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The Akhenaten Adventure

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The New York Times bestselling adventure about two twins, many djinns, and one very magical quest. Meet John and Philippa Gaunt, twelve-year-old twins who one day discover themselves to be descended from a long line of djinn. All of a sudden, they have the power to grant wishes, travel to extraordinary places, and make people and objects disappear. Luckily, the twins are i The New York Times bestselling adventure about two twins, many djinns, and one very magical quest. Meet John and Philippa Gaunt, twelve-year-old twins who one day discover themselves to be descended from a long line of djinn. All of a sudden, they have the power to grant wishes, travel to extraordinary places, and make people and objects disappear. Luckily, the twins are introduced to their eccentric djinn-uncle Nimrod, who will teach them how to harness their newly found power. And not a moment too soon . . . since John and Philippa are about to embark on a search to locate a monstrous pharaoh named Akhenaten and his eerie tomb. Book Details: Format: Paperback Publication Date: 9/1/2005 Pages: 384 Reading Level: Age 8 and Up


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The New York Times bestselling adventure about two twins, many djinns, and one very magical quest. Meet John and Philippa Gaunt, twelve-year-old twins who one day discover themselves to be descended from a long line of djinn. All of a sudden, they have the power to grant wishes, travel to extraordinary places, and make people and objects disappear. Luckily, the twins are i The New York Times bestselling adventure about two twins, many djinns, and one very magical quest. Meet John and Philippa Gaunt, twelve-year-old twins who one day discover themselves to be descended from a long line of djinn. All of a sudden, they have the power to grant wishes, travel to extraordinary places, and make people and objects disappear. Luckily, the twins are introduced to their eccentric djinn-uncle Nimrod, who will teach them how to harness their newly found power. And not a moment too soon . . . since John and Philippa are about to embark on a search to locate a monstrous pharaoh named Akhenaten and his eerie tomb. Book Details: Format: Paperback Publication Date: 9/1/2005 Pages: 384 Reading Level: Age 8 and Up

30 review for The Akhenaten Adventure

  1. 5 out of 5

    James Trevino

    After a few more challenging reads I felt the need for a palate cleanser and this worked just fine. TAA might be the most British book I've ever read, from the style to the characters to the humor. But I can't complain about that. The writing is impeccable and you can really feel the magic of this world P.B.Kerr created. The world building and mythology are excellent, even though that is a two edged sword. While I loved all the interesting little facts, the book felt like setup for the most part After a few more challenging reads I felt the need for a palate cleanser and this worked just fine. TAA might be the most British book I've ever read, from the style to the characters to the humor. But I can't complain about that. The writing is impeccable and you can really feel the magic of this world P.B.Kerr created. The world building and mythology are excellent, even though that is a two edged sword. While I loved all the interesting little facts, the book felt like setup for the most part. But it was a setup that was needed for future installments (I can confirm that because I am currently at book #3 and it is amazing!). I mentioned how all things feel British: the villain, Iblis, is the same. He could be a Bond villain. And that is good and bad. He is not really that believable as a 'the most even djinni in the universe', but as I said, things get better in future books. One thing I will say is that this gave me the same feeling as a Dan Brown book: a well documented travel work. Kerr seems as in love with the numerous places the book visits as with the book itself. And every novel in the series is the same: an Indiana Jones/Robert Langdon type adventure. The pacing is a bit slow because of all the setup, but in the end it is worth it. I highly recommend this series.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Connor

    This book has a lot of xenophobia and fatphobia in it. It constantly throws down on anyone who is not able-bodied, thin, gender-conforming, and white British/American. The main characters do black face to commit a crime because it was “suitable for carrying out a burglary.” I didn’t like any of the characters. I didn’t care for writing or pacing. I did not enjoy this reading experience much at all, and I sadly don’t recommend this.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Katri

    I found this an entertaining, quick-to-read adventure book, and the central idea, that some people in the modern day world are djinns of the ancient legends whose task is to protect the world, is nice enough. But the plot solutions were too facile and convenient, and so it was not really as exciting and fun as it could have been. However, what bugged me the most was the attitudes the author showed, through the narrative and the attitudes of the characters, towards, well, pretty much anything tha I found this an entertaining, quick-to-read adventure book, and the central idea, that some people in the modern day world are djinns of the ancient legends whose task is to protect the world, is nice enough. But the plot solutions were too facile and convenient, and so it was not really as exciting and fun as it could have been. However, what bugged me the most was the attitudes the author showed, through the narrative and the attitudes of the characters, towards, well, pretty much anything that was not American white upper-class and thin. Such xenophobia, especially towards the French and the Arabs, such disdain of everyone and everything not fitting the right kind of bracket, be it fat people or Nimrod's one-handed servant or anyone. I really couldn't wait to be rid of the author's thought world (it annoyed me enough that I'm not sure I'd have finished the book had it not been my only companion on a two-hour train trip when I needed something no-brainer to entertain me). Won't be reading the next books, I'm really not interested to learn what his attitudes are towards other European nationalities than the French. Had enough of this kind.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Colleen

    What a really cute book. I will definately let my daughter read this book when she is older. I've seen some criticism's about the issue of smoking in this book. In the book, the reason why Djinn smoke is because they are made of fire and they like heat and smoke. But the character, Nimrod, clearly states in the book that smoking is fine for Djinn but terrible for humans. "But isn't smoking bad for you?" Objected John. "It's terribly bad for human beings, yes. But not at all bad for djinn." Person What a really cute book. I will definately let my daughter read this book when she is older. I've seen some criticism's about the issue of smoking in this book. In the book, the reason why Djinn smoke is because they are made of fire and they like heat and smoke. But the character, Nimrod, clearly states in the book that smoking is fine for Djinn but terrible for humans. "But isn't smoking bad for you?" Objected John. "It's terribly bad for human beings, yes. But not at all bad for djinn." Personally, I don't worry that my daugher will read this and want to take up smoking. Very likeable characters, adventure, humor and fun. Great book!

  5. 5 out of 5

    John

    The book, inspired clearly by Harry Potter if not Rick Riordan's Percy Jackson books, was ok. The two protagonists, a set of twins who discover that they are djinn with magical powers, felt cookie cutter and never really seemed to break out of the mold. To make things worse, there were a fair number of xenophobic comments spread throughout the book, the French receiving a good number of shots (hygiene being the number one thing attacked) though Egyptians were not far behind. Coming at the book wit The book, inspired clearly by Harry Potter if not Rick Riordan's Percy Jackson books, was ok. The two protagonists, a set of twins who discover that they are djinn with magical powers, felt cookie cutter and never really seemed to break out of the mold. To make things worse, there were a fair number of xenophobic comments spread throughout the book, the French receiving a good number of shots (hygiene being the number one thing attacked) though Egyptians were not far behind. Coming at the book with adult sensibilities, I was clearly more sensitive than my 10 year old daughter who just breezed by these blissfully unaware. That said, the combination of fairly mediocre writing and near-bigotry (or to be generous just poorly honed humor) was tough to get past. The final straw was the author, who is quite prolific and this is nowhere near his first, or even tenth, book made a mess of the pacing. A major new villain was introduced in the last few chapters and dealing with them felt hurried and poorly executed, neatly solved by a little deus ex machina. Nowhere near the worst book I've ever read, hence a non-one star rating, it was bad enough that I have no interest in reading the rest of the series.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Book Elf

    Have you read the Red Pyramid by Rick Riordan? It was like reading that but at the same time nothing fancy like that~ because i like this one better! I liked how it was written (I dunno, i really liked how UK writers write). It was like in the same boat as Red Pyramid, being Cairo and travelling in London and other parts of the world but not in a very hectic manner like Rick Riordan's throwing all information to you that you were sick of it and you cannot take it anymore. This story was a fresh Have you read the Red Pyramid by Rick Riordan? It was like reading that but at the same time nothing fancy like that~ because i like this one better! I liked how it was written (I dunno, i really liked how UK writers write). It was like in the same boat as Red Pyramid, being Cairo and travelling in London and other parts of the world but not in a very hectic manner like Rick Riordan's throwing all information to you that you were sick of it and you cannot take it anymore. This story was a fresh perspective from the source of magic of the magicians...made me remember Bartimaeus the whole lot because he is a Djiin too, and was trapped to Nathaniel's bidding. So here, siblings with a Djiin roots and on their puberty they have to acknowledge their powers as Djiin. So, "be careful what you wish for" was a saying that's always in my mind all the time. It also wants me to read the Arabian Nights stories~ because this book promotes reading among children and adults alike. When I read the intention of P.B.Kerr in writing this book in his interview, it made sense. He intended this story for his son, to encourage him to read. If it did not work for his son, at least for me it did. Six books of these adventures? I have 2 so far~ so , i will hunt for more.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Thom

    Read aloud with daughter; this book has strong main characters and a great mythology, along with excellent descriptions of the locales (New York, London, and Cairo). It is the first of a series, and we plan to dig into the next book very soon. This story is mythological fantasy, with magic, but set in our modern day world. This element, along with what is clearly well thought out folkore of the djinn is excellent. I also appreciated references to other books - Tales from the Arabian Nights and Th Read aloud with daughter; this book has strong main characters and a great mythology, along with excellent descriptions of the locales (New York, London, and Cairo). It is the first of a series, and we plan to dig into the next book very soon. This story is mythological fantasy, with magic, but set in our modern day world. This element, along with what is clearly well thought out folkore of the djinn is excellent. I also appreciated references to other books - Tales from the Arabian Nights and The Oxford Book of English Verse. The two main characters (twins) show excellent problem solving skills and teamwork. The supporting characters, while mostly caricatures, provide both knowledge and humor. So why wasn't it awesome? The first part of the book felt very slow, with not a lot going on. If not for the humor and occasional in-jokes, we probably would have put the story down. Perhaps that was needed for the first book in this series - a lot of exposition. Overall result, recommended!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ari Odinson

    I remember this book. It's been years since I read it, but I also remember that it was a thoughtful gift from a friend. She said she knew I loved book with talking animals, but couldn't find any so she hoped this was alright. To be honest, I always been fascinated by 1001 Arabian Nights so this was a nice little discovery since it involved two children learning that they were djinns. The fantasy world opened up and expanded upon the usual locations of fantasy middle grade novels. Therefore, I co I remember this book. It's been years since I read it, but I also remember that it was a thoughtful gift from a friend. She said she knew I loved book with talking animals, but couldn't find any so she hoped this was alright. To be honest, I always been fascinated by 1001 Arabian Nights so this was a nice little discovery since it involved two children learning that they were djinns. The fantasy world opened up and expanded upon the usual locations of fantasy middle grade novels. Therefore, I consider this more of a "four star" read than a "three star" one because I was not as in love with the plot as I would have liked but the setting meant everything to me. The same with the characters. The setting, the background information and the fact that they were djinns meant a lot more to me. My memory of the novel is mostly of the end and haunted feelings of the climax. It was fun. I enjoyed the novel. If I ever find it again then I would take the pleasure of re-reading the book. It's not the best because I remember almost nothing of the characters and plot. I do still remember ow much fun I had and how in love I was with the world it was set in. That. Is important.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Two american children find out that they are actually Jinn (or Genie) and set off to London to help out their Uncle, er, Nimrod. Not a bad book, slightly action-adventurish, but spolied by stilted writing and a quite bizarre hatred for the French, which might be ment to be humerous, but instead comes off as quite xenophobic. The former might be because the author tends to write for adults and was trying to write "down" for children - the latter, I have no explaination for, unless his English-Sco Two american children find out that they are actually Jinn (or Genie) and set off to London to help out their Uncle, er, Nimrod. Not a bad book, slightly action-adventurish, but spolied by stilted writing and a quite bizarre hatred for the French, which might be ment to be humerous, but instead comes off as quite xenophobic. The former might be because the author tends to write for adults and was trying to write "down" for children - the latter, I have no explaination for, unless his English-Scot hertiage gives him some sort odd long historical memory.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Stella ☆Paper Wings☆

    I read this book in... 2015, I think? I don't remember a lot about it except thinking, why tf did I read this. Don't take my word for it, as I'm clearly no expert on the book, but...... Just saying. I really struggled.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Marcella Chan

    The name "Alan" means handsome and the name "Neil" means champion.

  12. 4 out of 5

    KristenR

    There were a lot of things I liked about this book, but also a few things I didn't like. The Good: 1. The Fantasy Element - I was impressed with the djinn folklore that was used as the basis of the story. It seemed well researched and was used intelligently, and I liked the references to literature such as The Arabian Nights, and the New Oxford Book of Verse (My daughter now wants to check out those books :) 2. Strong Protagonists - John and Philippa are strong, smart children who show quick thinki There were a lot of things I liked about this book, but also a few things I didn't like. The Good: 1. The Fantasy Element - I was impressed with the djinn folklore that was used as the basis of the story. It seemed well researched and was used intelligently, and I liked the references to literature such as The Arabian Nights, and the New Oxford Book of Verse (My daughter now wants to check out those books :) 2. Strong Protagonists - John and Philippa are strong, smart children who show quick thinking, teamwork, and problem solving skills. 3. Humorous Supporting Characters - genial Uncle Nimrod, xenophobic Mr. Groanin, and wise, meek Mr. Rakshasas made me smile. The Bad: 1. The Pacing - UGH, in the first half of the book almost *nothing* happens! Lots of talking, lots of instruction about djinn history and what they are. I felt like I was reading my daughter a mythology article. The last third of the book, the action picks up and it gets more enjoyable. 2. The Writing - I won't say that the writing was all bad, but some of the dialog was a bit stilted and not particularly realistic for the 12 year old siblings. It helped to read it out loud with a child's tone of voice, but it just wasn't quite right. Some of the paragraphs were a bit convoluted and it was tough to get the right phrasing the first time when reading aloud. Conclusion: Overall I enjoyed the book. I hope that some of my complaints are a symptom of this being the first book in the series with exposition being a necessary evil. My 10 year old daughter really enjoyed it (in fact, when she read my review, she told me that she completely disagreed with my criticism) so we will be giving the second book a chance.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Uriel

    The book is about twelve-year old twins named John and Philippa Gaunt. They both live an upper class life in New York City,New York. But there lifes change when suddenly their wisdom(dragon)teeth are removed. After arguing to desire heat, they are sent to live with thier uncle Nimrod. When they reach there, they have realized that they are djinns(genies). Then their uncle trains them how to use their powers before they take advantage. Nimrod, John and Philippa are trying to discover where the "Se The book is about twelve-year old twins named John and Philippa Gaunt. They both live an upper class life in New York City,New York. But there lifes change when suddenly their wisdom(dragon)teeth are removed. After arguing to desire heat, they are sent to live with thier uncle Nimrod. When they reach there, they have realized that they are djinns(genies). Then their uncle trains them how to use their powers before they take advantage. Nimrod, John and Philippa are trying to discover where the "Seventy Lost Djinn of Akhenaten" are hidden, which leads to the capture and binding of Nimrod,and a murder of a man called Hussein Hussaout. After several adventures in Cairo,the book concludes with a battle in the British Museum where John, Philipa, and Nimrod successfully ensure that the djinn will not be used for certain purposes. But everything turns out wrong. While ensuring that the djinn will not be controlled by bad djinn to tip the balance of luck in the universe towards more bad luck, Nimrod gets confined in the same lamp as Akhenaten himself. it turns out he was a bad djinn. But it was a tough job for them to release Nimrod because they were afraid Akhenaten would escape. So they all went to the Arctic for cold temperature. As the coldness slowed Nimrod and Akhenaten, John and Philipa warmed up inside to get Nimrod as quickly as possible. At the end they succeed and go home. This book is rated a 7. It can be for anyone and its intersting. I liked this book a lot. Children would like this book because of its adventureous magical about creatures that are unknown to mankind but this would be a raelistic to the children who have seen it before there live.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Michaela Brenneman

    Really good starter to the Children of the Lamp series. John and Phillipia find out they are Djinn and can grant wishes. It all starts when getting their wisdom teeth out. They have a vision where they talk to their uncle and he tells the to visit him in England. John and Phillipia do as they are told, on the plane they meet a nice couple who wish they accidently grant. They find out they are Djinn and go into the desert to practice their powers, but an evil source is stirring up trouble back ho Really good starter to the Children of the Lamp series. John and Phillipia find out they are Djinn and can grant wishes. It all starts when getting their wisdom teeth out. They have a vision where they talk to their uncle and he tells the to visit him in England. John and Phillipia do as they are told, on the plane they meet a nice couple who wish they accidently grant. They find out they are Djinn and go into the desert to practice their powers, but an evil source is stirring up trouble back home. After killing a friend of the uncle's, Uncle Nimrod leaves to find out how. The twins find their uncle trapped in a tomb. They go to the library with a fellow French Lady who turns out to be possed by the evil man Iblis. Iblis traps them in glass jars. Nimrod comes to the rescue and saves the day. You may be saying what does this have to do with the Akhenaten Adenture? Don't worry,I'm getting their. They go to a museum and find the 70 lost Djinn and Akhenanten who turns out to be evil, Akhenaten took their uncle captive. They end up trapping him in the same jar as their uncle is in! They freeze them, go in the bottle get Nimrod out, and then they shut the lid on Akhenanten when he trying to get out. The end is the start to the next book. At the end Phillipia is learning to play a Djinn luck/dice rolling game. I recomend this book to anyone who likes fantasy, adventure, and plot twists. This book is definately going to keep you on your toes. Enjoy!!!!!!!!!!!!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Luann

    This series was highly recommended to me by a couple of my library students several years ago. It was also recommended to me by a librarian friend. So this first book in the series has been on my to-read list all that time. I probably never would have actually read it if I wasn't participating in a challenge to read ten books this year that have been on my TBR the longest. I'm glad I finally got around to reading this, and I did mostly enjoy it. But I didn't fall in love with it. I thought the i This series was highly recommended to me by a couple of my library students several years ago. It was also recommended to me by a librarian friend. So this first book in the series has been on my to-read list all that time. I probably never would have actually read it if I wasn't participating in a challenge to read ten books this year that have been on my TBR the longest. I'm glad I finally got around to reading this, and I did mostly enjoy it. But I didn't fall in love with it. I thought the ideas were very clever and may inspire some children to want to know more about Egypt and the Arabian Nights and djinn. But I could never really warm up to Nimrod - which is funny (or sad?) since the author says in the notes at the end that "Nimrod is bits of me. Pompous. A little bit." I listened to parts of this as an audiobook and I found the narrator's voice for Nimrod to be quite annoying as well. Towards the end I did find myself getting caught up in the story and really hoping that all went well for Philippa and John. I don't know if I'll rush out and read any of the sequels, but I will recommend this to library students who are looking for a really interesting fantasy. 3.5 stars.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Gabby

    The actual rating is probably closer to a 4.58 star rating, since I had a few slight problems with the story. Overall, I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book, despite how long it took me to read. It took a bit of time to get into the book, and I'm glad that I read through the book and didn't put it down like I might have. So like most 'children's books' that I've read, the two main characters, John and Philippa, where more mature for their age, but I think that aspect fit in nicely with the rest The actual rating is probably closer to a 4.58 star rating, since I had a few slight problems with the story. Overall, I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book, despite how long it took me to read. It took a bit of time to get into the book, and I'm glad that I read through the book and didn't put it down like I might have. So like most 'children's books' that I've read, the two main characters, John and Philippa, where more mature for their age, but I think that aspect fit in nicely with the rest of the story. Also, I loved how well thought out the world was (basically, the world building was fabulous). The plot was well-thought-out, but the scene at the end (view spoiler)[with the twins and Groanin flying to the North Pole and conveniently finding a guide and all the right flights in what seemed like a very short amount of time (hide spoiler)] seemed a bit too convenient.(view spoiler)[As did the 'trapping Akhenaten' scene. Maybe I'm just used to death and mayhem and expected more death and mayhem. That's a morbid thought. (hide spoiler)] I will be picking up the other books in the series, but probably not that soon, with school about to start and everything.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sophie

    My grandpa bought me this book for Christmas as he had read some of Kerr's adult novels and while on Amazon he discovered that Kerr had written some books for children. Apparently it has really good reviews and I can see why! I absolutely loved this book. The story is about two twins; John and Philippa, who discover that they are djinn (kind of like a genie, although the word genie is repugnant to the djinn). All the characters are well developed and extremely likable. The plotline is clever and My grandpa bought me this book for Christmas as he had read some of Kerr's adult novels and while on Amazon he discovered that Kerr had written some books for children. Apparently it has really good reviews and I can see why! I absolutely loved this book. The story is about two twins; John and Philippa, who discover that they are djinn (kind of like a genie, although the word genie is repugnant to the djinn). All the characters are well developed and extremely likable. The plotline is clever and very enjoyable. My favorite parts were when John, Philippa and their Uncle Nimrod took the form of three policeman and the parts where they went inside the bottles. (view spoiler)[It was also really clever how the two dogs turned out to be their Dad's brothers who their mother transformed! (hide spoiler)] I would recommend this to children and adults alike. It is an amazing adventure story and I will definitely be reading the next in the series. Thank you Gramps for introducing me to another fantastic story teller.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Halli

    I really enjoyed reading this book and after reading negative reviews on Amazon, it just strikes me as funny as to what I don't notice when reading a book or things I automatically pass over. Maybe I too am a racist and sexist individual but I thought that people would have larger issues with other subject matter than what they did. I enjoyed the book and felt that I got to know the characters enough to care about them and love experiencing their adventures with them. As a piece of fiction I see I really enjoyed reading this book and after reading negative reviews on Amazon, it just strikes me as funny as to what I don't notice when reading a book or things I automatically pass over. Maybe I too am a racist and sexist individual but I thought that people would have larger issues with other subject matter than what they did. I enjoyed the book and felt that I got to know the characters enough to care about them and love experiencing their adventures with them. As a piece of fiction I see the author doing what he had to do for the story. Is the subject matter and language in pieces of fiction automatically representations of what the author believes? If a character has racist leanings is that the author's real feeling coming out? If that's the case then it justifies people choosing to ban books but if not, people need to relax the hell down. Its a book, written by a fallible man living in a fallible country, in a fallible world.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lee

    have an issue with the fact that 99% of the characters in the story were white, and I also was not a fan of the blatant racism from one of the characters that went completely unchallenged. The plot also moved in weird leaps and bounds and the explanations for a lot of the "magic" was unsatisfactory. I get that this is targeted at younger audiences, but still. Also, the two main characters have magical powers, but when they need space suits, they just happen to buy them at a department store? Lik have an issue with the fact that 99% of the characters in the story were white, and I also was not a fan of the blatant racism from one of the characters that went completely unchallenged. The plot also moved in weird leaps and bounds and the explanations for a lot of the "magic" was unsatisfactory. I get that this is targeted at younger audiences, but still. Also, the two main characters have magical powers, but when they need space suits, they just happen to buy them at a department store? Like actual NASA space suits?

  20. 5 out of 5

    Christy

    Corben and I really loved this book! We're definitely going to continue with this series. I love the way the author tied a lot of things in the world to the existence of Jin. There was a lot of smoking (Jin are made from fire so they smoke) and some possessing of others' bodies so I wouldn't recommend it for younger readers. We haven't come across many books having to do with Jinni so this was a nice change.

  21. 4 out of 5

    monigr(a.k.a. Monika)

    When i first picked this book up, I thought`it looks interesting.` But boy was I in for an adventure. From London, to Egypt, this book tells about 2 young kids who discover that they are djinn(genies). They must fight the evilest djinn in the world, and defeat an evil ancient Egyptian pharaoh named Akhenaten (we learned about him in history this year.). When i first picked this book up, I thought`it looks interesting.` But boy was I in for an adventure. From London, to Egypt, this book tells about 2 young kids who discover that they are djinn(genies). They must fight the evilest djinn in the world, and defeat an evil ancient Egyptian pharaoh named Akhenaten (we learned about him in history this year.).

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lori

    Awsome! We all enjoyed this story. A bit scary in parts but no more than the first harry potter book that we listened to in our last car trip. A bit long sometimes with overly complicated explanations that if i was reading i would have skimmed thru. Seriously... do we need a techinical explination of why genie's can survive in a bottle? just suspend your disbelif!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    I just discovered this wonderful fantasy series about 12 year-old boy-girl twins who live in New York City and discover that they're djinns. In this first book they accompany their English Uncle Nimrod to Egypt to learn about djinn culture. I've always been a sucker for books that take place in Egypt and this one is very well written.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Crysta

    While I felt that the twins' characters could have been a little more fleshed-out, they were pretty acceptable to read and maybe they'll become more real to me in later books. Besides, characterization really came out in their Uncle Nimrod. The story itself was entertaining, and it was a fun little read. There's also quite a bit of trivia in here too. :)

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    Horrible. In parts of this book the author tries to be funny by making fun of people (overweight people). I would not let my children read this. I don't mind frivolous books but this book has too much meanness.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Diana

    This was a fun read with my nine year old daughter. The author includes a lot of fun puns, characters and situations in his writing. We're excited to read the rest of the series.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Dinges

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This book is a very good book it has to do with Djinn also known as genies. I really enjoyed this book because it has to do with a brother and sister who were 12. They had to get there wisdom teeth pulled they are both twins and I guess thats not the normal age you get your wisdom teeth pulled. When they go to live with there uncle in england when they learn that they are genies. I found it intesesting to learn that there are more than 1 tribe of genie in this book there are three good tribes an This book is a very good book it has to do with Djinn also known as genies. I really enjoyed this book because it has to do with a brother and sister who were 12. They had to get there wisdom teeth pulled they are both twins and I guess thats not the normal age you get your wisdom teeth pulled. When they go to live with there uncle in england when they learn that they are genies. I found it intesesting to learn that there are more than 1 tribe of genie in this book there are three good tribes and three bad ones. They go to egypt because genies do better in hot enviorments. They meet with the leader of the bad djinn and he says he is going to kill the twins when i dont understand why he doesnt try to recruit them to join his tribe. The twins uncle has a butler but the butler only had one arm because the other got bitten off by a tiger and he had three wishes so i was confused as to why he didnt wish for a new arm. I learned later that they need that last wish because the kids uncle got trapped. I highly recommend this book to people who enjoy mythology and magic.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Cilla Savary

    I loved every book in this series. My kids had me read through the series twice. Fascinating story line about djinn and becoming one. Brilliant story.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Shaitanah

    DNF. Serious pacing problems (I got to chapter 13 and there wasn't anything like an adventure; I don't always mind slow pacing but when you have the word "adventure" in your title, it sort of speaks for itself), unlikeable characters, and well, frankly, I was bored.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Elle B.

    John and Philippa are no human children. They are Djinn: powerful, magical beings that are much like the genies in the old stories. They have a dream about their uncle nimrod, which their uncle sent to them as a message. It turns out their uncle and their mother also are djinn. After some lessons and training, they set off on a quest to egypt to find the tomb of akhenaten, an evil spirit who once was a wicked pharaoh. Unfortunately they are encountered by Iblis, the most evil djinn of all. He wi John and Philippa are no human children. They are Djinn: powerful, magical beings that are much like the genies in the old stories. They have a dream about their uncle nimrod, which their uncle sent to them as a message. It turns out their uncle and their mother also are djinn. After some lessons and training, they set off on a quest to egypt to find the tomb of akhenaten, an evil spirit who once was a wicked pharaoh. Unfortunately they are encountered by Iblis, the most evil djinn of all. He will thwart them until they drop. Want to know how it ends? READ THE BOOK!! Children of the lamp, the Akhenaten Adventure by P.B. Kerr is good for people who like books with fantasy & adventure genres. I recommend to children who have read the Harry Potter books and liked them. I also recommend this to readers of the Percy Jackson and the Olympians series. This has a similar plot to the harry potter books, only it is modern and doesn’t take place at hogwarts. It has humor in places, which I like. I also like how the author based the idea of djinn off genies. Djinn can turn into animals, make things appear and disappear, grant wishes, and even fit in lamps! Djinn can grant more than three wishes, but if you ask for a fourth one, it undos the first three. I feel this is in comparison to the Harry Potter and Percy Jackson books because they do not realise who they are until they are told who they are. Plus, in all of the books, the main characters are all are really powerful and sometimes do not even realise their own strength. Some key themes in this book are 1) identity, 2) mystery 3) excitement! I also like how the author sort of goes into a character’s shoes and writes it as if he actually is the character in that situation. Here is an example of that writing on page 135-137: “What?” exclaimed Philippa. “But I don’t want to be a camel. They’re so gross.” Her disgust at the idea of being a camel increased rapidly as one of the camels started to pee on the ground. “Nonsense,” said Nimrod. “These are very beautiful camels. The best in Cairo. What is more, the camel is a very important animal to our tribe of djinn. The Marid have been turning themselves into camels for thousands of years. Besides, this sort of experience is going to be very useful to you when you’re djinn.” For those of you reading this, Children of the lamp, the Akhenaten Adventure is a wonderful 355 page book for all ages. (unless you’re too young to read) This book was published in 2004 by Scholastic Inc. Enjoy!

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