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Condemn Me Not: Accused of Witchcraft

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“This woman was one of the most impudent, scurrilous, wicked creatures of this world; and she did now throughout her whole trial discover herself to be such a one. Yet when she was asked what she had to say for herself, her chief plea was that she had led a most virtuous and holy life.” —Reverend Cotton Mather, 1692 USA Today Bestselling author Heather B. Moore brings the “This woman was one of the most impudent, scurrilous, wicked creatures of this world; and she did now throughout her whole trial discover herself to be such a one. Yet when she was asked what she had to say for herself, her chief plea was that she had led a most virtuous and holy life.” —Reverend Cotton Mather, 1692 USA Today Bestselling author Heather B. Moore brings the life of her 10th great-grandmother to center stage. Susannah North Martin, accused of witchcraft in 1692, joins five women in the Salem Jail, all sentenced to death for their crimes. Amidst tragedy, Susannah finds hope and compassion as she remembers a well-loved life, and readers discover that love reaches far beyond the grave as Susannah faces the magistrates in Salem.


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“This woman was one of the most impudent, scurrilous, wicked creatures of this world; and she did now throughout her whole trial discover herself to be such a one. Yet when she was asked what she had to say for herself, her chief plea was that she had led a most virtuous and holy life.” —Reverend Cotton Mather, 1692 USA Today Bestselling author Heather B. Moore brings the “This woman was one of the most impudent, scurrilous, wicked creatures of this world; and she did now throughout her whole trial discover herself to be such a one. Yet when she was asked what she had to say for herself, her chief plea was that she had led a most virtuous and holy life.” —Reverend Cotton Mather, 1692 USA Today Bestselling author Heather B. Moore brings the life of her 10th great-grandmother to center stage. Susannah North Martin, accused of witchcraft in 1692, joins five women in the Salem Jail, all sentenced to death for their crimes. Amidst tragedy, Susannah finds hope and compassion as she remembers a well-loved life, and readers discover that love reaches far beyond the grave as Susannah faces the magistrates in Salem.

30 review for Condemn Me Not: Accused of Witchcraft

  1. 5 out of 5

    Montzalee Wittmann

    Condemn Me Not: Accused of Witchcraft by Heather B. Moore is a disturbing and brilliant book. Based on true historic events of the Salem witch hunts, this is a fictional account that hurt me to the core. The reader feels like you are there and you know the people, experiencing the hate, craziness, the superstitions, and the pain of it all. I don't cry in movies, books, TV but this book broke me down. I was wounded to the core when I finished this book, it was so moving. It is not the kind of bo Condemn Me Not: Accused of Witchcraft by Heather B. Moore is a disturbing and brilliant book. Based on true historic events of the Salem witch hunts, this is a fictional account that hurt me to the core. The reader feels like you are there and you know the people, experiencing the hate, craziness, the superstitions, and the pain of it all. I don't cry in movies, books, TV but this book broke me down. I was wounded to the core when I finished this book, it was so moving. It is not the kind of books I normally read and I didn't think I would really like it. I hated the concept and what happened but the book was excellent in getting this message across without blame or pointing fingers. Wow. I was breathless and stunned. I knew all this before, I am a big history buff and read this many times and it made me mad. Reading it here made me hurt, deep down. What a book! A 10 star book! I was given this book to read and under no obligation for a review but this book really shook me, I had to.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Bren

    “Unless I confess to a crime that I did not commit, I will be sentenced to death. The irony does not escape me. Lying before God will buy my freedom among men.” ― Heather B. Moore, Condemn Me Not: Accused of Witchcraft This book is about Susannah North Martin who was an ancestor of the author. It is also a masterpiece of writing, one that I suspected I would like and did. Loved. It is so good when the high hopes you have for a book are met or even exceeded. I am not including spoilers because we kn “Unless I confess to a crime that I did not commit, I will be sentenced to death. The irony does not escape me. Lying before God will buy my freedom among men.” ― Heather B. Moore, Condemn Me Not: Accused of Witchcraft This book is about Susannah North Martin who was an ancestor of the author. It is also a masterpiece of writing, one that I suspected I would like and did. Loved. It is so good when the high hopes you have for a book are met or even exceeded. I am not including spoilers because we know how this one ends. Susannah was accused of witchcraft during the era of the Salem witch trials, as were many other people. This book is told in two parts. In the present, she is jailed and awaiting her trial. But the book also goes back in time to tell of her life as a young girl and how she came to met and know her true love, George. I have read many books on this period in time. It both fascinates and horrifies me. But what really makes this book stand out ate two things. One: we get to know the other women in the cell as well. And we see the absurdity of these accusations and just how out of hand..crazy..things got. Condemn me not shows the tragedy so deeply that it is impossible, I think, not to feel emotional reading this. And angry as well. The other aspect that makes it stand apart...is the tenderness. Aching tenderness and the love story between George and Susannah. In as much as you weep for her fate, you rejoice knowing how deeply loved she was and I will freely admit that romances in books are not always my thing but I found the romance in this one as good as the other aspects of it. It completely carries one away and I adored reading about this wonderful couple's courtship. Five stars for sure. I will admit that I am a bit more hardened than I used to be and way more jaded. I now see how such a thing could have happened. It saddens me that I CAN see it. People are very gullible. And suggestible. And some people are just evil. And for me, I wanted to reach through the book and scream at all this lovely woman's accusers. So will you, I think. As great a book as this is, it's deeply painful too. In closing..highly recommended. A masterpiece. One of my best reads of 2020. And this is a book I will not forget any time soon or ever.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Katie W

    Some stories beg to be told and this is one of those. Based on the true story of the author's ancestor, Condemn Me Not delves into the Salem Witch Trials. My first exposure to the Trials was when I read The Witch of Blackbird Pond when I was nine or ten years old. Throughout my history classes in school, I learned basic details, but I hadn't ever stopped to think about what actually happened during this time in history. And what I learned horrified, appalled, fascinated, and engaged me. I closed Some stories beg to be told and this is one of those. Based on the true story of the author's ancestor, Condemn Me Not delves into the Salem Witch Trials. My first exposure to the Trials was when I read The Witch of Blackbird Pond when I was nine or ten years old. Throughout my history classes in school, I learned basic details, but I hadn't ever stopped to think about what actually happened during this time in history. And what I learned horrified, appalled, fascinated, and engaged me. I closed the book with one huge question--WHY?? Why would people (especially those silly girls) accuse those they didn't like and sentence them to death? I typically read Happily Ever After stories, and surprisingly, this one did have a shimmer of joy, but for all the sadness, this story captured my soul and wouldn't let go. I love the way the author tells the tale--a volley between Susannah's past and how she fell madly in love with her husband and her present, where tragedy has grasped her in its clutches. I felt it was very well researched and presented in a way that draws a reluctant non-fiction reader like me completely in. It's real; it's raw; it's a sorrowful tale. The life lessons that emerge from the ashes of a devastating part of history are powerful and will stick with me for a long time. Content: conditions of neglect and some violence (not too graphic/gruesome); romance (innuendo, passionate kissing, two instances of non-graphic intimate touching; fade to black between a married couple); some religious elements, as these characters live Puritan lifestyles, but definitely nothing preachy. *I received a complimentary copy, which didn't affect my review in any way. All thoughts and opinions are my own.*

  4. 5 out of 5

    Julie Carpenter

    This book was so much more than I thought it would be. I thought we would see the main moments and months leading up to when the main character Susannah North Martin was condemned, her trial and her hanging. We know as a reader that the author based this story on her 10th Great Grandmother who was tried and hung for witchcraft. So going into this we know how it will end. Yet, as I said before, it wasn't what I was expecting at all. The author takes the reader on a beautiful journey and remembran This book was so much more than I thought it would be. I thought we would see the main moments and months leading up to when the main character Susannah North Martin was condemned, her trial and her hanging. We know as a reader that the author based this story on her 10th Great Grandmother who was tried and hung for witchcraft. So going into this we know how it will end. Yet, as I said before, it wasn't what I was expecting at all. The author takes the reader on a beautiful journey and remembrance of the life, joys and love of Susannah Martin. We start sometime around the beginning of June, after Susannah and several other ladies have been in Jail for a month or so and continue on through late July. Susannah describes for us readers what is happening at the present for her, and interspersed with her jail and trial moments we read about her life when she meets George Martin. I loved both parts of her story and how although 50 years of time separates these two storylines, they flowed together very smoothly. The author also includes in between the chapters, quotes and dialogue from the accusers/accused and their trials. It was very interesting reading those, and seeing how the author used that research and history to create this novel. I remember when I first started learning about The Salem Witch Trials. Oh I was so furious. How could anyone do what they did. The group of girls who acted afflicted every time they saw one of the accused witches. These women and the horrific events they were forced through, most likely all because of someone hurt, offended or jealous of the accused women. It's heartbreaking to think about the craze of accusing someone and the lies and what people would come up with to accuse someone of witchcraft. For example: My cow died, it was because so and so was mad at me. I had a health problem but it was because of a curse or hex from that person. I loved how the author portrayed each woman that was in jail accused of witchcraft. Their hope, their sorrow, the many emotions they probably experienced as they sat awaiting false judgement. It was heartbreaking, it was beautiful. I admit that I did tear up, especially at the end. There were some real hard moments to think about. Family who accused family, wives, daughters, babies, mothers, siblings, probably all as a way to escape a perceived burden. I loved the beauty of the women gathering around each other, supporting, opening up to and knowing the pain that each was feeling. What they went through had to have been horrific and makes you wonder how they survived the day to day treatment, examinations, constant lies of loved ones. It was definitely an interesting part of history that brings much speculation and questioning of their hardships causing their lashing out at each other. On a happier note...the love story of Susannah and George was written very beautifully as well. After the despair and sorrow of the jail and trials(yes there was beauty in the women's actions and words but sorrow with the knowledge of what awaited them), the love story brought light and hope and joy back into the novel. The balance between the two really made this novel what it is. It's hard and emotionally taxing on a reader when all we read about it is sorrow and despair. But the addition of light and hope and beauty created a beautiful blend that pulled me into this novel. I was hooked and didn't want to set it down once I started. I kept hoping(even knowing Susannah's fate) that she would survive. I connected with her emotionally that I wanted a change to her story. But even her acceptance of what was to happen was written beautifully. (I'm sorry if I keep using that word over and over but for me, that is truly what I feel describes it best) George, oh he is wonderful. He comes in and saves the day. Not at the end, but at the beginning of her life. What a sweet love story and commitment these two have for each other. Susannah has several doubts about herself but finding a love that is beyond anything she could have hoped, even dreamed of, lets her see herself in a different light. Her love for her family and willingness to help them in anyway was a great trait to see in her character. Her husband, George, was one of my favorite characters throughout the book. Especially at the end, it was beautiful. I'm sure I could go on for quite a bit more about my thoughts but this is already a pretty long review so I'll put a stopper on my rambling thoughts and tell you that I loved this book and highly recommend it for anyone who loves historical fiction, a beautiful romance, a great storyline, or just a very well written novel. Content: a few sweet kisses, a few steamy kisses. There are a few scenes with Susannah and George after their wedding but they are clean and sweet and fade to black. The book deals with prisoners in jail and some of the effects of that. The examinations of a couple prisoners where they would have them strip down to nothing, showing the reader what the accused went through, but it was done well. The death of a couple people but not overly graphic especially going into this novel knowing the subject matter and the ending to those accused as witches. I would recommend this book for older YA and up. I would say it's a clean read and very well done! I received an ARC from the author, all thoughts and opinions in the review are my own. Happy Reading!!!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Heidi Robbins (Heidi Reads...)

    This in an incredible telling of two phases of Susannah Martin's life. It alternated between her time as a young adult when she met her husband, their romance, and early days of their marriage, and her incarceration in her 70's when she was accused and convicted of witchcraft. My favorite parts were the happy times of course, Susannah's relationship with George was a bit unexpected since she was looking forward to being a spinster, but his charm and teasing won her over eventually (not to mentio This in an incredible telling of two phases of Susannah Martin's life. It alternated between her time as a young adult when she met her husband, their romance, and early days of their marriage, and her incarceration in her 70's when she was accused and convicted of witchcraft. My favorite parts were the happy times of course, Susannah's relationship with George was a bit unexpected since she was looking forward to being a spinster, but his charm and teasing won her over eventually (not to mention his kisses) ;) There is a real sense of what the times were like back then, the Puritan way of life in a small and gossipy community. The more difficult parts were learning significant historical details behind the volatile period where people would accuse others of witchcraft out of ignorance, but more often for revenge, monetary gain, or power in the community. It was both fascinating and upsetting that such madness occurred in our country's early history. I couldn't help but think that there are still echoes of this in today's society, where reputations can be ruined with a word, and lives destroyed through the cruelness of others. I'm glad that I read this book and it gave me more compassion for those who suffered horribly from injustice. The ending was inspiring and despite the heaviness of the experiences of Susannah in the jail, there is an underlying current of faith in spite of the hopelessness that strengthened her and those around her. (I received a complimentary copy of the book; all opinions in this review are my own)

  6. 4 out of 5

    Aimee (Getting Your Read On)

    I knew going into this book that it was going to be emotional and hard to read. I have read things about the Salem Witch Trials but nothing too in depth and nothing this personal. Heather B. Moore does an excellent job of bringing the injustice and bleak realities of the people unfairly accused to real life. My heart broke. The story of Susannah Martin is told both from her view as a prisoner, accused of witchcraft to flashbacks of her younger years as she meets and falls in love with her husband I knew going into this book that it was going to be emotional and hard to read. I have read things about the Salem Witch Trials but nothing too in depth and nothing this personal. Heather B. Moore does an excellent job of bringing the injustice and bleak realities of the people unfairly accused to real life. My heart broke. The story of Susannah Martin is told both from her view as a prisoner, accused of witchcraft to flashbacks of her younger years as she meets and falls in love with her husband. Those were moments that held more hope, promise and love. It was a necessary change of pace from the hopeless and desperate circumstances of the prison and inquiries that Susannah and the other prisoners faced. It's honestly so hard to believe that people can do such horrible things to other people. It's absurd and heart wrenching. So, so sad. I thought the book was beautifully done. It made me think and feel so many emotions. I'm glad I had the opportunity to read it. Content: prisoners are abused and treated poorly, mild violence, death, characters stand naked in front of accusers to be scrutinized, kissing, some intimate touching, married relations (non graphic) - I received a copy of this book for free. All opinions expressed are my own.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Alisa

    Heather Moore is such a masterful story teller, and I loved the way she brought the Salem Witch Trials to life. This story is about Susannah North Martin, the author's 10th-great-grandmother. At times it was hard to read about the conditions she suffered at the end of her life, especially knowing that this really happened. The story alternated between Susannah's present-life self incarcerated in Salem, awaiting "trial" for witchcraft, and her story as a 25-year-old spinster falling in love with t Heather Moore is such a masterful story teller, and I loved the way she brought the Salem Witch Trials to life. This story is about Susannah North Martin, the author's 10th-great-grandmother. At times it was hard to read about the conditions she suffered at the end of her life, especially knowing that this really happened. The story alternated between Susannah's present-life self incarcerated in Salem, awaiting "trial" for witchcraft, and her story as a 25-year-old spinster falling in love with the new widower in town George Martin. Her back story was so sweet and really helped us get to know the real person who was on trial. The end of her life also had glimmers of hope in the middle of her tragic circumstances. I loved how the prisoners looked out for each other and treated each other with kindness. I would like to think that I could maintain kindness and dignity in the worst of circumstances and I love reading about people who manage to do that in real life situations!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mindy

    CONDEMN ME NOT is the hauntingly beautiful story about Author Heather B. Moore’s 10th great-grandmother, Susannah North Martin, who was hung as a witch in 1692. The book flashes from the time Susannah was in jail accused of witchcraft and when she met her husband George. Heather does an amazing job writing these two different time periods. The jail scenes were sad, but very well-written, as the horrors of “witch” jails and trails were depicted. I loved Susannah and George. Their courtship was wr CONDEMN ME NOT is the hauntingly beautiful story about Author Heather B. Moore’s 10th great-grandmother, Susannah North Martin, who was hung as a witch in 1692. The book flashes from the time Susannah was in jail accused of witchcraft and when she met her husband George. Heather does an amazing job writing these two different time periods. The jail scenes were sad, but very well-written, as the horrors of “witch” jails and trails were depicted. I loved Susannah and George. Their courtship was written perfectly. Hints of Susannah’s “witch” troubles are carried through the book, what a sad and frightening period of time for these women. I received a complimentary copy from the author, all views and opinions expressed are my own.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lisa (Bookworm Lisa)

    I don't not know if there are adequate words to express how I feel about the victims of the Salem Witch Trials. It is unimaginable to me what those people went through. I found Condemn Me Not to be a touching and thoughtful look at the life of Susannah North Martin. The author, Heather B Moore, is Susannah's 10th Great Granddaughter. Not only does it depict Susannah's life, it also touches on the life of several women who were imprisoned and hung as witches. This story vascillates between Susann I don't not know if there are adequate words to express how I feel about the victims of the Salem Witch Trials. It is unimaginable to me what those people went through. I found Condemn Me Not to be a touching and thoughtful look at the life of Susannah North Martin. The author, Heather B Moore, is Susannah's 10th Great Granddaughter. Not only does it depict Susannah's life, it also touches on the life of several women who were imprisoned and hung as witches. This story vascillates between Susannah's time in prison and her courtship and early marriage with her husband. I loved knowing that she was a real person in history and she lived a full life of love and happiness. Unfortunately, her life ended in tragedy. I love that the victims are looked on more kindly through history than the accusers. It still boggles my mind that they would accuse a four year old child. (I have to get off of this vein of thought, or there may be a rant in this review.) This is a beautiful story. It shows horrendous living conditions in jail, but it celebrates life. The book does have kissing and innuendo between a married couple.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Amy Koster

    In 1692 Susannah North Martin is accused of witchcraft. She joins five other women in the Salem Jail to be sentenced to death for their crimes. What a beautiful story. As I look back and think of our history, I cannot believe such an event could occur. I believe such accusations were misunderstandings that sadly took the lives of many young and old. People jailed because of the fears of others. This is one of those parts of history I am not proud to remember but feel it is necessary. Knowing this In 1692 Susannah North Martin is accused of witchcraft. She joins five other women in the Salem Jail to be sentenced to death for their crimes. What a beautiful story. As I look back and think of our history, I cannot believe such an event could occur. I believe such accusations were misunderstandings that sadly took the lives of many young and old. People jailed because of the fears of others. This is one of those parts of history I am not proud to remember but feel it is necessary. Knowing this would be a story of sorrow, I am thankful for the bright happy moments; and, of course, a wonderful love story. Heather Moore weaves a marvelous telling of her ancestor with facts from history. I highly recommend this to anyone who loves history mingles with romance. A great read! *Please note I received a copy to review for an honest opinion. All opinions are my own.

  11. 5 out of 5

    SA Krishnan

    Brilliant story The story was excellent at all levels. The time was during the Salem Witch burning and the story is told through the eyes of Susanah. Through Susanah we come to know not only about her, but also other women like her. The surprise in the story was Susanah was herself. Her life and the events which led to her present predicament was brought out so well that the difference in her present and her past was stark and sharp. The times of the story, the gullibility of the people, their naiv Brilliant story The story was excellent at all levels. The time was during the Salem Witch burning and the story is told through the eyes of Susanah. Through Susanah we come to know not only about her, but also other women like her. The surprise in the story was Susanah was herself. Her life and the events which led to her present predicament was brought out so well that the difference in her present and her past was stark and sharp. The times of the story, the gullibility of the people, their naivety and the evil in some people – all the things was expressed so beautifully, that the story took me to that time. Thoroughly enjoyed it.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Shash

    My heart ached as I read this book. I knew a little about the Salem witch trials, but facts and information could never bring the emotions I felt as I read. The story is told by Susannah, and therefore centered on the prisoners. As readers, we see what they went through, what they felt, how they helped each other and the bond that was created between them. Intermixed with the misery of the prison is the beautiful love story of George and Susannah Martin. It was wonderful to watch them fall in lo My heart ached as I read this book. I knew a little about the Salem witch trials, but facts and information could never bring the emotions I felt as I read. The story is told by Susannah, and therefore centered on the prisoners. As readers, we see what they went through, what they felt, how they helped each other and the bond that was created between them. Intermixed with the misery of the prison is the beautiful love story of George and Susannah Martin. It was wonderful to watch them fall in love. It brought much needed joy and hope to the book. Their love and devotion to each other was inspiring. Condemn Me Not is based on the life of Heather B. Moore’s tenth great-grandmother, Susannah North Martin, who was hanged during the Salem witch trials. It is written so well, with such heart and emotion. What a great tribute to her ancestor and all those that suffered during that time. I received a complimentary copy of the book. I have given my honest opinion.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rachelle

    Riveting look at life during Salem witch trials This book was incredibly intriguing because Moore brought to life the story of her ancestor accused of witchcraft. It held my attention because it helped me understand more of how the witch trials came about. I especially enjoyed how we were able to witness the life and love of Susannah North Martin. Excellent read!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sheila

    I've always been interested in the Salem Witch Trials that took place in the late 1600's in Salem, Massachusetts. I've been looking forward to reading this story that I knew Author Heather B. Moore was writing about her 10th Great-Grandmother, Susannah North Martin. I knew that she'd been doing intensive research in order to write this story. I was amazed at how she brought this story to life from an event in history to the story of a woman who lived, loved, laughed and cried. This book is not a I've always been interested in the Salem Witch Trials that took place in the late 1600's in Salem, Massachusetts. I've been looking forward to reading this story that I knew Author Heather B. Moore was writing about her 10th Great-Grandmother, Susannah North Martin. I knew that she'd been doing intensive research in order to write this story. I was amazed at how she brought this story to life from an event in history to the story of a woman who lived, loved, laughed and cried. This book is not a cheery book, but full of true angst. You feel a deep depression and lost hope from the women and men that were jailed and accused of witchcraft. The whole book isn't totally sunk in darkness though as you read about when she first met her husband and fell in love. Susannah's story is masterfully told from different viewpoints during her life. One is when she's in jail awaiting her trial and then the story shifts to her looking back at happier times in her life. This was a wonderful way to show just how horrid the townspeople and court were to the accused, as the writing and feel of the story goes from sadness to happiness. I'll say it again, this was a brilliant way to write this story. I really loved these quotes from the story that came from Susannah. I feel it shows how the Salem Witch trials and the hangings of innocent people were allowed to happen. "They do not have the courage to speak the truth, but rather they'd join in with the other accusers so that they themselves, might be seen as innocent." "Fear drives men and women to do mad things" Condemn Me Not is a great addition to other fiction and non-fiction books about the Salem Witch Trials. If you don't like reading non-fiction books, this novel will accurately show you the details from that time in Salem, while also weaving a powerful story that will leave you in tears and your heart aching for those who lost their lives to circumstances that were out of their hands.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Adrienne

    In this compelling piece of historical fiction, we read the story of Susannah North Martin as she awaits her trial--and ultimately her death--after being accused of witchcraft. We see the present day (Salem, 1692), interspersed with chapters that show how Susannah falling in love with George Martin and their beginning their life together. Both story lines were fascinating to me; it was very interesting to see how Susannah and the other women being held in jail were "tried" (the trials were a jok In this compelling piece of historical fiction, we read the story of Susannah North Martin as she awaits her trial--and ultimately her death--after being accused of witchcraft. We see the present day (Salem, 1692), interspersed with chapters that show how Susannah falling in love with George Martin and their beginning their life together. Both story lines were fascinating to me; it was very interesting to see how Susannah and the other women being held in jail were "tried" (the trials were a joke) and how they interacted with one another, as well as how each had come to be accused and all the pettiness and politics behind their accusations and convictions. That aspect of the story provided a discussion-worthy look at history. Even more than those parts of the book, though, I loved seeing Susannah and George's meeting and subsequent interactions--and how he had to persuade her to give him a chance. I just loved seeing their love story. It was sweet and funny and I was just totally drawn in by it. I haven't read ALL of Heather Moore's books, but I've read quite a few (full length and novellas) and this just might be my favorite of all of them. I was just especially eager to see how things played out for Susannah, both in her developing relationship with George and with her trial; even knowing what was ultimately going to happen, I couldn't help but want to know HOW it happened and what would lead up to it. Really riveting novel. I received a free copy from the author. All opinions are my own.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Cathy

    This was one book I was looking forward to reading. Just last summer, I discovered that our kids had ancestors who were hung in these same trials, they had one on each side and the women were actually hung the same day, so they most likely would have known each other. So crazy! I really enjoyed the way this book was written. Some of it was kind of hard to read, but I loved the way that the hard to read parts were balanced out with the memories of Susannah's happy life before she was accused of be This was one book I was looking forward to reading. Just last summer, I discovered that our kids had ancestors who were hung in these same trials, they had one on each side and the women were actually hung the same day, so they most likely would have known each other. So crazy! I really enjoyed the way this book was written. Some of it was kind of hard to read, but I loved the way that the hard to read parts were balanced out with the memories of Susannah's happy life before she was accused of being a witch. I liked that it bounced back and forth between the two time periods. I also liked that there were quotes included from the time period and specifically about Susannah. It made me remember that she was really a person and that these events really happened to her and the other women that were incarcerated with her. I can only imagine how horrific life was for them in the jail. Especially knowing that most of them would likely be condemned and would die for no crime. It's really a hard thing for me to understand that these people would have believed the claims of teenagers, who simply didn't like these women for whatever reason. I really enjoyed this book. I'm going to have to do some checking and see if I can find any of these kind of stories about our ancestors who were in these trials.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mara

    My gosh I don't know where to begin. Another great book by Heather B. Moore. I liked that it was based on the author's 10th great-grandmother so the things that happened were based on actual events. I like that it was kind of in two parts: 1) chapters that are Susannah remembering how she met the man she would marry (George), their wedding and the early months of their married life, and 2) chapters that take place in the Salem jail. Honestly there wasn't anything I disliked about the book, excep My gosh I don't know where to begin. Another great book by Heather B. Moore. I liked that it was based on the author's 10th great-grandmother so the things that happened were based on actual events. I like that it was kind of in two parts: 1) chapters that are Susannah remembering how she met the man she would marry (George), their wedding and the early months of their married life, and 2) chapters that take place in the Salem jail. Honestly there wasn't anything I disliked about the book, except that it had to end. I was so caught up in the story I finished the book in a couple of days. Heather does a wonderful job describing each of the women who share a cell with Susannah. I can't believe this actually happened in our history--that people could accuse others of witchcraft just because they didn't like them, their animals died or they couldn't explain how something happened. I found it hard to believe that a 4 year old child could've been accused of witchcraft. Even though Susannah is found guilty and is put to death at the end, I love how Heather wrote the ending and included Susannah's husband George. I would highly recommend this book .

  18. 5 out of 5

    Cordelianne

    4,5 stars Condemn me not: accused of withcraft was a beautiful story. The setting is in Sailsbury, England in the past around 1680. The main character is Suzanne, she is accused of withcraft and is awaiting her trial. What made this book so interesting was that the present and the past are woven together perfectly. While you discover more about what will happen to her, you also discover more about what made her the person she is in the present. Suzanne was a very strong and realistic character. E 4,5 stars Condemn me not: accused of withcraft was a beautiful story. The setting is in Sailsbury, England in the past around 1680. The main character is Suzanne, she is accused of withcraft and is awaiting her trial. What made this book so interesting was that the present and the past are woven together perfectly. While you discover more about what will happen to her, you also discover more about what made her the person she is in the present. Suzanne was a very strong and realistic character. Even when she was in jail, she never gave up hope and she kept believing in fate. This book taught me more about a part of history I did not yet know a lot about. I can hardly imagine that people could be hanged, just because some of their neighbours harvest failed and they were looking for someone else to blame. This book has made me think more about the death as a penalty. I can hardly believe that in some Western countries (United States) people still can get this. Overall I really enjoyed this book and it was written in a beautiful way. *I received a free ebook in exchange for an honest review*

  19. 4 out of 5

    Charissa

    Excellent historical fiction based on the real life events of the author’s 10th great-grandmother accused of being a witch during the Salem Witch trials. I loved the way the book was organized. Susannah Martin’s life is relived as she sits in a jail in Salem awaiting trial. Her love story with her husband, George, is given, and it was seriously amazing! Reminded me of the romance in These is My Words, where the hero is so awesome you just want to cry with happiness. Chivalry at its best. I’ve re Excellent historical fiction based on the real life events of the author’s 10th great-grandmother accused of being a witch during the Salem Witch trials. I loved the way the book was organized. Susannah Martin’s life is relived as she sits in a jail in Salem awaiting trial. Her love story with her husband, George, is given, and it was seriously amazing! Reminded me of the romance in These is My Words, where the hero is so awesome you just want to cry with happiness. Chivalry at its best. I’ve read other fiction based on this time period, but never have I felt so touched and changed by a work before. This one really helped me see what it could have been like back then for the accused, and it was horrifying. Yet the book was a hopeful piece that touched my heart as well since it gave me a bigger picture of Susannah’s whole life. Amazing! I loved this one!!! ***I received a copy of this from the author in exchange for a fair and honest review…and it was phenomenal.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    This book was based on the story of the author's tenth great grandmother, Susannah North Martin. She was was accused and convicted of being a witch during the Salem witch trials in 1692. I liked how the horrors of being in jail and facing execution were balanced with the love story of Susannah and George. Historical fiction is one of my favorite genres and Heather B. Moore always delivers an interesting and well researched story. I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest revie This book was based on the story of the author's tenth great grandmother, Susannah North Martin. She was was accused and convicted of being a witch during the Salem witch trials in 1692. I liked how the horrors of being in jail and facing execution were balanced with the love story of Susannah and George. Historical fiction is one of my favorite genres and Heather B. Moore always delivers an interesting and well researched story. I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Donna Campbell

    While this story is about tragic events, the majority of it is a beautiful love story. The relationship between Susannah and George is so very sweet. Their dedication to each other and family is wonderful. No matter what comes their way they are there for each other forever. The author's take on a portion of the Salem trials is written in a way that you feel the tragedy but at the same time feel the strength the victims share. While this story is about tragic events, the majority of it is a beautiful love story. The relationship between Susannah and George is so very sweet. Their dedication to each other and family is wonderful. No matter what comes their way they are there for each other forever. The author's take on a portion of the Salem trials is written in a way that you feel the tragedy but at the same time feel the strength the victims share.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    I loved this book. It is a stirring romance along with a fascinating look at the Salem witch trials. This is a book based on the author's 10th great grandmother. I would recommend it to anyone who is interested in this interesting time period of American history or who loves a good romance. Such an interesting look at what a culture of fear can inspire. I loved this book. It is a stirring romance along with a fascinating look at the Salem witch trials. This is a book based on the author's 10th great grandmother. I would recommend it to anyone who is interested in this interesting time period of American history or who loves a good romance. Such an interesting look at what a culture of fear can inspire.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Condemn Me Not: Accused of Witchcraft is my new favorite by Heather B Moore. I love how she tackled this time in history and the direction she took it. I admire her writing a book involving one of her own ancestors. Great book! I highly recommend this book. 5 plus stars.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Greta

    I wrote a lengthy review only to have the computer crash. I'll add a review later after I try to re-create it.---July 19, 2017 Okay, I couldn't re-create exactly what I wrote before, so hopefully the following review will suffice: 325 years ago, on July 19, 1692 my ancestor, Susannah North Martin, was executed by hanging as a condemned prisoner in the Salem Witch Trials. I am a 10th generation descendant, she, being my 8th great grandmother. A month ago, we traveled to New England as a family and s I wrote a lengthy review only to have the computer crash. I'll add a review later after I try to re-create it.---July 19, 2017 Okay, I couldn't re-create exactly what I wrote before, so hopefully the following review will suffice: 325 years ago, on July 19, 1692 my ancestor, Susannah North Martin, was executed by hanging as a condemned prisoner in the Salem Witch Trials. I am a 10th generation descendant, she, being my 8th great grandmother. A month ago, we traveled to New England as a family and spent some time visiting Salem Town, specifically viewing the Salem Witch Trials Memorial. This memorial was established to pay tribute to the men and women who were killed as a result of the witch hunt hysteria, which plagued this region back in the late 1600's. Seeking religious tolerance and freedom, these Puritan zealots left England and immigrated to the American colonies. Unfortunately, their intolerance and ignorance, fear and superstition, hampered, within their own communities, the very thing they were seeking to obtain. I have often wondered what the motivations were behind the accusers in the witch trials. Power? Personal economic gains? Jealousy? Another question I have is why the magistrates allowed the young women who convulsed and feigned seizures and made such outlandish claims about the accused to gain so much power? To what end were these illogical, and laughable abominations allowed? People who perjured themselves, naming other innocent members in the community as witches, to save themselves attributed to the frenzy. The testimony from “expert” witnesses stands as additional proof of the lunacy perpetuated because of ignorance, fear and superstition. These judges, doctors, citizens, religious leaders, and jury members are no more guiltless as those they condemned were guilty. Heather B. Moore, (hello cousin), creates the backstory of Susannah North and George Martin, their lives in Salisbury, their courtship, giving these people personalities, emotions, weaknesses, strengths, and passions. Drawing upon historical records, Moore is able to interweave the factual data with the conditions of the times to create a plausible background in which these real people lived. Without imposing her personal bias, or point of view, Moore masterfully tells the story, again quoting the actual historic accounts of the imprisonment, treatment, and trials of Susannah and her cellmates. From the actual records, one can see man’s inhumanity to man especially when one contemplates the deplorable cruelty of imprisoning the newborn babe, Mercy and her four-year-old sister, Dorothy. Ironically, it is those who are free: those who are doing the accusing, those who are flailing about in hysterics, perjuring themselves, stealing the food, blankets, or other provisions paid for by the prisoners’ families for their loved ones in jail, who are doing the work of “the devil.” Sadly, the events that occurred during this time period, amongst this group of people, isn’t the only time people have been wrongfully accused and condemned. Lest we forget, we, as a people, need to check ourselves and our reactions to circumstances in our current day, striving to uphold the rights and freedoms essential in ours and in all of God’s children’s lives. Civility, kindness, graciousness, and temperance are just as needed today in our interactions with others as they have ever been. I appreciate Moore’s putting into story form these real events from our history, and specifically to bring to life, in a very real sense, my 8th Great Grandmother.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lori

    Fianally found this book!! Thank you Heidi!!! I read your review and found it was on kindle unlimited. I've always been fascinated with this subject for many years after I read Ann Rinaldis book. After that I was hooked. I was excited when I seen this book and was very surprised to learn that it was print on demand. I'm going to say I usually don't like from past to present and present in in present tense genre I don't really care for. But the past isn't present tense genre and so therefore I'm Fianally found this book!! Thank you Heidi!!! I read your review and found it was on kindle unlimited. I've always been fascinated with this subject for many years after I read Ann Rinaldis book. After that I was hooked. I was excited when I seen this book and was very surprised to learn that it was print on demand. I'm going to say I usually don't like from past to present and present in in present tense genre I don't really care for. But the past isn't present tense genre and so therefore I'm really able to enjoy it. Some of Susanna's telling can make the hairs stand up on the back of your neck. It's a shame it happened. Jealousy is the key word in my opinion. Jealousy is an evil thing! I haven't read all of this book but it's wonderful so far!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    This was a novelization of the author's 10× great-grandmother's life, alternating between her life as a single 25 year old meeting the man she'd eventually marry and her arrest and trial as a witch at 71. Looking back on this period in history, it's crazy to think that those girls were able to convince so many that others were witches. I thought it was sweet that the prisoners cared for each other and didn't turn on others to try and save themselves. If your looking for a novel set in this time, I This was a novelization of the author's 10× great-grandmother's life, alternating between her life as a single 25 year old meeting the man she'd eventually marry and her arrest and trial as a witch at 71. Looking back on this period in history, it's crazy to think that those girls were able to convince so many that others were witches. I thought it was sweet that the prisoners cared for each other and didn't turn on others to try and save themselves. If your looking for a novel set in this time, I think you'd enjoy reading it.

  27. 4 out of 5

    iamnotabookworm

    This is not my first encounter with Heather B. Moore. I have read two other historical fiction books of hers and had really enjoyed them. When I saw that she had another book up for review on ebooksforreview.com, I was faster than a bullet to get signed up. Condemn Me Not is based on real events and people. The main character just happened to be the 10th great-grandmother of the author on her father's side. Yes, Heather B. Moore's great-grandmother was one of those that got accused and hanged for This is not my first encounter with Heather B. Moore. I have read two other historical fiction books of hers and had really enjoyed them. When I saw that she had another book up for review on ebooksforreview.com, I was faster than a bullet to get signed up. Condemn Me Not is based on real events and people. The main character just happened to be the 10th great-grandmother of the author on her father's side. Yes, Heather B. Moore's great-grandmother was one of those that got accused and hanged for witchcraft in Salem, Massachusetts in 1692. This book felt very close to home to the author. It's not everyday that you get to write and talk about a subject, much more a relative, who went through something so controversial and with a lot of mystery surrounding it. I applaud the author for writing about Susannah North Martin's life story. What made me so curious right after reading the first page of this book was that this was a real event. This was like reading an article on a newspaper. This is about a real person who went through hell and never survived it. I have heard stories about the Salem witch trials. I even read about one version that explained the possessions and bewitching caused by a fungus found on the food eaten by the girls that claimed to have been possessed. And then, there were other versions, too. As far as I know, the versions were mostly pointing more to the allegation that there were really women in Massachusetts that dabble in witchcraft and ways of the devil. I have watched movies of the same subject also. But what set this book apart from all those mentioned is that this was written by someone related to one of the accused. Well, a few generations removed but nevertheless I have never heard of any accounts of the stories of the persons personally accused of the said crimes. This story is as close as to the horse's mouth as we can get. The author made extensive researched to get to know her descendant and to understand the controversies surrounding her life and death. This also exposed the horrors and cruelties suffered by the accused parties while being held in their filthy cells waiting for their trials. I think people have a lot of opinions regarding the Salem witch trials. Some people may believe that those hanged were guilty, others would say they were victims. I personally do not believe them guilty or not. I know for a fact those trials and hanging happened but there were a lot of circumstances and events that were not known. I think there was a monopoly of information. There was more that condemn those that were accused than those that seek to shed light on the circumstances and understand. And having only a few references that contain accounts of those found guilty to go by, there is a possibility that those trials were actually done because of personal vendetta. After reading this, I am more inclined to believe that those people hanged might just have been innocent. One other thing about this story is ,as the author intended, this was about the life, family and circumstances of Susannah North Martin and some of the people hanged. It did not really focus on the trials but on the kind of life lived by Susannah--that she was a good sister, a caring mother and grandmother loved by her family, a loyal and dedicated wife that had a loving and faithful husband and a love that survived even after death. I give this book 4/5 mandrake roots. This was a refreshing other-side-of-the-coin story. The fact that this is my first time to read about accounts of those hanged for being a witch made this even more a must-read. This was so brave of the author to admit to be a descendant of one of those guilty in the Salem witch hunt trials. Surely, your great-grandmother, Susannah North Martin, is so proud of you for telling everyone her story. I condemn you not, or even Susannah and the rest. If you lie and accuse another of witchcraft, you are exonerated. If you tell the truth, you are imprisoned. - Heather B. Moore, Condemn Me Not - It was unfortunate that I was not able to read this in time for the deadline of the review. This review was supposed to be out last April 1. I apologized to Kathy of ebooksforreview.com for the delay and for not being able to give you a heads-up. I was running some errands these past few days, was home late in the evenings and had no energy left but sleep. I assure you this will not happen again. Thank you again for allowing me to review this book.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Rachel DeVaughn

    I knew going into this book that it was not going to have a good ending, however I chose to read it because I love all of the author's books and I knew that she had been working on this story for quite some time. "Condemn Me Not" is an historical novel is based on the life of the author's tenth great grandmother Susannah North Martin who was accused of witchcraft and hung in Salem Massachusetts in 1692. The chapters alternate between Susannah's time in the Salem jail in 1692 when she was in her I knew going into this book that it was not going to have a good ending, however I chose to read it because I love all of the author's books and I knew that she had been working on this story for quite some time. "Condemn Me Not" is an historical novel is based on the life of the author's tenth great grandmother Susannah North Martin who was accused of witchcraft and hung in Salem Massachusetts in 1692. The chapters alternate between Susannah's time in the Salem jail in 1692 when she was in her 70s and her life in Salisberry Massachusetts in 1646. Readers start with reading about Susannahs life in her mid-20s before she meets her husband George. It was so funny to read about George's forwardness towards Susannah and her ignoring his advances. The jail chapters were hard to read because of the impending trial and hanging, but I was able to catch a glimpse into how hard jail life was and how traumatic this was for everyone involved. Susannah was able to take comfort in jail from frequent visits of her late husband and by keeping her faith in God. The story was very well written and the characters and plot completely drew me in. I could not put this book down until I finished it. It was very emotional and I was crying at the end of the book. Very well written for such a very hard time in history. I applaud the author Heather Moore for taking the time to write her grandmother's story! I received a copy of this book complimentary for blog and social media review. All opinions are my own.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Delina

    I have always been interested in the Salem Witch trials and Heather B. Moore is always the best at getting to a story from another angle! I so enjoyed reading 'Condem Me Not'. The back in forth between the Jail and Susannah's younger life is perfectly balanced and provides so much depth to her character. The love story between Susannah and George is a brilliant contrast to the horrific events experienced in Salem Jail. This story had me laughing and crying. The perfect story for a lazy afternoon I have always been interested in the Salem Witch trials and Heather B. Moore is always the best at getting to a story from another angle! I so enjoyed reading 'Condem Me Not'. The back in forth between the Jail and Susannah's younger life is perfectly balanced and provides so much depth to her character. The love story between Susannah and George is a brilliant contrast to the horrific events experienced in Salem Jail. This story had me laughing and crying. The perfect story for a lazy afternoon!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Darcia Helle

    Can you imagine being locked in a dank cell because your neighbor accuses you of killing his cow with your mind? I've read a lot of nonfiction about the Salem Witch Trials, a tumultuous period in which religious beliefs, fear, and common jealousy combined to create hysteria in one small town. The author nails this period in Condemn Me Not. I felt what it was like to be a Puritan woman whose every action was open to public scrutiny. This story is told in alternating timelines from Susannah's persp Can you imagine being locked in a dank cell because your neighbor accuses you of killing his cow with your mind? I've read a lot of nonfiction about the Salem Witch Trials, a tumultuous period in which religious beliefs, fear, and common jealousy combined to create hysteria in one small town. The author nails this period in Condemn Me Not. I felt what it was like to be a Puritan woman whose every action was open to public scrutiny. This story is told in alternating timelines from Susannah's perspective. We have Susannah as an older woman in 1692, in the Salem Jail after being accused of and arrested for witchcraft. And we see her in 1646, as a young woman who doesn't quite fit in with the expectations of her small community. The chapters are short and the transitions work well. I enjoyed getting to know Susannah and seeing how her life unfolded, leading to her current situation. For me, at about the one-third point the story starts to drag and become repetitive. We spend a lot of time on Susannah's budding romance in the earlier timeline, which is sweet but slow-moving. I would've liked to see more of the turmoil of the period, showing us the path from past to present. The scenes from Salem Jail are intense and vivid. This timeline was definitely my favorite part of the book.

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