😐

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kim j

    I am not sure how I want to rate this book because it was not a Lucy Stone cozy book. It was a political book and if I wanted to read about that I would have gone to that section to pick a book. I read books that are made up to get away from everyday life and enjoy reading. This I did not enjoy. It was about addiction crisis, race relations, protests and much more. I don't mind if an author does a story that includes these items as a story but not ALL at once and this was out of character for th I am not sure how I want to rate this book because it was not a Lucy Stone cozy book. It was a political book and if I wanted to read about that I would have gone to that section to pick a book. I read books that are made up to get away from everyday life and enjoy reading. This I did not enjoy. It was about addiction crisis, race relations, protests and much more. I don't mind if an author does a story that includes these items as a story but not ALL at once and this was out of character for the characters. Its fantasy to think that you get someone into rehab overnight and that will solve the crisis!!! I hope the author does not keep this up as its a turnoff.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Debbie Beeman

    I am glad I got this book out of the library instead of paying for it. I don’t feel this book falls into the cozy mystery category, it falls into the author’s political views. If she wants to write these, she should write opinion pieces for the newspapers not pass it off as a holiday cozy. If the author continues down this road, I’m thinking maybe the Pennysaver needs to close down for good.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Pria Alston

    Another Lucy Stone book in the series. I liked that it felt contemporary and using current issues. It was a little triggering as a POC I didn't expect to deal with racism and hate speech while reading a cozy mystery Another Lucy Stone book in the series. I liked that it felt contemporary and using current issues. It was a little triggering as a POC I didn't expect to deal with racism and hate speech while reading a cozy mystery

  19. 5 out of 5

    Robin Loves Reading

    Lucy Stone had quite a few busy Thanksgiving day's over the years. Cooking for her family of six, and any other family and friends kept her busy. With her children all being adult and living their own lives, Lucy has a chance to do something else to keep herself busy. She will be participating in Tinker Cove's 5K run. So she begins training vigorously. On a run she finds a woman named Alison Franklin dead and frozen in a pond. Who was Alison and was her death an accident? Actually, it was learned Lucy Stone had quite a few busy Thanksgiving day's over the years. Cooking for her family of six, and any other family and friends kept her busy. With her children all being adult and living their own lives, Lucy has a chance to do something else to keep herself busy. She will be participating in Tinker Cove's 5K run. So she begins training vigorously. On a run she finds a woman named Alison Franklin dead and frozen in a pond. Who was Alison and was her death an accident? Actually, it was learned that Alison struggled with a drug addiction. So, could an overdose have been the root cause behind Alison's death? Leave it to our amateur sleuth, Lucy, to get to the bottom of things. After attending Alison's funeral, Lucy beings asking a lot of questions. There was serious family dysfunction going on, and so there might actually be suspects involved in Alison's death. So, the holiday, the run and the murder all play a hand when it comes to keeping Lucy busy. Then the fact that Alison had been involved with drugs exposes a growing problem in Tinker's Cove, one of the serious issues addressed in this entry in the Lucy Stone series. It also deals with immigration. Despite the seriousness of this book, it was just average for me when it comes to looking at the series as a whole. However, because of the deeper issues presented in this book, I will say that it shows better growth for the long-running series.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tarissa

    Reporter Lucy Stone comes across another death, another mystery to investigate. Some of the townspeople want to blame it on drugs. This leads the plot to get into racial divides in the town too. Altogether, it's an intriguing Thanksgiving holiday read -- complete with, in fact, two deaths, and a particularly heart-pounding moment for a climax. Cons? A small amount of mildly "rough" language. Reporter Lucy Stone comes across another death, another mystery to investigate. Some of the townspeople want to blame it on drugs. This leads the plot to get into racial divides in the town too. Altogether, it's an intriguing Thanksgiving holiday read -- complete with, in fact, two deaths, and a particularly heart-pounding moment for a climax. Cons? A small amount of mildly "rough" language.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

    A fun read!

  22. 5 out of 5

    ☘Tara Sheehan☘

    The 24th in the Lucy Stone Series continues her sleuthing activities while also playing journalist. I normally have nothing but positive, glowing remarks for Lucy Meier and her mystery series but this one was rough. Only a few page in a dead body is found and it’s immediately told this is the daughter of a wealthy town newbie who has been irritating quite a bit of the town. That isn’t my problem. My problem was a remark made that because this was a wealthy person somehow that made her death worse The 24th in the Lucy Stone Series continues her sleuthing activities while also playing journalist. I normally have nothing but positive, glowing remarks for Lucy Meier and her mystery series but this one was rough. Only a few page in a dead body is found and it’s immediately told this is the daughter of a wealthy town newbie who has been irritating quite a bit of the town. That isn’t my problem. My problem was a remark made that because this was a wealthy person somehow that made her death worse – yes that was actually stated. Why is a wealthy person’s death more tragic than others? Maybe it angered me because I’m part of the 99% who struggles to pay their bills, has to budget carefully, has to hear my daughter tell me it’s ok if she doesn’t participate in a school activity because she knows we need the money for food. Yes it hurt quite a bit that even if Meier didn’t intend it this way she made me feel like my death and by extension life is worth less than the 1%. Granted I already get told that regularly by the 1% but to hear it from an author I admired made it worse. Then there were the stereotypes and ignorant comments made towards drug abuse. Don’t get me started on the racism used in the plot line because I will never get off my soapbox. I’m very pro-immigrant being part of a family of immigrants so this section of the story was playing seesaw for which part upset the most in this book. I come to Meier and others like her in this genre so I can escape from a society that tells me how I and others like me are the reason society sucks. I don’t want it rubbed in my face again, especially in this manner, in a fiction book meant to provide escapism. Were there any positives? It’s not your normal fluff piece by Meier but her main characters stayed true to how they’ve always been portrayed. She does provide great character work particularly since quite a few of them pissed me off so they felt authentic. The mystery aspect was her typically well-written and the planned out crime plus logical solve were what I’d come to expect from the author. I have a feeling this is going to be one of those you will either love or hate depending on where you stand on certain issues or if you even care when hot button topics in society get used as plot points in your fiction stories – particularly if you are used to depending on the author to provide light fair to get you AWAY from the hot button topics.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Fluff Smut & Murder

    Thank you to NetGalley.com for the opportunity to read an Advanced Reader Copy of this book in exchange for my honest opinion. Lucy Stone is back at it again! Just when you think there isn’t another holiday to revisit – a fresh new murder (or two) in tiny Tinker’s Cover, ME occurs. Almost all of the usual suspects are present in the tale, along with a few new additions. Is it just me or does Tinker’s Cove get a lot of new arrivals for a mildly financially depressed town? What I loved: While the mu Thank you to NetGalley.com for the opportunity to read an Advanced Reader Copy of this book in exchange for my honest opinion. Lucy Stone is back at it again! Just when you think there isn’t another holiday to revisit – a fresh new murder (or two) in tiny Tinker’s Cover, ME occurs. Almost all of the usual suspects are present in the tale, along with a few new additions. Is it just me or does Tinker’s Cove get a lot of new arrivals for a mildly financially depressed town? What I loved: While the murderer is a little predictable, the fact that Ms. Meier tackles issues (opiates and immigration) that are plaguing our country is very commendable. Her stance on immigration is neutral yet she manages to portray both sides of the argument via her characters very fairly. Ed seems to be a little Trump-esque in his looks, manner, and wealth yet her drug addicted character is what is most touching. What I didn’t love: Sue is just a witch of a character – I really don’t understand why she’s so fricken bitter and critical all of the time. Is she really worth having has a friend? More like a frienemy.. Maybe if she actually ate something once in a while she may be a tad but nicer. What I learned: Doesn’t matter who you spend the holidays with as long as its people you love. Overall Grade: B www.FluffSmutandMurder.com

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    What I love about this series is that Leslie Meier has allowed her characters to grow. A series that has gone on this long usually becomes stale, repetitive, and static. But Meier, at least to me, excels at making her characters dynamic, so that we see some of their faults and prejudices, and that keeps each book fresh. She is also not afraid to tackle some tough subjects like racism and drug addiction, which also makes the characters seem more real. Although this book reads more like a suspense What I love about this series is that Leslie Meier has allowed her characters to grow. A series that has gone on this long usually becomes stale, repetitive, and static. But Meier, at least to me, excels at making her characters dynamic, so that we see some of their faults and prejudices, and that keeps each book fresh. She is also not afraid to tackle some tough subjects like racism and drug addiction, which also makes the characters seem more real. Although this book reads more like a suspense/thriller and less like a cozy mystery, I still enjoyed it. The only reason I did not give it five stars is because there are way too many typos/grammatical errors for my liking. But it seems that there are a lot of those in almost any book I read lately, making me wonder if any of the publishing houses still employ editors or proofreaders.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    I've enjoyed this series over the years. Tinkers Cove and its residents are familiar and it's nice to be reacquainted with them. I was troubled by the new 'political correctness' of Ms. Meier's latest cozy. To me, cozies are not the best venue for attempting to express societal concerns, especially, to say it kindly, in such a simplistic manner. The violent demise of a character (his description will quickly let you know the person he is intended to remind you of) did not seem appropriate. I was I've enjoyed this series over the years. Tinkers Cove and its residents are familiar and it's nice to be reacquainted with them. I was troubled by the new 'political correctness' of Ms. Meier's latest cozy. To me, cozies are not the best venue for attempting to express societal concerns, especially, to say it kindly, in such a simplistic manner. The violent demise of a character (his description will quickly let you know the person he is intended to remind you of) did not seem appropriate. I was disappointed, as I expected more.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Daisy

    More of a commentary on current American events and less of a cozy mystery. Too preachy. Two stars is actually overly generous for this mystery. 🖓

  27. 4 out of 5

    Heidi Burkhart

    I am a big fan of the Lucy Stone mysteries. This one a little disappointing because one of the subplots digressed into the topic of heroin use. I felt that Meier may have had a personal agenda for this subject, but don't really know for sure. It felt overdone to me. Otherwise I enjoyed the story, and it kept me guessing. I am a big fan of the Lucy Stone mysteries. This one a little disappointing because one of the subplots digressed into the topic of heroin use. I felt that Meier may have had a personal agenda for this subject, but don't really know for sure. It felt overdone to me. Otherwise I enjoyed the story, and it kept me guessing.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    Could have done without all of the political overtones regarding immigration.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Steph

    I won't be finishing this. There are already too many drug use issues, political issues and race issues in the world right now........I just don't need that in a book. I won't be finishing this. There are already too many drug use issues, political issues and race issues in the world right now........I just don't need that in a book.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    I really enjoyed this mystery! The topics of addiction and immigration were handled very well and in very thought provoking ways. I am enjoying this series that is new to me!

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.