web site hit counter The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, February 1977 (The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, #309) - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, February 1977 (The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, #309)

Availability: Ready to download

Volume 52, Number 2, Whole Number 309 Contents: John Varley - In the Hall of the Martian Kings John Clute - Books Joanna Russ - How Dorothy Kept Away the Spring Gahan Wilson - Cartoon Steven Utley - Upstart Bob Shaw - Dream Fighter Baird Searles - Films: Fillet of Solaris L. Sprague deCamp - Tiki Ron Goulart - Lunatic at Large Isaac Asimov - Science: Asimov's Corollary Joseph C. Stace Volume 52, Number 2, Whole Number 309 Contents: John Varley - In the Hall of the Martian Kings John Clute - Books Joanna Russ - How Dorothy Kept Away the Spring Gahan Wilson - Cartoon Steven Utley - Upstart Bob Shaw - Dream Fighter Baird Searles - Films: Fillet of Solaris L. Sprague deCamp - Tiki Ron Goulart - Lunatic at Large Isaac Asimov - Science: Asimov's Corollary Joseph C. Stacey - Atomic Terms (Quiz) Fritz Leiber - The Pale Brown Thing (2nd of 2 parts) Georgia F. Adams - Acrostic Puzzle Cover by Rick Sternbach for In The Hall of The Martian Kings"


Compare

Volume 52, Number 2, Whole Number 309 Contents: John Varley - In the Hall of the Martian Kings John Clute - Books Joanna Russ - How Dorothy Kept Away the Spring Gahan Wilson - Cartoon Steven Utley - Upstart Bob Shaw - Dream Fighter Baird Searles - Films: Fillet of Solaris L. Sprague deCamp - Tiki Ron Goulart - Lunatic at Large Isaac Asimov - Science: Asimov's Corollary Joseph C. Stace Volume 52, Number 2, Whole Number 309 Contents: John Varley - In the Hall of the Martian Kings John Clute - Books Joanna Russ - How Dorothy Kept Away the Spring Gahan Wilson - Cartoon Steven Utley - Upstart Bob Shaw - Dream Fighter Baird Searles - Films: Fillet of Solaris L. Sprague deCamp - Tiki Ron Goulart - Lunatic at Large Isaac Asimov - Science: Asimov's Corollary Joseph C. Stacey - Atomic Terms (Quiz) Fritz Leiber - The Pale Brown Thing (2nd of 2 parts) Georgia F. Adams - Acrostic Puzzle Cover by Rick Sternbach for In The Hall of The Martian Kings"

12 review for The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, February 1977 (The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, #309)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    CONTENTS ◾Fiction: ▪️"In the Hall of the Martian Kings"- John Varley ▪️"How Dorothy Kept Away the Spring" - Joanna Russ ▪️"Upstart" - Steven Utley ▪️"Dream Fighter" - Bob Shaw ▪️"Tiki" - L. Sprague de Camp ▪️"Lunatic at Large" - Ron Goulart ▪️"The Pale Brown Thing" - Fritz Leiber (2nd of 2 parts) ◾Non-fiction: ▪️Cartoon - Gahan Wilson ▪️Quiz: "Atomic Terms" - Joseph C. Stacey ▪️Acrostic Puzzle - Georgia F. Adams ▪️"Science: 'Asimov's Corollary'" - Isaac Asimov ▪️"Books" - John Clute ▪️"Films: 'Fillet of CONTENTS ◾Fiction: ▪️"In the Hall of the Martian Kings"- John Varley ▪️"How Dorothy Kept Away the Spring" - Joanna Russ ▪️"Upstart" - Steven Utley ▪️"Dream Fighter" - Bob Shaw ▪️"Tiki" - L. Sprague de Camp ▪️"Lunatic at Large" - Ron Goulart ▪️"The Pale Brown Thing" - Fritz Leiber (2nd of 2 parts) ◾Non-fiction: ▪️Cartoon - Gahan Wilson ▪️Quiz: "Atomic Terms" - Joseph C. Stacey ▪️Acrostic Puzzle - Georgia F. Adams ▪️"Science: 'Asimov's Corollary'" - Isaac Asimov ▪️"Books" - John Clute ▪️"Films: 'Fillet of Solaris'" - Baird Searles In the mid-1970's, there was no author of science fiction at short lengths hotter than John Varley. "In the Hall of the Martian Kings" is Varley just a bit under his best. (The title comes from Edvard Grieg's "In the Hall of the Mountain King," music composed as an interlude for Henrik Ibsen's 1867 play, Peer Gynt.) Something goes terribly wrong on the first manned mission to land on Mars, and all but five people are killed. The people who die include the only two members of the crew able to pilot the lander. Those five people, three women and two men, are marooned on Mars, with limited food, water, and, especially, oxygen. But then things go amazingly right. Things start growing and creatures appear - and all of them seem to be made of plastic. This seems to be a planned response to humans going to Mars. But whose plan, and where are the planners? Two of the short stories are parts of series by well-known authors. "Tiki" is a Willy Newbury tale by L. Sprague de Camp. Newbury, narrator of these stories, is a banker who frequently encounters fantastic creatures and events. "A tiki," Newbury explains, "is a Polynesian statue or idol." When Newbury's son and the son's friend deface a tiki in a museum, the tiki attempts to take revenge. In "Lunatic at Large" by Ron Goulart, Goulart's talented and irascible series character, free-lance ghost writer Jose Silvera, tries to get a $10,000 fee owed him by a lizard man on the planet Barafunda. The Silvera stories always seemed to me to be some of Goulart's most routine and uninspired work, but even uninspired Goulart is amusing. Bob Shaw's story "Dream Fighter" is a post-atomic war tale in which one of the mutations that have arisen is the ability to make others see things that don't exist. People who have this ability can have the products of their imagination battle those conjured up by the minds of people with that same ability for the entertainment of the public. I found this unconvincing in many ways. In "Upstart" by Steven Utley, humans in space are captured by intermediaries of the mighty race, the Sreen. The human response is unexpected. "How Dorothy Kept Away the Spring" by Joanna Russ tells the story of a sick young girl named Dorothy who dreams that she is on an exciting mission with three strange, not exactly human friends. They must dethrone an evil tyrant. I think that the Oz reference must be deliberate, although it is never made explicit. Russ wrote lovely, evocative prose: She wandered slowly upstairs and down, through the bare halls and the dusty, crannied spaces under stairs. She watched the snow swirl silently around the corners of the house and went into the kitchen to breathe on the windows' frost-jungles, but the housekeeper didn't want her there. Much of this issue is devoted to the second half of Fritz Leiber's horror novel The Pale Brown Thing, later revised and expanded under the title Our Lady of Darkness. In the book, a writer of horror fiction named Franz Westen, living in San Francisco, still mourns for his late wife Daisy four years after her death. (Leiber lived in San Francisco; his late wife was named Jonquil.) He lives in an old apartment building, in which a number of his friends live as well, including Cal, a female harpsichord player with whom Westen develops a romantic relationship. In Part 1 of the two-part serial, looking out his window using binoculars, Westen spies a figure wearing pale brown robes at the summit of a hill. Curious, he makes his way to the top of the hill and finds no one, but when he happens to use the binoculars to look at his own apartment, he sees the figure in pale brown robes waving back at him. In this second part, Westen learns more about Thibaut de Castries, a deceased San Francisco author who had been obsessed with the occult. De Castries had mingled with other San Francisco authors such as Jack London, Ambrose Bierce, and Clark Ashton Smith. His malevolent influence lingers on and threatens Westen's very life. I am not generally a reader of horror stories but this is quite well done. I did not attempt the acrostic puzzle designed by Georgia F. Adams. The "atomic terms" quiz is not actually a quiz but a series of anagrams of single-word atomic terms. For example, "O, I'm Ruth!" is an anagram of "thorium." Gahan Wilson's cartoon shows a somewhat misconceived version of a pyramid. Isaac Asimov's science column is titled "Asimov's Corollary," stating that: When...the lay public rallies around an idea that is denounced by distinguished but elderly scientists, and supports that idea with great fervor and emotion - the distinguished but elderly scientists are then, after all, probably right. Asimov gives a number of examples, pointing out that his own decisions about matters scientific are always based on thoughtful examination of evidence. (If someone were looking for a motto to sum up most of what I have read of Asimov's non-fiction, I think a very apt one would be, "Oh, what a good boy am I!") Baird Searles reviews a film that I have not seen, the Russian film of Solaris, later remade in the United States. He dislikes it. The "Books" column in this issue is by John Clute. He is quite critical of two books by Alfred Bester, devoting half a page to criticizing one of Bester's dedications. Had Bester written "To Adolf Hitler, with love and admiration," this might be appropriate; what Bester did write was, "For the fans - for the wonderful demented fans." Clute is also most unpleasant about works by Edward Bryant and by Harry Harrison and Gordon Dickson in collaboration. He is somewhat less critical of the third of Frank Herbert's Dune books. There is a very nice cover by Rick Sternbach illustrating "In the Hall of the Martian Kings." I would strongly recommend the stories by Varley and Leiber.

  2. 4 out of 5

    John Loyd

    6 • In the Hall of the Martian Kings • 39 pages by John Varley Very Good/Excellent. Matt Caldwell is one of five survivors when the pod almost everyone is in ruptures. Twenty of the Mars landing party dead including the two astronauts that could pilot the shuttle. The main ship is in orbit but there is no way for it to come to the surface or to send help. The expedition just became a colony. They have supplies to possibly last two years, but the earliest a rescue could get there is five. The gro 6 • In the Hall of the Martian Kings • 39 pages by John Varley Very Good/Excellent. Matt Caldwell is one of five survivors when the pod almost everyone is in ruptures. Twenty of the Mars landing party dead including the two astronauts that could pilot the shuttle. The main ship is in orbit but there is no way for it to come to the surface or to send help. The expedition just became a colony. They have supplies to possibly last two years, but the earliest a rescue could get there is five. The group makes plans to survive, starting by seeing what happened to the pod to make it explode. Had some humor to go along with the discoveries they are making. 53 • How Dorothy Kept Away the Spring • 8 pages by Joanna Russ Poor. Dorothy has been sick all winter. She dreams of an expedition with the Hunter, the Clown and the Gnome. 61 • Upstart • 4 pages by Steven Utley OK/good. The Sreen want to keep the Earth's starship from exploring. The Captain will have none of it and demands an audience with them. 65 • Dream Fighter • 11 pages by Bob Shaw Good/VG. After the dust up many mutations occurred. Victor Rowan is able one of those people able to create images. Able to be caught on camera, but more real in person. He's on the tail end of his career as a dream fighter, where the two combatants project their images at each other. 79 • Tiki • 8 pages by L. Sprague de Camp Good+. Willy Newbury is invited to his boss's museum. He takes his twelve year old son and mischievous pal Hank along. The boys run along ahead. When Willy and Mr. Drexel get to the Tiki statue they see some minor vandalism and Willy has an auditory hallucination. 87 • Lunatic at Large • 15 pages by Ron Goulart Good. Vintage Goulart. Quipping protagonist, Jose Silvera, wants to get his 10,000 from Mazda, but Pablo has the contract and he's disappeared. Confronting Mazda has put Silvera between the government and KAML (kill all monarch leaders). 113 • The Pale Brown Thing (part 2 of 2) • 45 pages by Fritz Leiber Good. Franz Westen has or thinks he has seen a paramental looking back at him from his apartment window. He was in Corona Heights because from his window he has seen a shadowy shape there. He has an inkling that it has to do with megapolisomancy. Four years ago he bought a book by de Castries and a notebook of conversations with him. After seeing the paramental, Franz talks with Byers who is the expert, gives him a lot of background and actually believes he saw it and is not crazy. Not my favorite genre of story, rate it higher if you're a fan of horror.

  3. 4 out of 5

    jennet wheatstonelllsl

  4. 5 out of 5

    OTIS

  5. 4 out of 5

    Leroy Erickson

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tina

  7. 5 out of 5

    Michael Joseph Schumann

  8. 5 out of 5

    Alice Arnold

  9. 5 out of 5

    Dax

  10. 4 out of 5

    Justin

  11. 4 out of 5

    Dante

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Crowl

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.