web site hit counter Building the New American Economy: Smart, Fair, and Sustainable - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Building the New American Economy: Smart, Fair, and Sustainable

Availability: Ready to download

In this passionate and powerful book--part manifesto, part plan of action--the renowned economist Jeffrey D. Sachs offers a practical strategy to move America, seemingly more divided than ever, toward a new consensus: sustainable development. Sustainable development is a holistic approach that emphasizes economic, social, and environmental objectives in shaping policy. In In this passionate and powerful book--part manifesto, part plan of action--the renowned economist Jeffrey D. Sachs offers a practical strategy to move America, seemingly more divided than ever, toward a new consensus: sustainable development. Sustainable development is a holistic approach that emphasizes economic, social, and environmental objectives in shaping policy. In focusing too much on economic growth, the United States has neglected rising economic inequality and dire environmental threats. Now, even growth is imperiled. Sachs explores issues that have captivated the nation and political debate, including infrastructure, trade deals, energy policy, the proper size and role of government, the national debt, and income inequality. Not only does he provide illuminating and accessible explanations of the forces at work in each case, but he also presents specific policy solutions. His argument rises above the pessimism born of political paralysis, economic stagnation, and partisanship to devise a brighter way forward, achievable both individually and collectively. In Building the New American Economy, Sachs shows how the United States can find a path to renewed economic progress that is fair and environmentally sustainable.


Compare

In this passionate and powerful book--part manifesto, part plan of action--the renowned economist Jeffrey D. Sachs offers a practical strategy to move America, seemingly more divided than ever, toward a new consensus: sustainable development. Sustainable development is a holistic approach that emphasizes economic, social, and environmental objectives in shaping policy. In In this passionate and powerful book--part manifesto, part plan of action--the renowned economist Jeffrey D. Sachs offers a practical strategy to move America, seemingly more divided than ever, toward a new consensus: sustainable development. Sustainable development is a holistic approach that emphasizes economic, social, and environmental objectives in shaping policy. In focusing too much on economic growth, the United States has neglected rising economic inequality and dire environmental threats. Now, even growth is imperiled. Sachs explores issues that have captivated the nation and political debate, including infrastructure, trade deals, energy policy, the proper size and role of government, the national debt, and income inequality. Not only does he provide illuminating and accessible explanations of the forces at work in each case, but he also presents specific policy solutions. His argument rises above the pessimism born of political paralysis, economic stagnation, and partisanship to devise a brighter way forward, achievable both individually and collectively. In Building the New American Economy, Sachs shows how the United States can find a path to renewed economic progress that is fair and environmentally sustainable.

30 review for Building the New American Economy: Smart, Fair, and Sustainable

  1. 5 out of 5

    Trish

    Jeffrey Sachs’ new book, which runs about 150 pages, has a Foreword by Bernie Sanders. Sachs directly addresses the new Trump administration, and makes suggestions about our nation’s priorities. Sachs wrote it fast, since the election, and it shows. He'd supported Bernie, but Sanders was not particularly explicit when it came to running the government. These are Sachs' ideas, but knowing he supports Sanders is helpful to our understanding of Sanders' positions as well. Sachs allows that we might Jeffrey Sachs’ new book, which runs about 150 pages, has a Foreword by Bernie Sanders. Sachs directly addresses the new Trump administration, and makes suggestions about our nation’s priorities. Sachs wrote it fast, since the election, and it shows. He'd supported Bernie, but Sanders was not particularly explicit when it came to running the government. These are Sachs' ideas, but knowing he supports Sanders is helpful to our understanding of Sanders' positions as well. Sachs allows that we might be able to comprehend priority spending of the government, so shares some national budget particulars: “Federal taxes account for about 18 percent of GDP, mostly income and payroll taxes…Together with state and local taxes, the total tax collection of all levels of government amounts to around 32 percent of GDP.” On the spending side, first is military spending at 5% of GDP. Next is what Sachs calls “mandatory spending” but what Republicans call “entitlements:” Medicare, Medicaid, Social Security, income support programs, etc. This is a rising share of GDP, at 12.6%. The third category of spending is interest payments of government debt, which will rise when interest rates increase. Public debt to national income is about 75%, and average interest charges on that debt are at about 1.5% of GDP per annum. Finally, we have non security discretionary spending, or our investment in the future, which in the scenario Sachs talks about here, doesn’t even make it to the drawing board unless we take on further debt. The reason Sachs gives us is that income taxes, etc are only 18% of GDP while military, mandatory spending, and interest payments alone are 19%. He is a smart guy, and he may be right, but if you are asking us to decide on which categories or programs to cut, I will need to see the whole budget, many thanks. [Unfortunately the graphs and charts are not reproduced in the ebook of this pre-publication galley.] Anyway, Sachs suggests we cut military spending and increase discretionary spending commensurately, leaving the other categories to be adjusted in smaller ways. In theory, I don’t have a problem with this. I have lately weighed good and bad in American foreign policy in the past fifty years, and see lots of room for a reduced role, though one has to acknowledge the vacuum of leadership is going to be filled, perhaps by a country we don’t admire much, or at all. When we abdicate as a superpower, we also jettison some of the trust and reliance of our allies, as some of their positions and spending were predicated on our own. It is a much more fragmented and divided world, a world that may not be so amenable to policies the U.S. supports. And Sachs’ proposals for the future are all about global cooperation. He suggests that we use our military spending instead on global development projects, which will keep some portion of goodwill headed our way. Sachs also recommends a value-added tax like they have in Scandinavia which would raise another 3-4% of income. The huge discrepancies in income from top to bottom of the U.S. income ladder will still be there, they just won’t be as great, and more in line with the world’s other great democracies. Sachs is even willing to consider restructuring corporate taxes, like Trump has already proposed, but only “if combined with an end to corporate loopholes and foreign tax deferral provisions.” Definitely one of the main income disparities is who even pays taxes in the U.S. Sachs looks not very far into the future and see some major changes in our economy: an end to internal combustion mobility and the beginning of a low-carbon lifestyle, regardless of government leadership. It would help if government was in front, using their think tanks and scientific offices to help direct some of the changes, but what we really have to guard against is allowing entrenched corporate interests to hijack our future and investment money. We can decide these things without government, though. Trump has stated he wants states to make their own decisions on many things we have in the past asked the federal government to do. States with wealth, educated workforces, and well-funded universities (like Massachusetts, California, and New York) may make out very well, drawing more similarly-minded folks to them, and exacerbating the cross-talk divisiveness among the states. They’d have to capture taxes from individuals who wish to work, but not live in their states. But my feeling is, if we can’t work together within our own country, how can we expect to work across national boundaries on important issues like climate change, exploration, and energy supplies? When Sachs discusses the changes in the workplace, I find my credibility meter reading low. I agree that even educated workers will be replaced in the modern economy as computers and machines get more capable. But Sachs is suggesting that older, experienced workers pay some part of their wages to younger people who cannot find jobs. Hello! We’re already doing that! It’s called taxes, and it is a stupid idea. Older workers, whether they want to believe it or not, are going to die, and if they haven’t mentored young people to get experience and be able to take on the stress of creativity everyday, they may be surprised when the whole show goes tits up. [This was Hillary Clinton’s problem. She thought she needed to do everything herself.] We cannot continue to have older workers stay in the workplace as long as they want—and continue to decline—keeping younger folk from earning and gaining experience, let alone spur creativity. May I suggest this is a real problem? People who have been working for forty or fifty years cannot keep up, no matter what they believe about themselves. And it is not good for the country. Sachs has one idea towards the end that is kind of interesting: that Wall Street be tasked with earning and churning the financial investment monies for our infrastructure retooling. I actually really like that idea, and think the incentives could be restructured to focus on this. Once the wonky windfall profits not only on Wall Street, but everywhere in corporate America, are tempered with reasonable tax policy and closing of tax havens and loopholes, people might remember they must play well with others. We don’t have long, however: we should already be well into flood abatement. There are lots of other things lightly touched on in this book, including a discussion of why “free trade” is not free for everyone. Sachs has a blog where he makes notes and posts articles and media accounts that he find interesting or thinks we need to discuss. In the summer of 2016, his important and informative discussion about the election, globalization, immigration, and Brexit was subsequently picked up by NPR and discussed on radio. He pointed to what is now called “populist” anger and explains the real substantive issues behind this. Jeffrey Sachs is professor of economics and sustainable development at Columbia University, and former director of the Earth Institute, special advisor to UN Secretary General Ban Kin-moon. He is the author of The End of Poverty.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Alexander

    This was an uneven mixed bag. Definitely much better thought of as an anthology of essays than as a coherent book. More on that in a bit, and I'll temper all of the below with A) the caveat that I actually agree with 80-90% of this book and B) the recognition that Jeffrey Sachs is much, much smarter than I am. I'll start with the good. There are a lot of ideas in here -- I'll probably return to this later as I continue work. The chapter on trade is very good, and one of the more coherent, thought This was an uneven mixed bag. Definitely much better thought of as an anthology of essays than as a coherent book. More on that in a bit, and I'll temper all of the below with A) the caveat that I actually agree with 80-90% of this book and B) the recognition that Jeffrey Sachs is much, much smarter than I am. I'll start with the good. There are a lot of ideas in here -- I'll probably return to this later as I continue work. The chapter on trade is very good, and one of the more coherent, thoughtful short critiques of modern American trade policy I've read recently-- his view is not isolationist, but instead a recognition that the problem is not so much trade deals that have gone awry, but our complete political failure to compensate the people who lose out from these changes in the rules and our unwillingness to divvy up the larger pie. The chapter on automation, while a bit weaker, is also solid. The bad and the ugly: this is poorly organized, and the fact that chapters are drawn from op-eds shows in a grating, obnoxious way. There's a thread across chapters of building a smart, fair, and sustainable economy, but why on earth would you talk so much throughout about the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) then bury the chapter about what the SDGs are at the end? Other chapters don't flow in a natural way -- infrastructure gets a big chapter near the front, but then comes back throughout in ways that seem to assume the reader hasn't read that chapter. And since these were op-eds, there are a lot of "rule of three"-type sections Structure aside, the bigger challenge is a book that at times struggles to decide what it wants to be. In some places, it's a polemic, waxing at length about the trend toward plutocracy in the United States and the need for a better, more-inclusive politics. In others, it's a wonky policy manifesto, with targets for the obesity rate down to the percentage point and clear policy prescriptions to improve our infrastructure and fight inequality. Sachs doesn't transition between the two modes very effectively, and in my view, this book is at its best when it talks about solutions. One last set of gripes: the book seems to ignore politics -- too often Sachs slips into a "pox on both houses" critique of modern policymaking that draws no difference between Republicans and Democrats, particularly with respect to the Obama and Clinton administrations. I'll be charitable and call this naive; someone more critical than I would call this intentionally misleading. The barrier to getting strongly progressive policies enacted, in Sachs's view, always seems to be moneyed interests that have captured both parties -- it's very rare that Republicans specifically come up for blame (even though Obama proposed a number of the policies Sachs now calls for). I could go on, but I'll leave it there. (Actually, one last gripe -- while I am a firm believer Europe and Canada show you can do policymaking much, much better than we do, Sachs totally ignores the challenges unique American heterogeneity presents for redistributionist policy, and like Sanders, whose campaign Sachs advised, race often seems an afterthought). Anyway, worth a read -- it's short, and there's fodder for other work and thinking that builds on this -- but it's pretty aggravating at many points, too.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Matt Mihm

    I read this book last summer, but I decided to re-read it because it's a bit dry and wonkish but also very important to understand the best way forward, economically speaking. Sachs is not a fan of the "tranquilizing drug of gradualism" when it comes to reforms, and he uses clear statistics to illustrate the magnitude of our current economic morass. The solution is a bold combination of doing what countries with better outcomes do (only on a larger scale) and a moonshot marshalling of resources. I read this book last summer, but I decided to re-read it because it's a bit dry and wonkish but also very important to understand the best way forward, economically speaking. Sachs is not a fan of the "tranquilizing drug of gradualism" when it comes to reforms, and he uses clear statistics to illustrate the magnitude of our current economic morass. The solution is a bold combination of doing what countries with better outcomes do (only on a larger scale) and a moonshot marshalling of resources.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Abi Olvera

    Very short read, but I am very glad that Sachs wrote this. Very short and efficient, written sort of a guiding handbook for a would-be politician or perhaps someone contributing to policy formulation. How does what the US is doing compare to its prime days of tech advancement? He talks realistically about the state of our infrastructure and how the US has steered away from the bread and butter that made us great - education, technology, infrastructure, etc. Now, we have a distorted medical and p Very short read, but I am very glad that Sachs wrote this. Very short and efficient, written sort of a guiding handbook for a would-be politician or perhaps someone contributing to policy formulation. How does what the US is doing compare to its prime days of tech advancement? He talks realistically about the state of our infrastructure and how the US has steered away from the bread and butter that made us great - education, technology, infrastructure, etc. Now, we have a distorted medical and pharmaceutical market, where Medicare is not allowed to negotiate because of law that the pharmaceutical industry wrote into a massive congressional bill which became law. The US has tax revenue of 18% of GDP but spends 19% of GDP - this is not sustainable. This is a wide angle view of the US economy and direction at a time when perhaps we need a reminder of what is actually going on.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Michaeline Barnhart

    I read some of the reviews of this book on this site. Lots of cynicism as if stuck in ruts and this book didn't help lift them out. I empathize. At the same time, I find Jeffrey D. Sachs refreshingly straightforward with a solid understanding of the big picture made surmountable. If just some portion of his recommendations were adopted this nation, this planet would be so much better off at some point in the future. I've lived long enough, as has Sachs, to know what he says is doable. And even w I read some of the reviews of this book on this site. Lots of cynicism as if stuck in ruts and this book didn't help lift them out. I empathize. At the same time, I find Jeffrey D. Sachs refreshingly straightforward with a solid understanding of the big picture made surmountable. If just some portion of his recommendations were adopted this nation, this planet would be so much better off at some point in the future. I've lived long enough, as has Sachs, to know what he says is doable. And even way up here in Northern Michigan I have spoken to thought leaders joining together locally to move the needle. Under the radar, things are stirring. A favorite line from this book, for me, was about connecting each Congressperson with a worthy science department in their own district to learn about the climate. If people in enough U.S. Congressional Districts did this, then united in holding their Members accountable it could produce change in national direction. More of us need to become fuller-time citizens and walk the talk of people like Sachs.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Rodrigues

    "By defining our goal more clearly, by making it seem more manageable and less remote, we can help all people to see it, to draw hope from it, and to move irresistibly toward it." - JFK A timely and optimistic look at real, tenable solutions to what ails American political economy. Professor Sachs manages to discuss often-stressful or frightening topics without succumbing to fearmongering, and instead offers practical solutions that have already been successfully undertaken by other major economi "By defining our goal more clearly, by making it seem more manageable and less remote, we can help all people to see it, to draw hope from it, and to move irresistibly toward it." - JFK A timely and optimistic look at real, tenable solutions to what ails American political economy. Professor Sachs manages to discuss often-stressful or frightening topics without succumbing to fearmongering, and instead offers practical solutions that have already been successfully undertaken by other major economies. Covering trade, the federal budget, inequality, job automation, foreign policy, and energy policy, (I'm sure I'm missing something), this is a dense little book. (My ARC was 154 pages.) The author doesn't waste any time with excessive text. He gets to the point, and it's very readable and accessible to readers who may not feel very well read on these topics. Overall, I highly recommend this book. It's meaty enough to satisfy policy wonks, without overwhelming casual readers. I received this book via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Claude Forthomme

    Great book - a rallying cry, a call to action. In this Trumpian era, this is a must read. I was particularly fascinated with the way this book hits on the three major issues of our times: IT (or technological progress), Fair (or the fight against inequality) and Sustainable (or defending our planet from pollution and climate change so that our children and grandchildren can enjoy it as we - still, if not for long - do) It is also a very easy read, nice and short, not your usual academic brick. Do Great book - a rallying cry, a call to action. In this Trumpian era, this is a must read. I was particularly fascinated with the way this book hits on the three major issues of our times: IT (or technological progress), Fair (or the fight against inequality) and Sustainable (or defending our planet from pollution and climate change so that our children and grandchildren can enjoy it as we - still, if not for long - do) It is also a very easy read, nice and short, not your usual academic brick. Don't miss out on it. And I think that if you're American (I'm not) this should act as a wake-up call. You really can't let Trump destroy America's leadership of the world and this book tells you quite clearly how to stop him.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Wendelle

    A good brief for policy makers (and voters). None of Sach's observations or prescriptions are extremely novel or ahead of the curve, but it's attention-grabbing to have a well-known economist lend these ideas with his authority. For instance, it is surprising to hear a leading economist say, as Sachs does, that 'corporations are not people' and 'CEOs should be held accountable-- to the point of corporate indictment' for malfeasance and 'the ethos of the shareholder profit should be abandoned' fo A good brief for policy makers (and voters). None of Sach's observations or prescriptions are extremely novel or ahead of the curve, but it's attention-grabbing to have a well-known economist lend these ideas with his authority. For instance, it is surprising to hear a leading economist say, as Sachs does, that 'corporations are not people' and 'CEOs should be held accountable-- to the point of corporate indictment' for malfeasance and 'the ethos of the shareholder profit should be abandoned' for the stakeholder approach that is obligated to include public welfare and environmental outcomes in corporate accounting. Some of Sachs' points/ propositions: -President Obama's 'Yes we can' philosophy was always a fable, and never deliverable, because his actual budget proposals did not reflect his promises - Americans should act on two political philosophies that have long been antithetical to their political mindset: long-term planning that stretches beyond one administration to become decades-long policy, and bigger government -Wall Street should course-correct to investing and administering sustainability projects rather than high-speed trades they are currently doing - politics is what determines how shares between corporations and workers-- capital and labor-- are halved, but both the Republicans (Reagan's small government) and the Democrats (Clinton's 'War on Welfare') have thrown their weight behind big business and accelerated the stark inequality in social outcomes in the US - Americans should develop infrastructure and transport, and President Obama did not invest in long-term infrastructure and he develop 'no long-lasting results' in infrastructure despite workshopping the term 'high-speed rail' in his talking points - Americans should abandon new oil and fossil fuel projects because even just practically speaking, these don't have financial future -Americans should accept higher taxes, especially the wealthy, since taxation is simply not generating enough revenue to service the debt burden, and to fund outlays like health care and education - end absurd tax giveaways that allow corporations to exploit tax havens, and raise national sales tax - looming inequality have destroyed the social fabric and social trust, and has inhibited happiness even among high earners - technological change is going to break social cohesion even further unless politics intervenes to redistribute disposable income - the future tech revolution will shift income away from all workers (both high and low-tech) and to capital owners, and from the young to the old - there will be higher returns to capital, which will be advantageous to older and thus richer Americans regardless of their individual ability, while the younger workers who have to rely on their labor without any money to invest will be unable to find decent jobs (automated) or to have enough savings to invest - successive generations will be trapped in the downward spiral of savings decline unless older, richer generations cooperate in income transfers - a condemnation of regime change wars -ceilings on prescription costs and other medical care changes - there is a 'collapse of civic trust' in American society

  9. 4 out of 5

    Oliver Minshall

    This book gave me very mixes feelings. I enjoyed some of the concrete policy proposals but they all seemed half-baked, unoriginal or undeveloped. This felt like a long serious book consisting of position papers and justifications for main points was condensed into 100 pages of generalizations and shibboleths. For example, it mentioned an innovative clean power project that would involve the US and Canada but never really explained how that would be built or listed any specifics ( I may have miss This book gave me very mixes feelings. I enjoyed some of the concrete policy proposals but they all seemed half-baked, unoriginal or undeveloped. This felt like a long serious book consisting of position papers and justifications for main points was condensed into 100 pages of generalizations and shibboleths. For example, it mentioned an innovative clean power project that would involve the US and Canada but never really explained how that would be built or listed any specifics ( I may have missed them). There was some attempt to interpolate graphs and statistic but if you were expecting anything more than pop-economics , then you will be disappointed. I actually agree with much of what Sachs says in the book but his ideas aren't developed to the extent that I would like. This did give the book the upside of prompting further reading. This entire book has the feeling of being cropped and heavily edited for general audiences. This is primarily a manifesto, not a polemic. While perfunctory concern is given to substantiating the author's claims , many questions remain unanswered. The lack of supporting evidence makes Sachs seem overly self assured and even arrogant at times. Often, he declares a problem to be a grave threat and then charges head-long into a solution completely failing to consider common counter arguments or alternative solutions. He also takes pot shots at various other economists at certain points like an aberrant swing at Paul Krugman for being a deficit dove and his abrupt dismissal of secular stagnation. It also bears being mentioned that this book is very much akin to other books by different others . Robert Reich and Bernie Sanders both cover this material more elegantly and skillfully in their respective books. I think most people could probably skip this one if they have read Reich or Sanders.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Bryant Jefferson

    Sachs is a rather progressive economist, and that is clear just from the foreword from Bernie Sanders. The book is very precise in its policy recommendations, and reads more like a platform released by a Presidential candidate. The structure is more in the form of separate essays, with little connective tissue between topics. The book is also short, with the issues explored on a surface level more than what is perhaps desired. The book emphasizes raising taxes on the super rich, cutting the milit Sachs is a rather progressive economist, and that is clear just from the foreword from Bernie Sanders. The book is very precise in its policy recommendations, and reads more like a platform released by a Presidential candidate. The structure is more in the form of separate essays, with little connective tissue between topics. The book is also short, with the issues explored on a surface level more than what is perhaps desired. The book emphasizes raising taxes on the super rich, cutting the military budget, and free higher education. Senator Sanders wasn't too specific about how he would pay for his bold proposals, and Sachs does enough to support his policy recommendations. Most of the revenue would come from the top down, and these questions must be answered if we are to accept the proposals brought forward, considering our debt growth can strangle future growth. The book does just enough to show that we can address our debt and invest in projects such as a smart grid, new infrastructure, and addressing health care. I appreciate the books willingness to embrace bold solutions, as we need those solutions more than ever. In addition to our issues in health care, education, and climate change, we have the debt crisis. Addressing this is vitally important, and we cannot solve societal problems without solving the debt problem with it. Doing so can be accomplished via a restructuring of the tax code, such as a carbon tax, and land-value tax, a financial transaction tax, and possibly a prosperity dividend. Overall, there are a lot of good ideas presented by Sachs in this book. The structure is a bit fractured, which hurts the delivery, but the propositions are worth exploring.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Tara

    Finally got around to finishing this book. It's actually a quick read but noticed I forget most of the "stats /data" by a week later. Interesting things I got from this book: 1. Trade agreements - The proposal here by Sachs, who advised Bernie Sanders is against TTIP (Europe trade agreement) and the TPP (Asia version) in their current form. He proposed to remove a certain international provision (ISDS), although reading it makes me think ... well, Trump and the conservatives are against these agre Finally got around to finishing this book. It's actually a quick read but noticed I forget most of the "stats /data" by a week later. Interesting things I got from this book: 1. Trade agreements - The proposal here by Sachs, who advised Bernie Sanders is against TTIP (Europe trade agreement) and the TPP (Asia version) in their current form. He proposed to remove a certain international provision (ISDS), although reading it makes me think ... well, Trump and the conservatives are against these agreements in current form as well. 2. Increase in infrastructure spending - Of course, devil's are in the details but again, similar platform as Trump's campaign. Aside from these points, lots of divergence from today's reality and I feel that reading this book feels like reading an orbituary of a child, born with so much potential for life, but passed. His proposal for a tax transfer from the wealthy to the poor, healthcare for all are a few examples. There are much more grounds covered, most of them based on the UN Sustainable Development Goals, where he provided overview of the goals. He also proposed a few ideas of how they could be achieved, or applied to the US, and harkening back to JFK's goals setting for the US. There's much nostalgia for a better government / leadership, but one won't find exactly "how" we can achieve the goals. (The book is thin and I can see it's hard for the "how" to exist if the goals are lofty and our current government veered complete opposite).

  12. 4 out of 5

    Shaun Mosley

    TL;DR - It's an informative read, but mainly confirmation bias for Climate change believers. Not sure it will convince nonbelievers to change their minds. I absolutely love Sach's SDGs (Sustainable Development Goals) and the impact they would have around the world. Unfortunately, the book falls short on delivering good reason to convert nonbelievers (ie, the Trump administration) to adhere to the SDGs. It was right up my alley with tons of things I wanted to hear, but it didn't challenge much of t TL;DR - It's an informative read, but mainly confirmation bias for Climate change believers. Not sure it will convince nonbelievers to change their minds. I absolutely love Sach's SDGs (Sustainable Development Goals) and the impact they would have around the world. Unfortunately, the book falls short on delivering good reason to convert nonbelievers (ie, the Trump administration) to adhere to the SDGs. It was right up my alley with tons of things I wanted to hear, but it didn't challenge much of the beliefs of the opposition. Example, for years, scientists have warned us of global warming. And for years, some groups ignore the warnings and scientific advice. So saying "we have to listen to the science community" when they've voluntarily ignored is not a strong response. My thoughts - why not present the immediate pros and cons of green energy vs fossil fuels - such as new jobs and energy independence? What about reframing global warming as a pollution issue?

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lena Denman

    Some of Sachs writing is dated as he mused about what the Trump Administration might do in its first one hundred days in office. Despite this minor annoyance, the work is excellent. Sachs focuses on the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals and points out that one reason why states such as Israel and Japan are so innovative is because their governments invest in Research & Development far more than the US Government does. Our priorities as a country are reflected through our national budget. Sachs Some of Sachs writing is dated as he mused about what the Trump Administration might do in its first one hundred days in office. Despite this minor annoyance, the work is excellent. Sachs focuses on the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals and points out that one reason why states such as Israel and Japan are so innovative is because their governments invest in Research & Development far more than the US Government does. Our priorities as a country are reflected through our national budget. Sachs argues greatly that the US Government should spend far more on humanitarian aide and less on the US military. 900 billion dollars for the US military, our intelligence agencies and Veterans Affairs is a good chunk of our annual budget. Humanitarian aid has an excellent return on investment diplomatically that the US would do well to increase.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Tunde

    Good coverage on income equality and that the minimum wage has actually decline 35% since its adjusted high of $11+ in the ‘60’s. Retain people not jobs Dysfunctional healthcare Pollution lack of sustainable energy and an energy plan DOD 4,154 facilities 114 are in us colonies and 587 in 42 countries. $900 billion a year. 5% of national income and 25% of the federal Govt outlay. Brown University cost of Iraq and Afghanistan war by 2016 was $4.7 trillion. More than the 15 yearnoutlay of Depts of Educa Good coverage on income equality and that the minimum wage has actually decline 35% since its adjusted high of $11+ in the ‘60’s. Retain people not jobs Dysfunctional healthcare Pollution lack of sustainable energy and an energy plan DOD 4,154 facilities 114 are in us colonies and 587 in 42 countries. $900 billion a year. 5% of national income and 25% of the federal Govt outlay. Brown University cost of Iraq and Afghanistan war by 2016 was $4.7 trillion. More than the 15 yearnoutlay of Depts of Education, Energy, labor, interior, transportation NSF, NIH and EPA COMBINED from 2000-2015! No investment for innovation Need for political system reform. Corporations with free speech and citizen rights.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    Sachs's proposals are pretty mainstream fare of technocratic social democracy, and what's striking (and depressing) is how radical that ends up seeming in the US context given the lack of long-term planning and investment and a retrenchment of the non-militarized public sector. I don't care about the debt as much as he does (I'm sympathetic to MMT arguments here--although his proposals to address it are fine), and I'm far more skeptical of nuclear power and CCS than he is, but the US would be a Sachs's proposals are pretty mainstream fare of technocratic social democracy, and what's striking (and depressing) is how radical that ends up seeming in the US context given the lack of long-term planning and investment and a retrenchment of the non-militarized public sector. I don't care about the debt as much as he does (I'm sympathetic to MMT arguments here--although his proposals to address it are fine), and I'm far more skeptical of nuclear power and CCS than he is, but the US would be a far better country if our elected officials listened to the proposals in the books, which seem to align US policy with the Sustainable Development Goals. Too bad that the ones in the White House couldn't care less.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    I don't think Sachs breaks much new ground here but what he does accomplish is sharing common ideas on how to approach the new economy in a compact book. I think it's also great because he packs in some statistics a research to support his recommendations. The book runs the table from politics to economics, but as he emphasizes...in the US they are intimately bound together. I think this is a good read if you want a primer on concrete policy decisions that could move the US economy towards a mor I don't think Sachs breaks much new ground here but what he does accomplish is sharing common ideas on how to approach the new economy in a compact book. I think it's also great because he packs in some statistics a research to support his recommendations. The book runs the table from politics to economics, but as he emphasizes...in the US they are intimately bound together. I think this is a good read if you want a primer on concrete policy decisions that could move the US economy towards a more sustainable future.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Franklin J. Vergara M.

    Crude Realities and Hopeful Outlooks Even though the book was published in the days after 2016 election, but before President Trump took office, the calls to action contained in this book remain valid, and will remain so, until the American people reclaim their right to a better future. Reflecting over this realities should not depress you, but energize you to action. This work is very relevant indeed.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    The US economy right after the election of Trump. Professor Sachs sees wide ranging ways forward. Hard to envision Congress taking the steps necessary, but as China and Europe move forward perhaps the US will tag along behind. Sigh. Foreword by Bernie Sanders. I wonder if he really read the book. Sachs sees a major role for nuclear power in the next decades. And tax hikes on more than the top 1%.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kulwarn Parmar

    Essential short read I believe our politicians and large part of mass media don't seem to highlight how far behind we have fallen c o compared to other developed countries. While America has great resources to correct these inbalances, our politics and policies need to change to utilise these resources. Prof Sacks both lays out what a ills our nation and offers the remedies. Highly recommend to everyone concerned citizen. Essential short read I believe our politicians and large part of mass media don't seem to highlight how far behind we have fallen c o compared to other developed countries. While America has great resources to correct these inbalances, our politics and policies need to change to utilise these resources. Prof Sacks both lays out what a ills our nation and offers the remedies. Highly recommend to everyone concerned citizen.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sandeep Nair

    This book was written in the wake of the 2016 US Presidential elections, and discusses the reasons that led the US to rank relatively low on the sustainable development index, and how it can redeem itself through public policy and activism. The book is short, to the point, and accessible to any curious citizen without training in economics, math, or policy analysis. Sustainable development is defined by the author as economic growth, with social inclusion, and environmental protection. The themes This book was written in the wake of the 2016 US Presidential elections, and discusses the reasons that led the US to rank relatively low on the sustainable development index, and how it can redeem itself through public policy and activism. The book is short, to the point, and accessible to any curious citizen without training in economics, math, or policy analysis. Sustainable development is defined by the author as economic growth, with social inclusion, and environmental protection. The themes discussed are: budget allocation towards education, health, infrastructure, innovation, energy, and military; taxes and tax transfers; globalization, AI, and labor; campaign finance. While there are no new ideas or deliberation on any existing proposals, it makes for a good introductory read covering key points on sustainable development that every responsible citizen must know.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Nadin Brzezinski

    A must read If we are to become leaders once again, we first must face what ails us. However, this will not happen until we first face it. We are at the cusp of a new economic system. In broad strokes this book tells us some of the reasons why I admit that was not the goal. But sustainable development requires we rethink the way we conceive of the economy.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mexscrabbler

    A manifesto for Progessives, this book prescribes a series of actions that should be taken by government to achieve a Smart, Fair and Sustainable economy. This book is aspirational and optimistic; it could have been a blueprint for a 3rd Obama administration. Unfortunately much of this agenda is the opposite of what the Trump administration is pursuing.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Elise White

    My son is reading this book for his Pioneering Business for the Public Good class at Denver University so I decided to read it too! It's a short, succinct, brilliant and hopeful read by a Columbia University professor. He provides sources for all information presented. He lays out solutions and time-frames. For me, it was a hopeful challenge to America. My son is reading this book for his Pioneering Business for the Public Good class at Denver University so I decided to read it too! It's a short, succinct, brilliant and hopeful read by a Columbia University professor. He provides sources for all information presented. He lays out solutions and time-frames. For me, it was a hopeful challenge to America.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Diane Scholten

    Great book! Actionable, do-able, hopeful! I feel like Professor Sachs was even handed despite the fact that he clearly tilts left (as do I). He clearly outlines the problems, suggests an over-arching solution (The UN Sustainable Development Goals) and then lays out a framework. Imagine if we had leaders who would actually READ this and then implement it.....

  25. 4 out of 5

    Carmen Stormer

    The content of the book was pretty good. He focused on specific points and the effects on the economy. The book wasn't very exciting for me. I didn't feel as if I was enjoying this book the entire way through. Instead, I felt as if I was reading this book quickly to get through it to the other book that I am reading. I dropped the book about 2.3 of the way through it. The content of the book was pretty good. He focused on specific points and the effects on the economy. The book wasn't very exciting for me. I didn't feel as if I was enjoying this book the entire way through. Instead, I felt as if I was reading this book quickly to get through it to the other book that I am reading. I dropped the book about 2.3 of the way through it.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Dan Castrigano

    Good. Bernie-ish. Bernie wrote the foreword... More of an economics book than a sustainability book. Named four big players who need to be taken down in order to achieve sustainable development: Wall Street, Military-Industrial Complex (MIC), Big Pharma, and Big Oil. Sort of a Green New Deal manifesto. Short series of essays. Pretty good. Not what I expected, but pretty good.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Paul Kreiner

    Some fascinating insights and analysis, but the sweeping statements, rhetorical questions, and empty critiques, which neglect political realities, make one wonder whether it's more fantasy than viable prescription. Some fascinating insights and analysis, but the sweeping statements, rhetorical questions, and empty critiques, which neglect political realities, make one wonder whether it's more fantasy than viable prescription.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Liza

    A very easy read that is easy to digest and understand. Need to look more into the feasibility of his plans, but a good start/motivation to better understand the American economy and how much room for improvement it still has to go

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ivan Beeckmans

    Easy to read. Harder to implement. Perversely, it appears that much of what is happening now in the United States is just the opposite of what is prescribed in this book; to follow the United Nations 17 Sustainable Development Goals.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Karen Bonuck

    A short & upbeat overview of why we should/how we can move towards sustainable development in climate, health care, and justice realms.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.