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The More Than Complete Hitchhiker's Guide

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Includes an essay entitled "Introduction: A Guide to the Guide," the complete texts of The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy; The Restaurant at the End of the Universe; Life, the Universe and Everything; and So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish, as well as the short story "Young Zaphod Plays It Safe." Includes an essay entitled "Introduction: A Guide to the Guide," the complete texts of The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy; The Restaurant at the End of the Universe; Life, the Universe and Everything; and So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish, as well as the short story "Young Zaphod Plays It Safe."


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Includes an essay entitled "Introduction: A Guide to the Guide," the complete texts of The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy; The Restaurant at the End of the Universe; Life, the Universe and Everything; and So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish, as well as the short story "Young Zaphod Plays It Safe." Includes an essay entitled "Introduction: A Guide to the Guide," the complete texts of The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy; The Restaurant at the End of the Universe; Life, the Universe and Everything; and So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish, as well as the short story "Young Zaphod Plays It Safe."

30 review for The More Than Complete Hitchhiker's Guide

  1. 5 out of 5

    carol.

    The edition of the Guide that replaced all others in my library, it contains an introduction by Douglas Adams that adds interesting details for fans of the series in his characteristic voice. Originally a radio series, it was produced by the BBC. "I think that the BBC's attitude toward the show while it was in production was very similar to that which Macbeth had toward murdering people--initial doubts, followed by cautious enthusiasm and then greater and greater alarm at the sheer scale of the The edition of the Guide that replaced all others in my library, it contains an introduction by Douglas Adams that adds interesting details for fans of the series in his characteristic voice. Originally a radio series, it was produced by the BBC. "I think that the BBC's attitude toward the show while it was in production was very similar to that which Macbeth had toward murdering people--initial doubts, followed by cautious enthusiasm and then greater and greater alarm at the sheer scale of the undertaking and still no end in sight." Adams continues that while the show was fun, "it didn't exactly buy you lunch," so he turned it into a book "in which some of the characters behaved in entirely different ways and others behaved in exactly the same ways but for entirely different reasons, which amounts to the same thing but saves rewriting the dialogue." Supposedly, this edition is "complete and unabridged," although, since Adams kept changing things, I'm not sure how 'complete' it is. It does have a bonus short story, "Young Zaphod Plays it Safe." This edition contains The Hitchhiker's Guide, The Restaurant at the End of the Universe and Life, the Universe and Everything and looks suspiciously like the Good News Bible I was given as a child, with paper-thin, gold-leafed pages, albeit with a bonus cloth bookmark and leather binding. Honestly, it's probably fitting, as it was my go-to mockery of the world for at least a decade, and remains a strong influence. It's responsible for my search for the perfect drink: [The Guide] says that the best drink in existence is the Pan Galactic Gargle Blaster. It says that the effect of a Pan Galactic Gargle Blaster is like having your brains smashed out by a slice of lemon wrapped round a large gold brick. It's probably responsible for crystalizing my view of the human race: One of the things Ford Prefect had always found hardest to understand about humans was their habit of continually stating and repeating the very very obvious, as in It's a nice day, or You're very tall, or Oh dear you seem to have fallen down a thirty-foot well, are you alright? At first Ford had formed a theory to account for this strange behaviour. If human beings don't keep exercising their lips, he thought, their mouths probably seize up. After a few months' consideration and observation he abandoned this theory in favour of a new one. If they don't keep on exercising their lips, he thought, their brains start working. After a while he abandoned this one as well as being obstructively cynical. It likely expanded my love of word-play: The ships hung in the sky in much the same way that bricks don't. "You'd better be prepared for the jump into hyperspace. It's unpleasantly like being drunk." "What's so unpleasant about being drunk?" "Ask a glass of water." And it's clearly responsible for a personal running joke of 35 years, which I use to gauge the sci-fi and humor literacy of the people around me: Forty-two," said Deep Thought, with infinite majesty and calm. *And may I just add that as of May 6, 2017, the average star rating for the book is 4.20? I rest my case.

  2. 4 out of 5

    J.G. Keely

    The universe is a joke. Even before I was shown the meaning of life in a dream at 17 (then promptly forgot it because I thought I smelled pancakes), I knew this to be true--and yet, I have always felt a need to search for the truth, that nebulous, ill-treated creature. Adams has always been, to me, to be a welcome companion in that journey. Between the search for meaning and the recognition that it's all a joke in poor taste lies Douglas Adams, and, luckily for us, he doesn't seem to mind if you The universe is a joke. Even before I was shown the meaning of life in a dream at 17 (then promptly forgot it because I thought I smelled pancakes), I knew this to be true--and yet, I have always felt a need to search for the truth, that nebulous, ill-treated creature. Adams has always been, to me, to be a welcome companion in that journey. Between the search for meaning and the recognition that it's all a joke in poor taste lies Douglas Adams, and, luckily for us, he doesn't seem to mind if you lie there with him. He's a tall guy, but he'll make room. For all his crazed unpredictability, Adams is a powerful rationalist. His humor comes from his attempts to really think through all the things we take for granted. It turns out it takes little more than a moment's questioning to burst our preconceptions at the seams, yet rarely does this stop us from treating the most ludicrous things as if they were perfectly reasonable. It is no surprise that famed atheist Richard Dawkins found a friend and ally in Adams. What is surprising is that people often fail to see the rather consistent and reasonable philosophy laid out by Adams' quips and absurdities. His approach is much more personable (and less embittered) than Dawkins', which is why I think of Adams as a better face for rational materialism (which is a polite was of saying 'atheism'). Reading his books, it's not hard to see that Dawkins is tired of arguing with uninformed idiots who can't even recognize when a point has actually been made. Adams' humanism, however, stretched much further than the contention between those who believe, and those who don't. We see it from his protagonists, who are not elitist intellectuals--they're not even especially bright--but damn it, they're trying. By showing a universe that makes no sense and having his characters constantly question it, Adams is subtly hinting that this is the natural human state, and the fact that we laugh and sympathize shows that it must be true. It's all a joke, it's all ridiculous. The absurdists might find this depressing, but they're just a bunch of narcissists, anyhow. Demnading the world make sense and give you purpose is rather self centered when it already contains toasted paninis, attractive people in bathing suits, and Euler's Identity. I say let's sit down at the bar with the rabbi, the priest, and the frog and try to get a song going. Or at least recognize that it's okay to laugh at ourselves now and again. It's not the end of the world. It's just is a joke, but some of us are in on it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    The first book was amazing, with great plot line and humor. however, my enjoyment started to decline by the third book.(that's not to say i didn't enjoy it, just not as much as the first two. great humor, i could not stop laughing in parts The first book was amazing, with great plot line and humor. however, my enjoyment started to decline by the third book.(that's not to say i didn't enjoy it, just not as much as the first two. great humor, i could not stop laughing in parts

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    A re-read. Obviously. Read the entire thing aloud to Jefferson as bedtime story night after night. It took ages. In recognition of both my father reading the first book to me as a bedtime story when I was a wee lass, and Andrew's many, many readings of this book in grad school. Bedtime story often became a whole family affair. Thoughts on reading it all again: The first book and the fourth book are definitely my favorites. The second and third I could largely do without, except you'd miss the whole A re-read. Obviously. Read the entire thing aloud to Jefferson as bedtime story night after night. It took ages. In recognition of both my father reading the first book to me as a bedtime story when I was a wee lass, and Andrew's many, many readings of this book in grad school. Bedtime story often became a whole family affair. Thoughts on reading it all again: The first book and the fourth book are definitely my favorites. The second and third I could largely do without, except you'd miss the whole "Arthur learns to fly" bit. Otherwise the middle two seem so muddly and meandering. I got very impatient with them. My sister recently wrote of C.S. Lewis's Narnia series representing mastery: "There are no wobbly to-and-fro plotlines" in that saga. The Hitchhiker's Guide is pretty much the opposite of that. That said, I love the mice, and the dolphins, and the Rain God, and Arthur. And, of course, most of the bits from the Guide. I love Trillian and Fenchurch, both. I love all the bits about the fjords. To make completely modern, all you would have to do is replace every instance of "digital watches" with "smart phones."

  5. 4 out of 5

    Yuki Shimmyo

    I haven't a clue why I waited so long to read these books. I love this type of tongue-in-cheek (British) humor and sly satire. Brilliant! The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy The Restaurant at the End of the Universe Life, the Universe, and Everything So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish + "Young Zaphod Plays It Safe" I haven't a clue why I waited so long to read these books. I love this type of tongue-in-cheek (British) humor and sly satire. Brilliant! The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy The Restaurant at the End of the Universe Life, the Universe, and Everything So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish + "Young Zaphod Plays It Safe"

  6. 4 out of 5

    Cosmic Sher

    Brilliant. Just read it already. If you don't get it, wait a couple of years then read it again. Seriously. Oh, and don't panic! Brilliant. Just read it already. If you don't get it, wait a couple of years then read it again. Seriously. Oh, and don't panic!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Terrence

    Mostly harmless.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Bailey Peyton

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Contrary to my "Currently Reading" shelf, no, I definitely did not finish this in one day; I simply found my edition and replaced it in my shelves. Despite the length of the novels (I believe they're all under two hundred pages), they are dense in detail. I was honestly about to DNF (not even a chapter in, no less), but then I got to the bulldozer bit. I decided any book that actually gets me to laugh out loud is worth investing in. Also, I'm very aware of this book's post-modern scifi cult clas Contrary to my "Currently Reading" shelf, no, I definitely did not finish this in one day; I simply found my edition and replaced it in my shelves. Despite the length of the novels (I believe they're all under two hundred pages), they are dense in detail. I was honestly about to DNF (not even a chapter in, no less), but then I got to the bulldozer bit. I decided any book that actually gets me to laugh out loud is worth investing in. Also, I'm very aware of this book's post-modern scifi cult classic status, but I really don't gravitate towards straight up scifi in any medium. No shame, it's just not generally for me. But this had so much more to offer than just scifi (but don't discard the sub genre): it's got action, adventure, road trip comedy, a dash of romance at the very end, and, so much Britain it should take you to tea. Be warned: it lives up to its cult status: beloved by a small group, but beloved nonetheless. It's not for everyone. If I were to name one con it would be that there are asides that lead to nowhere. And while it's absurdist at it's finest, I could probably wax philosophical on the series for pages. This review will be all over, because that's my reading/rating: all over the spectrum. The easiest way to examine the aspects is taking them book by book. So here are a few aspects I found interesting/amusing... - The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy *We're literally thrown into the action in chapter one: Arthur's whole world is turned upside down when Ford (an alien of sorts) tells him his house/Earth are set to be destroyed so why not see the galaxy? *Biting presidential/Royalty commentary: "very much a figurehead" *Ford's father dying of shame because his son couldn't pronounce his name. The humor gets me. *"Don't Panic"=my reading advice for this book series *Arthur attempting to placate the Vogon with poetry analysis is every student attempting to understand Gertrude Stein's Tender Buttons. -The Restaurant at the End of the Galaxy *Notion that Earth (and by default Arthur and Trillian) were leftovers from the Great Experiment (find meaning of Ultimate Answer to Life, the Universe and Everything) is a nice change from humans believing they're at the center of the universe when in reality, we're all cogs in the machine. *Zaphod's seance in the middle of a Vogon attack; literally most WTF moment in the whole series *Arthur's need for tea shut down the ship... guess he really wanted a cuppa. I can relate. *Alien parodies of human book titles; my personal favorite? "Everything You Never Wanted to Know About Sex but Have Been Forced to Find Out". *Marvin the Paranoid Android's convo with the battle machine: mono toning his way to victory with nothing but emotional manipulation. * Arthur's discomfort at the meat who wants to be eaten and Zaphod's response: " you're used to eating the unwilling"; cutting commentary (that's the watchword for this review, guys) on meat eaters -Life, the Universe and Everything *Not even two chapters in, and we've Ford and Arthur having a ball chasing a sofa through the fields. *The notion of fate: Arthur and Ford travel to "prehistoric" (I put it in quotations because Ford tells Arthur the inhabitants aren't cavemen) Earth, and therefore know of its destruction, but Ford tells him they can't stop what's meant to be. *Reincarnation: one man has been destroyed by Arthur in every single life. This confrontation marks a dark turn for the series: Arthur is confronted with the Cathedral of Hate, complete with every being he's inadvertently harmed along his travels. *The quote: "And the terrible thing was, it was a very good one. It was very clear, very rational, and tough. The Messenger would hang his head and feel sad and foolish that he had not realized what a tough and complex place the real world was, and what difficulties and paradoxes had to be embraced if one was to live in it." Felt like he was talking to the reader in regards to not only the story but life: skipping the struggle means you miss the big picture. *Arthur's dejection at not knowing the Ultimate Question. Response to the critics who expect every novel to be bow wrapped; the journey/reading experience should be fulfilling enough. Not everything means something. -So Long and Thanks for All the Fish *Fenchurch's "Was I found in a Handbag" ref. to Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest made me chuckle. *Not a ton to say on this one: there's a lack of Zaphod and Trillian, but at least we get Marvin in the last few pages. *God's final message: WE APOLOGIZE FOR THE INCONVENIENCE, and last but not least the last words of the epilogue: 'There was a point to this story, but it has temporarily escaped the chronicler's mind." Yep. Honestly, we're all Arthur (or at least I was): just an innocent bystander along for the ride. Don't dwell on all the small things (Unless you absolutely want to) and above all don't panic!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Emily W

    This is by far my new favorite book I have read. Granted I have a horrible memory and tend to forget what books I have said were my favorite in the past, but I don't see myself forgetting this one. I picked this book to read because my dad had read it and liked it, and I was in the mood for something funny. On top of my dad nagging at me to read it, I also overheard a snippet of an audiobook version of another Douglas Adams’ book and it definitely made me want to read his stuff. The version I re This is by far my new favorite book I have read. Granted I have a horrible memory and tend to forget what books I have said were my favorite in the past, but I don't see myself forgetting this one. I picked this book to read because my dad had read it and liked it, and I was in the mood for something funny. On top of my dad nagging at me to read it, I also overheard a snippet of an audiobook version of another Douglas Adams’ book and it definitely made me want to read his stuff. The version I read was all four books of the trilogy compiled into one text, and it's rather hard to summarize the whole story. I’ll try my best though. The books tend to focus on Arthur Dent, a plain Englishman, and what happens to him after the Earth is suddenly and violently destroyed to make a bypass. Arthur happens to be friends with Ford Prefect, who happens to be an alien. Ford is a researcher for the book Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, which is about exactly what it sounds like, but has been unable to hitch a ride off the planet for 15 years. Ford manages to hitch himself and Arthur a ride off Earth just before it is destroyed on one of the ships destroying earth. They end up getting kicked out of that ship, end up in another ship where they meet the President of the Galaxy, Zaphod Beeblebrox, who happens to be Ford’s semicousin, Marvin the Paranoid Android and Trillian. And then quite a bit more happens, they find out the answer to life the universe and everything is 42, that the Earth was actually just a computer made by mice who are actually beings from another dimension, meet the real ruler of the universe, they travel back to prehistoric Earth, save the universe at least twice, get blown up several times, and so on and so forth. There is so much about this book that I loved. If I was being sworn into some type of job that requires a swearing in, I would probably chose this book to swear on as opposed to the bible. The characters felt very alive and real, they talked like real people, even if their profanity was just made up words for the most part. This book was laugh out loud funny at times and touching at others, but it was never a dull read. The writing never took itself too seriously, but it was still mature when it needed to be. This is the first book that I have actually marked with sticky notes quotes that I want to write down. The voice Adams writes in is so unique, because it is like someone telling you a story yet it's completely focused on the characters, none of which are the narrator. The tone is cheeky and sarcastic at time but it's never too much. Before I start on what I disliked, let me just say two things, first that I had to wrack my brain to think of anything at all, and second, because of that these things are sort of nitpicky. That aside, the biggest thing I had a problem with was the relationships. I often found myself forgetting that there was meant to be something between two characters, so when it was brought up it startled me a bit. I don't mean the explicitly stated romances like that between Zaphod and Trillian or Ford and alcohol, but rather the implied stuff, like Arthur being interested in Trillian. Names was also a bit of an issue, both because they were long and complicated and because there was quite a few of them to remember. Finally and most nitpicky of all, Ford’s name. Ford Prefect gave himself that name before coming to Earth because it was the name of a car and he thought cars were the dominant species. This is mentioned about once, and never brought up again. Honestly I think Adams forgot about that line, because when Zaphod and Ford meet up Zaphod calls Ford Ford, but he wouldn't have know that was what he was calling himself. See what I mean by nitpicky?

  10. 5 out of 5

    Matt Milosevich

    Okay so maybe 4.5 starts only because the ending is quite sudden and not so much an ending but I guess it flows with the rest of the book.... Surprisingly it all reads very smooth contrary to the storyline which is very chaotic, ridiculous, and flat out stupid but it is incredibly imaginative and fun. I definitely enjoyed reading these books !

  11. 4 out of 5

    Troy Neujahr

    This book is so cool you could keep a side of meat in it for a month. It is so hip it has difficulty seeing over it's own pelvis. You sass that hoopy Douglas Adams? There's a frood that really knows where his towel is. True story: This book is so awesome that when I first read it in seventh grade, I deliberately decided to memorize "Xanthic Restructron Destabilized Zenon Emitter." Oh, and the way in which Arthur Dent finally has pleasant things happen to him in "So Long and Thanks for All the Fi This book is so cool you could keep a side of meat in it for a month. It is so hip it has difficulty seeing over it's own pelvis. You sass that hoopy Douglas Adams? There's a frood that really knows where his towel is. True story: This book is so awesome that when I first read it in seventh grade, I deliberately decided to memorize "Xanthic Restructron Destabilized Zenon Emitter." Oh, and the way in which Arthur Dent finally has pleasant things happen to him in "So Long and Thanks for All the Fish" is wonderful. Jynnan tonix all around. Or , if you prefer, Ousighian Zodahs. That is all. Thank you.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    Entertainment-1 Stars Education- 1 Star Readability- 1 star Innovation- 0 Stars Inspiration- 1 Stars I loved this book. It was pretty easy to read and very funny. Comedy is difficult :) Marvin the robot captures my view of the world. I know this is most unfortunate. But it doesn't really matter anyway as we will all be dead and gone when the sun goes supernova in 5 billion years. We'll just mope along till then. The part where the aliens send their invasion force to earth and turns out they are about t Entertainment-1 Stars Education- 1 Star Readability- 1 star Innovation- 0 Stars Inspiration- 1 Stars I loved this book. It was pretty easy to read and very funny. Comedy is difficult :) Marvin the robot captures my view of the world. I know this is most unfortunate. But it doesn't really matter anyway as we will all be dead and gone when the sun goes supernova in 5 billion years. We'll just mope along till then. The part where the aliens send their invasion force to earth and turns out they are about the size of a flea also helps one keep ones perspective about our place in the universe. I should be more offended by the fact that they included accountant on the spaceship they used to get rid of all the useless people that don't actually produce anything. Oh well, whats the use anyway?

  13. 4 out of 5

    Irene

    I wasn't too thrilled with this book. I think I expected a lot more of it due to its fame than it could deliver, and that's probably part of the reason. I don't regret reading this, but I doubt I'll read the fifth book in the series (which is not included in this collection, oddly enough). It was funny at times, but I got bored pretty quickly; that's why it took me so long to read it. It was, I am a bit ashamed to say, a relief to finally finish this book so that I could move on to the next one I wasn't too thrilled with this book. I think I expected a lot more of it due to its fame than it could deliver, and that's probably part of the reason. I don't regret reading this, but I doubt I'll read the fifth book in the series (which is not included in this collection, oddly enough). It was funny at times, but I got bored pretty quickly; that's why it took me so long to read it. It was, I am a bit ashamed to say, a relief to finally finish this book so that I could move on to the next one in the stack on my desk. The reading experience reminded me a lot of The Lord of the Rings, which I also struggled to get through and haven't read the last one, so maybe books like these just aren't my type. The only problem is, I don't know what type that is because I love science fiction and fantasy; what makes this book so different that I can't get into it?

  14. 4 out of 5

    Steve Tetreault

    I had read Douglas Adams' entire catalog back in high school and had enjoyed it, so when I saw someone discussing The Hitchhiker's Guide a while back and realized I no longer had my copies, I picked this one up so I'd have it all in one place. But then I never actually got around to reading it. When I did pick it up, I read the first few chapters and was dismayed to find I wasn't enjoying it nearly as much as I had remembered. So I put it aside and forgot about it for a while. When I recently fou I had read Douglas Adams' entire catalog back in high school and had enjoyed it, so when I saw someone discussing The Hitchhiker's Guide a while back and realized I no longer had my copies, I picked this one up so I'd have it all in one place. But then I never actually got around to reading it. When I did pick it up, I read the first few chapters and was dismayed to find I wasn't enjoying it nearly as much as I had remembered. So I put it aside and forgot about it for a while. When I recently found myself without something to read, I saw this stuck in my dust-collecting "to read" pile and figured it was time to pick it back up. And this time, I found myself really enjoying it! Clearly, this is a book that requires a certain frame of mind to appreciate it. Once I was in the right mental state, this was a fun romp around the galaxy!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rhettreaux

    When the first two words that popped into my mind to describe this series of books were "endearing" and "mind-opening", I realized how unique this book truly is. The characters are so human (even when they are decidedly NOT), vulnerable, and understandable even while the scenarios they are hurled into are bizarre, inexplicable, and inscrutable. This book made me laugh out loud while I was reading it and made me contemplate how we are tiny specks in the universe whenever I set it down. Don't feel When the first two words that popped into my mind to describe this series of books were "endearing" and "mind-opening", I realized how unique this book truly is. The characters are so human (even when they are decidedly NOT), vulnerable, and understandable even while the scenarios they are hurled into are bizarre, inexplicable, and inscrutable. This book made me laugh out loud while I was reading it and made me contemplate how we are tiny specks in the universe whenever I set it down. Don't feel guilty about reading this book because it is fun to read. The entire series will increase your perspective of the possibilities of the universe and also help you appreciate the importance of the people you connect with.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Vicky

    Recently, a show on our NPR station replayed over several weeks the BBC radio series of Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, which prompted me to get out my copy and read it again. It still holds up, makes me laugh out loud and provides words of wisdom to live by. Today would have been Adam's 61 birthday and the Google Doodle is a fitting tribute. http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/c... Recently, a show on our NPR station replayed over several weeks the BBC radio series of Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, which prompted me to get out my copy and read it again. It still holds up, makes me laugh out loud and provides words of wisdom to live by. Today would have been Adam's 61 birthday and the Google Doodle is a fitting tribute. http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/c...

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ben Stiefel

    i only give this 4 stars because of the 2 times i bought this version, the binding was terrible... the book fell apart on me. still the best series, but just not my favorite edition

  18. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    Douglas Adams signed my copy...

  19. 4 out of 5

    Fiona Russo

    My favorite compilation.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Alex Guo

    sometimes not exciting, a real mind bender though

  21. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    The More than Complete Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy Review Is it more important to know where we are going or who we are? Douglas Adams’ The More than Complete Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy is a humorous tale with a deeper meaning hidden in the text. In this sci-fi comedy, there are amazing and unique characters who really stood out to me. The story follows many different people as they journey through space doing all sorts of things of varying magnitudes, from saving the universe to maki The More than Complete Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy Review Is it more important to know where we are going or who we are? Douglas Adams’ The More than Complete Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy is a humorous tale with a deeper meaning hidden in the text. In this sci-fi comedy, there are amazing and unique characters who really stood out to me. The story follows many different people as they journey through space doing all sorts of things of varying magnitudes, from saving the universe to making tea. Officially, the main character is Arthur Dent, however, it is important to note that the book does put a lot of time into the other characters traveling with him by switching perspectives. Arthur Dent is just a normal human living on Earth until one day his house is about to be knocked down for a bypass. Arthur is furious with this but nobody except his friend Ford Prefect realized how pointless this whole situation would be. The Earth was going to be destroyed by the Vogons, and thanks to Ford, Arthur was able to escape onto the Vogon ship. After being caught and ejected into space the two think they will die there but they are saved by Zaphod Beeblebrox and Trillian with their paranoid robot Marvin. After conversing on the ship, the group adventure through space creating and being a part of many ludicrously improbable events. The thing I like most about this book is the design of the characters. Each character has their own personality no matter how little importance they have to the story. Arthur is lazy, unmotivated, and sometimes downright stupid while Zaphod is arrogant, prideful, and self-centered. You will always remember the main character even if he is bland because the story revolves around him, but I still remember the barman at the start of the book who maybe only had five sentences because of how well he was implemented. I didn’t really connect to Arthur but I connected to others because there are many characters with different memorable personalities that the reader can connect to in the universe Adams created. Another thing that I like about this book is the pace. This book moves forward at quite a fast pace but it is still clear enough to understand. Through one part of the book, you will have gone through at least five if not more different settings. Most of the settings are unique and possibly only show up once only to then lose relevance in the story. Some people may dislike jumping around from place to place and not being able to build a connection with the settings, but I prefer this style because it allows for constant introductions of creative and funky ideas. The last thing that I really like about this book is how it hides deeper meanings within the text multiple times throughout the book. The book uses humor to keep the reader entertained and to hide messages in plain sight. From a book like this, these messages can be subjective to each individual. The main message of the book I got was that there is no solid meaning to life and we all need to figure out for ourselves why we exist. I like the addition of these messages because it gives a deeper meaning to the book and allows people rereading the book to notice more and think about certain events differently than the first time they read the book. Overall, I enjoyed this book and would rate it a 4/5 and I would recommend this book to everybody. I think everybody would enjoy this book because it has great characters, humor, and interesting ideas that would be hard to find elsewhere. I especially recommend this book to people who love weird settings and unorthodox characters with new things popping up all the time.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Honestly, I can't remember why it was so difficult for me to pick this book up before. The humor is delightful. The dialogue is so twisty and absurd, but strangely, it all makes sense. Above all else, I now know that the the answer to the Ultimate Question of Life is 42. Update: Having now finished the second book, I have a better grasp on the plot. Not much happens, however, and at times the words muddle together and sometimes, I found myself skimming pages. The characters do a lot of wandering, Honestly, I can't remember why it was so difficult for me to pick this book up before. The humor is delightful. The dialogue is so twisty and absurd, but strangely, it all makes sense. Above all else, I now know that the the answer to the Ultimate Question of Life is 42. Update: Having now finished the second book, I have a better grasp on the plot. Not much happens, however, and at times the words muddle together and sometimes, I found myself skimming pages. The characters do a lot of wandering, and it certainly feels like nothing’s been achieved. With all that said, though, I’m still enjoying this saga. Douglas Adams has so many good quotes! Another update: I’ve now finished the third book,and I’m highly disappointed that the Earth hasn’t been magically recovered via some timeline intervention. On the surface, you’d get a headache reading through the pages and trying to keep track of just what’s happening. It seems that the characters aren’t really doing anything, and in the end, Arthur ends up saving the world from a supercomputer struggling to fulfill its purpose and robots from the planet of Krikkit (which sounds like Cricket, now that I’m writing this). However, Arthur still can’t memorize those complicated alien names and he still doesn’t know the Ultimate Answer to the Ultimate Question. With the fourth book tucked away, I can finally give a proper review. Overall, this book is good. It’s humorous and, as strange as this may be, it feels distinctly British. The characters are hilarious - my favorite is that paranoid depressed robot Marvin who got a somewhat happy ending. The only complaint I have, and the reason for the four stars, is that there are times where I don’t know what’s happening. This is usually due to the distracting interludes that are injected into the scene. These interludes rip you away from the story, and then that story suddenly jumps locations, leaving you to wonder when those characters made that leap. As an example, Arthur jumps from a ship to a Cathedral of Hate, and then he bumps into everyone in a party on a cloud. It felt like my book was missing pages.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Charles

    I read The More Than Complete Hitchhiker's Guide, and I found that it is a very interesting book. It is written in a way that is slightly confusing and hard to understand at first, but it draws the reader into the book. This book contains five different books inside of it. Each of these books is tied to the others extremely well. They all contribute to the overall storyline, while each has its own unique plot and structure. The dialog between the different characters is very realistic and it hel I read The More Than Complete Hitchhiker's Guide, and I found that it is a very interesting book. It is written in a way that is slightly confusing and hard to understand at first, but it draws the reader into the book. This book contains five different books inside of it. Each of these books is tied to the others extremely well. They all contribute to the overall storyline, while each has its own unique plot and structure. The dialog between the different characters is very realistic and it helps contribute to the theme of the story. I would recommend this book to anyone with a lot of time that isn't going to read this book quickly because it would be fairly hard to understand what the author is trying to say. I think that the main reason for this misunderstanding is that the book was begun in Europe. The protagonist is Arthur Dent. He begins the story and the series as a dumb earthman. His character progresses very slowly through the book and in a very brilliant way. His character goes through a lot of development and he becomes a very different person by the end. He has an understanding that many of us would never have dreamed he would by the end. Arthur Dent feels like a very real person by the way that he is described. He is very relatable and has some of the same attributes that some of the people I know do. This made the book extremely enticing whenever it way laying just within reach. This book was really well written and I give it a 5-star rating.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Luke

    What can I say about the Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy? It’s an absolute legend of science fiction and comedy. It’s a series I’ve read countless times (or maybe a dozen) since first being introduced to it and definitely was a major influence on my sense of humor and me as whole. It’s even a series I completely forgot I stole phrases from I still use in conversation today. Heck, this collection of the first four books is one I’ve owned since 1994 or ‘95. That how important it is to me. Though What can I say about the Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy? It’s an absolute legend of science fiction and comedy. It’s a series I’ve read countless times (or maybe a dozen) since first being introduced to it and definitely was a major influence on my sense of humor and me as whole. It’s even a series I completely forgot I stole phrases from I still use in conversation today. Heck, this collection of the first four books is one I’ve owned since 1994 or ‘95. That how important it is to me. Though it’s been a long time since I’ve read it, I still remembered plenty of story beats, and yet there was still more I forgot and gave me a laugh of surprise. My mother, bless her, truly had no idea what she was doing when she bought me the original computer game at a yard sale oh so many years ago, and I’ll always be thankful she did.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kirstin

    I feel like I might just get stoned by my literary peers with this review, but here goes: 'The hitchhiker's guide to the galaxy' was just not my cup of tea. I'm glad to have read/experienced it for myself finally, as it is commonly accepted as a sci-fi/comedy standard of the 20th century western literature canon. And while it was definitely interesting, I think it was perhaps just a little too heavy into a zany or wacky comedy feel for my own personal tastes. That being said, and for the record, I feel like I might just get stoned by my literary peers with this review, but here goes: 'The hitchhiker's guide to the galaxy' was just not my cup of tea. I'm glad to have read/experienced it for myself finally, as it is commonly accepted as a sci-fi/comedy standard of the 20th century western literature canon. And while it was definitely interesting, I think it was perhaps just a little too heavy into a zany or wacky comedy feel for my own personal tastes. That being said, and for the record, I did not finish this complete edition, but only read the first book in the series.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ramona Tibrin

    I never thought i'll ever have a favorite book , i mean .. how can you choose ..and then .. i read " The complete Hitchhiker's guide to the galaxy " . I've never had my imagination so strongly exercised before . Every single chapter was like a conversation with yet another toddler that explained how he thought things and the universe worked. So funny , so witty , so addictive . From now on , whenever i'm having a bad day , i'll just pick up this book , and read any chapter at random , any given I never thought i'll ever have a favorite book , i mean .. how can you choose ..and then .. i read " The complete Hitchhiker's guide to the galaxy " . I've never had my imagination so strongly exercised before . Every single chapter was like a conversation with yet another toddler that explained how he thought things and the universe worked. So funny , so witty , so addictive . From now on , whenever i'm having a bad day , i'll just pick up this book , and read any chapter at random , any given page is bound to put a smile on my face .

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jdetrick

    The first three books in this collection are certainly worth five stars....while Douglas Adams' plotting is always a little wonky and his character work is sketchy, his prose is a dream to read. His sentence structure is a wonder to behold, and it's also very funny. Unfortunately, this is not a series that needed more than three books, and by the fourth book the plotting has become extremely problematic and impossible to ignore anymore and even his prose can't make up for the holes in both the p The first three books in this collection are certainly worth five stars....while Douglas Adams' plotting is always a little wonky and his character work is sketchy, his prose is a dream to read. His sentence structure is a wonder to behold, and it's also very funny. Unfortunately, this is not a series that needed more than three books, and by the fourth book the plotting has become extremely problematic and impossible to ignore anymore and even his prose can't make up for the holes in both the plotting and the characters' personalities.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Courtney Harbin

    This is a funny and clever read. Adams takes everything we think we know and turns it all upside down. The comedy, especially in the first two books, is great. The characters are all wonderful. I am especially fond of Marvin and Fenchurch. There were times where I felt the story was dragging, especially in The Restaurant at the End of the Universe, but it's still entertaining enough. It's worth checking out at least once. I know I will be reading this again. This is a funny and clever read. Adams takes everything we think we know and turns it all upside down. The comedy, especially in the first two books, is great. The characters are all wonderful. I am especially fond of Marvin and Fenchurch. There were times where I felt the story was dragging, especially in The Restaurant at the End of the Universe, but it's still entertaining enough. It's worth checking out at least once. I know I will be reading this again.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Finley

    The Hitchhiker's Guide to the galaxy is a crazy, hilarious, and overall great book. It blows all human logic out the window in a comedic fashion. Its absurdity feels surprisingly believable. The story is amazing and completely weird. I feel though, it could go over some peoples heads in its craziness. Overall, it is a great read. The Hitchhiker's Guide to the galaxy is a crazy, hilarious, and overall great book. It blows all human logic out the window in a comedic fashion. Its absurdity feels surprisingly believable. The story is amazing and completely weird. I feel though, it could go over some peoples heads in its craziness. Overall, it is a great read.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ocean Zen

    Each of the books in the series had its own unique flavor; but, I have to admit that I found the last book in this series to be a bit anticlimactic and it left so many unanswered questions. Overall I like the series and the humor.

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