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Adventures in Graphica: Using Comics and Graphic Novels to Teach Comprehension, 2-6

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Comic books and graphic novels, known collectively as "graphica," have long been popular with teenagers and adults. Recently graphica has grown in popularity with younger readers as well, motivating and engaging some of our most reluctant readers who often shun traditional texts. While some teachers have become curious about graphica's potential, many are confused by the o Comic books and graphic novels, known collectively as "graphica," have long been popular with teenagers and adults. Recently graphica has grown in popularity with younger readers as well, motivating and engaging some of our most reluctant readers who often shun traditional texts. While some teachers have become curious about graphica's potential, many are confused by the overwhelming number of new titles and series, in both fiction and nonfiction, and are unsure of its suitability and function in their classrooms. Drawing on his own success using graphica with elementary students, literacy coach Terry Thompson introduces reading teachers to this popular medium and suggests sources of appropriate graphica for the classroom and for particular students. Taking cues from research that supports the use of graphica with students, Terry shows how this exciting medium fits into the literacy framework and correlates with best practices in comprehension, vocabulary, and fluency instruction. Adventures in Graphica contains numerous, easy-to-replicate, instructional strategies, including examples of how graphic texts can be used to create a bridge as students transfer abstract comprehension strategies learned through comics and graphic novels to traditional texts. Adventures in Graphica provides a roadmap for teachers to the medium that the New York Times recently hailed as possibly "the next new literary form."


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Comic books and graphic novels, known collectively as "graphica," have long been popular with teenagers and adults. Recently graphica has grown in popularity with younger readers as well, motivating and engaging some of our most reluctant readers who often shun traditional texts. While some teachers have become curious about graphica's potential, many are confused by the o Comic books and graphic novels, known collectively as "graphica," have long been popular with teenagers and adults. Recently graphica has grown in popularity with younger readers as well, motivating and engaging some of our most reluctant readers who often shun traditional texts. While some teachers have become curious about graphica's potential, many are confused by the overwhelming number of new titles and series, in both fiction and nonfiction, and are unsure of its suitability and function in their classrooms. Drawing on his own success using graphica with elementary students, literacy coach Terry Thompson introduces reading teachers to this popular medium and suggests sources of appropriate graphica for the classroom and for particular students. Taking cues from research that supports the use of graphica with students, Terry shows how this exciting medium fits into the literacy framework and correlates with best practices in comprehension, vocabulary, and fluency instruction. Adventures in Graphica contains numerous, easy-to-replicate, instructional strategies, including examples of how graphic texts can be used to create a bridge as students transfer abstract comprehension strategies learned through comics and graphic novels to traditional texts. Adventures in Graphica provides a roadmap for teachers to the medium that the New York Times recently hailed as possibly "the next new literary form."

30 review for Adventures in Graphica: Using Comics and Graphic Novels to Teach Comprehension, 2-6

  1. 5 out of 5

    Pasquale

    This book is enthusiastically written and can be really helpful in motivating the unmotivated readers in our classrooms using 'graphica' (comic books, graphic novels, etc.). This book seems it would be especially helpful for those unfamiliar with the comic book medium, how comics work, and how to use them in the classroom. If you are not a comic book reader, I reccommend this book. It has many helpful resources in its many appendices to help teachers start using graphica to teach readers. If you w This book is enthusiastically written and can be really helpful in motivating the unmotivated readers in our classrooms using 'graphica' (comic books, graphic novels, etc.). This book seems it would be especially helpful for those unfamiliar with the comic book medium, how comics work, and how to use them in the classroom. If you are not a comic book reader, I reccommend this book. It has many helpful resources in its many appendices to help teachers start using graphica to teach readers. If you were, or are, a comic book reader, this book may not really explore much new ground for you, especially if you have read "Understanding Comics" by Scott McCloud, which is referenced three times in this book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Wendie

    Very helpful when using Graphica with my students. I'm hoping to do more with it next year. This is definitely a book you need in your teacher library.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Melina

    What I really enjoyed about this book (and there were many things I enjoyed about it) was the tone taken throughout. Some teaching books can be a bit (or over-the-top) preachy. This was like a good friend had just walked into the staffroom, all excited because something they tried out in class really worked, and was really fun. And that good friend really knows what they're talking about. I've only really started building my graphic novel collection this year, and I'm constantly astounded by the What I really enjoyed about this book (and there were many things I enjoyed about it) was the tone taken throughout. Some teaching books can be a bit (or over-the-top) preachy. This was like a good friend had just walked into the staffroom, all excited because something they tried out in class really worked, and was really fun. And that good friend really knows what they're talking about. I've only really started building my graphic novel collection this year, and I'm constantly astounded by the interest a good graphic novel stirs in children. This book gives me some reasons why, and even better, some ideas of how I can harness this interest to further improve the comprehension of my students. Highly recommend for any teacher teaching reading.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Colby Sharp

    This books is a must read for teachers as we are starting to see the excitement reluctant readers are have when presented with graphic novels and other graphica. We have all seen our reluctant readers go ga-ga over a Diary of a Wimpy Kid or Babymouse book. Adventures in Graphica shows you how to teach "best practices" while using graphic novels. My favorite thing about this book was when Terry showed you how to transfer the learning in graphic novel instruction to more traditional text.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jen Munnerlyn

    This book simply intrigues me. At first glance I thought of our boy learners (and men teachers) but when I reviewed the book write up more carefully I realized every child might find inspiration from the use of Graphic novels in K-2 classrooms. This book also recently received an award from the Achievement Awards from the Association of Education Publishers (AEP) group. If you buy this book or are using it I would love to know how you like it.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Theresa

    I learned so much about the medium of comics/graphica from this resource and got some great ideas about how to use comics to engage kids in literacy. This book a great for teachers who know little about the medium! Also, if you are a creative teacher looking for a basis for writing your own lessons, this is an excellent resource.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mary Lee

    Everything I've been doing instinctively with graphic novels is here -- clearly explained, linked to comprehension strategies, embedded in reading workshop, and backed up by research. THANK YOU, Terry Thompson!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sheila Ramirez

    I thought think this is a resource a lot of teachers have not explored. I'm not to sure that I would use this as a regular choice in my classroom for independant reading, but maybe for a struggling reader it would be a good idea. This might be a good hook for them.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jaye

    Awesome book to help backup why teachers should use graphic novels in ANY classroom.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mary Beth Revesz

    A good overview of Graphic Novels and how to use them in the classroom for teaching reading. Now I need to find a book that teaches the writing of comics for elementary students.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Laura Crawford

    Great! Informative! And chock full of practical lessons that are easily implemented in the classroom. I am recommending this book to all my colleagues. Thank you, Terry, for all the great resources!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ann

    Excellent book for teaching anything related to Graphica!

  13. 4 out of 5

    The Reading Countess

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sonia Barajas

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sara

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jenn Marshall

  18. 4 out of 5

    Autumn

  19. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia Smith

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tara

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  22. 4 out of 5

    Alyson (Kid Lit Frenzy)

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

  24. 5 out of 5

    Nick Vittas

  25. 5 out of 5

    katsok

  26. 5 out of 5

    Moon

  27. 5 out of 5

    Paul Hankins

  28. 5 out of 5

    Todd

  29. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

  30. 5 out of 5

    Donalyn

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