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Animorphs

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Animorphs "RM" is an exciting series for young adult readers about five teens who are given the power to "morph" into any animal they touch and then to absorb its DNA. This power is granted them by a dying Andalite alien named Elfangor, who also warns the teens that Earth is being threatened secretly by a group of aliens called Yeerks. This high-interest series is currentl Animorphs "RM" is an exciting series for young adult readers about five teens who are given the power to "morph" into any animal they touch and then to absorb its DNA. This power is granted them by a dying Andalite alien named Elfangor, who also warns the teens that Earth is being threatened secretly by a group of aliens called Yeerks. This high-interest series is currently a successful television show and will be sure to intrigue even the most reluctant readers.


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Animorphs "RM" is an exciting series for young adult readers about five teens who are given the power to "morph" into any animal they touch and then to absorb its DNA. This power is granted them by a dying Andalite alien named Elfangor, who also warns the teens that Earth is being threatened secretly by a group of aliens called Yeerks. This high-interest series is currentl Animorphs "RM" is an exciting series for young adult readers about five teens who are given the power to "morph" into any animal they touch and then to absorb its DNA. This power is granted them by a dying Andalite alien named Elfangor, who also warns the teens that Earth is being threatened secretly by a group of aliens called Yeerks. This high-interest series is currently a successful television show and will be sure to intrigue even the most reluctant readers.

30 review for Animorphs

  1. 5 out of 5

    Latonya

    (Spoiler-free review) In my life, there have only ever been two book series where I spent my time impatiently awaiting the release of the next installation. This was one of them. I grew up being absolutely obsessed with this series. I was there right from the beginning along with several of my friends. Whenever a new book came out, we were there that day to buy it and we usually devoured it in one or two sittings and then spend the next month talking about it, all the way up until the release of (Spoiler-free review) In my life, there have only ever been two book series where I spent my time impatiently awaiting the release of the next installation. This was one of them. I grew up being absolutely obsessed with this series. I was there right from the beginning along with several of my friends. Whenever a new book came out, we were there that day to buy it and we usually devoured it in one or two sittings and then spend the next month talking about it, all the way up until the release of the next book. When the series finally came to an end, I remember wishing that it could go on (the cliffhanger in the last book certainly didn't help things) and that I, too, could be a member of the Animorphs. (Oh, the days I spent wishing I could find one of those blue morphing cubes.) Then, after graduating college, I decided to go back and reread the series for fun and to see if it still held up. I'd been disappointed that The Chronicles of Narnia had, sadly, not (see my review), and was prepared to face the same letdown all over again. That didn't happen. I reread every last book, including The Andalite Chronicles, all Megamorphs books, and the others, and loved it as much as an adult as I did as a kid. What I think makes the series stand up better than other children's series is that Applegate never talked down to her audience. She even dealt with difficult subject matter like the brutality of war and didn't sugarcoat anything, something I appreciated as a kid and, later on, as an adult. Applegate also had a real knack for creating vivid, relatable, complex, and dynamic characters. For example, Marco begins with the singular trait of being the sarcastic jokester of the group, who often tried to make light of things during serious situations, much to the chagrin of the rest of the Animorphs. Yet, as the series continues and we get more of each character's backstory, we learn why he behaves this way. We learn that he sees he has two choices when things get serious: focus on the negative and feel overwhelmed and hopeless, or try to make things seem like they aren't so bad with humor. As another example, Rachel, who contrasts with Marco and is thus a rival to him, begins the series being described as super-model material with a huge love for malls and shopping...and a good fight. However, as the series goes on, Rachel discovers that she really loves the fight and it gets to the point where she feels intense bloodlust, which worries her friends. When she sees how worried they are, she begins to worry herself and spends time conflicted over her own nature. I could talk about all the other characters, too, but we'd be here all day. I could also talk about the many themes that Applegate explores, but I think that I'll save that for a blog post. This should, however, stand as a testament to why the series works so well and why it developed such a devoted fan base throughout its run. It was exciting, emotional, action-packed, and original...and didn't shy away from dealing with serious topics. It treated its readers as intelligent and mature, not as fragile little creatures too sensitive and innocent to be able to handle anything more serious than, I don't know, magical fairy gardens and a bad day at school—not that there is anything wrong with those books. They have their place, but it would be nice to see junior-level books that treat their audience with a little more intelligence. Of course, the series won't be for everyone. It can get very violent and, for a children's series, pretty graphic. Limbs get torn off (but, in the case of the Animorphs, as long as they morph back into their own bodies, they'll be fine), blood spills, and guts get strewn about. If I were to rate it, I'd say the violence is very borderline PG/PG-13. It is, however, not violence for the sake of violence and serves as a powerful illustration of the consequences and brutality of war. All that said, Animorphs is a fantastic series and I can do nothing but highly recommend it. It is currently being reprinted, complete with brand new covers, and I am hopeful that kids today will pick it up and get sucked into it and love it like just like my friends and I did.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Corytregoart

    It's easy to look at the premise of this book--pre/teens transform into animals to fight alien invaders--and scoff, or write it off as juvenile nonsense. However, in doing so you'd be dismissing what is actually a very deep and rewarding series of books, a series that has the utmost respect for its audience. Firstly, there's the aliens. Far from generic bug-eyed monster, each race has a distinct ethos and biology, with their own culture, traditions, life cycles, idiosyncrasies, and prejudices, ex It's easy to look at the premise of this book--pre/teens transform into animals to fight alien invaders--and scoff, or write it off as juvenile nonsense. However, in doing so you'd be dismissing what is actually a very deep and rewarding series of books, a series that has the utmost respect for its audience. Firstly, there's the aliens. Far from generic bug-eyed monster, each race has a distinct ethos and biology, with their own culture, traditions, life cycles, idiosyncrasies, and prejudices, explained and elaborated upon in depth over the course of the series. The aliens in Animorphs compare favorably to some of the best aliens I've encountered in "real" adult science fiction. They're all vividly described as well, firing the imagination and providing endless inspiration for artistic types such as myself. And new species were introduced regularly throughout the series; every single book at times, especially when Visser Three's around to transform into one of his endboss morphs. One thing I really liked about the aliens is that their powers (with a couple obvious exceptions) were always limited. Neither the Yeerks nor the Andalites had endless forces of troops and super-weapons at their disposal. Their resources were always limited, so they had to use strategy. That's one of the things that made the series so interesting. But more so than its interesting aliens or military strategies, what really sets Animorphs apart is the respect it had for the intelligence and emotional resilience of its young audience. My intelligence was never insulted while reading these books. They were never dumbed down. The characters and situations were complex. The villains had their own motives and ambitions that could be understood and even sympathized with. None of the heroes were without flaw. There was hardship, suffering, and tragedy. Near the end of the series, all of the protagonists bear the psychological scars of their long struggle.

  3. 5 out of 5

    The Scarecrow

    I read all of these on PDF files I stole from the internet, since a 54-book series is expensive to buy in one sitting and impossible to find in completion at my local libraries. Believe me, I tried. It took me about three days to finish the lot, mostly because they're easy to read, but also because for 90% of the books the first few chapters are a generic introduction to the series. Why Applegate felt the need to do this is beyond me. When you read the books one after the other it just comes off I read all of these on PDF files I stole from the internet, since a 54-book series is expensive to buy in one sitting and impossible to find in completion at my local libraries. Believe me, I tried. It took me about three days to finish the lot, mostly because they're easy to read, but also because for 90% of the books the first few chapters are a generic introduction to the series. Why Applegate felt the need to do this is beyond me. When you read the books one after the other it just comes off as formulaic and tedious, which is exactly the opposite of the story and characters. I know the final volume has been getting a lot of slack which is perfectly understandable. Applegate seems to think this is because she gave us a realistic ending, but it's really because she introduces a completely new and unresolved plot about twenty pages into the volume. Ouch. I found the ending to be fine enough in a very Nolan-esque way, but I can see what all the hoopla is about. I formed my own ideas about what I think happened in the end and I'm satisfied with that. I think that level of ambiguity is quite trusting of an author and rewarding for a reader. Book 22 is my favourite volume (tough pick, but hey), since it both terrified me and underscored the fact that Rachel's true strength lay in her willpower. It is also probably one of the best written volumes in the series. Books 13, 30, 33 and 49 are also fantastic. The whole series, however, is fully worth a read and I wholeheartedly recommend it. (This is an abridged review. The rest is at my blog.)

  4. 4 out of 5

    Shar

    despite how long this series ran and how many books fit into its canon, there's not many people i know who picked these up as kids like i did, and most scoff at the premise now. it's easy to, what with the silly covers and the plot revolving around teenagers who can turn into animals to fight off an alien invasion. what is overlooked, however, are the mature and at times very dark themes that run throughout the series - PTSD, depression, torture, dehumanization, moral ambiguity, death, loss of i despite how long this series ran and how many books fit into its canon, there's not many people i know who picked these up as kids like i did, and most scoff at the premise now. it's easy to, what with the silly covers and the plot revolving around teenagers who can turn into animals to fight off an alien invasion. what is overlooked, however, are the mature and at times very dark themes that run throughout the series - PTSD, depression, torture, dehumanization, moral ambiguity, death, loss of innocence and the gruesome violence of war to name a few. KA applegate doesn't shy away from addressing any of these, even at times touching upon racism, ableism, and homosexuality. the lines between good and bad start out clear but start to venture more into the greys as the protagonists interact more with the other side and begin to have to question their own choices -- and then follow through with some very tough ones -- and the series never lets you stop and think for a second that either side is completely correct in their actions. what i appreciate about this series, even as an adult having done a re-read, is that even though the target demographic is children, KA's writing never talks down to the reader. sure there are cheesy and very simplistic moments, considering the audience and this *is* set in the 90s, but there are just as many poignant moments both from the main protagonists -- including their closest alien companion ax who makes some very interesting and astute observations about humanity as an outsider -- as well as secondary characters and villains. with each book being from a different perspective, we get to know each character individually along with their specific struggles. because of this format, all the characters are fleshed out wonderfully with very distinct voices and personalities, and we get to see so many different sides to them. for me personally, i deeply appreciate how diverse the group is, with two intricately characterized females, as well as two people of color (including one of the girls). the prominent female voices, along with other factors in the series, makes this a very feminist series (demonstrated most explicitly by my favorite, rachel who will never shy away from telling you how feminist she is). but besides all of that, and though many of the ghost written books were unnecessary and as with any series this one has its own set of flaws, a series as long as this one allows for an extremely rich world to be painted. what with several companion books revolving around alien characters who make brief appearances throughout the main installments and their backstories, along with the main series, as well as an actual main character who is not human, we get to explore beings, races, sometimes entire worlds that are completely alien and most of the time not humanoid in the slightest. it's so vibrant and lush, with tons of detail to sink into. it's also absolutely worth a mention that along with the darkness and details, there's equal amounts of humor (PLENTY of it) and touching moments, along with some of my favorite literary relationships ever. animorphs may not be your thing now (maybe because of the length of the series or the premise or the writing or maybe you're just too old etc) but it's certainly something i am eternally grateful for noticing that one day on my scholastic book fair order form in fourth grade and i look forward to revisiting and giving it another spin someday.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nicki

    I don't know how to express how much this book series changed my life. It's almost impossible to describe. When I first started reading avidly, around age six, I just couldn't really get into a book series. I'd read a book, but I wouldn't think about it again afterward. Then I found Animorphs. And I fell in love. I read, and I read, and then I'd read the books over again. I became obsessed with the lives of the characters, and determined to find out how their stories would end. Over the course o I don't know how to express how much this book series changed my life. It's almost impossible to describe. When I first started reading avidly, around age six, I just couldn't really get into a book series. I'd read a book, but I wouldn't think about it again afterward. Then I found Animorphs. And I fell in love. I read, and I read, and then I'd read the books over again. I became obsessed with the lives of the characters, and determined to find out how their stories would end. Over the course of ten years, I collected the entire series. I got my first Animorphs book when I was seven, and I got my last when I was seventeen. I have all 54 books, the alternamorphs, the specials. I have two of the videos, the book about the cast, etc. I love this book series so much. It follows a group of five kids and their alien friend. But what I really liked is that Applegate didn't treat me like a kid. Her stories progressed in maturity as I did. And by the end, I was so absorbed. I cried when (view spoiler)[ Rachel went evil, and when she died (hide spoiler)] , and at the ending. I understand a lot of people are upset about the ending, and it wasn't my favorite. But I actually liked the ambiguity. (view spoiler)[ It kind of made me happy knowing that Jake didn't end up a depressed hobo, and Marco, a movie star. It just wasn't them, you know? I liked the idea of them continuing to fight the good fight (hide spoiler)] . And it was a good fight.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Paige

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I was eight years old when I read my first Animorphs book. Animorphs was the first science fiction series I ever read, and (let’s see) seventeen years later, it’s still one of the best. I know a lot of people my age say that Harry Potter was the series that shaped their childhood, but for me Animorphs was that formative series. Animorphs pretty literally shaped how I view the world. It starts with a very black and white kind of world and then it slowly breaks that apart. It’s the kind of series t I was eight years old when I read my first Animorphs book. Animorphs was the first science fiction series I ever read, and (let’s see) seventeen years later, it’s still one of the best. I know a lot of people my age say that Harry Potter was the series that shaped their childhood, but for me Animorphs was that formative series. Animorphs pretty literally shaped how I view the world. It starts with a very black and white kind of world and then it slowly breaks that apart. It’s the kind of series that forces you to grow up with the MCs. It disguises this morality in extremely cool depictions of flying, amusing and occasionally silly tangents, and fights scene against a big bad who is incredibly easy to hate. But then suddenly, you’re nine years old and reading about a kid with the power to morph about to sell the gang out to the yeerks and asking what would I do here? What could I do? You’re watching a character be tortured for the good of the mission. Watching a kid coldly plot the death of his own mother because she’s housing the enemy. And you watch the Animorphs make compromises, make impossible choices and you watch them change and you wonder. For all that there are silly stand-alone novels, this series stands out from other kids series because every action has very real ramifications (we’re literally not even done with book one before a character is permanently stuck as a bird). Nearly every thread has major ties to the end game and while I don’t like all of them (*cough*Ellimist*cough*), it’s so very rare to see a series this long with a definite plan. This is not a perfect series. It suffers a little from the ghost-writing (the 30s on the whole, are rough) and it’s probably too long by half. But even the down books have moments like Marco’s endless snark at the Helmacrons: You couldn’t go mano a mano with maggot and hope to win. And that’s sad, because a maggot has no manos. Or the capstone in the #48 which was terrible until all of a sudden it wasn’t: It would be hard to believe the entire fate of the planet depended on that girl. A girl who wanted to do the right thing. But who had no idea at all what it was. [haha! That one’s in reference about if Rachel will do a mercy killing or not! Totally appropriate for an eight year old!] I found myself frustrated with the optimist of the group, Cassie, a lot. But the most interesting part of that is the fact that when Cassie takes her massive risks, hope and optimism pay off. And that's a message that's beyond cool. This is a series that manages to be darker than nearly all of adult literature I’ve read in the past decade. It’s a war story about child soldiers. It’s about morally gray spaces and shattered misconceptions and the way constant fight can break a person. But it's also about how making the hopeful, stupid choice isn't always wrong and how six kids can change the fate of an entire planet. I can’t tell you how important this series is to me. This stupid kid’s series with the gimmicky covers and the flip-book corners. This series with parasitic alien invaders who are fought by shape shifters. This series that managed to slip into my eight year old brain and shape the way I think. This series that deals with the horrors of war, and never hits the reset button, but has such a sense of humor that you can’t help but smile. Cassie, everyone here has problems. Ax is the only member of his species within a trillion miles who’s not a Controller; you’re a pacifist who spends half her time battling aliens; Jake is just a dumb jock trying to play General Eisenhower; Rachel is about three millimeters away from morphing permanently into the Terminator; and, oh, by the way, Tobias is a bird who lives in a tree and eats mice for breakfast. Seriously guys. They take like thirty minutes each to read. The dialogue is great. The action sequences are awesome. The stories are a really screwball mix of fun and soul-crushing and Animorphs is pretty much the best gateway to science fiction you could ever hand a kid.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Vince Snow

    ReRead in 2017. Was surprised and impressed how well the books held up. After starting I quickly realized there was much more to the story than a few kids turning into animals. The story delves into complex moral issues and lets the reader decide the 'right' thing was. Loss of innocence, life and death, free will, war, depression, family, loyalty. I enjoyed different books this read through than I had when I read through the series more than ten years ago. Couldn't recommend the series highly en ReRead in 2017. Was surprised and impressed how well the books held up. After starting I quickly realized there was much more to the story than a few kids turning into animals. The story delves into complex moral issues and lets the reader decide the 'right' thing was. Loss of innocence, life and death, free will, war, depression, family, loyalty. I enjoyed different books this read through than I had when I read through the series more than ten years ago. Couldn't recommend the series highly enough.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Rachelann

    I remember reading a lot of these as a kid. I can't believe there's 54 books. -.-' I remember reading a lot of these as a kid. I can't believe there's 54 books. -.-'

  9. 4 out of 5

    Talon Kartchner

    I read every book in this series, including all the Megamorphs, Andalite Chronicles, Hork Bajur Chronicles, etc. I love this series! A way better alternative to the Goosebumps, in my opinion.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Ball

    If you grew up in the 90s-00s and didn't read the Animorphs, you missed out! If you grew up in the 90s-00s and didn't read the Animorphs, you missed out!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Vjustin

    *** ALERT. MAY. CONTAIN. SPOILERS.*** A book I first saw when I was in elementary school in the Scholastic catalog. Incidentally, do those still exist? Anyway, I had read maybe the first 5 books, after which I read some random ones in the series. It wasn't until last year that I realized I had never finished the series nor bothered to even find out if it had an actual ending. So I set off to the library like any good bookworm and borrowed the books 10 at a time. It's a series I think most people *** ALERT. MAY. CONTAIN. SPOILERS.*** A book I first saw when I was in elementary school in the Scholastic catalog. Incidentally, do those still exist? Anyway, I had read maybe the first 5 books, after which I read some random ones in the series. It wasn't until last year that I realized I had never finished the series nor bothered to even find out if it had an actual ending. So I set off to the library like any good bookworm and borrowed the books 10 at a time. It's a series I think most people do not really look at. It's easy not to notice it; the series was never as big as Harry Potter. It starts out very cool actually. The whole 'superpowers' thing and aliens are real. Later on in the series however, it does get serious as they get into the war more and in the end, I actually felt quite lonely. I had always like Rachel in the book and to see that she was 'let go' and in the manner she went was actually very heartbreaking. I guess most of the questions that surround the book i.e do people ever find out, what about Marco's mom and the Animorphs families are answered. I TRY to understand the author's reasons for the ending that it had even if part of me wishes it was a happily ever after. But even then, I loved the series. You see angst, love, war, BIG decisions. A very good read, but the series is a little long at 54 books. I've read most companion books which are good, you see the story from another character's POV besides the Animorphs.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    Animorphs was the first book series I really got into as a kid. I discovered them at my elementary school library; they occupied an entire shelf, and were not marked with the dreaded red sticker which separated the more "mature" books from the ones that had been deemed suitable for all ages. (For comparison, Applegate's Remnants series was housed on the next shelf but had the sticker; when I became old enough, I went after those on the basis of having loved Animorphs and was quite disturbed and Animorphs was the first book series I really got into as a kid. I discovered them at my elementary school library; they occupied an entire shelf, and were not marked with the dreaded red sticker which separated the more "mature" books from the ones that had been deemed suitable for all ages. (For comparison, Applegate's Remnants series was housed on the next shelf but had the sticker; when I became old enough, I went after those on the basis of having loved Animorphs and was quite disturbed and put off by what I read. But I'll save that story for another time.) So I was allowed to check out this series about teenagers getting involved in a massive interspecies war at the age when I was still reading the Magic Tree House, Goosebumps, and Junie B. Jones. My memories of this series are in flashes. I didn't read all of the books, and what's more I read them out of order. The series had been over with for 5-6 years by the time I started reading, and I remember not really being surprised by the twists (having already had them spoiled) so much as I was intrigued. I know the names of all the characters, their basic personality traits, and what I thought of them at the time. Tobias was my favorite, primarily because I was obsessed with the idea of a kid finding out their father was an alien. Looking back, his angst probably would have annoyed the shit out of me now. As a prelude to my love of weird alien characters like Spock, I also tended to prefer the books written by Ax; he was more successful as a comic relief character than Marco, whose character arc took a decidedly darker turn as the series progressed and their lives became more difficult. Rachel could be bitchy at times and I thought of her as a stereotype (there were so many stunningly beautiful fierce warrior blondes in 90s/early 2000s media that the trope was nearly as strong as the "dumb blonde") but I enjoyed her little romance with Tobias. In fact, I think they were the second couple I ever "shipped" after Lana and Clark in Smallville. Cassie and Jake were both boring to me (Jake lacked the pizzazz and style which sets other leader-types apart, and Cassie's main character trait was that she was nice, normal, and her parents being veterinarians meant that she could get them access to animals so they could absorb their DNA) and I didn't care about their relationship. The books I remember most vividly were the weirder ones. There was the one where Cassie had to perform amateur brain surgery on Ax in a barn with carpentry tools, and he woke up in the middle of it screaming because they had put a sympathetic Yeerk in his head to help guide the procedure. Then there was the one where Cassie was infected by a Yeerk, the two had to work together to solve some problem, and at the end they gave the Yeerk the ability to morph; they turned into a caterpillar, then a butterfly. Or was that Cassie herself? Tobias was contacted by a lawyer who claimed to have found his father's long-lost will. He went there to have it read, and had to sit there and pretend he thought it was all a cruel joke as the will revealed his father was Elfangor. The lawyer and somebody else there were infected, and if he showed any sign of knowing the truth already or believed it, his ass would've been grass. There were a few time travel stories, one told by Marco where they went back to the Ice Age. The final scene had them back in the present, and Marco was taking the hottest shower he could. His father came in and asked if he wanted to go get ice cream, causing Marco to laugh his ass off. I even read a Choose Your Adventure book where the reader was placed in the role of an extra unnamed Animorph. If you screwed up in your decisions, the others would force you to morph into a fly and then trap you that way, with a lifespan of only three days being the fate that awaited you for your mistakes. These books were so sick, I loved them. At some point I read the last book. I went in knowing Rachel would die. I could predict it. And sure enough, she got rammed to death. Or was she impaled? I look back on this series with mixed feelings. On the one hand, it was my introduction to "true" sci-fi. It had many concepts which fascinated me, and some memorable characters and moments. It was also horribly dated even five years later and reeked of Scholastic sensibilities in the worst way possible. The writing style as I remember it was sparse and utilitarian, which fit with the concept of books written from the POV of a a bunch of 90s teenagers. The basic premise was fun and interesting, but only as long as you didn't go into too much depth trying to explain how the mechanics of it all worked. And that's where I think this series started to fail. It went on for too long, tried to do too much, and as a result it started to show seam lines. The introduction of the Ellimist, a godlike cosmic being that essentially served as a deus ex machina and solved all/most of the intriguing obstacles they faced, particularly by doing away with the issue of Tobias getting stuck in his hawk form within a few days of getting the power to morph, annoyed me even as an eight year old. I wanted to see how these characters would win the war even when Tobias was trapped as a hawk forever. I was promised higher stakes, only for the author(s) to renege halfway through. That betrayal was worse than any stupid one-off story ever could be, because it held ramifications that affected everything in the series from then onward. I don't want to start ranting. Since I want to become an author myself, I can still say this series taught me a valuable lesson about storytelling - one that has been beaten into me by the slow, drawn-out deaths of many of my other favorite IPs: Quit while you're ahead. Don't keep going just because you love money. Don't let the publisher convince you to keep going. Don't sign a contract that legally binds you to keep going. If you get to the point where you have to hire ghost writers to keep up the constant output demanded of you by the publishers and readers, then it's time to stop.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jacob Gowans

    I started reading this series back when I was in junior high. It finished when I was a freshman in college. This series is outstanding. I doubt many people allowed themselves to really get into a series that lasts almost 60 books, but the entire thing is phenomenal. It's a must read for anyone who wants to get a glimpse of what kids go through while fighting a war. KA Applegate didn't allow herself to compromise the truth for happy endings. These kids are fighting an overwhelming enemy, the Yeer I started reading this series back when I was in junior high. It finished when I was a freshman in college. This series is outstanding. I doubt many people allowed themselves to really get into a series that lasts almost 60 books, but the entire thing is phenomenal. It's a must read for anyone who wants to get a glimpse of what kids go through while fighting a war. KA Applegate didn't allow herself to compromise the truth for happy endings. These kids are fighting an overwhelming enemy, the Yeerks, and they are constantly beaten, set back, and worn down, but never give up. Are there times when you have to suspend disbelief a little bit? Yes, but rarely. KA Applegate's only fault is that some of the books feel like "filler episodes" in a TV series, but on a whole the series has a great linear progression that continues to expand on itself. I would love to see this series turned into a series of novels or movies someday.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    Okay, these books made my childhood! Too bad they had the worse ending of a series EVER! It was the first book I cried over, and I cried for days (give me a break, I was 11!). It didn't help that I was at camp in a cabin of non-readers, trying to explain why I was crying. Besides the end (which come on, did ANYONE like?) the series was one of the best for that age group. I have the urge to go back and read them all again now... Okay, these books made my childhood! Too bad they had the worse ending of a series EVER! It was the first book I cried over, and I cried for days (give me a break, I was 11!). It didn't help that I was at camp in a cabin of non-readers, trying to explain why I was crying. Besides the end (which come on, did ANYONE like?) the series was one of the best for that age group. I have the urge to go back and read them all again now...

  15. 4 out of 5

    M.M. Strawberry Library & Reviews

    Weren't the late 90's just awesome? It seemed that everyone I knew had read at least one Animorphs book. Overall the story was engaging, and the covers were always a treat to look at. Weren't the late 90's just awesome? It seemed that everyone I knew had read at least one Animorphs book. Overall the story was engaging, and the covers were always a treat to look at.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

    Rather than rate each Animorphs book individually, I just gave the entire series 5 stars. First of all, these books aren't directly targeted for a mature adult; they are mostly written for kids. Actually, they are perfect for preteens, these books got me into reading in the first place. Not saying an adult can't enjoy them, I started reading them when I was about 9 or 10 and finally read the last one when I was 22, because they most certainly can. The books start off where every good preteen sci Rather than rate each Animorphs book individually, I just gave the entire series 5 stars. First of all, these books aren't directly targeted for a mature adult; they are mostly written for kids. Actually, they are perfect for preteens, these books got me into reading in the first place. Not saying an adult can't enjoy them, I started reading them when I was about 9 or 10 and finally read the last one when I was 22, because they most certainly can. The books start off where every good preteen sci-fi series should, aliens invading earth and a group of teenagers are the ones to stop them. Their weapon: the ability to turn into animals. Such a clever concept actually, using all our animal's powers to save the planet. The team needs to get somewhere fast? They morph into an Eagle. Sneak into an alien facility? Cockroaches work pretty well(and never seem to die). What about stomping bad guys? Try an Elephant, Tiger, or Gorilla. Each book is told from the point of view of a certain character which allows you to really get to know their personality, what are they thinking, and what they are fighting for. The entire series is 54 books long with some extra "Megamorphs" books(usually a larger unique adventure told from alternating points of view). The writing is better than it should be, has a healthy mix of young humor, solid action scenes, interesting plot twists, and tackles some social problems as the books get darker: how and why is fighting a war worth it, does one person doing the right thing matter, standing by your friends no matter what, and why leadership is important. I was amazed at how deep these themes were when I finally read all the books as an adult and that I couldn't fully realize them in Jr High School. Too Long Didn't Read? I am convinced that Animorphs is the perfect mix of what a young reader needs to stay interested in and get a lot more out of reading than they would ever understand. It was my gateway to the book world, and I am most certainly going to read these to my kids someday.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jordan Schnaidt

    It's that same old story. Aliens invade Earth and this group of kids are the only ones who can stop them, right? Okay, sure, but the coolest thing about the Animorphs was the power of morphing. Not only did it empower them to become any animal via a simple touch, but they got a firsthand peek into the minds of other creatures, and by extension, so did the readers. As educational as it was exciting, Animorphs is really a book series that many ages can enjoy. The writing can have its ups and downs It's that same old story. Aliens invade Earth and this group of kids are the only ones who can stop them, right? Okay, sure, but the coolest thing about the Animorphs was the power of morphing. Not only did it empower them to become any animal via a simple touch, but they got a firsthand peek into the minds of other creatures, and by extension, so did the readers. As educational as it was exciting, Animorphs is really a book series that many ages can enjoy. The writing can have its ups and downs, and suffers somewhat after Book 24 when the series was taken over by ghostwriters so Applegate could write the Everworld series (she still had a hand in the books, but she didn't write every word at that point). Regardless, these books are fun to read as a kid and as an adult (with the bonus of finding much deeper meaning in some of the conflicts when reading as an adult), and they age well even if the Animorphs don't all have cellphones like modern kids.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Faysal Subhani

    Wow. What a series. I started reading these book sporadically and non-chronologically in grade 7. 11 years later, I sat down and read them all, including Megamorphs and Chronicles. Believe me, these books are every bit as enjoyable for an 'old' adult as they are a young one. I was surprised at how dark they can get (minus Marco's insistence on cracking jokes even in the most dire situations). Thoroughly enjoyable. Towards the end however, each character's traits are dominated by a single recurre Wow. What a series. I started reading these book sporadically and non-chronologically in grade 7. 11 years later, I sat down and read them all, including Megamorphs and Chronicles. Believe me, these books are every bit as enjoyable for an 'old' adult as they are a young one. I was surprised at how dark they can get (minus Marco's insistence on cracking jokes even in the most dire situations). Thoroughly enjoyable. Towards the end however, each character's traits are dominated by a single recurrent theme: Rachel's dark side, Tobias' brooding, Cassie's pacifism, Marco's immaturity and intelligence and Jake's tortured leadership. It gets a tad annoying as the characters take on two-dimensional personalities. However, excellent story-line throughout the series.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Chris Cole

    The entire series is something I think youth can enjoy. It's very accessible, and you get drawn in through the variety of characters. You're on this journey with them, and throughout the series you watch them go from overwhelmed young teenagers to warriors, with real and deep problems. Tensions increase and relationships strain as the kids wage war against impossible odds. Of course, I was sad for the way the series ended, but realistically, war is about death. The entire series is something I think youth can enjoy. It's very accessible, and you get drawn in through the variety of characters. You're on this journey with them, and throughout the series you watch them go from overwhelmed young teenagers to warriors, with real and deep problems. Tensions increase and relationships strain as the kids wage war against impossible odds. Of course, I was sad for the way the series ended, but realistically, war is about death.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    Ah, Animorphs. You completed my childhood. How could I not love the combination of fighting aliens and turning into animals? Honestly, it was like this series was created just to appeal to the childhood me. My love of it is therefore a combination of that and the nostalgic value it provides me. Of course, I never did read the last few books...well, there's next summer's project Ah, Animorphs. You completed my childhood. How could I not love the combination of fighting aliens and turning into animals? Honestly, it was like this series was created just to appeal to the childhood me. My love of it is therefore a combination of that and the nostalgic value it provides me. Of course, I never did read the last few books...well, there's next summer's project

  21. 4 out of 5

    Alexander

    One of the most influential book series in my life.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Alexandra

    Because it's too much effort to add every single book from the series. Because it's too much effort to add every single book from the series.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Scrawlers

    Animorphs is a series that is both for kids, and not for kids. It's a series that should be held up among the classics, yet is instead often mocked and parodied. The premise is simple: While taking a shortcut home through an abandoned construction site, five pre-teens meet a dying alien. The alien tells them about a different race of aliens secretly invading and enslaving the planet, and then gives them the power to morph into any animal they touch for two hours at a time in order to fend the inv Animorphs is a series that is both for kids, and not for kids. It's a series that should be held up among the classics, yet is instead often mocked and parodied. The premise is simple: While taking a shortcut home through an abandoned construction site, five pre-teens meet a dying alien. The alien tells them about a different race of aliens secretly invading and enslaving the planet, and then gives them the power to morph into any animal they touch for two hours at a time in order to fend the invading aliens off. He then dies, and the kids are left to wage guerrilla warfare (joined a couple books later by the dead alien's little brother). While this seems like it could have been the premise for a '90s action cartoon, Animorphs goes so much deeper. Not once does Animorphs shy away from showing the horrors of war. The kids have PTSD that affects their every day lives from the battles they go through, from nightmares to flashes of emotional instability and violence throughout the day. The consequences they suffer are permanent. The moral questions they're forced to ask themselves and each other (and try to answer) are real. "How far do you go into savagery to defeat the savage?" asks one of them as they all discuss whether using a chemical weapon (in the form of instant maple-and-ginger oatmeal, but still) against the enemy is a legitimate tactic, or too cruel to consider. They're forced to grapple with extreme violence, death, and the fact that not everyone on the other side is a mindless enemy to be slain, just as not everyone on their side is a good person to be pals with. War is brutal, and war is complicated. There are shades of grey, and Animorphs emphasizes that time and time again. The kids are not allowed to act with impunity because they're the heroes. They're not allowed to skate by without considering the moral implications of their every action. And though the beginning of the series makes it seem as though there are Good Aliens and Bad Aliens, the series spells out in no short time that species and race aren't what determine good or evil, but rather the actions of each individual person. Though these are children's books that were sold in Scholastic magazines -- though I myself first read them when I was a kid -- these books are graphically violent and, as mentioned, deal with the concept of war with more nuance and gravitas than most series aimed at older audiences. It is this which makes Animorphs so brilliantly accessible to audiences across the age spectrum; it has cool animals and animal facts for younger readers, but it also deals with heavy concepts and ideas which appeal to older ones. To that end, introducing nuance and shades of grey as it does to younger readers is, in my opinion, incredibly important. Unfortunately, the "silly" covers have turned them into a joke over the years, particularly since this series never took off in the same way that children's series published around the same time (such as Harry Potter) did. Nonetheless, having started a re-read of this series last year, I can say that these books do hold up to the test of time, perhaps better than series such as Harry Potter, in some ways. Regardless, this is a sci-fi series that, no matter your age, will make you laugh, scream, and cry, cry, cry. It is absolutely worth the read and time.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Naomi Ruth

    This is one of few childhood book-series that I still not only own but regularly re-read. While the writing is standard grade-school level and the premise requires a good amount of suspended disbelief, the message and morals contained with these books, as well as the questions raised and unanswered, are timeless and appropriate for all ages. The main cast features a diverse group of characters, which was rare for children's books of my generation. The leader of the group is a Jewish boy from an This is one of few childhood book-series that I still not only own but regularly re-read. While the writing is standard grade-school level and the premise requires a good amount of suspended disbelief, the message and morals contained with these books, as well as the questions raised and unanswered, are timeless and appropriate for all ages. The main cast features a diverse group of characters, which was rare for children's books of my generation. The leader of the group is a Jewish boy from an All American family, and his cousin (the standard Pretty Girl) is also a Jewish girl, she from a family of divorce who defies stereotypes of Tall Blonde and Fashionable to become the most bloodthirsty, arguably out-of-control warrior of the gang. The comic-relief is a Latino boy being raised by his widower father and he is also one of the smartest, most ruthless, and perhaps most emotional of all the team. The moral compass of the group is an African American girl with two parents and no siblings who holds them all accountable, displaying impressive sensitivity and empathy, and constantly trying to keep their humanity alive in a war where lines are constantly blurred and changed. Perhaps the most tragic of the human group is a young orphaned boy who was raised by abusive relatives and seeks escape in the fight and his friends. The alien of the group is smart but lost, allowing children who feel isolated and abandoned a familiar outlook through the eyes of someone far from home. Every reader can find themselves in one or all of the narrators or their struggles. As we progress, our group faces the challenges of war, loss (of both loved ones, innocence, and self), difficult and irreversible choices, and questions of identity. The fight scenes are described with accurate grief, exhilaration, fear and terror. The war itself unfolds over an astounding 54 books, allowing us as readers to go through the entire process slowly along with the main characters, so by the time the final moments arrive we have seen so clearly the journey they have undertaken and what it cost. There are moments of pure fun, laughter and soft wonder, moments of joy and even hilarity. And then there are devastating moments of pain and anger and shock. These books make us face the question of good versus evil, of "becoming the monster you fight," of what would you pay to win, and what is the cost of war worth... the books do not answer the questions. Not fully. They don't intend to, really. I think these books intended to make their readers think, about the complexities of life and the realities of battle. Considering their readers were young children, who likely did not ruminate much on either life or battle, these books certainly had a challenge, but I believe they rose to it magnificently, proven by the mere fact that I am writing this review fourteen years after picking up a battered copy of #3 (The Encounter) from my school library, having read all 54 (plus the extended-universe standalones) of these books over and over again, each time finding more joy, pain, questions, answers, and things to think about than I did before. Highly recommended for people of all ages and kids of all generations.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Natalie

    I remember reading this in my years of elementary school and I LOVED them. The plot was interesting, the characters were memorable, and the story was unpredictable that I had no idea how it was going to end or where this series was going. As long as the execution is done well, I love these types of books. The plot is pretty basic and good for a series for kids. Aliens are using human bodies to take over and it's up to human kids with the power of alien technology to stop them. What's not to love I remember reading this in my years of elementary school and I LOVED them. The plot was interesting, the characters were memorable, and the story was unpredictable that I had no idea how it was going to end or where this series was going. As long as the execution is done well, I love these types of books. The plot is pretty basic and good for a series for kids. Aliens are using human bodies to take over and it's up to human kids with the power of alien technology to stop them. What's not to love? It is a really easy read and not that difficult to follow. Like seriously, the reading level of these books is the same as the Goosebumps series. The characters are memorable and so likeable that I just absolutely adored them. What makes it even better is the fate of most of these characters are unpredictable and not expected. This I like. I really appreciate books that keep you interested and guessing about what's going to happen. (view spoiler)[For one thing, Jake and Cassie, who are clearly a couple don't even get together in the end because they grow too far apart from the war. A couple that was obvious from the get-go doesn't even get together in the end? That is really rare, especially in children's books. That was totally unexpected and fascinating at the same time. (hide spoiler)] I love turns like these, even as I kid I still was shocked but still loved it because it was not cliche. (view spoiler)[There was also Rachel's death, which was totally unexpected as well. I felt so sad that she died and I was definitely not expecting that, and the effect that it had on the characters was just so deep that you could feel their sorrow once she died. (hide spoiler)] There was also other drama that went on in this series that gives the series a little bit of an edge and kind of exposes children to adult-like themes. Especially the drama for the characters, for example you have Rachel's inner conflict between her bloodlust violence and her kind and caring side. There was also Jake's depression that he struggled with because of decisions he had to make during this war. Not to mention the struggle within Tobias between his human conscious and his mind as a predator. It was a lot to take in but it made their journey seem so much real and heartfelt because of all these struggles they go through. Now the characters. Jake - Jake is an incredibly likeable leader. He's not perfect, he makes mistakes and those mistakes have significant consequences that he learns from. His leadership during the war causes him to mature quickly and become a dependent leader. However, there are some flaws with this character, he gets depressed a lot. (view spoiler)[His depression causes him to give up his leadership position and lose trust in Cassie after she allows his older brother Tom to escape. The war affects him greatly and he changes from it. This is a good changeable character. He doesn't always improve or get better. I'd dare say that he almost changes for the worst when the war comes to an end. He's more ruthless and doesn't question himself in making decisions for the best of the team. (hide spoiler)] Cassie - Cassie was one of those characters that I tolerated the least. I'm not saying that I hate her at all, I just got a little impatient with her at times. She is likeable as well. She is the one that keeps the group together. She's kind, yet has doubts about the morals of the group. Although she is very against violence, she does a lot of planning and is very reliable even though she is a 'tree-hugger' or nature loving. Sometimes it got in the way but then you have to realize that she's the voice of reason for the group. Rachel - She is one of my favorite characters in the series. I like this character, she was involved with gymnastics, but also liked to go to the mall and shop. She's attractive, confident and bold. Not to mention very smart. (Kind of like Kim Possible except she morphs into animals and fights aliens) This shows that a female character can be feminine and still be a badass. Her character change is so awesome that I loved every minute of reading about her. (view spoiler)[When she gets involved with the war she becomes very violent and always eager to do battle. I really loved it when the author added Rachel's dark bloodthirsty nature to appear because of her obsession of the war and violence that followed. It was really interesting to see. Especially her inner struggle, she loved power yet became concerned with her change. (hide spoiler)] Tobias - He is your typical quiet loner kid in the group. He was a bully target and tired of his human life. When he gains the power to morph he stays as a hawk because he went over the 2 hour limit. The conflict between his humanity and the predator of the hawk was interesting to read and kind of a new thing in kid's books. He had to hunt and kill to survive yet he had difficulty in keeping his human conscience. (view spoiler)[I thought that the romance between him and Rachel was very genuine. It wasn't perfect but they tried as best as they could and I honestly liked their relationship much better than Jake and Cassie's. The part in the series where Tobias is actually Elfangor's biological son which explains why Elfangor's death had more of an impact on him. It wasn't important or relevant to the series but still a nice twist. (hide spoiler)] Marco - He is my favorite male character in this series. He is a bit of a sarcastic person that always throws jokes around. He has a sense of humor but he's also cautious, ruthless yet calculative and strategic. While Cassie is the 'voice of reason' for the group, Marco is more of a 'devil's advocate' for the group. He the guy that says stuff that no one will say out loud but are quietly thinking.. (view spoiler)[His involvement with his father being depressed with his mother's "death", who is actually Visser One, is pretty genuine as well. He's hesitant to join the Animorphs because of his concern for his father and I think that his character is very well done. (hide spoiler)] Aximili-Esgarrouth-Isthill (more commonly known as Ax) - He is a very interesting character when it comes to alien characters. His curiosity and enthusiasm in Earth's culture was fun to read and I loved his sense of humor that the Animorphs didn't find funny. What I really liked about this character was the fact that the book series wasn't shy about showing his arrogance. He sees his own species as superior and doesn't hide his distaste for other alien creatures (especially his archenemies, the Yeerks). He's very intelligent and has the information of alien customs and technology to help the rest of the Animorphs fight against the Yeerks. The other aliens - I think that the alien designs in this series was brilliant. Each species was unique and had interesting characteristics (and cool names). The Yeerks, the Taxxons, the Hork-Bajir, and the Andalites. They were so interesting and so well developed that I loved the series the whole way through. The only downside is that these books are easy read. I remember reading at least five books per day minimum. But considering that this is an incredibly easy read, this is just a nitpick for me. It's still fun and a great sci-fi adventure. Now I plan to reread the series and review each book individually.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Katie (kt-recs)

    Listen. LISTEN. These books are incredible. I'm not saying they don't have their flaws - formulaic writing style, and a storyline involving the "New Animorphs" that actually threatened to ruin my enjoyment of the books it was so ableist, but honestly?? There are 54 books in the main storyline, not including the periphery books, and as a child I wanted to read every single one of them. Money and incomplete library collections made this impossible, but the good kind of children's lit, the lasting Listen. LISTEN. These books are incredible. I'm not saying they don't have their flaws - formulaic writing style, and a storyline involving the "New Animorphs" that actually threatened to ruin my enjoyment of the books it was so ableist, but honestly?? There are 54 books in the main storyline, not including the periphery books, and as a child I wanted to read every single one of them. Money and incomplete library collections made this impossible, but the good kind of children's lit, the lasting kind, is the kind that inflames the imagination of its readers, and this series's combination of high paced, high tension sci-fi and immersive, wonder-filled animal transformations certainly hooked me. Creative, immersive, and fascinating was the world that Applegate drew around us when she wrote these books. But that's not truly why these books shine. They shine because of the true complexity of the storyline and the issues Applegate tackles. Because of its tacky covers, simplistic writing and target audience, I think people have a tendency to assume that Animorphs is mostly fluff, a light-hearted, series about turning into cool animals. Yet, this series proves that kids and young adults are capable of understanding and facing heavy, moral dilemmas, both in its characters, such as the war general, 13-yeae-old Jake Berenson, and in its readership. Animorphs gives us complex, thoughtful, often conflicting, always personal to her characters, views on war, and all that encompasses - from PTSD, to war crimes, to sacrifice, love, depression, fear, autonomy - these books are anything but simple. I loved these books as a child because they refused to pander to me, handling these issues with truth and clarity. I love them as an adult because of the intricate and honest way they piece together, and also because of the aliens. Could not more highly recommend.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Chris Booth

    When I was kid, Animorphs was one of the best series of books I'd ever read. There was just something about kids turning into animals and kicking alien butt that appealed to a young child. But after reading them as an adult (and reading every single book in order), my perceptions have changed. I don't know if it was nostalgia or forgetfulness, but these books are way way darker than I remember.  Before I reread Animorphs, I remembered the majority of the plot lines of the books, but for some reaso When I was kid, Animorphs was one of the best series of books I'd ever read. There was just something about kids turning into animals and kicking alien butt that appealed to a young child. But after reading them as an adult (and reading every single book in order), my perceptions have changed. I don't know if it was nostalgia or forgetfulness, but these books are way way darker than I remember.  Before I reread Animorphs, I remembered the majority of the plot lines of the books, but for some reason, I didn't recall the intense messages (such as the hardships and futility of war, the effects of PTSD, and the ethics of the trolley problem), nor had I remembered just how gruesome and gory the stories could get. However, despite these aspects coming through strongly as an adult, I still absolutely love the series - if not more so. The action scenes are still perfect to enjoy for the fun of it, while the intense messages and ethical conundrums really challenge the mind. Even the character development and the story progression of the series is something that is rare in many book series for kids. The deep morals and messages of the series might be difficult to swallow at times, but by the end it’s easy to see what K.A. Applegate was trying to say: “War is hell”. Overall, I enjoyed the majority of The Animorphs books and if I had to rank all 54 books and 10 companion books - I would have to say that the Chronicle books are the best (with The Ellimist Chronicles being top of the pops) and the second-to-last book being the most disappointing (the last book is not as much of a let down as everyone claims). So, whether you’re an adolescent or an adult, try picking up an Animorphs book and enjoy the perfect blend of sci-fi action and ethical conundrums.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Moxie

    Animorphs is a good series and you should read it. In all seriousness, it delves into a lot of really intense topics for a kid's series. Over the course of the series, it discusses PTSD and trauma, the morality of war, what it means to be human, and a lot of other things I'm probably forgetting. The characters go through development that's well paced, so much so that them at the beginning of the series is practically unrecognizable to them at the end. The story and plot are intense. The alien spe Animorphs is a good series and you should read it. In all seriousness, it delves into a lot of really intense topics for a kid's series. Over the course of the series, it discusses PTSD and trauma, the morality of war, what it means to be human, and a lot of other things I'm probably forgetting. The characters go through development that's well paced, so much so that them at the beginning of the series is practically unrecognizable to them at the end. The story and plot are intense. The alien species are all super interesting - both the Yeerks and the Andalites have biologies and worldbuilding that make them fun to read about. Applegate even put time into developing the God figure, The Ellmist, with a backstory book that is utterly buckwild in the best of ways. This series, overall, is completely and utterly buckwild. It's ridiculous, and I love it, so much. While they're written in a very seventh-grade-book style (seriously, how many times can you say "BOOM!" in the books), they're still worth reading if you skipped over them in grade school. (SPOILERS) That being said, it's 54 books long, and not all of them are really worth your time. Special shout out goes to 46 (it's 80 pages that's mostly just one line), 14 (ah yes, the book about an Andalite toilet), 17 (or, The One About The Asylum!), and 36 (interesting premise that never comes up ever again). Some of the books are just straight-up lazy or portray the characters in very, very strange ways. Also, fair warning, it is VERY 90s. 16 is practically devoted to explaining the Internet in a way that's so over the top 90s it should be illegal. Also, it has a lot of graphic descriptions of gore, violence, etc, so if that's upsetting to you, I would not recommend it.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Tori

    This review may be blurred by nostalgia, but, to be honest, I don't care. This series was awesome. It was my first introduction to science fiction and I don't think I could have asked for a better one. Each of the characters had a traits that made them heroes, in one way or another; but they were not perfect. And the series made sure that we knew that they had their shortcomings. Making these characters realistic made them that much easier to identify with, even with the crazy plot. Even though This review may be blurred by nostalgia, but, to be honest, I don't care. This series was awesome. It was my first introduction to science fiction and I don't think I could have asked for a better one. Each of the characters had a traits that made them heroes, in one way or another; but they were not perfect. And the series made sure that we knew that they had their shortcomings. Making these characters realistic made them that much easier to identify with, even with the crazy plot. Even though the plot was fantastical, it introduced young readers to scruples and philosophical questions that they may have otherwise not been exposed to. These books are what inspired my love of reading. When I was in elementary and middle school, my family would sit and read these books out loud instead of watching television. I would inevitably want to know more of the story, but to read ahead without the rest of my family was very much frowned upon. So, I would check out books from the library as a place holder. Even after we completed the series, I sought characters similar to the heroes on the Animorph team. This series whet my appetite and, since then, my hunger for tales has never been sated.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Alexis

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I'm not even ashamed. I was obsessed with these in elementary school. I still pull one down every once and a while. And yes, okay, the reading level is obviously meant for kids, plus the technology is a little dated since these were written in the '90s, but the content starts dark and just gets darker through the series. I read these as an adult and I can't believe how adult these are. There are flashing claws and throats getting ripped out and people getting mauled and kids wrestling with decisi I'm not even ashamed. I was obsessed with these in elementary school. I still pull one down every once and a while. And yes, okay, the reading level is obviously meant for kids, plus the technology is a little dated since these were written in the '90s, but the content starts dark and just gets darker through the series. I read these as an adult and I can't believe how adult these are. There are flashing claws and throats getting ripped out and people getting mauled and kids wrestling with decisions like, "do I kill my family member to save the rest of the world?" or "what's the moral argument for sabotage, biological weapons or assassination in the middle of a guerrilla war?" As for the ending, I hated what Applegate did to the characters as a kid, but appreciate it as an adult. She doesn't shy away from the PTSD post-conflict messiness.

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