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"do You Have a Band?": Poetry and Punk Rock in New York City

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During the late 1960s, throughout the 1970s, and into the 1980s, New York City poets and musicians played together, published each other, and inspired one another to create groundbreaking art. In "Do You Have a Band?", Daniel Kane reads deeply across poetry and punk music to capture this compelling exchange and its challenge to the status of the visionary artist, the cultu During the late 1960s, throughout the 1970s, and into the 1980s, New York City poets and musicians played together, published each other, and inspired one another to create groundbreaking art. In "Do You Have a Band?", Daniel Kane reads deeply across poetry and punk music to capture this compelling exchange and its challenge to the status of the visionary artist, the cultural capital of poetry, and the lines dividing sung lyric from page-bound poem. Kane reveals how the new sounds of proto-punk and punk music found their way into the poetry of the 1960s and 1970s downtown scene, enabling writers to develop fresh ideas for their own poetics and performance styles. Likewise, groups like The Fugs and the Velvet Underground drew on writers as varied as William Blake and Delmore Schwartz for their lyrics. Drawing on a range of archival materials and oral interviews, Kane also shows how and why punk musicians drew on and resisted French Symbolist writing, the vatic resonance of the Beat chant, and, most surprisingly and complexly, the New York Schools of poetry. In bringing together the music and writing of Richard Hell, Patti Smith, and Jim Carroll with readings of poetry by Anne Waldman, Eileen Myles, Ted Berrigan, John Giorno, and Dennis Cooper, Kane provides a fascinating history of this crucial period in postwar American culture and the cultural life of New York City.


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During the late 1960s, throughout the 1970s, and into the 1980s, New York City poets and musicians played together, published each other, and inspired one another to create groundbreaking art. In "Do You Have a Band?", Daniel Kane reads deeply across poetry and punk music to capture this compelling exchange and its challenge to the status of the visionary artist, the cultu During the late 1960s, throughout the 1970s, and into the 1980s, New York City poets and musicians played together, published each other, and inspired one another to create groundbreaking art. In "Do You Have a Band?", Daniel Kane reads deeply across poetry and punk music to capture this compelling exchange and its challenge to the status of the visionary artist, the cultural capital of poetry, and the lines dividing sung lyric from page-bound poem. Kane reveals how the new sounds of proto-punk and punk music found their way into the poetry of the 1960s and 1970s downtown scene, enabling writers to develop fresh ideas for their own poetics and performance styles. Likewise, groups like The Fugs and the Velvet Underground drew on writers as varied as William Blake and Delmore Schwartz for their lyrics. Drawing on a range of archival materials and oral interviews, Kane also shows how and why punk musicians drew on and resisted French Symbolist writing, the vatic resonance of the Beat chant, and, most surprisingly and complexly, the New York Schools of poetry. In bringing together the music and writing of Richard Hell, Patti Smith, and Jim Carroll with readings of poetry by Anne Waldman, Eileen Myles, Ted Berrigan, John Giorno, and Dennis Cooper, Kane provides a fascinating history of this crucial period in postwar American culture and the cultural life of New York City.

45 review for "do You Have a Band?": Poetry and Punk Rock in New York City

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jim Jones

    This is probably not going to be very entertaining for someone looking for a rock and roll book about the early NY punk scene, but for people who want to see the connection between punk's earliest stars and the Downtown poetry scene, this book is a treasure. It starts with proto-punk band The Fugs, and extends on through Lou Reed, the NY Dolls (David Johanson considered his lyrics poetry), Richard Hell, Patti Smith, Jim Carroll, and even the NO Wave scene. Fascinating connections with poets and This is probably not going to be very entertaining for someone looking for a rock and roll book about the early NY punk scene, but for people who want to see the connection between punk's earliest stars and the Downtown poetry scene, this book is a treasure. It starts with proto-punk band The Fugs, and extends on through Lou Reed, the NY Dolls (David Johanson considered his lyrics poetry), Richard Hell, Patti Smith, Jim Carroll, and even the NO Wave scene. Fascinating connections with poets and writers like Ann Waldman, Delmare Schwartz, Wm. Burroughs, and Allen Ginsberg. The influences of writers on this very artsy NY scene has been obvious for some time, but no one until now has researched it so well and put it all together. My only criticism is the overly academic language.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ietrio

    An inane text that feels like an expanded version of a 6th grader essay. > Richard Meyers, like Lou Reed, Patti Smith, and Ed Sanders, moved to New York City to be a writer. That is a chapter opening! Taking a more profound look, Kane is a poser who gathered the data, structured the data, like the said 6th grader, and listed the data. He does not get it, but, again, what's there to get, right? An inane text that feels like an expanded version of a 6th grader essay. > Richard Meyers, like Lou Reed, Patti Smith, and Ed Sanders, moved to New York City to be a writer. That is a chapter opening! Taking a more profound look, Kane is a poser who gathered the data, structured the data, like the said 6th grader, and listed the data. He does not get it, but, again, what's there to get, right?

  3. 4 out of 5

    Greg Masters

    On-the-money depiction of the art-punk-poetry scene of lower Manhattan from the 60s through the 70s with insightful analysis that credits influences of one genre on the other.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Brandon

  5. 5 out of 5

    Michele

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jill

  7. 5 out of 5

    Eli

  8. 4 out of 5

    Cody Taylor

  9. 4 out of 5

    Andrea Janov

  10. 5 out of 5

    Amy

  11. 5 out of 5

    Claudius

  12. 4 out of 5

    Katie

  13. 4 out of 5

    Weldon Hunter

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mills College Library

    811.5409 K1625 2017

  15. 5 out of 5

    A.D. Harper

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sordid

  17. 4 out of 5

    Derek W.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Clara Mars

  19. 4 out of 5

    Heather

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sam

  21. 4 out of 5

    Steven Anthony

  22. 4 out of 5

    N

  23. 4 out of 5

    Meara

  24. 4 out of 5

    Emilia Hamra

  25. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sasha Ng

  27. 4 out of 5

    Pam

  28. 5 out of 5

    Joris

  29. 4 out of 5

    Dane Vannatter

  30. 4 out of 5

    Dan Vinson

  31. 5 out of 5

    amanda

  32. 5 out of 5

    Raymond Rusinak

  33. 5 out of 5

    Warrick

  34. 5 out of 5

    Drew

  35. 5 out of 5

    Barry Graubart

  36. 4 out of 5

    Victor May

  37. 4 out of 5

    mark mendoza

  38. 5 out of 5

    solarider

  39. 5 out of 5

    Matt

  40. 4 out of 5

    Nick

  41. 4 out of 5

    sowhatnow

  42. 4 out of 5

    Brittany

  43. 4 out of 5

    Ben Richardson

  44. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Elliott

  45. 5 out of 5

    Stacy268

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