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This Cheese Is Nuts!: Delicious Vegan Cheese at Home

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The essential primer and guide to preparing delicious, totally vegan, nut-based cheeses, from the coauthor of The Plantpower Way. In their debut cookbook, The Plantpower Way, Julie Piatt and her ultra-endurance athlete husband, Rich Roll, inspired thousands to embrace a plant-fueled lifestyle, and through their advocacy efforts, podcasts, and talks, countless people are now The essential primer and guide to preparing delicious, totally vegan, nut-based cheeses, from the coauthor of The Plantpower Way. In their debut cookbook, The Plantpower Way, Julie Piatt and her ultra-endurance athlete husband, Rich Roll, inspired thousands to embrace a plant-fueled lifestyle, and through their advocacy efforts, podcasts, and talks, countless people are now enjoying healthier and more vibrant lives. In This Cheese is Nuts, Julie is bringing that message to the forefront once more, with a stunning collection of flavorful nut-based cheeses. Julie has always been known for her dairy-free cheeses, and here she shares seventy-five recipes using almonds, cashews, and other nuts to create cheeses anyone can make right at home. Nut-based cheeses are on the cutting edge in the world of vegan cuisine. They're remarkably simple to prepare (all you need are a few simple ingredients and a basic dehydrator), and in as little as twenty minutes, you can have an assortment of tasty fresh cheeses fit for any occasion. Even creating aged cheeses is easy--they require only a day or two in the dehydrator, so making "fancier" cheeses, like Aged Almond Cheddar, is an almost entirely hands-off process. And though they're delectable on their own, Julie's nut-based cheeses are a terrific component in her recipes for Raw Beet Ravioli with Cashew Truffle Cream, Country Veggie Lasagna with Fennel and Brazil Nut Pesto, French Onion Soup with Cashew Camembert, and more. Filled with the essential tips, tools, and mouth-watering recipes home cooks need to immerse themselves in the world of nut-based cheese-making, This Cheese is Nuts will demonstrate why nut cheeses should be part of any healthy, sustainable diet.


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The essential primer and guide to preparing delicious, totally vegan, nut-based cheeses, from the coauthor of The Plantpower Way. In their debut cookbook, The Plantpower Way, Julie Piatt and her ultra-endurance athlete husband, Rich Roll, inspired thousands to embrace a plant-fueled lifestyle, and through their advocacy efforts, podcasts, and talks, countless people are now The essential primer and guide to preparing delicious, totally vegan, nut-based cheeses, from the coauthor of The Plantpower Way. In their debut cookbook, The Plantpower Way, Julie Piatt and her ultra-endurance athlete husband, Rich Roll, inspired thousands to embrace a plant-fueled lifestyle, and through their advocacy efforts, podcasts, and talks, countless people are now enjoying healthier and more vibrant lives. In This Cheese is Nuts, Julie is bringing that message to the forefront once more, with a stunning collection of flavorful nut-based cheeses. Julie has always been known for her dairy-free cheeses, and here she shares seventy-five recipes using almonds, cashews, and other nuts to create cheeses anyone can make right at home. Nut-based cheeses are on the cutting edge in the world of vegan cuisine. They're remarkably simple to prepare (all you need are a few simple ingredients and a basic dehydrator), and in as little as twenty minutes, you can have an assortment of tasty fresh cheeses fit for any occasion. Even creating aged cheeses is easy--they require only a day or two in the dehydrator, so making "fancier" cheeses, like Aged Almond Cheddar, is an almost entirely hands-off process. And though they're delectable on their own, Julie's nut-based cheeses are a terrific component in her recipes for Raw Beet Ravioli with Cashew Truffle Cream, Country Veggie Lasagna with Fennel and Brazil Nut Pesto, French Onion Soup with Cashew Camembert, and more. Filled with the essential tips, tools, and mouth-watering recipes home cooks need to immerse themselves in the world of nut-based cheese-making, This Cheese is Nuts will demonstrate why nut cheeses should be part of any healthy, sustainable diet.

30 review for This Cheese Is Nuts!: Delicious Vegan Cheese at Home

  1. 4 out of 5

    RustyShack

    Obscure ingredients with no alternatives provided (e.g. Modified tapioca starch--NOT standard tapioca starch--which seems impossible to find in Canada. Irish Moss? Dried Peruvian olives?)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kate McMurry

    Clearly written with an emphasis on vegan replacements for gourmet cheeses I checked out this book from the library, because I wasn't sure if I personally would find enough use for it to be worth owning it. Over the past six months, I have experimented with multiple recipes that I found online for vegan mozzarella and vegan powdered parmesan. They have both turned out really well, and I have made them many times as a result. My approach to this book, therefore, was to examine the general cheese-m Clearly written with an emphasis on vegan replacements for gourmet cheeses I checked out this book from the library, because I wasn't sure if I personally would find enough use for it to be worth owning it. Over the past six months, I have experimented with multiple recipes that I found online for vegan mozzarella and vegan powdered parmesan. They have both turned out really well, and I have made them many times as a result. My approach to this book, therefore, was to examine the general cheese-making instructions and specific recipes in this book to see if there might be some useful, practical tips for making vegan cheese that I had not already tried and/or recipes for other types of vegan cheeses that looked tasty enough to be worth the effort and expense to make them. The first thing I noticed at the beginning of the book was a list of recommended equipment and ingredients to have on hand for vegan cheese-making in the particular manner that the author of this book approachs the process of making vegan cheese. Of the kitchen equipment that the author considers essential, I own the following: --Vitamix --food processor --fine cheesecloth --small and medium rubber spatulas --ice cream scooper I do not own the following equipment: --dehydrator --coco-jack for opening fresh coconuts --cheese molds and/or springform pans in multiple small sizes Of the pantry staples that the author considers essential, I own the following: --cashews --almonds --refined coconut oil I do not own the following pantry staples: --macadamia nuts --pine nuts --beta-carotene capsules to serve as a natural, harmless, yellow food dye I did not feel that, for my purposes, it was worth investing in the equipment that I do not have. As for the pantry items I do not have, I am fine with almonds and cashews for making vegan cheese. I do not feel the need to additionally purchase extremely expensive macadamia nuts and pine nuts, given that these are used for a series of gourmet recipes in this cookbook that do not interest me. If I can find a decent source of beta-carotene, that is not made with corn or soy, I might be interested in trying that as a yellow food dye versus using a tiny amount of turmeric powder, which is what I have used in the past. But I think what I would more likely prefer to experiment with next is using carrot juice as a yellow food dye, which is a possibility this author does not mention. After I carefully examined the entire book, I only found recipes personally of interest to me on 11 pages. In terms of general, cheese-making instructions, I did not particularly learn anything from this cookbook that I did not already know, and at zero cost, by exploring vegan cheese-making instructions and recipes online at vegan cooking blogs. Since I have turned vegan the past two years, I have gradually expanded the sophistication of recipes that I have experimented with, from casseroles, to soups, to desserts, to vegan substitutes for meat and dairy. However, most of the cheeses listed in this book are a leap into a realm of culinary savoir faire that is well beyond anything I am particularly interested in. That is because, for the most part, these recipes are vegan substitutes for expensive, gourmet dairy cheeses that I had either never consumed before I became vegan, or had sampled and did not like. I have uncomplicated tastes and am mainly interested in making three simple cheeses that were the only cheeses I primarily ate before I became vegan and therefore would have the most desire to replicate now: mozzarella, parmesan and cheddar. This means that the vast majority of the types of cheese presented in this cookbook are of no interest to someone like me. My conclusion from my own experience is that, unless you had an epicurean palate with regard to cheese consumption before you became vegan, I believe you will find most of these recipes are of little interest to you as well. On the other hand, if you did, in fact, have gourmet tastes and a budget to match prior to becoming vegan, you will probably love this cookbook. In terms of the format and structure of the book itself, it is of very high quality. The photographs are beautiful, the quality of the paper is thick and semi-gloss, which feels very good to the fingers. The recipes are clearly written and carefully laid out on the page in large font with plenty of white space. If you have the proper equipment and ingredients, none of these recipes are complex or difficult to make. Basically, if you are willing to spend between $800 to $1,000 on cheese-making equipment and ingredients that the author outlines in this book, then you will easily be able to follow her instructions to make fancy vegan cheeses of many different types. In summation: If you are a vegan who loves collecting cookbooks, you might enjoy owning this book. If you do not collect cookbooks, or if you are a bare-bones cook, you might want to get this book from the library. I rate this cookbook as follows: Clarity of instructions: 5 stars Creativity of recipes: 5 stars Design of book: 5 stars Value to gourmet cooks: 5 stars Value to ordinary cooks: 3 stars Overall rating: 4.6 rounded to 5 stars

  3. 4 out of 5

    Margaret

    I recently bought a vegan cheese kit that had many of the ingredients needed to make recipes from this book. Yes, as some reviewers said, many of the recipes have obscure ingredients, but you can order all of them online very easily. I used a small food processor to make a cheddar, so you don't actually need a Vitamix ( although it would be nice!) If you can't have dairy, but would still love to have cheese, this is the answer for you! So far I have only made some cheddar, which is softer than r I recently bought a vegan cheese kit that had many of the ingredients needed to make recipes from this book. Yes, as some reviewers said, many of the recipes have obscure ingredients, but you can order all of them online very easily. I used a small food processor to make a cheddar, so you don't actually need a Vitamix ( although it would be nice!) If you can't have dairy, but would still love to have cheese, this is the answer for you! So far I have only made some cheddar, which is softer than regular cheddar, but still sliceable ( and much superior to store-bought non-dairy cheese!) My next batch will be mozzarella to use for pizza and I am really anxious to try the smoked Gouda! Edit: I have now made the mozzarella which was awesome on gluten free pizza, as well as the smoked Gouda which had a great flavor and slices very nicely to put on crackers, but is not very melty or gooey in a grilled cheese sandwich. It was still very good though, and I would definitely make it again.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Peachie

    So glad I borrowed this book from the library before purchasing because, unless you have a Vitamix and an unlimited supply of coconuts and aquafaba, this book is useless. Also, the tone of this book is maddening- everything is sooooo precious. For vegan chefs I don't want to punch, I'll stick with Isa Chandra Moskowitz Isa Does It: Amazingly Easy, Wildly Delicious Vegan Recipes for Every Day of the Week and Matt FrazierNo Meat Athlete: Run on Plants and Discover Your Fittest, Fastest, Happiest S So glad I borrowed this book from the library before purchasing because, unless you have a Vitamix and an unlimited supply of coconuts and aquafaba, this book is useless. Also, the tone of this book is maddening- everything is sooooo precious. For vegan chefs I don't want to punch, I'll stick with Isa Chandra Moskowitz Isa Does It: Amazingly Easy, Wildly Delicious Vegan Recipes for Every Day of the Week and Matt FrazierNo Meat Athlete: Run on Plants and Discover Your Fittest, Fastest, Happiest Self

  5. 4 out of 5

    K

    I had high hopes for this one but found there were very few recipes I could actually make. Some of the ingredients were next to impossible for me to find and you truly do need a Vitamix; a food processor simply will not blend things to the proper smoothness. A dehydrator is also required for a large number of recipes. The recipes I tried were very good, the 3-Herb Macadamia - Pine Nut Cheesy Pesto was especially tasty. The Classic Cashew Cheese Sauce was good but, without a Vitamix, the texture I had high hopes for this one but found there were very few recipes I could actually make. Some of the ingredients were next to impossible for me to find and you truly do need a Vitamix; a food processor simply will not blend things to the proper smoothness. A dehydrator is also required for a large number of recipes. The recipes I tried were very good, the 3-Herb Macadamia - Pine Nut Cheesy Pesto was especially tasty. The Classic Cashew Cheese Sauce was good but, without a Vitamix, the texture was unpleasantly granular.

  6. 4 out of 5

    M T White

    I am not vegan, vegetarian, or lactose intolerant. In fact I live on a farm and own several dairy cows and goats (rescued and purchased...but my vegan friends give their animal welfare stamp of approval on their care... for what that is worth haha). Anyway, I bought this book both because I have the aforementioned vegan friends and because I love cooking and experimenting in the kitchen. So many people complain about vegan cooking being terrible, vegan cheese being terrible, etc. I enjoy the cha I am not vegan, vegetarian, or lactose intolerant. In fact I live on a farm and own several dairy cows and goats (rescued and purchased...but my vegan friends give their animal welfare stamp of approval on their care... for what that is worth haha). Anyway, I bought this book both because I have the aforementioned vegan friends and because I love cooking and experimenting in the kitchen. So many people complain about vegan cooking being terrible, vegan cheese being terrible, etc. I enjoy the challenge of mastering difficult, unusual, or plain old different food, both for myself and my friends, and figure if I can get my husband to love it then the recipe will be very well accepted by people that haven't eaten meat or cheese in years. So that is the backstory, and I'm happy to say this book has fantastic recipes that we all love, and for us personally, are enjoyed alongside farm fresh non industrial cheese. I think that speaks volumes for the author and their creativity. Back in the dark ages I would try to make vegan cheese out of virtually nothing but nutritional yeast following sparse online or printed recipes, and while my friends that were vegan might find it "edible" and a compliment to a dish, no one that consumed the real deal would touch it. A book like this opens up a vast new world for people that do not consume dairy. I very much recommend it to anyone that is vegan, vegetarian, or even contemplating either, or to anyone that just likes to try new and different foods. Eta: I've been thinking about some of the negative reviews revolving around unusual ingredients. They kind of stuck in my craw and I couldn't quite place why, it finally dawned on me that these people must really haven't ever made any dairy cheese either, wherein all manner of equipment is required in addition to a plethora a simple to bizarre ingredients. You're making *cheese* and complaining you need a good blender? Sheesh, don't crap on the book, admit you're too cheap and or lazy for the process and buy the junk at the health food store (which in the long run tastes worse and would cost more than investing in a good blender). It's a specialty craft, not hacking up some veggies, tossing them in a bowl and voila, salad! So rather than give bad reviews because you're not committed to experimenting with a new craft, evaluate your own goals and commitment level. Cheese making of any variety isn't exactly a purely simple process, and this book tackled the subject not using dairy at all!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Cat

    This is the book I need! I paged through it last night and was salivating. I have been in search of a decent vegan cheese for years. I've read all the reviews and lists comparing brands, no matter what they say, it tastes like vegan cheese (ie: not good), has a weird texture, is painfully expensive, and usually ends up in the garbage within moments of being opened. I pretty much gave up on it, but then I started experimenting with homemade cheese sauces (cashews, sweet potatoes, nooch and the li This is the book I need! I paged through it last night and was salivating. I have been in search of a decent vegan cheese for years. I've read all the reviews and lists comparing brands, no matter what they say, it tastes like vegan cheese (ie: not good), has a weird texture, is painfully expensive, and usually ends up in the garbage within moments of being opened. I pretty much gave up on it, but then I started experimenting with homemade cheese sauces (cashews, sweet potatoes, nooch and the like) and the dream was kept alive. And now...this book! That said, this does feel like some freaky vegan shit. I wouldn't have been ready for this a couple of years ago, but there are lots of things I once considered freaky vegan shit that I work with on a regular basis now (tvp? egg replacer powder?) so I think I'm ready. However there are a ton of recipes that my kitchen just isn't equipped to make at this point since I haven't figured out how to square my bank account with my Vitamix dreams, and a fair number of ingredients that I've never heard of nor seen in the grocery store, so my guess is I would be doing some online ordering. So it might still be out of reach, but it's something to keep on my shelf and slowly work toward.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Alli Maydole

    SO MANY THINGS TO BUY! Although she has some solid recipes in this book that I would love to conquer and try in a vegan way, most of the ingredients are pretty crazy....drops of coloring from specific vitamin tablets? Irish moss? The bummer is that I invested in literally everything needed for this cookbook and of the 4 recipes I’ve made, there was only 1 I would make again, which isn’t a good percentage for me so far. Going to stick it out since I invested but still bummed.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jan Swinger

    This is my second book by this author and just like the last one, the recipes are wonderful. I am lucky, I have a Vitamix and access to a natural food store so the ingredients aren't hard. I love to cook and this is helping me cook vegan and enjoy the food. I would definitely recommend this book!! This is my second book by this author and just like the last one, the recipes are wonderful. I am lucky, I have a Vitamix and access to a natural food store so the ingredients aren't hard. I love to cook and this is helping me cook vegan and enjoy the food. I would definitely recommend this book!!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Chris Worthy

    This is a beautiful book and I think there are those for whom it will be a great help in breaking an addiction to dairy cheese. I don't think it's for me, but if I add more nuts to my diet (and get a Vitamix), this is definitely a book I would turn to for recipes. This is a beautiful book and I think there are those for whom it will be a great help in breaking an addiction to dairy cheese. I don't think it's for me, but if I add more nuts to my diet (and get a Vitamix), this is definitely a book I would turn to for recipes.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Bernadette

    Very good, interesting selection of homemade vegan cheeses. Mostly but based, with some made with seeds & beans for those with nut allergies/concerns. Helpful lists of commonly used ingredients & recommended equipment for cheese making.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    Could've done without the fat shaming and food policing in the intro of "if you are overweight you should opt for recipes in the nut free and dairy free chapters". But otherwise beautiful photos and interesting recipes. Could've done without the fat shaming and food policing in the intro of "if you are overweight you should opt for recipes in the nut free and dairy free chapters". But otherwise beautiful photos and interesting recipes.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sue Trav

    Recently dairy free (non vegan) and have marked a few of these cheeses as "to make". I have no interest in making aged cheddar or other formed cheeses out of nuts but I do miss spreadable cheese and cheese sauce so will be attempting those for sure. Recently dairy free (non vegan) and have marked a few of these cheeses as "to make". I have no interest in making aged cheddar or other formed cheeses out of nuts but I do miss spreadable cheese and cheese sauce so will be attempting those for sure.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Arvind Vermani

    Good guide for a fairly narrow wedge (excuse the pun) of the culinary pie. Some of the ingredients like liquid smoke are tough to come by and debatable as far as health is concerned.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Annie de Bhal

    There are a good few oil-free options in this one, which is great!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Brenda Williams

    Being Vegan and Gluten Free it makes it difficult to find items. With this book I am able to make my own cheese without additives I don't want. The book Plant Power Way is one of my favorites. Being Vegan and Gluten Free it makes it difficult to find items. With this book I am able to make my own cheese without additives I don't want. The book Plant Power Way is one of my favorites.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Cardona

    Good starter vegan cheese book Easy to follow and good pictures. Aging cheese we’re interested and tasteful. Good book to have if you interested at starting you cheese adventures

  18. 5 out of 5

    Emma Cooper

    I haven't cooked anything from it yet, so my review might change, but looking very promising so far. I haven't cooked anything from it yet, so my review might change, but looking very promising so far.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Cindy Mooney

    I’ve made numerous recipes from this book and they all taste exactly the same..not like cheese. Not even close.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    The tone of some of the written portions was a bit preachy about health and wellness, but the recipes are numerous and fabulous.

  21. 4 out of 5

    CeeJ

    If you wanted any seed based recipes- don’t look here. 100% of the recipes are made with tree nuts. Gave it 5 stars Bc it’s not fair fir me to judge without testing any (nut allergy)

  22. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    great book, very doable recipes and delicious product.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ariel chanko

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kristin Peterson

  25. 5 out of 5

    Miche

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ruth

  27. 5 out of 5

    Niamh

  28. 5 out of 5

    KarenLana

  29. 4 out of 5

    Wendy Orewyler

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly

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