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Shaping Hearts and Minds: Why It Matters Where Your Child Goes to School

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In Shaping Hearts and Minds, Monica and Shawn Whatley give a brief introduction to the purpose and nature of classical Christian education. They argue that the decision parents make regarding their child's education is of immense importance, and they argue that classical Christian education is the best option for the children of Christian families. In Shaping Hearts and Minds, Monica and Shawn Whatley give a brief introduction to the purpose and nature of classical Christian education. They argue that the decision parents make regarding their child's education is of immense importance, and they argue that classical Christian education is the best option for the children of Christian families.


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In Shaping Hearts and Minds, Monica and Shawn Whatley give a brief introduction to the purpose and nature of classical Christian education. They argue that the decision parents make regarding their child's education is of immense importance, and they argue that classical Christian education is the best option for the children of Christian families. In Shaping Hearts and Minds, Monica and Shawn Whatley give a brief introduction to the purpose and nature of classical Christian education. They argue that the decision parents make regarding their child's education is of immense importance, and they argue that classical Christian education is the best option for the children of Christian families.

30 review for Shaping Hearts and Minds: Why It Matters Where Your Child Goes to School

  1. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    A great read!!! This is an excellent resource for parents who are passionate about their kids' education and, especially, faith. It's in a easy format, quickly consumed by any reader (even the most reluctant), yet it's very rich with a clear understanding of why education is the way it is today, how this impacts our kids' souls, and what we can do about it. This resource is key for parents considering school options, and it is particularly valuable to anyone wanting to know more about classical A great read!!! This is an excellent resource for parents who are passionate about their kids' education and, especially, faith. It's in a easy format, quickly consumed by any reader (even the most reluctant), yet it's very rich with a clear understanding of why education is the way it is today, how this impacts our kids' souls, and what we can do about it. This resource is key for parents considering school options, and it is particularly valuable to anyone wanting to know more about classical education. It would be a very useful tool for schools to share with their parents. I enjoyed the read and wish I had learned through this method myself!!!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Tabitha Roberts

    Monica Whatley and Dr. Shawn Whatley do an excellent job making a case for Classical Christian education in a clear and simplistic way. This case supports our family’s conviction to have our children in a Classical Christian school. As a public school teacher, I have begun unlearning the progressive “modern” educational jargon that denies and ignores God and now see revelations of how the Creator and Biblical truth are integrated in every facet of life.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Katie Krombein

    Quick intelligent read about the goals of Classical Christian Education. Some thoughtful bits that I appreciated: p. 39+: "Students have the potential to gain perspective through the study of these influential people including [Herodotus, Hippocrates of Kos, Aristotle, Alexander the Great, Archimedes, Julius Casesar, Constantine the Great, Leonardo da Vinci, Galileo Galilei, Isaac Newton, John Stuart Mill, Abraham Lincoln]... This does not mean that everything that they said was true or good. We Quick intelligent read about the goals of Classical Christian Education. Some thoughtful bits that I appreciated: p. 39+: "Students have the potential to gain perspective through the study of these influential people including [Herodotus, Hippocrates of Kos, Aristotle, Alexander the Great, Archimedes, Julius Casesar, Constantine the Great, Leonardo da Vinci, Galileo Galilei, Isaac Newton, John Stuart Mill, Abraham Lincoln]... This does not mean that everything that they said was true or good. We need to sift through what they said, guided by the light of revelation. But we cannot do this if we are not exposed to it. These and other influential people spent a great deal of time thinking, writing and learning, and building upon past theories and ideas--many grappling with issues we struggle with today, such as justice, faith, truth, civil rights, and freedom. This was done through the filter of two thousand years of learning in Western civilization and in the conversation that has taken place throughout the centuries. The conversation is being cut off in modern education without us even realizing it." p. 49+: I could not pass that 1895 8th grade exam!!! p. 52+: "Curriculum focuses less and less on producing independent thinkers as it works increasingly to socialize children. Modern education assumes children depend on technology to find information. Most everything students want to know can be found on the Internet. But the new curriculum only suggests ways to manipulate media and ignores the fact that students lack context and perspective and have not learned how to synthesize the information they now have access to. They also lack the tools to critique that information. Our current society is expected to thrive when children grow up and get along with others as they work within the system. Modern education does not equip them to think for themselves or to challenge it. Central planners trim content to make more room to socialize children. This socialization trains students in values antithetical to a Christian worldview." p. 59: "Classical Christian education is centred on the philosophy that we can only know where we are going when we know where we have been. Classically educated students have a huge knowledge base. They become socialized through exposure to classical Western content, not modern, progressive social fads. As C.S. Lewis writes, 'Most of all, perhaps, we need an intimate knowledge of the past. Not that the past has anything magic about it, but we cannot study the future, and yet need something to set against the present, to remind us that the basic assumptions have been quite different in different periods and that much which seems certain to the uneducated is merely temporary fashion. A man who has lived in many places is not likely deceived by the local errors of his native village; the scholar has lived in many times and is therefore in some degree immune from the great cataract of nonsense that pours from the press and the microphone of his own age.'" p. 65: "Are we too busy to care? We get swept along with modern thinking and don't even realize the unraveling of the net that holds society together. We go from activity to activity, forgetting about any time outside our own short lives. Even the most committed amongst us become self-serving." p. 69+: "'[Evildoers] are more pained if their villa is poor than if their life is bad, as though man's greatest good were to have everything good except himself.' (St Augustine) A thorough study of revelation throughout time is not enough. A head full of knowledge and the ability to argue one's case is extremely valuable...ad potentially very dangerous without virtue. According to Arthur Wellesley, 'Educate people without religion and you make them but clever devils.' Our current culture doesn't need another clever devil. Building one's intellect is counterproductive if one has no virtue. As Theodore Roosevelt said, 'To educate a man in mind and not in morals is to educate a menace to society.' Morals or 'character traits' intended to shape our public-schooled children today are not enough. Students work to show 'goodness' and integrity' and struggle to understand what they really mean. Again classical Christian education works to shape the heart. It labours to nurture and grow the love of Christ, from whom virtue flows. But morals unconnected to a moral lawgiver become relative. We look to the circumstances to decide if it is a good idea to tell the truth. Emphasis focuses on benefits, and ethics become situational. Moralism insists that we can achieve righteousness with good behavior. Combined with modern relativism, moderns believe that one is a better person purely because of what one does. improved behavior seems to supersede the need for sanctification. As believers, the core to our faith--the redemptive power of the cross of Jesus Christ--is replaced by an attempt to be 'good' people. Since 'good' has become relative, it drifts and changes with time. The lines of right and wrong blur, and truth depends on the philosophy of the teacher or politician who shares it. The core of classical Christian education is to cultivate wisdom and virtue resulting from growing in relationship with our Creator, as we understand truth as revealed throughout time."

  4. 5 out of 5

    Keith

    This book is ideal for anyone who is new to classical Christian education and would like to learn more about it without being overwhelmed. Although the entire book can be read in just over an hour, it's so packed with excellent content, that readers will likely return to important portions of the book time and time again. Highly recommended! This book is ideal for anyone who is new to classical Christian education and would like to learn more about it without being overwhelmed. Although the entire book can be read in just over an hour, it's so packed with excellent content, that readers will likely return to important portions of the book time and time again. Highly recommended!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Brandon Eastin

    Short intro to arguments to Classical Christian Education.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Boomershine

    One of the best summaries of classical Christian education available. Very helpful.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Brian Michael Stegner

    Excellent short-form apologetic for classical education.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl Neer

    A short introduction to the concept of classical education.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Nelms

    Great introduction to Classical Christian Education. The appendix is also helpful in covering Dewey and others and their design of the modern day educational system. Great primer to dig deeper.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jodi

    Good book that I picked up at school

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kyle Rapinchuk

    For those who have no background in classical Christian education (CCE), this is a fantastic introduction to some of the basics. For those who are familiar with CCE, this is a good reminder and reinforcer of key aspects of the goal of CCE, but it doesn't provide new insight. This is definitely a helpful book for administrators of CCE schools to put into the hands of parents interested in the school. For those who have no background in classical Christian education (CCE), this is a fantastic introduction to some of the basics. For those who are familiar with CCE, this is a good reminder and reinforcer of key aspects of the goal of CCE, but it doesn't provide new insight. This is definitely a helpful book for administrators of CCE schools to put into the hands of parents interested in the school.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Russell Hayes

  13. 5 out of 5

    Deanne Benedito

  14. 4 out of 5

    David

  15. 4 out of 5

    Emily Dixon

  16. 4 out of 5

    Erin

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lara

  18. 5 out of 5

    Katherine Bryan

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rural Reader

  20. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Perkins

  21. 5 out of 5

    Courtney Palumbo

    A must read for parents considering classical Christian education.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Amy Carey

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kim Baskey

  24. 5 out of 5

    Joy Hale

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sheila

  26. 4 out of 5

    Amy

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn Reyes

  28. 5 out of 5

    Derek Olson

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Hetrick

  30. 4 out of 5

    abbie

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