web site hit counter Pep Talks for Writers: 52 Insights and Actions to Boost Your Creative Mojo (Novel and Creative Writing Book, National Novel Writing Month NaNoWriMo Guide) - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Pep Talks for Writers: 52 Insights and Actions to Boost Your Creative Mojo (Novel and Creative Writing Book, National Novel Writing Month NaNoWriMo Guide)

Availability: Ready to download

Every writer knows that as rewarding as the creative process is, it can often be a bumpy road. Have hope and keep at it! Designed to kick-start creativity, this handsome handbook from the executive director of National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) gathers a wide range of insights and advice for writers at any stage of their career. From tips about how to finally start t Every writer knows that as rewarding as the creative process is, it can often be a bumpy road. Have hope and keep at it! Designed to kick-start creativity, this handsome handbook from the executive director of National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) gathers a wide range of insights and advice for writers at any stage of their career. From tips about how to finally start that story to helpful ideas about what to do when the words just aren't quite coming out right, Pep Talks for Writers provides motivation, encouragement, and helpful exercises for writers of all stripes.


Compare

Every writer knows that as rewarding as the creative process is, it can often be a bumpy road. Have hope and keep at it! Designed to kick-start creativity, this handsome handbook from the executive director of National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) gathers a wide range of insights and advice for writers at any stage of their career. From tips about how to finally start t Every writer knows that as rewarding as the creative process is, it can often be a bumpy road. Have hope and keep at it! Designed to kick-start creativity, this handsome handbook from the executive director of National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) gathers a wide range of insights and advice for writers at any stage of their career. From tips about how to finally start that story to helpful ideas about what to do when the words just aren't quite coming out right, Pep Talks for Writers provides motivation, encouragement, and helpful exercises for writers of all stripes.

30 review for Pep Talks for Writers: 52 Insights and Actions to Boost Your Creative Mojo (Novel and Creative Writing Book, National Novel Writing Month NaNoWriMo Guide)

  1. 5 out of 5

    ☘Misericordia☘ ⚡ϟ⚡⛈⚡☁ ❇️❤❣

    Insane! Otherworldly! I'm instantly in love with it! This is a book I definitely will be willing to return to again and again and again! Q: Let thoughts race through your mind like whippets. Write with hurrious need. (c) Q: There’s a certain magic in writing intensely for a 30-minute block. When Ray Bradbury first started as a writer, he had to get out to write away from a house full of children, so he paid a dime to use a typewriter for 30 minutes at UCLA’s library. He was poor, and he wanted to ge Insane! Otherworldly! I'm instantly in love with it! This is a book I definitely will be willing to return to again and again and again! Q: Let thoughts race through your mind like whippets. Write with hurrious need. (c) Q: There’s a certain magic in writing intensely for a 30-minute block. When Ray Bradbury first started as a writer, he had to get out to write away from a house full of children, so he paid a dime to use a typewriter for 30 minutes at UCLA’s library. He was poor, and he wanted to get his money’s worth, so he was forced to focus and write at a frantic pace. He wrote Fahrenheit 451 in such a way and described the novel as an effortless creative experience. (c) Q: As the clock is ticking, it’s important not to hesitate. Let thoughts race through your mind like whippets. Write with hurrious need. Catapult over your inhibitions and illuminate every stray, orphaned thought in your mind and allow it to erupt. Drench your page with ink. (c) Q: So don’t worry about tripping when you write. Trip on a banana peel. Trip on a plot point. Trip on a character description, a line of dialogue, a single extravagant word. The more improvisational, the more foolish I am, the more likely I am to chase bolder angles, discover unexpected plot developments and surprising character pivots, and open the door to what I call happy accidents. (c) Q: Choose a name and create a character background for this new author—this new version of you. Write a story, a poem, even just a scene by inhabiting this new self, and see what different words emerge. If you want to take it one step further, create a Twitter account for your new authorial self. Who does your nom de plume follow? How does he or she comment on the world? Become someone different. (c)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Dannii Elle

    It is almost my favourite time of year. Not Christmas, not Halloween, but Nanowrimo! Every November thousands of individuals, across the globe, take part in a month-long challenge to each write 50,000 words of their current work in progress. This has become known as National Novel Writing Month, or NaNoWriMo. This is not only a hugely popular online phenomenon but has a slew of well-known and best-selling authors - including Donna Tartt and Erin Morgenstern - who have cited NaNoWriMo as the place It is almost my favourite time of year. Not Christmas, not Halloween, but Nanowrimo! Every November thousands of individuals, across the globe, take part in a month-long challenge to each write 50,000 words of their current work in progress. This has become known as National Novel Writing Month, or NaNoWriMo. This is not only a hugely popular online phenomenon but has a slew of well-known and best-selling authors - including Donna Tartt and Erin Morgenstern - who have cited NaNoWriMo as the place where they honed their craft and completed their manuscripts. So, with just one month left to prepare until this year's event kicks off, I am in need of all the help I can get! And help comes in no better form than a book penned by the NaNoWriMo executive director himself, Grant Faulkner. 52 Pep Talks for Writers does exactly as the title suggests. This features 52 short essays to kick-start creativity and motivate your writer's mojo, and is suitable for any writer on any stage of their creative journey. This is a complete guide to mentally motivating yourself for the chaotic month to come but, with timelessly solid advice suitable for any creative individual, this is also a good resource to be pored over at any time of the year. This handy book's universal appeal is furthered by the broad topics covered inside this relatively short but waffle-free guide. Gathered is a wide range of insights and advice for writers at any stage of their career and featured is a plethora of handy tips for writers on any stage of their manuscripts. Not only is this hugely helpful, but it is also a great physical asset to your bookshelves. This slim volume is full of fully-coloured and glossy pages that retain your focus by its use of illustration, bold text and vivid shades. With nothing to fault and a lot to gain, this is a book that should be packed into any writer's arsenal.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Beth Cato

    I received this book through the LibraryThing Early Reviewers program. Where was this book 10 years ago when I was starting out?! The good news is that it exists now, and people are still in desperate need of its perspective. Written by Grant Faulkner, Executive Director of NaNoWriMo, this book is the perfect stepping stone for writers who thrive on NaNo and want to stay motivated to keep writing the other 11 months of the year (NaNoWriMo, in case you don't know, takes place each November, as wri I received this book through the LibraryThing Early Reviewers program. Where was this book 10 years ago when I was starting out?! The good news is that it exists now, and people are still in desperate need of its perspective. Written by Grant Faulkner, Executive Director of NaNoWriMo, this book is the perfect stepping stone for writers who thrive on NaNo and want to stay motivated to keep writing the other 11 months of the year (NaNoWriMo, in case you don't know, takes place each November, as writers worldwide bond as they fight to complete 50,000 words of book in a thirty day span.) but I'd argue that it's good for authors at all levels. I mean, heck. I'm an author with Harper Voyager with 4 novels out. I know impostor syndrome, depression, crippling doubt. Those difficulties have evolved over time; they don't go away. This book still spoke to me in a profound way. The book is organized like a devotional. Its 52 pep talks are only about 2-4 pages each, easy to read in a few minutes, with each one capped off with a 'Try This' task designed to inspire writing and/or the writer to look at things a different way. It'd be easy to read this book, solo or in a writing group, over one year--or to read it as I did, in a matter of days. I loved the book even more when I reached the end and found a "Where Do You Need Help?" special index organized by topics like Starting a New Project, Feeling Stuck, and Nourishing Your Muse.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Robin Bonne

    I listened to the audiobook while doing my chores, and it helped inspire me to stop being distracted and get writing.

  5. 4 out of 5

    tappkalina

    "Making art tells you who you are. Making art in turn makes you." "Making art tells you who you are. Making art in turn makes you."

  6. 4 out of 5

    Audrey

    I was in need of some writing inspiration and this totally hit the spot. As a NaNoWriMo participant (many years over!) I've been a fan of Grant Faulkner for a while. I totally enjoy his podcast and his nuggets of writing advice and this book was filled with even more great takeaways. There are so many books of writing advice out there and what I loved about this one is that it's accessible and actionable. He gives direct, down to earth advice, and gives some 'to do's' at the end of each chapter. I was in need of some writing inspiration and this totally hit the spot. As a NaNoWriMo participant (many years over!) I've been a fan of Grant Faulkner for a while. I totally enjoy his podcast and his nuggets of writing advice and this book was filled with even more great takeaways. There are so many books of writing advice out there and what I loved about this one is that it's accessible and actionable. He gives direct, down to earth advice, and gives some 'to do's' at the end of each chapter. It was like chatting with a good friend. My only bummer about the audiobook is that Grant Faulkner himself didn't narrate it. No disrespect to the narrator (he was great), but I think Grant has a great voice and always love a non-fiction read by the author. That said, a totally worthwhile listen and read. It's also the kind of book you can dip in and out of, but if you need a little writing inspiration, don't wait until November to give this one a listen. FYI - This book is for sure targeted toward writers vs. creatives in general.

  7. 5 out of 5

    C.L. Cannon

    I found this book to be great for new writers and those who need more inspiration or direction. There are many things inside that are said in multiple marketing books, but as they say, there are no new ideas, just different ways to say the same thing! There were a few personal anecdotes that I really enjoyed, like Faulkner's practice of setting three writing escapes that are easily attainable each year—a way to escape the monotony of everyday life and challenge yourself without breaking your ban I found this book to be great for new writers and those who need more inspiration or direction. There are many things inside that are said in multiple marketing books, but as they say, there are no new ideas, just different ways to say the same thing! There were a few personal anecdotes that I really enjoyed, like Faulkner's practice of setting three writing escapes that are easily attainable each year—a way to escape the monotony of everyday life and challenge yourself without breaking your bank or pushing you too far out of your comfort zone. There are also some quotes and observations about famous classic authors that are actually interesting factoids and fun to take in. Overall, a good book, but your mileage may vary based upon your own experiences within the industry.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Wendopolis

    Definitely a book to add to my personal collection! Every writer or would-be writer needs to read this book.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

    3 ⭐️ I’m glad I didn’t pay full price for this. This book isn’t anything new. If you need a boost of confidence on a certain subject, or are a beginner writer and aren’t sure where you’re going yet, it might be just what you need. It wasn’t for me. I didn’t need anpther middle-class white man’s perspective on writing. And if you wonder why I just brought up the author’s class, race and gender, know that he announces loud and clear in his tips that he wanted to write a book about Thailand, so he ate 3 ⭐️ I’m glad I didn’t pay full price for this. This book isn’t anything new. If you need a boost of confidence on a certain subject, or are a beginner writer and aren’t sure where you’re going yet, it might be just what you need. It wasn’t for me. I didn’t need anpther middle-class white man’s perspective on writing. And if you wonder why I just brought up the author’s class, race and gender, know that he announces loud and clear in his tips that he wanted to write a book about Thailand, so he ate in Thai restaurants and watched a Thai tv show he didn’t understand... that’s why we keep seeing whitewashed version of every goddamn culture and cultural appropriation in so many books. And on another chapter about travelling, he mentions how we see life differently when we travel, as if most tourists aren’t taking advantage of and destroying the places they visit. I am also wary of non-fiction books where authors cite numerous sources but never give a proper bibliography or even add the full source at the bottom of the page. If you’re going to talk about a study that says this and that, I need to be able to find it. Otherwise I’ll just have to trust that your paraphrasing is perfect – and I doubt it is if you don’t give me the source. I did highlight from every chapter. Will I do the exercises? Maybe some of them. But the one thing I appreciated most was the “Where do you need help?” section at the very end. At least that’s somewhat useful (because that contents table in the beginning is just messy).

  10. 5 out of 5

    Emma Farley

    f you’re looking for something to boost your writing mojo, grab a copy of Grant Faulkner’s Pep Talk For Writers. Faulkner is the Executive Director of National Novel Writing Month, so he knows his shit! More relevant to creative writers and, in particular, those embarking on November’s #NaNoWriMo (write 50,000 words in 30 days), there’s still a lot of useful info here bloggers/non-fiction writers. He touched on something that I think of a lot and have trouble saying out loud: you don’t need permis f you’re looking for something to boost your writing mojo, grab a copy of Grant Faulkner’s Pep Talk For Writers. Faulkner is the Executive Director of National Novel Writing Month, so he knows his shit! More relevant to creative writers and, in particular, those embarking on November’s #NaNoWriMo (write 50,000 words in 30 days), there’s still a lot of useful info here bloggers/non-fiction writers. He touched on something that I think of a lot and have trouble saying out loud: you don’t need permission to be a creator – you’re a writer because you write, regardless of whether or not you’ve actually been published. I still find it hard to refer to myself as a writer. There are a lot of writer life lessons here that I can easily embed into my life as a blogger (in fact, I ditched the dishes in order to write this!), such as identifying your own creative process and making it a routine, building a creative community and focusing on what inspires you. Faulkner also touched on two big issues in blogging: comparison and imposter syndrome, something which I think a lot of us struggle with. I have to admit, I was expecting something a bit more like Creative Pep Talk, which I reviewed earlier this year, but I suppose it makes sense to have something more focused on copy and less on the way things look – although I think the book would have benefited from more firsthand accounts and top tips/inspiration from other writers. It’s easy to get stuck in a writing rut or to lose your way a bit in terms of content and/or scheduling but I’ve found the trick is to paraphrase one of Jenson’s favourite films and just keep writing! If you’ve just kicked off Blogtober and are wondering what you’ve gotten yourself into, or are planning ahead for Blogmas, there’s a lot to inspire you in Pep Talk for Writers (out on Tuesday). I’ve also got a separate post coming next week on how I find the time to blog daily, so pop back soon! *I was sent a copy of this book for review purposes and all thoughts are my own This review first appeared on A Cornish Geek on 4 October 2017 https://acornishgeek.com/2017/10/04/p...

  11. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Dugas

    This book deserves a place on all writers' bookshelves, right between Lamott's Bird By Bird and King's On Writing. Many such writing manuals too often rehash the same old axioms: write what you know, kill your darlings, silence your inner editor. Faulkner blessedly avoids this trap. When he does cover an old axiom, he dissects it, inverts it, turns it inside out, or simply comes at it from a new angle. Instead of admonishing the reader to silence the inner editor, Faulkner instead shows us how t This book deserves a place on all writers' bookshelves, right between Lamott's Bird By Bird and King's On Writing. Many such writing manuals too often rehash the same old axioms: write what you know, kill your darlings, silence your inner editor. Faulkner blessedly avoids this trap. When he does cover an old axiom, he dissects it, inverts it, turns it inside out, or simply comes at it from a new angle. Instead of admonishing the reader to silence the inner editor, Faulkner instead shows us how to make that editor work for us. Of course, the book is more than revisiting old advice. Faulkner, as Exec. Director for NaNoWriMo, knows writers don't need more tips, more advice, more admonishments. They need encouragement, news they can use in a way they can use. They need pep talks from someone who's been there and will be there again. For this reason, the book is delivered in short, focussed chapters. Faulkner doesn't get lost in long-winded anecdotes about his experience, but does, very surgically, use his own struggles to illustrate and enliven the pep talks. Rather than coming off as an old master casting his pearls from on high, Faulkner feels more like a peer sharing to-the-point war stories over a beer. I strongly recommend this book for writers of all levels of skill and success. For beginners, it will help through the most typical difficulties and disappointments. For veterans, it will refresh your spirit by reminding you of where you've -- and are maybe finding yourself again. Because that is how writing is. We are all beginners, regardless of where we stand in our development as writers.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Antonia

    Although the book is aimed primarily at novelists (both beginning and published), I found so much here that applies to poetry or any kind of writing — indeed, to any creative endeavor. Faulkner gives us inspiration, encouragement, and gentle wisdom without the typical advice we’ve all read in other writing guides: e.g., write what you know, kill your darlings, silence your inner editor, blah, blah, blah. I found Faulkner refreshing and interesting. The book consists of 52 short chapters, each on Although the book is aimed primarily at novelists (both beginning and published), I found so much here that applies to poetry or any kind of writing — indeed, to any creative endeavor. Faulkner gives us inspiration, encouragement, and gentle wisdom without the typical advice we’ve all read in other writing guides: e.g., write what you know, kill your darlings, silence your inner editor, blah, blah, blah. I found Faulkner refreshing and interesting. The book consists of 52 short chapters, each one easy to read whenever you need a little kick in the pants. I wanted to read the whole thing in one setting, but it’s probably better consumed more slowly, taking time to think about your own process and to try some of the exercises that cap each chapter. I’ll be dipping into this often. I really loved this book and am searching out some interviews with Faulkner (i.e., on various podcasts, such as Joanna Penn’s “The Creative Penn Podcast.” “Inspiration is a funny thing. It’s powerful enough to move mountains. When it strikes, it carries an author forward like the rushing torrents of a flooded river. And yet, if you wait for it, nothing happens.” — Grant Faulkner

  13. 5 out of 5

    MWT

    I received this book as a door prize for attending a Nanowrimo kickoff party. I've not been impressed with Grant Faulkner's pep talks when he fills in for a Nanowrimo weekly, but thorough editing of his essays for a book has done him good. These essays are great. Much better than I expected. I received this book as a door prize for attending a Nanowrimo kickoff party. I've not been impressed with Grant Faulkner's pep talks when he fills in for a Nanowrimo weekly, but thorough editing of his essays for a book has done him good. These essays are great. Much better than I expected.

  14. 5 out of 5

    The Reading Countess

    A quick e-read, I'm glad that I read it but equally as relieved to not have purchased a copy of it for myself. Here are the biggest takeaways, if you are into the Reader's Digest version of following along. 1. Aha's: Ray Bradbury's kick start? Make a long list of nouns to trigger ideas. They'll be disjointed, sure, but find a way to bring all of them to the surface, recognize their patterns, and you're off. Don't believe it works? Check out his list that jump started Something Wicked This way Come A quick e-read, I'm glad that I read it but equally as relieved to not have purchased a copy of it for myself. Here are the biggest takeaways, if you are into the Reader's Digest version of following along. 1. Aha's: Ray Bradbury's kick start? Make a long list of nouns to trigger ideas. They'll be disjointed, sure, but find a way to bring all of them to the surface, recognize their patterns, and you're off. Don't believe it works? Check out his list that jump started Something Wicked This way Comes: The lake. The night. The crickets. The ravine. The attic. The basement. The trapdoor. The baby. The crowd. The night train. The fog horn. The scythe. The carnival The carousel. The dwarf. The mirror maze. The skeleton. Find your people, your writing community, for "none of us is as smart as all of us." Help your readers give you feedback by providing a framework of questions: --What would you cut? --What would you add? --If this was your piece, how would you revise it? Vulnerability in writing is so difficult to overcome. We are conditioned to be accepted, to not step on toes. Don't be. Continuing that line of thinking, he quotes Brene Brown's work when she states that creatives can usually point to a "creativity scar." This is "a specific incident when they were told they weren't talented as artists, musicians, writers or singers." The way that most people heal that scar is to clam up, but he urges against this, warning us that "a stoic show of invulnerability can feel stronger than the weakness of openness." On the inevitability of rejection, he shares the Japanese word Osu. Loosely translated, it means to have patience, determination and perseverance. And this little gem too good to paraphrase that I simply must quote the whole paragraph: "The world in general disapproves of creativity," said Isaac Asimov, and that's because creativity disrupts the norms of the status quo. Defiance isn't an easy thing: it's a lonely pursuit. So any people love saying, "That's not the way we do things." or "We've always done it this way," and if you listen to them you've decided to live by their rules, whether it's the rules of storytelling or of life. 2. Mmm hmms: Other snippets that felt validating included the fact that creatives are slightly frenetic, that the dishes can wait (I feel better already) and that "ff a cluttered desk is a sign of a cluttered mind, of what, then is an empty desk a sign?" 3. Uh. Nope. Then there were little tidbits in there that I just can't saddle up to. One in particular? Dressing the part of a writer. Yeah, I get his point. We all need to make sure we are presentable. But donning garb reflective of the genre you are writing? Nah. Not my speed.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Christabelle

    A fun way to prep for NaNoWriMo! Listened to this in audiobook form while doing housework.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Cathy Ferringo

    Some great advice. I listed to the audiobook format and enjoyed it.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Erika

    This book was great! It helped boost my confidence about writing and made me excited to create. There were so many great quotes and pieces of advice that I found myself highlighting more than I normally do in other books. This will be a book I revist as I continue on my writing journey.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Monique

    I would not have survived my first NaNoWriMo without this book!

  19. 5 out of 5

    L

    "One day I will find the right words, and they will be simple." "Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing." "You never have to change anything you got up in the middle of the night to write." "No tears in the writer, no tears in the reader.” ‘You can make anything by writing’ – C.S. Lewis Pep talks for writers is an inspiring little book full of empowering quotes, helpful writing advice and inspiration that helps keep you motivated when writing. If you are someone wh "One day I will find the right words, and they will be simple." "Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing." "You never have to change anything you got up in the middle of the night to write." "No tears in the writer, no tears in the reader.” ‘You can make anything by writing’ – C.S. Lewis Pep talks for writers is an inspiring little book full of empowering quotes, helpful writing advice and inspiration that helps keep you motivated when writing. If you are someone who like me takes part yearly in ‘National Novel Writing Month’ or writes novels as a serious endeavour, then this book is definitely one to add to your bookshelf. Grant Falkner the director of NaNoWriMo has written this helpful collection of insights, tricks and activities for all writers in any stage of their creative process. Every year I struggle to find books that will help inspire and help me during NaNoWriMo, and this book is perfect. Every month online you are sent pep talks to help boost your confidence and creativity, and this book is packed with simply the best reads that I would highly recommend. One is left feeling bold and confident, excited about creating new work, inspired, empowered and ready to take on National novel writing month. This book; 52 insights to boost your creative mojo is a must-read for any writer, whether you are studying writing as a student, a NaNoWriMo participant or someone who is novel writing –this is the book for you!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Marlena Corcoran

    By noon today, the one day a week when I am supposed to abjure solving other people's problems and turn to my dreams, I found myself at the bottom of the staircase of "the cluttered basement of (my) daily tasks." Enter Grant Faulkner and a chorus of angels, in the form of writers who have, every one, been there. You know this, Marlena. You don't need T.S. Eliot to tell you that you cannot let yourself be brought to a halt by paperwork from the Library of Congress. Except that you do. "The life of By noon today, the one day a week when I am supposed to abjure solving other people's problems and turn to my dreams, I found myself at the bottom of the staircase of "the cluttered basement of (my) daily tasks." Enter Grant Faulkner and a chorus of angels, in the form of writers who have, every one, been there. You know this, Marlena. You don't need T.S. Eliot to tell you that you cannot let yourself be brought to a halt by paperwork from the Library of Congress. Except that you do. "The life of an artist is filled mainly with rejection," observes Grant Faulkner. What's wrong with us, that we persevere? The miracle is not that we get discouraged, but that day after day, we're back at the keyboard. And who can stop us? "You don't need permission to be a creator," says Grant. "Write with abandon. . . Cultivate your illusions of grandeur." You must have them, or you wouldn't have read this far. Desperate writers can turn to the topical index in the back. What's your problem? "Starting a new project?" "Need to go deeper, take bigger risks?" "Riddled by creative doubts?" Sage advice on these topics and more are grouped together for writers on the verge, who need targeted talk fast. And that's all of us, isn't it? Whether we crave a leisurely soak in affirmation, or strong medicine to snap out of it, we find it here, in "Pep Talks for Writers." Thank you, Grant Faulkner, for this beautifully written and ever-so-treasured volume.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Janine

    Written by current National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) Executive Director Grant Faulkner, this book is made up of 52 pep talks, all about 3-5 pages long, which is great if you want to read all of them at once or refer back to select ones for a boost of confidence. At the end of each one, there’s a short exercise to help reenforce each pep talk, most are not too difficult to implement ASAP. At the back of the book, there’s a reference guide to the chapters based on topics, which really helps Written by current National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) Executive Director Grant Faulkner, this book is made up of 52 pep talks, all about 3-5 pages long, which is great if you want to read all of them at once or refer back to select ones for a boost of confidence. At the end of each one, there’s a short exercise to help reenforce each pep talk, most are not too difficult to implement ASAP. At the back of the book, there’s a reference guide to the chapters based on topics, which really helps if you’re looking for certain categories. If you’re familiar with the NaNoWriMo event that takes place in November, they send pep talks similar to the ones here throughout, and while many of those I feel are hit or miss, the ones here are just about all hits. Clear, deep enough to understand the basics, but brief enough to get to the point without overstaying their welcome. Unlike other writing books, it’s not preachy about what a writer must do or not do or make the reader feel bad for not following the advice. Instead, Faulkner encourages the writer that all that’s needed is a bit of a positive boost at any stage of the writing process. It’s a great go to when I’m hitting a slump in my writing, which happens quite a bit.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kat

    While in the grip of NaNoWriMo fever, I saw this book listed in their store. Because I like to sample things before actually buying them, I rented a copy from my local library and found it quite enjoyable. The chapters are very short so it's easy to take them in small bites (which is great when you only have 15 minutes to eat at work) and is encouraging without being unrealistic or cloying. Some of the topics are easier to do than others, but there were plenty of good suggestions. Some I'd heard While in the grip of NaNoWriMo fever, I saw this book listed in their store. Because I like to sample things before actually buying them, I rented a copy from my local library and found it quite enjoyable. The chapters are very short so it's easy to take them in small bites (which is great when you only have 15 minutes to eat at work) and is encouraging without being unrealistic or cloying. Some of the topics are easier to do than others, but there were plenty of good suggestions. Some I'd heard before in different incarnations and some were new. For me, I found it to be a good reminder that writing is supposed to be fun. It's easy to get lost in the grind, especially if your writing isn't going well, which is a spot I've been in lately. So this was a nice reality check that doesn't downplay the challenge of writing, but also doesn't let you give up either. Since there are 52 pep talks, I'm curious to see what would happen if one tried to focus on doing an exercise with a suggestion each week to cover the whole year. If you're a writer or interested in creativity, you may want to give this a look.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Deb (Readerbuzz) Nance

    We writers want so much to write, and yet many of us have great difficulty in actually writing. That’s what these pep talks are designed for. Grant Faulkner, the executive director of National Novel Writing Month, is an expert on inspiring writers to write, and to write quickly, and to write well. In this book, Faulkner shares fifty-two insights and actions to jolt a writer’s creativity. Some that I loved (and plan to use next year) are: *building a creative community *cavorting...wandering...play We writers want so much to write, and yet many of us have great difficulty in actually writing. That’s what these pep talks are designed for. Grant Faulkner, the executive director of National Novel Writing Month, is an expert on inspiring writers to write, and to write quickly, and to write well. In this book, Faulkner shares fifty-two insights and actions to jolt a writer’s creativity. Some that I loved (and plan to use next year) are: *building a creative community *cavorting...wandering...playing *using your life in your story *trusting in the absurd *using the secrets of improv in your writing And, probably most importantly, *logging in the hours. This is a book I want to keep and reread a month into the year when my writing mojo starts flagging. Thank you, Grant Faulkner, for this book.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Shayla Raquel

    Pep Talks for Writers by Grant Faulkner is a must-have book for writers of all walks of life and skill levels. Each pep talk is unique and motivating and educational. My favorites included: —Taking a story field trip —Spending time outside under the stars to enjoy the solitude —Planning a mini writing retreat —Showing gratitude to others to heal wounds —Faking it till you make it when faced with imposter syndrome I loved this book so much that I did a session on it for my writers’ group. We had a cla Pep Talks for Writers by Grant Faulkner is a must-have book for writers of all walks of life and skill levels. Each pep talk is unique and motivating and educational. My favorites included: —Taking a story field trip —Spending time outside under the stars to enjoy the solitude —Planning a mini writing retreat —Showing gratitude to others to heal wounds —Faking it till you make it when faced with imposter syndrome I loved this book so much that I did a session on it for my writers’ group. We had a class called NaNoWriMo Halftime, so these pep talks were a huge help to our members. We made it interactive so we were able to solve quite a few problems our members were facing during NaNoWriMo. Finally, the best part about this book is that you’ll always come back to it when you need a kick in the pants!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    At some point, all writers and want to be writers hit a roadblock and production slowly stops. This book has fifty-two ways to jump start stimulation and break through the dam to let the words flow. Each thought had an anecdote, common sense suggestion, and practice exercise. Although the Table of Contents headings are very descriptive, subject index is included. I received this book through a LibraryThing giveaway. Although encouraged, I was under no obligation to write a review. The opinions I At some point, all writers and want to be writers hit a roadblock and production slowly stops. This book has fifty-two ways to jump start stimulation and break through the dam to let the words flow. Each thought had an anecdote, common sense suggestion, and practice exercise. Although the Table of Contents headings are very descriptive, subject index is included. I received this book through a LibraryThing giveaway. Although encouraged, I was under no obligation to write a review. The opinions I have expressed are my own.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Clive Robin

    What a wonderful book. I really enjoyed reading every page of this book that is quite well written in a simple and interesting style. I would certainly recommend this book to any beginner writer to read. I think I would re-read this book in the future. This book is easily one of my favorite books ever. *I reviewed the book on 6/6/2018. “There's the creative life. You don't need a certificate for it; you don't need to apply to do it; you don't even need to ask permission to do it. You just have to What a wonderful book. I really enjoyed reading every page of this book that is quite well written in a simple and interesting style. I would certainly recommend this book to any beginner writer to read. I think I would re-read this book in the future. This book is easily one of my favorite books ever. *I reviewed the book on 6/6/2018. “There's the creative life. You don't need a certificate for it; you don't need to apply to do it; you don't even need to ask permission to do it. You just have to claim it.” — Grant Faulkner

  27. 5 out of 5

    S. Gregory

    I love this book. I take it with me wherever I'm writing for the day just in case I hit a block or a slump and need those words of encouragement or inspiration. Faulkner is easy to relate to and motivating. Having both the Kindle version and the autographed hardcover from the NaNoWriMo site, this has proven to be an invaluable tool that helped me get back to writing every day. Thank you, Grant! I have been looking for a book like this everywhere and no others compare in regards to creative motiv I love this book. I take it with me wherever I'm writing for the day just in case I hit a block or a slump and need those words of encouragement or inspiration. Faulkner is easy to relate to and motivating. Having both the Kindle version and the autographed hardcover from the NaNoWriMo site, this has proven to be an invaluable tool that helped me get back to writing every day. Thank you, Grant! I have been looking for a book like this everywhere and no others compare in regards to creative motivation. It's a gem.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Evgenia Trofimova

    Maybe it is for a very specific type of people, but I had hard times with this book, cause it is very simple, nothing new and not inspiring. I write a lot for my work and have writer's block, but I am not a writer of novels. Had several attempts to go through this book, and sadly there was nothing that could inspire or teach me a new trick. So, unless you are a real-real writer, the one who earns by writing books and must keep writing pages no matter what, I would check additionally before buyin Maybe it is for a very specific type of people, but I had hard times with this book, cause it is very simple, nothing new and not inspiring. I write a lot for my work and have writer's block, but I am not a writer of novels. Had several attempts to go through this book, and sadly there was nothing that could inspire or teach me a new trick. So, unless you are a real-real writer, the one who earns by writing books and must keep writing pages no matter what, I would check additionally before buying this book.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey Fisher

    ABSOLUTELY read this before starting ANY writing project, especially NaNoWriMo!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Misty Harvey

    Most of you may know that he is the executive director of NaNoWriMo. During the beginning of this book, it really encapsulated all the good things that come with that 'magical' month of November. I couldn't put it down for the first part of the novel. When I got to chapter twenty, though. I hit a bad part. The title of the chapter is Put Your Life Struggles In Perspective. While I could see the value in such a thing, there was a terribly researched part that yanked me right out of the whole secti Most of you may know that he is the executive director of NaNoWriMo. During the beginning of this book, it really encapsulated all the good things that come with that 'magical' month of November. I couldn't put it down for the first part of the novel. When I got to chapter twenty, though. I hit a bad part. The title of the chapter is Put Your Life Struggles In Perspective. While I could see the value in such a thing, there was a terribly researched part that yanked me right out of the whole section. He has a part where he shows you an author's life struggles and you have to try to guess what author it is. It was the first one on that list that pulled me right out. "As a single mother, she wrote in cafes so she could escape her cold apartment. Poor, practically homeless, she was diagnosed with clinical depression and considered taking her own life. Her best-selling novel received 12 rejections before it was published, and her editor advised her to get a day job because she had little chance of making a living as a writer." While most people wouldn't pick up on any differences in this and wouldn't think anything differently, it bothered me. J.K. Rowling is an author that I take great inspiration from. I've studied her writing habits and have watched many documentaries about her life and how Harry Potter came to be. It was during one of these that I discovered why this statement is wrong. During an interview and documentary that she did with BBC in 2001 called Harry Potter and Me, she stated that people saying she wrote in cafes to escape her unheated/cold apartment is absolutely false. 'She wasn't stupid enough to rent an unheated flat in Edinborough.' The truth is, she used to have to walk her daughter Jessica around to get her to fall asleep, so she'd strap her in and go for a walk. As soon as she fell asleep, she'd go to the nearest cafe to work.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...