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Is it possible to turn that rush that comes from closing a business deal or having a brief, passionate affair into an enduring sense of wholeness and peace? Kabbalah, according to its increasingly large group of practitioners, is the path from that fleeting feeling of pleasure that most people settle for to the lasting fulfillment that is their birthright as human beings. Is it possible to turn that rush that comes from closing a business deal or having a brief, passionate affair into an enduring sense of wholeness and peace? Kabbalah, according to its increasingly large group of practitioners, is the path from that fleeting feeling of pleasure that most people settle for to the lasting fulfillment that is their birthright as human beings. In The Power of Kabbalah, renowned teacher Yehuda Berg shows how to view and navigate through life by tapping Kabbalistic truths. He explains the key process of transforming from a reactive to a proactive being that will in turn trigger increased creative energy, greater personal power, and a stronger and more satisfying sense of life. These teachings include embracing rather than avoiding problems and obstacles as true opportunities for spiritual development; making miracles through positive thinking; and accepting responsibility for what happens in one's life.


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Is it possible to turn that rush that comes from closing a business deal or having a brief, passionate affair into an enduring sense of wholeness and peace? Kabbalah, according to its increasingly large group of practitioners, is the path from that fleeting feeling of pleasure that most people settle for to the lasting fulfillment that is their birthright as human beings. Is it possible to turn that rush that comes from closing a business deal or having a brief, passionate affair into an enduring sense of wholeness and peace? Kabbalah, according to its increasingly large group of practitioners, is the path from that fleeting feeling of pleasure that most people settle for to the lasting fulfillment that is their birthright as human beings. In The Power of Kabbalah, renowned teacher Yehuda Berg shows how to view and navigate through life by tapping Kabbalistic truths. He explains the key process of transforming from a reactive to a proactive being that will in turn trigger increased creative energy, greater personal power, and a stronger and more satisfying sense of life. These teachings include embracing rather than avoiding problems and obstacles as true opportunities for spiritual development; making miracles through positive thinking; and accepting responsibility for what happens in one's life.

30 review for The Power of Kabbalah: Technology for the Soul

  1. 4 out of 5

    India M. Clamp

    In this review, I am only commenting on the quality of the writing/methodology presented herein. Rabbi Yehuda Berg has given us a way of living that is loftier than most of us consider. Author Berg is known as “The People’s Kabbalist". Principles within prescribe a course in which to eradicate negativity within the human vessel. "Happy is he who is present...will merit that light of joy of the King. In relation to that time, it is written: "And I will refine them as silver is refined and will try In this review, I am only commenting on the quality of the writing/methodology presented herein. Rabbi Yehuda Berg has given us a way of living that is loftier than most of us consider. Author Berg is known as “The People’s Kabbalist". Principles within prescribe a course in which to eradicate negativity within the human vessel. "Happy is he who is present...will merit that light of joy of the King. In relation to that time, it is written: "And I will refine them as silver is refined and will try them as gold is tried." (Zechariah 13:9) ---Zohar, Shemot 15:96-97" Within we come to know that by shutting down a lower animal nature or reactiveness, we are able to manifest peace within ourself. Additionally, there are concepts of stoicism applied within his teachings. Yehuda Berg was named “One of the Top Rabbis in the US” by Newsweek. Wisdom is a constant theme and comes from making complex to simple. A strong paradigm is Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Via creativity this composer achieved the mastery of “thinking” the full score before it was penned. It was as if he orchestrated all the parts, and such transcended what we commonly refer to as time. This light which some refer to as inspiration is what Wolfgang called “a rush.” Opponent is real and is manifested from within. Read.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly

    First off, if you have read Mr. Berg’s book, “Living Kabbalah”, please attempt to forget everything that you’ve read. This book is better. Much better. However, a previous criticism of Mr. Berg’s work is that the parables and teachings are used throughout all of his books. It’s one thing to say the same thing and tailor it different ways, like Abraham does through the Abraham-Hicks works. It’s another to basically say the same example for the same concept, book after book. I found it too easy to First off, if you have read Mr. Berg’s book, “Living Kabbalah”, please attempt to forget everything that you’ve read. This book is better. Much better. However, a previous criticism of Mr. Berg’s work is that the parables and teachings are used throughout all of his books. It’s one thing to say the same thing and tailor it different ways, like Abraham does through the Abraham-Hicks works. It’s another to basically say the same example for the same concept, book after book. I found it too easy to glance over and tune out sections of Mr. Berg’s work due to the “heard that before” complex. But, let’s get to the meat of the review: Mr. Berg states that human beings are a composite of our desires. Human beings operate on three different desire levels: Level one (lust) , level 2 (intangible motivations such as status, power and honor) and level 3: higher motivations relating to wisdom, knowledge and answers. It is from this that the motivations create our life in the manifested world. Again, the Light is explained – however, in way more flowery adjectives than needed. Light is the Kabbalah representation of the energy of God / the will of God. The 1% (the world of physical manifestations) and 99% (the collective unknown / unseen matrix) are explained. The bread of shame complex (the reason for the Light and the Vessel to split, creating the cycle of incarnation as a way for the Vessel to manifest and create with the Light) is explained in a much better detail than I’ve read in Mr. Berg’s previous works. The Ten Sefirot (tree of life) and the concept of duality between the sub worlds is explained in a very easy to access manner, leaving the reader to want more. Mr. Berg’s summary of the meaning of life, the individual spark of Light to change itself from a reactive force to a proactive force, was surprisingly beautifully explained. It is the ultimate in self-mastery and operating from the spark of the Cause, rather than the outside world of the Effect. But of course, Mr. Berg explains that this can only be achieved through removing the ego and becoming selfless and proactive in helping others. Outstanding aspects: Mr. Bergs explanation of Time as a 30-story building on page 149. The explanation of tikkun, which is the Kabbalah version of karma energy. The story of the Michael and the mission money on p211 was an eye opener of how to experience life in the proactive expression of the Light rather than reactive nature of the “I’m going to kick some ass” ego. It really brought home the principle of Certainty in a way that nothing else could. Parts that I still have a challenge with: The overwhelming concept that one should seek out suffering to allow constant practice to connect with the Light. Specifically, that one shouldn’t exist in a state of self-praise. What is so bad about having self-esteem about your accomplishments? My own personal challenge – but still there. Overall, this book is a winner. Read this before or instead of “Living Kabbalah”, as I consider it a much better book. I leave this review with one of the best quotes within this work, “The process is the fulfillment.”

  3. 5 out of 5

    Gary

    I have read a great many self help books and some on Kabbalah. This book by Rav Berg is not a detailed exposition of the mysticism of Kabbalah as such but rather a book of how the practical wisdom enshrined in the ancient science of Kabbalah can give us the tools to completely change our lives and live full, meaningful, plentiful , happy and healthy lives. This book contains true enlightenment, and comfort as well as giving us the tools to bring balance and fulfillment to our lives and abolish em I have read a great many self help books and some on Kabbalah. This book by Rav Berg is not a detailed exposition of the mysticism of Kabbalah as such but rather a book of how the practical wisdom enshrined in the ancient science of Kabbalah can give us the tools to completely change our lives and live full, meaningful, plentiful , happy and healthy lives. This book contains true enlightenment, and comfort as well as giving us the tools to bring balance and fulfillment to our lives and abolish emotional pain and fear. The author explains Kabbalah as an ancient hidden wisdom that reveals and unifies the physical and spiritual laws of life. As the source of all spiritual teachings of this planet, predating religion, Adam and Eve and even Creation of the world itself. He explains how the Kabbalah has influenced the most important thinkers and scientists throughout history such as Aristotle, John Dee, Isaac Newton,. Thomas Edison and Albert Einstein. As Rav Berg explains 'Kabbalah was and continues to be the original technology of life. It's the science of the soul and the physic and metaphysics of fulfillment' This books explains our inner being as being driven by desire, We are described as a vessel and light is used as the code word , a metaphor offered by the ancient kabbalists to convey the broad spectrum of fulfillment for which human beings long. Rav Berg explains how the ancient wisdom of Kabbalah can eradicate the chaos that causes unhappiness in our lives, turn on the light and vanquish the darkness. Pushing back of the light is resistance and we have to overcome the resistance which constricts the light and creates darkness in the vessel, Kabbalah explains how we can do this. Rav Berg explains how Kabbalah teaches us how to remove the layers of cloth one strip at a time to reassemble the puzzle of Creation and bring even more light into our lives" He instructs us how mediation on certain Hebrew letters he gives here can : 1 Remove compulsive or recurring negative thoughts 2 Arouse total certainty in any situation 3 Arouse healing power 4 Remove negative forces from people or places 5 Generate the energy of financial sustenance 6 Remove egomania 7 Eradicate the force of death 8 Return to the seed level of our existence 9 Give us the strength to stand after we fall 10 Give us the courage trio speak and hear the truth He lists and expounds on Kabbalah's 13 rules of the game And lastly gives us a brief history of Kabbalah. And the roles played by including others Abraham, Moses, Pythagoras, Plato and Aristotle, Rabbi Shimon Bar Yochai and Rabbi Isaac Luria.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Victoria Ray

    Quite inspiring, easy to read and understand... agreed that The Bible is a code but humanity treat it “too literally”. Enjoyed the “Resist” & “Be Proactive” philosophy....in general, that means - SELF DISCIPLINE (again!) Well, we all would love to get more LIGHT (and access to 99% ) ...but how committed are you? :)

  5. 4 out of 5

    Dennis

    This is a quick overview of Kabbalah that is interesting in a variety of ways. One way is its take on the purpose of the existence of evil. "A burning candle emits no light against the backdrop of a brilliant sunlit day. But in a darkened football stadium, even a single candle is clearly visible. Similarly, the Vessel was incapable of creating and sharing in a realm already radiating Light." I disagreed with the author's statement that "It makes little sense...to ponder the source of infinity whe This is a quick overview of Kabbalah that is interesting in a variety of ways. One way is its take on the purpose of the existence of evil. "A burning candle emits no light against the backdrop of a brilliant sunlit day. But in a darkened football stadium, even a single candle is clearly visible. Similarly, the Vessel was incapable of creating and sharing in a realm already radiating Light." I disagreed with the author's statement that "It makes little sense...to ponder the source of infinity when we cannot truly grasp or behold the concept of infinity itself." His illustration for this was that we can enjoy sunlight, but cannot stand on the sun. Still, we can and do ponder the sun, not just its sunlight. In all, this book presents a good lense through which to see freshly again one's own faith. But, for me, Kabbalah falls into the age-old trap of so many religious institutions that have a need to codify and concretly define God and truth (here into 72 names of God and a ten-dimension curtain). Still, its final and lasting message is great: "Love thy neighbor as thyself. All the rest is mere commentray. Now go and learn." Must Read - 1; Kept Attention - 5; Well-Written - 3; Meaningful - 3; Accessible - 5

  6. 4 out of 5

    Anita

    I'm currently taking a free Kabbalah course at http://edu.kabbalah.info/home. This book is the most simple, easy to follow piece of literature I've read on the subject or any subject for that matter. Some of the texts and articles I've read are complicated in the terms and abstract descriptions used since for the layperson, Kabbalah requires interpretation from the teacher or author. The author Yeuda Berg has a wonderful weekly blog and youtube channel (yehudaberg) that I find clear, relatable a I'm currently taking a free Kabbalah course at http://edu.kabbalah.info/home. This book is the most simple, easy to follow piece of literature I've read on the subject or any subject for that matter. Some of the texts and articles I've read are complicated in the terms and abstract descriptions used since for the layperson, Kabbalah requires interpretation from the teacher or author. The author Yeuda Berg has a wonderful weekly blog and youtube channel (yehudaberg) that I find clear, relatable and inspiring. One doesn't need to practice or understand Kabbalah to receive the wisdom his insights offer.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Folmus

    I got this book as a present from a good friend, so I read it. I was curious at first, but after 200 pages I really wanted to get to the last one. I have read several self-help/mystic books and most of them I have enjoyed at least partially. This one is an exception, its full of dumb examples, the author tries really hard to convince the reader that the Kabbalah is THE TRUTH, that its even science and the message behind is quite greedy and selfish, it's spirituallity for your pocket and for "suc I got this book as a present from a good friend, so I read it. I was curious at first, but after 200 pages I really wanted to get to the last one. I have read several self-help/mystic books and most of them I have enjoyed at least partially. This one is an exception, its full of dumb examples, the author tries really hard to convince the reader that the Kabbalah is THE TRUTH, that its even science and the message behind is quite greedy and selfish, it's spirituallity for your pocket and for "success". I'll leave the Kabbalah for Madonna and the Hollywood gang.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Rick

    Brilliant beginner's guide to a stupendous resource that I would be foolish not to act upon. The discourse on The Opponent and the ultimate remedy "Resistance" is of epic proportions. I intend to read this book again to reinforce it's precepts and to achieve transformation for the good. Of course, the journey of transformation of consciousness is continuous and unending. Brilliant beginner's guide to a stupendous resource that I would be foolish not to act upon. The discourse on The Opponent and the ultimate remedy "Resistance" is of epic proportions. I intend to read this book again to reinforce it's precepts and to achieve transformation for the good. Of course, the journey of transformation of consciousness is continuous and unending.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Nealen

    This book started out with a very interesting reconciliation of Genesis and the Big Bang Theory. Later the book seemed to be very superstitious. When I researched the author, I discovered he is not considered a universally well-respected expert on Kabbalah. While there may be some wisdom here, it seems that it may not be authentic Kabbalah teachings.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    This is a simple introduction to a complex philosophy. If you are a seeker of something structured to meet the quantum world, the Kabbalah has stood the test of time and is extremely noteworthy in this troubles day and time.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    I had a love/hate relationship with this book. So many of the concepts resonant with other ideals I try to live by. But this essential information was muddled by the use of poor metaphor and comparisons to scientific discoveries. I don't need the erroneous pseudoscience to support my spiritual practices. I had a love/hate relationship with this book. So many of the concepts resonant with other ideals I try to live by. But this essential information was muddled by the use of poor metaphor and comparisons to scientific discoveries. I don't need the erroneous pseudoscience to support my spiritual practices.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Brian Hunt

    so basic and yet so profound. it's part big bang theory, part christianity, part The Secret and part good old-fashioned karma. reading this book is like meeeting someone for the first time and feeling like you've known them for years. so basic and yet so profound. it's part big bang theory, part christianity, part The Secret and part good old-fashioned karma. reading this book is like meeeting someone for the first time and feeling like you've known them for years.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sheli

    Gosh - what didn't I learn from the book. It started my journey as a student of Kabbalah. The lessons and the journey have been incredible. I could probably give 20 Kabbalah books I've read, but this one started me off - Gosh - what didn't I learn from the book. It started my journey as a student of Kabbalah. The lessons and the journey have been incredible. I could probably give 20 Kabbalah books I've read, but this one started me off -

  14. 5 out of 5

    Erasamo Da rotterdam

    one of the best spirituality book

  15. 4 out of 5

    Camila Ft

    This book is a great introduction to kabbalah. It teaches the very basic concepts and is rather easy to read. It took me 2 weeks to read and I feel like I understand the bases of Kabbalah. I really recommend it as a first approach to Kabbalah. If you at expecting a profound explanation this is not the book though, just for beginners.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ettienne De Beer

    I wasn´t sure at the start, however, the deeper I went the more I felt an opening of my understanding. Great read, thank you.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sintija

    I so wanted this to be a worthy phylosophical book. It is so vague in all its sentences that it makes it hard to apply anything practically from it - however I wanted to do it. It left me with a heavy smell of pseudo-something that I just read. I can’t follow something that mixes God, quantum world, “99% world”, “The Light”, and other made up things. It just doesn’t work for me.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Aline

    A brilliant book about the Kabbalah. If you are curious about the Kabbalah’s teachings including its history, the doctrine and etc, you should definitely pick this book up. I have always found Kabbalah extremely intriguing, but it wasn’t till recent years that detailed books about it were published, and “The Power of Kabbalah: Technology for the Soul” is a great example of a introductory guide to the Kabbalah dogma. Religion is a really sensitive topic and I personally don’t believe on people sh A brilliant book about the Kabbalah. If you are curious about the Kabbalah’s teachings including its history, the doctrine and etc, you should definitely pick this book up. I have always found Kabbalah extremely intriguing, but it wasn’t till recent years that detailed books about it were published, and “The Power of Kabbalah: Technology for the Soul” is a great example of a introductory guide to the Kabbalah dogma. Religion is a really sensitive topic and I personally don’t believe on people shoving their beliefs down people’s throats, but what is great about this book is that, at no point it forces you to believe in the Kabbalah thinking nor it insults any religion. It is a really quick, easy read. The large font along with the informational style of writing- bullet points, brief sentences and paragraphs, makes the reading extremely enjoyable. This book had a really positive impact on me and I am really interested in reading more books on the topic. Regardless of whether or not you choose to follow the teachings its undoubtedly an interesting, powerful read that I would recommend to anyone. Don’t be hesitant to pick up this book due to the heavy nature of the subject; like I said before they did a fantastic job of making it reachable for anyone to grasp. x Aline

  19. 4 out of 5

    Gaz Page

    Some interesting philosophical ideas and arguements promoting this jewish mysticism. It is an advertisement for a larger school of discipline which I do not gave too much faith for or trust. The idea that modern physics and the 10 dimensions being in agreement with their sephirot is a boastful statement which proves nothing. Just as the big bang being likened to the word of G-d or Ohm of Sanskrit Hindu faith. An interesting look at monotheistic thought.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    Turned off by the attempts to join science and spirituality. It was done badly and doesn't line up with actual science. Also, I tend to object to all things spiritual being "other" in the sense that it comes from some different, unseen realm. Not for me. Turned off by the attempts to join science and spirituality. It was done badly and doesn't line up with actual science. Also, I tend to object to all things spiritual being "other" in the sense that it comes from some different, unseen realm. Not for me.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Britney Petrini

    I have started, and then stopped, and really want to start reading this book again. Its full of a completely new outlook on life, a found every bit of what I read so far true and insiring!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mary Jaclyn

    lots of information, but just a little on each page. Very important or beginners.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Michele Harrod

    See review for The Way. I have found this very inspiring. Logical, and on some inner level it rings true. Has certainly steered me onto a new path of reading material!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    It made me realize that I'll never be able to follow Kabbalah because of my anger issues! It made me realize that I'll never be able to follow Kabbalah because of my anger issues!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kyle Wendy Skultety (gimmethatbook.com)

    I've already started to apply some principals to my life and am so much happier. Written in easy to digest chapters, this book is a life changer. I've already started to apply some principals to my life and am so much happier. Written in easy to digest chapters, this book is a life changer.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Gayatri

    A beautiful introduction to the Kabbalah, I'm so glad I took a chance and read this book. Star ratings don't lie, huh. This book is not dense or pedantic like many books about ancient belief systems. It even explicitly says at the beginning that the best concepts are explained simplistically. Simplicity was definitely it's high point, especially since the concepts that it goes over are mind blowing. The ability to convey complex messages in a simple manner is impressive. I must say, the concepts t A beautiful introduction to the Kabbalah, I'm so glad I took a chance and read this book. Star ratings don't lie, huh. This book is not dense or pedantic like many books about ancient belief systems. It even explicitly says at the beginning that the best concepts are explained simplistically. Simplicity was definitely it's high point, especially since the concepts that it goes over are mind blowing. The ability to convey complex messages in a simple manner is impressive. I must say, the concepts themselves must make sense in order to be impressive as well. The Kabbalah is as ancient as recorded spirituality goes, and it isn't attached to any one religion as some might think. It's also written like each page or two is a short article, which allows for the pages to turn quickly. I read it with hungry eyes, finishing it within 4 days. It's also written like you're a child learning from a very wise yet playful teacher, refreshing for sure. In regards to the content itself, I'm mind blown. I gotta think about that big bang thing a lot more... and ground breaking philosophers and mathematicians took from the Kabbalah / Zohar. I'm also shocked to find out that the Law of Attraction actually originated here as well. This all inspires me to read deeper into other well-made Kabbalist resources out there; I'll definitely be studying the Kabbalah more throughout my life, and I have this book to thank for that. The only two downsides I felt were these: 1. The book talks a lot about removing ego or the Opponent, yet claims to be the source of all great knowledge and wisdom in the world. Literally ALL... I have a hard time believing that. It even claimed that the Eastern traditions (I'm guessing this refers to Hinduism, Buddhist and Taoism) came about because early Kabbalists sent out men to travel to the East and share knowledge. So you're saying those belief systems and others around the world couldn't have been downloaded from God by themselves? It's quite hypocritical that the writer says not to give into your ego/the Opponent and yet repeatedly brings this proudiness into the test, its egotistical indeed. If it weren't for that, this would be nearly a perfect book. I'm just glad Berg put the history of the Kabbalah at the end (not sure why it was in the appendix) instead of the front, because more people would've put it down faster due to this reason. 2. The first few chapters are full of questions that Berg expects the reader to ask in general about life. I was so excited coming across these questions because they definitely were things I wanted to learn, deeper questions I had about the reality of life and more that I hadn't even thought of. I don't feel that Berg addressed all of them, and thus I feel it's quite a bummer that he put so many out and didn't explicitly revisit each one to answer them for us. But perhaps I can justify this as him telling us that these questions can be answers by looking into the Kabbalah, just not entirely in this book since it's meant to be introductory? Idk, I'm gonna read more Kabbalah though so I don't mind but I'd expect this to be annoying for someone who won't.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Caro Raciti

    Re-read this book just now and I got a much better understanding. There is a lot to take from this little book and I feel I have done sufficient progress on my personal work in the last 2 years to get a better sense of the Kabbalah principles. This does not mean I am an expert as I realize there is a lot of work I need to continue to do and there is a lot of learning ahead. Some notes: "Love your neighbor as you love yourself" "Those who embrace spiritual transformation - moving from reactive behav Re-read this book just now and I got a much better understanding. There is a lot to take from this little book and I feel I have done sufficient progress on my personal work in the last 2 years to get a better sense of the Kabbalah principles. This does not mean I am an expert as I realize there is a lot of work I need to continue to do and there is a lot of learning ahead. Some notes: "Love your neighbor as you love yourself" "Those who embrace spiritual transformation - moving from reactive behavior to proactive- will dwell in a bubble of serenity, even though the world around them might collapse into rubble and ruin. The choice is ours" "Ask a friend or someone you trust: Do you see a pattern where I repeatedly tend to get in my own way?" "There is a law of cause and effect in this universe. What we put out is what we get back. " "Any action, kind or unkind, sets in motion a chain reaction of effects" "Those who dance were thought to be quite insane by those who could not hear the music - Angela Monet" Desire is the essential quality of human nature>think of a newborn. There is the 1%, our reality, and the 99%, a dimension in which we can initiate positive lasting change that also manifests in our 1% world. We live in the classical world where everything seems normal, everything has shape, place and substance. However, at very small scales, the quantum world reigns and everything is strange and bizarre, defying common sense~ Professor Stuart Hameroff, MD. "Dreams, visions, intuition, these are all moments of connection to the 99% real where all information, wisdom, energy, fulfillment and light exist. Plato called this connection divine madness. Philosopher Nicholas of Cusa called it divine revelation. Mozart described it as a rush. Philosopher and Mathematician Edmund Husserl called it pure intuition. We call it: A mother's intuition Sixth sense Gut instinct"

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mary-Anne Lekoma

    A truly engaging spiritual book. For the fact that the author makes mention of a quote I once read that roughly says "never believe anything you read unless it truly resonates with you spirit" I was intrigued from the get go. I like to regard myself as a Christian that dabbles in teachings that expand my soul and this book is no exception to the expansion and deepening of my faith. I recommend it to all that are seeking a deeper understanding of their faith, regardless what it may be. An open mi A truly engaging spiritual book. For the fact that the author makes mention of a quote I once read that roughly says "never believe anything you read unless it truly resonates with you spirit" I was intrigued from the get go. I like to regard myself as a Christian that dabbles in teachings that expand my soul and this book is no exception to the expansion and deepening of my faith. I recommend it to all that are seeking a deeper understanding of their faith, regardless what it may be. An open mind is, in my opinion, pivotal to one's enlightenment. The path to enlightenment is clad with uncertainty of our own makings, which the author makes mention of but its still a road that we must travel to find what we seek. I completely enjoyed reading The Power of Kabbalah, it wasn't as imposing as some spiritual books I have read. Its more of a suggestive kind of read. Read it.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sam Barnett

    The Power of Kabbalah is a great book and I think everybody should read it at least once. The biggest concept in the book is changing your nature from reactive to proactive. My only problem with the book is that it makes it seem like you will only find the answers from Kabbalah, which may be true for some people. The lessons you get from Kabbalah are not a "secret wisdom" of any sort, which this book does emphasize. Every one can gain something from reading this book, but be careful as Kabbalah The Power of Kabbalah is a great book and I think everybody should read it at least once. The biggest concept in the book is changing your nature from reactive to proactive. My only problem with the book is that it makes it seem like you will only find the answers from Kabbalah, which may be true for some people. The lessons you get from Kabbalah are not a "secret wisdom" of any sort, which this book does emphasize. Every one can gain something from reading this book, but be careful as Kabbalah is not the only way.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Duncan Reed

    A mish mash of all the 'best bits' of different spiritual paths, and written in a very cheesy style, though it's very easy and quick to read. There is a short section in the back on the Hebrew alphabet, but it didn't go into any detail about gematria or the deeper meanings of any particular Hebrew words used in the Torah, for example. You could be forgiven for thinking that Kabbalah is a surface level combination of Buddhism and Hinduism, with some Christianity thrown in. I don't know much more A mish mash of all the 'best bits' of different spiritual paths, and written in a very cheesy style, though it's very easy and quick to read. There is a short section in the back on the Hebrew alphabet, but it didn't go into any detail about gematria or the deeper meanings of any particular Hebrew words used in the Torah, for example. You could be forgiven for thinking that Kabbalah is a surface level combination of Buddhism and Hinduism, with some Christianity thrown in. I don't know much more than that after reading this book.

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