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The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing: Violate Them at Your Own Risk

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There are laws of nature, so why shouldn't there be laws of marketing? As Al Ries and Jack Trout—the world-renowned marketing consultants and bestselling authors of Positioning—note, you can build an impressive airplane, but it will never leave the ground if you ignore the laws of physics, especially gravity. Why then, they ask, shouldn't there also be laws of marketing tha There are laws of nature, so why shouldn't there be laws of marketing? As Al Ries and Jack Trout—the world-renowned marketing consultants and bestselling authors of Positioning—note, you can build an impressive airplane, but it will never leave the ground if you ignore the laws of physics, especially gravity. Why then, they ask, shouldn't there also be laws of marketing that must be followed to launch and maintain winning brands? In The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing, Ries and Trout offer a compendium of twenty-two innovative rules for understanding and succeeding in the international marketplace. From the Law of Leadership, to The Law of the Category, to The Law of the Mind, these valuable insights stand the test of time and present a clear path to successful products. Violate them at your own risk.


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There are laws of nature, so why shouldn't there be laws of marketing? As Al Ries and Jack Trout—the world-renowned marketing consultants and bestselling authors of Positioning—note, you can build an impressive airplane, but it will never leave the ground if you ignore the laws of physics, especially gravity. Why then, they ask, shouldn't there also be laws of marketing tha There are laws of nature, so why shouldn't there be laws of marketing? As Al Ries and Jack Trout—the world-renowned marketing consultants and bestselling authors of Positioning—note, you can build an impressive airplane, but it will never leave the ground if you ignore the laws of physics, especially gravity. Why then, they ask, shouldn't there also be laws of marketing that must be followed to launch and maintain winning brands? In The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing, Ries and Trout offer a compendium of twenty-two innovative rules for understanding and succeeding in the international marketplace. From the Law of Leadership, to The Law of the Category, to The Law of the Mind, these valuable insights stand the test of time and present a clear path to successful products. Violate them at your own risk.

30 review for The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing: Violate Them at Your Own Risk

  1. 5 out of 5

    Viraj

    For the summary, please email / PM me. 1: The Law of Leadership: It’s better to be first than it is to be better. 2: The law of category: If you can’t be first in a category, setup a new category you can be first in. 3: The law of the mind: It’s better to be first in the mind than to be first in the market place 4: The law of perception: Marketing is not a battle of products; it’s a battle of perceptions. 5: The law of focus: The most powerful concept in marketing is owning a word in the prospect’s For the summary, please email / PM me. 1: The Law of Leadership: It’s better to be first than it is to be better. 2: The law of category: If you can’t be first in a category, setup a new category you can be first in. 3: The law of the mind: It’s better to be first in the mind than to be first in the market place 4: The law of perception: Marketing is not a battle of products; it’s a battle of perceptions. 5: The law of focus: The most powerful concept in marketing is owning a word in the prospect’s mind. 6: The Law of Exclusivity: Two companies cannot own the same word in the prospect’s mind. 7: The law of ladder: The strategy to use dependent on which rung you occupy on the ladder. 8: The Law of Duality: In the long run, every market becomes a two-horse race. 9: The Law of the opposite: If you’re shooting for second place, your strategy is determined by the leader. 10: The Law of Division: Over time, a category will divide and become two or more categories. 11: The Law of perspective: Marketing effects take place over an extended period of time. 12: The Law of Line Extension: There’s an irresistible pressure to extend the equity of the brand. 13: The Law of sacrifice: You have to give up something in order to get something. 14: The Law of Attributes: For every attribute, there is an opposite, effective attribute. 15: The Law of candor: When you admit a negative, the prospect will give you a positive. 16: The Law of singularity: In each situation, only one move will produce substantial results. 17: The Law of unpredictability: Unless you write your competitors’ plans, you can’t predict the future. 18: The Law of success: Success often leads to arrogance, and arrogance to failure. 19: The Law of failure: Failure is to be expected and accepted. 20: The Law of hype: The situation is often the opposite of the way it appears in the press. 21: The Law of acceleration: Successful programs are not built on fads, they’re built on trends. 22: The Law of Resources: Without adequate funding an idea won’t get off the ground.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Yevgeniy Brikman

    This book is a good overview of basic marketing principles, but the so-called "immutable laws" are neither laws nor immutable. They are, at best, rules of thumb that often change and contradict each other. The book itself contains plenty of examples of this! For example, they talk at length about the "Law of Extension", and how successful brands should never extend their product line to new products/markets, but in later chapters, you see a few successful examples of companies doing exactly that This book is a good overview of basic marketing principles, but the so-called "immutable laws" are neither laws nor immutable. They are, at best, rules of thumb that often change and contradict each other. The book itself contains plenty of examples of this! For example, they talk at length about the "Law of Extension", and how successful brands should never extend their product line to new products/markets, but in later chapters, you see a few successful examples of companies doing exactly that. Moreover, the book is dated. They talk extensively about how essential it is to be first in the market ("Law of Leadership"), but there are a huge number of modern examples that became wildly successful despite violating this "law", including Google (not the first search engine), Facebook (not the first social network), LinkedIn (not the first professional network or job site), and many others. An even bigger problem with this book is that it's observational and not predictive. Whereas laws of science allow you to predict what will happen in the future (e.g. the law of gravity allows you to predict how to planets will move in space), the "laws" in this book merely describe something that happened in the past. The authors try to determine cause and effect from these past events, but correlation does not imply causation. For example, the book talks about IBM being wildly profitable while they focused on one business line and then barely surviving after starting to work on multiple business lines. If this was a controlled experiment and the *only* thing that changed was that IBM started to work on multiple business lines, the "Law of Extension" would be a reasonable explanation. But the world isn't static. IBM could've started to struggle for dozens of other reasons: competitors introduced new products, new technologies were developed, the quality of IBM's products decreased, and so on. All that said, this book is still valuable as a collection of interesting marketing case studies and as a way to get into the mind of a marketer. Some of the useful ideas you'll find: * Perception is more important than product. * Customers put products into "categories" that have more to do with marketing than product. For example, in the US, Honda is seen as a car maker, whereas in Japan, it's seen as a motorcycle maker, even though it's the same company with the same products. * Once you're in a category, it's very hard to move, which is why using the same brand name on everything, even if it's a powerful brand name, doesn't always work (e.g. Heinz ketchup = good, Heinz salad = WTF). * Your basic goal in marketing is to be #1 in your category. You can get there by dominating an existing category... or by creating a new category. * Don't be afraid to admit weaknesses and flaws. Candor can be disarming. People are naturally suspicious of anyone praising themselves, but if you admit a negative, most people a) automatically assume you're telling the truth, b) assume if you're willing to talk about a weakness, then you must have some amazing strengths, c) reflexively forgive you and become more open to the rest of your message. * Focus your marketing on the leader's weaknesses rather than their strengths. For example, if you make cars that compete with Volvo, marketing around "safety" won't be as effective as marketing around "speed" or "fun" or "elegant design". I recommend skimming the book, and instead of accepting the authors' interpretation of events and assuming they are teaching you immutable laws, file away these ideas as facets you should consider when developing a marketing strategy. I suppose it would be more accurate to call this book "22 rules of thumb about marketing," but I'm sure that would violate one of their marketing laws... As always, I saved a few of my favorite quotes from the book: "The basic issue of marketing is creating a category you can be first in." "Marketing is a battle of perceptions, not products." "Don't try to be better. Try to be different."

  3. 5 out of 5

    Amir Tesla

    It’s an illusion. There is no objective reality. There are no facts. There are no best products. All that exists in the world of marketing are perceptions in the minds of the customer or prospect. The perception is the reality. Everything else is an illusion. Marketing is a manipulation of those perceptions. Reading some books is like learning a new language, you understand things you didn't before and you see things, you didn't see before "the 22 immutable laws of marketing" is definitely one of It’s an illusion. There is no objective reality. There are no facts. There are no best products. All that exists in the world of marketing are perceptions in the minds of the customer or prospect. The perception is the reality. Everything else is an illusion. Marketing is a manipulation of those perceptions. Reading some books is like learning a new language, you understand things you didn't before and you see things, you didn't see before "the 22 immutable laws of marketing" is definitely one of them. Besides these, knowing about marketing can have significant implications for your personal lives as well a couple of which I'll point out throughout this review. Since first I started reading about "Cognitive Science", it's fascinating how counter-intuitive many things in life are and the same holds true for marketing. This book, envelops 22 principles of marketing which is the result of a 25 years experience. Very concise and illuminating, the authors explain each law followed by several examples of businesses who followed or violated that law along with the consequences of their actions. Here are a gist of the important laws and I think the other ones are an interplay or derivation of these laws. The law of leadership According to this law, the first company who starts with an idea, will always own the major market share. Once a name captures the prospects' mind, nothing can change it. The other reason is that people associate the name of the first brand to the idea. For instance Xerox, still many people use the name xerox when they want to ask for a copy. Well, does it mean when some company (like coca-cola) starts a coke business, its over for the others? No, if the newcomers exploit the other laws.The basic issue in marketing is creating a category you can be first in. It's much easier to get into the mind first than to try to convince someone you have a better product than the one that did get there first.The law of the category If you can't be first in a category, set up a new category you can be first in. When you lunch a new product, to compete the first-comer, you must NOT ask yourself: "How is this new product better than the competetion?" but "First what?" In other words, what category is this new product first inProspects are on the defensive when it comes to brands. Everyone talks about why their brand is better. But prospects have an open mind when it comes to categories.For instance, IBM was first in computers, DEC established itself as first, in minicomputers...The law of the mindIt's better to be first in the mind than to be first in the market place. This law supports the first one. marketing is the battle of perception, not product. The fist one who reaches the minds of the prospects, wins the position. You can't change the mind once it's made upif you want to make a big impression on another person, you cannot worm your way into their mind and then slowly build up a favorable opinion over a period of time. The mind doesn’t work that way. You have to blast your way into the mind. The reason you blast instead of worm is that people don’t like to change their minds. Once they perceive you one way, that’s it. They kind of file you away in their minds as a certain kind of person.The law of perception This is one of my favorites:It’s an illusion. There is no objective reality. There are no facts. There are no best products. All that exists in the world of marketing are perceptions in the minds of the customer or prospect. The perception is the reality. Everything else is an illusion. Marketing is a manipulation of those perceptions. The law of focus Continued ...

  4. 4 out of 5

    Luke

    Tim Ferriss listed this in his top 5 favorite books, so I picked it up. The core of the 22 laws is Identity. The authors argue that too many businesses believe they will win simply by having the best product, which isn't true. The winner is the product that captures the mind of its target customers. When a product is first to market, the first of its category, it usually establishes a foothold that no other company can wrest away. So create your own category, and be first there. Win the minds of t Tim Ferriss listed this in his top 5 favorite books, so I picked it up. The core of the 22 laws is Identity. The authors argue that too many businesses believe they will win simply by having the best product, which isn't true. The winner is the product that captures the mind of its target customers. When a product is first to market, the first of its category, it usually establishes a foothold that no other company can wrest away. So create your own category, and be first there. Win the minds of the people. If you are second or worse in a category, acknowledge this. Avis Rent-a-Car did this by admitting, "We're second place - but we try harder." Or, win a new word in the minds of your customers. Ragu pasta sauce did this by winning the word "thicker," which differentiates them from the market leader, Prego. A very good book for understanding basic principles of how marketing needs to go beyond simply saying why your product is the best.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    The usual business book....They violated their title in the first chapter...

  6. 5 out of 5

    Joseph McBee

    I read this book because another business author I like recommended it and because I am currently writing a class on marketing and wanted to use it for research. I hated it. I want to be careful here. When writing a review for a book I don't like I want to keep in mind that I am talking about something that people created. I do NOT want to write anything that I would not say to the authors' faces if they were standing right in front of me. This is difficult in a way because I really, REALLY didn't I read this book because another business author I like recommended it and because I am currently writing a class on marketing and wanted to use it for research. I hated it. I want to be careful here. When writing a review for a book I don't like I want to keep in mind that I am talking about something that people created. I do NOT want to write anything that I would not say to the authors' faces if they were standing right in front of me. This is difficult in a way because I really, REALLY didn't like this book. The book struck me as being a manual on how to manipulate others written by masters of the craft. The book is woefully out-of-date as well and many of the author's examples are no longer relevant. I get that the majority of the "laws" they espouse in the book are still relevant, but I don't know if I could, in good conscience, use many of them. In one part of the book the authors recommend that you choose a product differentiator and then make people believe that this aspect of your product is something that they desperately need. Even when they don't. Here's the thing,I KNOW that this is a standard marketing tactic. We all do. But knowing something and having it shoved in your face in all its ugliness are two different things. If anything, this book drove home the truth of the sinfulness of man for me. Not just because of the things these men were recommending but also because of my response. Here I was, reading the book and feeling disgusted and then I started feeling very smug that I was so much more moral than the authors. That's not attractive. But it is human. And maybe that can be said about the book too.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Umar Ghumman

    I love this book. The laws are still applicable and will be applicable 25 years from now.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Received this 23-year-old book for my 23rd birthday and wanted to like it but it was so frustrating. "There are laws of nature (physics), so why shouldn't there be laws of marketing?" ??? Here are just a couple reasons: 1) Dealing with absolutes sets an author up to look foolish when most of his examples don't come true... e.g. "There are ominous signs of softness in Microsoft's strategy... i.e. expanding into spreadsheets (Lotus is the leader), word processing (WordPerfect is the leader), and busi Received this 23-year-old book for my 23rd birthday and wanted to like it but it was so frustrating. "There are laws of nature (physics), so why shouldn't there be laws of marketing?" ??? Here are just a couple reasons: 1) Dealing with absolutes sets an author up to look foolish when most of his examples don't come true... e.g. "There are ominous signs of softness in Microsoft's strategy... i.e. expanding into spreadsheets (Lotus is the leader), word processing (WordPerfect is the leader), and business graphics (Harvard Graphics is the leader)." 2) Most of these immutable laws are subjective, e.g. "Law 18: Success often leads to arrogance, and arrogance to failure." Right, compare to Newton's third law: "When one body exerts a force on a second body, oftentimes, depending on its personality, the second body will decide to exert a force in the opposite direction, usually equal in magnitude, on the first body."

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kirtida Gautam

    The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing is a great book. It's very small and easy to read. The chapters start with words of wisdom. Some of them are counter intuitive and makes complete sense. Few Quotes that I liked. Hype is hype. Real revolutions don’t arrive at high noon with marching bands and coverage on the 6 p.m. news. Real revolutions arrive unannounced in the middle of the night and kind of speak up on you. Capturing the imagination of the public is not the same as revolutionizing a market. The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing is a great book. It's very small and easy to read. The chapters start with words of wisdom. Some of them are counter intuitive and makes complete sense. Few Quotes that I liked. Hype is hype. Real revolutions don’t arrive at high noon with marching bands and coverage on the 6 p.m. news. Real revolutions arrive unannounced in the middle of the night and kind of speak up on you. Capturing the imagination of the public is not the same as revolutionizing a market. Unless you write your competitor’s plans, you can’t predict the future.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Abugosh

    So many people recommend that I read this book, so I finally gave it a shot. At first I thought it was amazing and lived up to the hype, law of leadership, cool, law of perception, even better! I loved how he got psychological about it and talks about how people perceive brands. Where he began to lose me however, was everything that had to do with anything that happened in the last 20 years. I realize this book was written in the early 90's but some of the things he mentioned have been proved wr So many people recommend that I read this book, so I finally gave it a shot. At first I thought it was amazing and lived up to the hype, law of leadership, cool, law of perception, even better! I loved how he got psychological about it and talks about how people perceive brands. Where he began to lose me however, was everything that had to do with anything that happened in the last 20 years. I realize this book was written in the early 90's but some of the things he mentioned have been proved wrong many times. He gets very cynical towards the end. I can't tell if he was joking when he said you should marry/divorce rich? It just seemed out of place, and silly. Obviously you have advantages if you already have money or get married into it. How does that help us? Also, he mentioned that products always sneak up on you at night and catch on in the back of the paper but never on the front page, but that's not really true all of the time (look at the unveiling of any Apple product or more recently Tesla). He also really puts down the startup and entrepreneurial spirit by saying the only way to get an idea off the ground is to find a business to sponsor you / buy the idea. True that is easier, but there are countless startups that have made it by bootstrapping or seeking angel investment. It's also worth noting that since this book was written, the entire marketing scene changed , since Seth Godin's permission marketing, to the modern day highly analyzed digital targeting we have. All in all, the book is great to give you a base on how to think about marketing and human emotions, but in terms of practice, is severely outdated.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Dax

    This book is a great illustration of what can go wrong with business wiriting. The 22 Laws themselves are actually great. I can see the value in the insights shared by the authors. The problem with the book is the timeliness of the examples. I laughed out loud several times because the supporting references they used were either incrediblly dated or just completly wrrong. Don't get me wrong. I am not bashing the authors becuase they are not omniscient. Exactly the opposite. The point is that thi This book is a great illustration of what can go wrong with business wiriting. The 22 Laws themselves are actually great. I can see the value in the insights shared by the authors. The problem with the book is the timeliness of the examples. I laughed out loud several times because the supporting references they used were either incrediblly dated or just completly wrrong. Don't get me wrong. I am not bashing the authors becuase they are not omniscient. Exactly the opposite. The point is that things change, the future is uncertain, and you can't believe everything you read. Some of the hilarious examples I came across include: 1) Pointing to Donald Trump as an example of a failure because he had his hand in too many things. 2) Citing the flawed logic of Bill Gates thinking he would be able to battle Lotus (spreadsheets) and WordPerfect (word processing). 3) Extolling the virtues of the leading computer companies: Only one of the top 6 still make computers. I can't recommend this book until it gets an update unless you want a good laugh.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Dũng Nguyễn

    I found this book practical and interesting, except for the last law where authors stressed the importance of money in Marketing, I mean, what happened with new wave of startups recently proved that money doesn't matter that much in marketing. However, I again believe that this is a MUST-READ book for those who want to step in the market, either they use these rules or not I found this book practical and interesting, except for the last law where authors stressed the importance of money in Marketing, I mean, what happened with new wave of startups recently proved that money doesn't matter that much in marketing. However, I again believe that this is a MUST-READ book for those who want to step in the market, either they use these rules or not

  13. 4 out of 5

    Michael Gerasimenko

    Easy to understand, clearly written, high content, a variety of examples. The book leaves you wondering how can it be that most companies completely ignore them. 22 immutable laws of marketing also includes the answer: Ego, inner dynamics, hierarchical structures,... the classic capital errors nowadays, not only in the marketing realm. A must read for everybody interested in understanding more about marketing. The book provides you with a proper fundament for every marketing consideration. Viola Easy to understand, clearly written, high content, a variety of examples. The book leaves you wondering how can it be that most companies completely ignore them. 22 immutable laws of marketing also includes the answer: Ego, inner dynamics, hierarchical structures,... the classic capital errors nowadays, not only in the marketing realm. A must read for everybody interested in understanding more about marketing. The book provides you with a proper fundament for every marketing consideration. Violate these laws at your own risk!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Manoj Kakran

    Ground searching and a valuable book. Not updated according to recent times.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Dexter Zhuang

    I'm not sure how immutable these laws really are, but many of them are pretty interesting to read. I think the biggest takeaways for me from Al Ries and Jack Trout are that 1) you should always strive to be #1 in your category in peoples' minds 2) if you're not #1, differentiate yourself completely from the #1 and occupy your niche 3) be cautious about moving into other categories of mindshare at the risk of losing hold of your currently dominated category. The key assumption I think made in this I'm not sure how immutable these laws really are, but many of them are pretty interesting to read. I think the biggest takeaways for me from Al Ries and Jack Trout are that 1) you should always strive to be #1 in your category in peoples' minds 2) if you're not #1, differentiate yourself completely from the #1 and occupy your niche 3) be cautious about moving into other categories of mindshare at the risk of losing hold of your currently dominated category. The key assumption I think made in this book that I'm confident has changed is the way that people learn about products. In the world of the 90's, people learned about products through TV, print, and other forms of media where they would then have to go into a store and make a cognitive decision to purchase the product. However, in the modern Internet business world, your product is discoverable through referrals, world of mouth, search, etc. etc. where people don't need to make a serious cognitive decision to purchase something. As a result, the way that companies can get mindshare for their products today is through getting people to commit time to trying their product in the first place and give them a positive experience as soon as possible.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    A very short book on marketing principles with a few examples. The authors need to consult their thesaurus, their laws presented are not laws nor are they immutable. This book could push to 5 stars if they put more data behind their claims. Here are my favorite principles presented: Leadership: Be first, not better Category: Make a new category if you do not fit in existing categories. Perception: Marketing is a battle of perceptions, not products. Duality: Every market is a two-horse race. Succes A very short book on marketing principles with a few examples. The authors need to consult their thesaurus, their laws presented are not laws nor are they immutable. This book could push to 5 stars if they put more data behind their claims. Here are my favorite principles presented: Leadership: Be first, not better Category: Make a new category if you do not fit in existing categories. Perception: Marketing is a battle of perceptions, not products. Duality: Every market is a two-horse race. Success: Success leads to arrogance and then failure. Acceleration: Successful programs are built on trends.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Carlos

    Some really good points made, but packed full with hindsight biases.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad El shazly

    For a beginner in the marketing field, I feel so lucky to start with this book.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Tonya Burrows

    Dated

  20. 4 out of 5

    Vlad

    This book has not held up well, and isn't nearly as good as the author's book on brand positioning. Here are the 22 laws, in my own words, with their examples: 1. *Be first in category in the customer's mind.* E.g., Kleenex, Nintendo, Heinz, Xerox. The examples given are so old that they now undermine the "law." E.g., "USA Today will never succeed." "Playboy leads Penthouse." 2. *If you can't be first in a category, set up your own category.* E.g., Amelia Earhart was the first *female* pilot to This book has not held up well, and isn't nearly as good as the author's book on brand positioning. Here are the 22 laws, in my own words, with their examples: 1. *Be first in category in the customer's mind.* E.g., Kleenex, Nintendo, Heinz, Xerox. The examples given are so old that they now undermine the "law." E.g., "USA Today will never succeed." "Playboy leads Penthouse." 2. *If you can't be first in a category, set up your own category.* E.g., Amelia Earhart was the first *female* pilot to cross the Atlantic solo. "You can turn an also-ran into a winner by inventing your own category." 3. *Better to be first in the customer's mind than first in sales.* 4. *Perceptions matter more than product.* "There is no objective reality, there are no best products. Perception is reality, everything else is illusion." E.g., New Coke won in taste tests, but flopped in market. 5. *Focus so that you own a word/category in the customer's mind.* E.g., PC = IBM PC; ketchup = Heinz; spreadsheet = Excel; Atari = videogames; BMW = driving. 6. *Multiple companies can't own the same word* 7. *For each category, prospects have a hierarchy in their minds and use it to filter, accept/reject marketing messages.* E.g., Avis's "we try harder" campaign worked, but the switch to "we'll be #1" failed; multiple universities have tried "we're the Harvard of [region]," and that's usually a failure, too. 8. *Every category eventually turns into a duopoly.* E.g., Pepsi and Coke, Crest and Colgate, Nestle and Hershey. Again, the examples haven't aged well: "American Airlines will probably end up as the Coca-Cola of the skies." 9. *Don't compete on factors that the leader of a category already owns -- be different.* "Too many potential #2 brands try to emulate the leader." E.g., Scope was positioned as "the good-tasting mouthwash" vs. Listerine; Stoli vodka positioned as "true Russian vodka" vs. American-made vodkas; 10. *Large categories subdivide.* E.g., "cars" became SUVs, wagons, sports cars, compact cars, luxury cars, etc.; "top 40 music" subdivided; 11. *Marketing takes time.* "At first The Donald was successful... today, Trump is $1.4B in debt. What caused Trump to fail was line extension." 12. *Line extension is a bad idea." "Microsoft is setting itself up as the next IBM, with all the negative implications." The authors suggest Microsoft will fail to achieve marketshare in word processing, spreadsheets, databases, etc. The prediction was clearly off. But the argument that line extension dilutes brand distinctiveness is still good advice. E.g., Heinz babyfood; Adidas cologne; Lifesavers gum; Bic pantyhose; Coors water; Pierre Cardin wine; Levis shoes. 13. *Sacrifice (focus) to win.* Sacrifice product line breadth to win in a single category. Sacrifice changing things every year to keep them "fresh." 14. *Every attribute attached to a brand has a counter-attribute.* E.g., Coca-Cola's "original" attribute also creates the weakness of "older", allowing Pepsi to position as "younger" and more youth-appealing. 15. *Be honest about your flaws to win points with customers.* E.g., "Avis is only #2 in rent-a-cars."; "The VW will stay ugly longer."; "With a name like Smuckers, it has to be good."; "Grapenuts is a learned pleasure." 16. *Focus on a few big levers, not being excellent across a thousand initiatives.* Look for that "one bold stroke" to make a big difference. Be unexpected in your one big move. 17. *Things are unpredictable because laws change, competitors surprise, tastes change.* E.g., Xerox research showed nobody would pay $.05 for a paper copy but obviously that wasn't true. 18. "Ego blinds marketers to reality and prevents good decision-making." "...the result: early success, and long-term failure, as demonstrated by the failure of Donald Trump." 19. *Admit your mistakes and move on with changed plans.* 20. *Don't believe the press hype.* 21. *Ignore fads, but ignore trends at your peril.* E.g., Ninja Turtles vs. Barbie Doll. 22. *It takes money to do marketing well.* You need money to land in a prospect's mind. Spend enough to be effective. You can't save your way to success.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Thuy

    Law 22 (it takes money to do marketing) seems obsolete or overridden by Law 17 (things are unpredictable). In the age of the Internet, we have free social media tools, and they have proven powerful. Don’t let the late 80s/early 90s brand references bother you. The point the authors are trying to make with those stories still hold true.

  22. 4 out of 5

    John

    Pretty good, it was a fast listen. Prioritized is because Tim Ferriss pumped it way back. A lot of the examples were dated but that was actually kind of nice because, especially in the case of "line extension", you could actually add to their examples which only compounded the the point/law. Pretty good, it was a fast listen. Prioritized is because Tim Ferriss pumped it way back. A lot of the examples were dated but that was actually kind of nice because, especially in the case of "line extension", you could actually add to their examples which only compounded the the point/law.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Heston

    Some of the stories are outdated as this was originally published in the 90's, but the "Laws" seem to hold true for almost all segments. There are a few statements that fall apart in rare cases such as with SaaS co's but for everyone else, this is pure GOLD. If you're in biz, read this book immediately. Some of the stories are outdated as this was originally published in the 90's, but the "Laws" seem to hold true for almost all segments. There are a few statements that fall apart in rare cases such as with SaaS co's but for everyone else, this is pure GOLD. If you're in biz, read this book immediately.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Marvin Musfiq

    One of the best marketing book I've ever read. A must read One of the best marketing book I've ever read. A must read

  25. 4 out of 5

    Siddharth Singh

    It's 22 steps of mind bending. The instances of real case scenarios is very well explained and would surprise the general perception of the reader. It's 22 steps of mind bending. The instances of real case scenarios is very well explained and would surprise the general perception of the reader.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sairam Krishnan

    I really should have got to this sooner, but I'm glad that I now have. Recommended reading for any marketer. I really should have got to this sooner, but I'm glad that I now have. Recommended reading for any marketer.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Colby

    I am getting a kick out of reading dated books with enduring principles. You read their ideas/ideas/advice/wisdom and can clearly see how their predictions played out (in this case 30 years later) and evaluate how true their advice is. He is talking about what phone company will win the LONG DISTANCE calling market. I laughed. AT&T is still winning. Although it is out-dated, it gives lots to think about and you can immediately test all ideas with 20/20 hindsight.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mohamed Al-Ali

    The holy Bible of marketing

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ricardo

    It has some outdated information and others things didn't come true, but overall the book is solid. It gives you great insides how to approach marketing. One thing is that it says that is hard or impossible to predict the future, but the book does try that in a few occasions. It has some outdated information and others things didn't come true, but overall the book is solid. It gives you great insides how to approach marketing. One thing is that it says that is hard or impossible to predict the future, but the book does try that in a few occasions.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Vugar

    The Bible of Marketing!

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