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For over three and a half years, from 1779 to 1783, the tiny territory of Gibraltar was besieged and blockaded, on land and at sea, by the overwhelming forces of Spain and France. It became the longest siege in British history, and the obsession with saving Gibraltar was blamed for the loss of the American colonies in the War of Independence. Located between the Mediterrane For over three and a half years, from 1779 to 1783, the tiny territory of Gibraltar was besieged and blockaded, on land and at sea, by the overwhelming forces of Spain and France. It became the longest siege in British history, and the obsession with saving Gibraltar was blamed for the loss of the American colonies in the War of Independence. Located between the Mediterranean and Atlantic, on the very edge of Europe, Gibraltar was a place of varied nationalities, languages, religions and social classes. During the siege, thousands of soldiers, civilians and their families withstood terrifying bombardments, starvation and diseases. Very ordinary people lived through extraordinary events, from shipwrecks and naval battles to an attempted invasion of England and a daring sortie out of Gibraltar into Spain. Deadly innovations included red-hot shot, shrapnel shells and a barrage from immense floating batteries. This is military and social history at its best, a story of soldiers, sailors and civilians, with royalty and rank-and-file, workmen and engineers, priests, prisoners-of-war, spies and surgeons, all caught up in a struggle for a fortress located on little more than two square miles of awe-inspiring rock. Gibraltar: The Greatest Siege in British History is an epic page-turner, rich in dramatic human detail - a tale of courage, endurance, intrigue, desperation, greed and humanity. The everyday experiences of all those involved are brought vividly to life with eyewitness accounts and expert research.


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For over three and a half years, from 1779 to 1783, the tiny territory of Gibraltar was besieged and blockaded, on land and at sea, by the overwhelming forces of Spain and France. It became the longest siege in British history, and the obsession with saving Gibraltar was blamed for the loss of the American colonies in the War of Independence. Located between the Mediterrane For over three and a half years, from 1779 to 1783, the tiny territory of Gibraltar was besieged and blockaded, on land and at sea, by the overwhelming forces of Spain and France. It became the longest siege in British history, and the obsession with saving Gibraltar was blamed for the loss of the American colonies in the War of Independence. Located between the Mediterranean and Atlantic, on the very edge of Europe, Gibraltar was a place of varied nationalities, languages, religions and social classes. During the siege, thousands of soldiers, civilians and their families withstood terrifying bombardments, starvation and diseases. Very ordinary people lived through extraordinary events, from shipwrecks and naval battles to an attempted invasion of England and a daring sortie out of Gibraltar into Spain. Deadly innovations included red-hot shot, shrapnel shells and a barrage from immense floating batteries. This is military and social history at its best, a story of soldiers, sailors and civilians, with royalty and rank-and-file, workmen and engineers, priests, prisoners-of-war, spies and surgeons, all caught up in a struggle for a fortress located on little more than two square miles of awe-inspiring rock. Gibraltar: The Greatest Siege in British History is an epic page-turner, rich in dramatic human detail - a tale of courage, endurance, intrigue, desperation, greed and humanity. The everyday experiences of all those involved are brought vividly to life with eyewitness accounts and expert research.

30 review for Gibraltar: The Greatest Siege in British History

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jean

    From 1779 to 1783 the Spanish and French Ships had blockaded the British owned City of Gibraltar. The Spanish also besieged the city by land. The obsession with saving Gibraltar was blamed for the loss of the American colonies by some historians. The authors tell the story of the siege. They tell the stories of the soldiers, their families and civilian workers who withstood the bombardment, starvation and diseases for three years. The fortress was located on about two square miles of rock. The Br From 1779 to 1783 the Spanish and French Ships had blockaded the British owned City of Gibraltar. The Spanish also besieged the city by land. The obsession with saving Gibraltar was blamed for the loss of the American colonies by some historians. The authors tell the story of the siege. They tell the stories of the soldiers, their families and civilian workers who withstood the bombardment, starvation and diseases for three years. The fortress was located on about two square miles of rock. The British Army conducted daring guerilla strikes into Spain. In the end, the French Navy was eventually sunk when their gun batteries overheated and exploded. I enjoyed the descriptions from Mrs. Green’s diary about the various diseases that went through the city and army base. I found the information about smallpox the most interesting. Sometimes smallpox was brought in on a ship that ran the blockade and at other times it seemed to be a seasonal outbreak. Mrs. Green appeared to be most upset that Governor Elliott did not allow vaccinations to stop the epidemic. Mrs. Green had excellent descriptions of other diseases and the effects of starvation such as scurvy. The authors report that food prices were extremely high but the Governor did not allow price fixing because of the high profits to be made which were the incentive to the privateers to risk running the blockade. The book is well written and meticulously researched. The Adkin’s writing style is to intersperse narrative with first-hand accounts that give an accurate picture of the times. The authors reveal step by step every major decision made by Governor Elliott and the military staff. This provides a fascinating insight into the officers and the wives as well as the enlisted men and civilian workers. The book format provides a comprehensive bibliography and index as well as maps, diagrams and photographs. The Adkins are well-known British archeologists and historians and have written a number of books. For the more serious reader the book format would make an excellent reference book. I read this as an audiobook downloaded from Audible. The book is fifteen hours long. John Telfer does a good job narrating the book. Telfer is a well-known English actor and audiobook narrator.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jerome

    An interesting, rich and compelling account of the siege. The book is engaging, and the authors do a good job on providing background of how Britain ended up with Gibraltar, why the Spanish wanted it back, and how war with Spain broke out. The bulk of the narrative is then taken up with the actual siege. The narrative is readable, lively, and moves along at a good pace despite the detail. The authors do a great job showing the wartime experience of British, Spanish and French officers and soldier An interesting, rich and compelling account of the siege. The book is engaging, and the authors do a good job on providing background of how Britain ended up with Gibraltar, why the Spanish wanted it back, and how war with Spain broke out. The bulk of the narrative is then taken up with the actual siege. The narrative is readable, lively, and moves along at a good pace despite the detail. The authors do a great job showing the wartime experience of British, Spanish and French officers and soldiers, the poor discipline and training on the British side, the suffering endured by the local civilians, and the humanity and craftiness of Governor Elliott. There are a few minor issues, like the biographies of individual soldiers and some tangential discussions of how the era’s weapons worked. The story is also told mostly from the British side. Also, the authors do a good job describing how the war affected the siege, but not so much the other way around. Still, a dramatic, well-researched and well-written work.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Elliot

    Gibraltar tells a story of perseverance and courage. The siege of Gibraltar is a relatively unknown event, at least in the United States, which is ironic because the British efforts to keep their hold on the Rock had tangible affects on the war in America. The story is told through the words of those who experienced this monumental, four year long siege. The Adkins rely heavily on eyewitness accounts, and it seemed to me that between one third and one half of the text consisted entirely of diary Gibraltar tells a story of perseverance and courage. The siege of Gibraltar is a relatively unknown event, at least in the United States, which is ironic because the British efforts to keep their hold on the Rock had tangible affects on the war in America. The story is told through the words of those who experienced this monumental, four year long siege. The Adkins rely heavily on eyewitness accounts, and it seemed to me that between one third and one half of the text consisted entirely of diary entries, memoirs, reports, and other forms of first hand accounts. On one hand, this reliance on primary sources lends the book a great deal of credibility, and it gives the reader an excellent sense of the privations experienced, the gruesome injuries sustained, and the emotions that were felt. The first hand accounts give the tale an authenticity that would be difficult to reach otherwise. However, at times I felt that the prose was too saturated with these excerpts. There were moments in which the authors relied too heavily on the accounts instead of explaining more clearly their own words. This feature was especially marked in dealing with the military movements and information. For instance, I rarely had a good grasp on the size of the forces involved. In military history, it's often the case that the private soldier's perspective is ignored in favor of the strategic situation. Here, I feel the case is the opposite. That being said, I think Gibraltar is designed for a wider audience than the pure military historian. The Adkins do a wonderful job at explaining the nuances of living and soldiering in the 18th century, which makes this book accessible to anyone, regardless of their background knowledge. What's more, this book is illustrated with maps and pictures which greatly aid the reader in understanding the unique geography of Gibraltar. There are seven maps showing Europe, Britain, and most importantly, Gibraltar and its environs. Along with the maps are pictures of Gibraltar taken by the authors which provide excellent resources throughout the reading. To conclude, the Adkins have provided an excellent, single volume narration of this incredible event. The book isn't perfect by any means, but I think readers will enjoy this book, no matter how much or little they knew about the siege beforehand.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Erik Graff

    A quick read, this is an account of the Franco-Spanish siege of Gibralter of 1779-1783. Overlapping the American war of independence, it is a contention of the authors that the demands upon British resources eventuated by this, the successful conquest of Minorca and unsuccessful attempt to invade England (both discussed herein), may have substantially contributed to the British defeat and creation of the United States of America. My mother used to live part of each year on the Spanish coast betwe A quick read, this is an account of the Franco-Spanish siege of Gibralter of 1779-1783. Overlapping the American war of independence, it is a contention of the authors that the demands upon British resources eventuated by this, the successful conquest of Minorca and unsuccessful attempt to invade England (both discussed herein), may have substantially contributed to the British defeat and creation of the United States of America. My mother used to live part of each year on the Spanish coast between Malaga and Gibralter. Despite having visited the area three times I never made to the Rock, but did, on one occasion, see faint outline of the Atlas Mountains in Africa across the sea.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Entertaining blend of military and social history, full of first-person accounts from diaries and letters of an epic siege that has previously received surprisingly little attention (at least on this side of the pond), given its impact on the War of Independence.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    A decent account of the Siege of Gibraltar using mainly first had accounts via diaries of multiple participants. This is the books greatest strength and it biggest weakness. The diaries give a very personal feel to the narrative but at times it gets in the way of the history and worse makes the reading choppy so there is no flow. If you know nothing about a pivotal siege that was happening during the time of the American Revolution this is worth a look.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Val

    World history often turns on the outcome of a single event, and for 1,323 days from 1779-1783 a rather long event changed the world forever. This book tells the story of that event in great detail, placing it in historical context and describing what happened to all of the key figures on all sides of the conflict, as well as the multi-ethnic civilian population on Gibraltar. The Great Siege of Gibraltar is legendary in military history, memoirs, and even the art of its era. I had the memorable o World history often turns on the outcome of a single event, and for 1,323 days from 1779-1783 a rather long event changed the world forever. This book tells the story of that event in great detail, placing it in historical context and describing what happened to all of the key figures on all sides of the conflict, as well as the multi-ethnic civilian population on Gibraltar. The Great Siege of Gibraltar is legendary in military history, memoirs, and even the art of its era. I had the memorable opportunity in 2017 to visit Gibraltar and walk the Great Siege Tunnels. I looked out from the gun emplacements hewn into the solid and towering Rock of Gibraltar and envisioned the allied Spanish and French troops besieging the mountain fortress by land and battering it incessantly with canon balls fired from warships and eventually from floating gun batteries the French invented. The engineering feats required to tunnel so deeply and broadly into the massive Rock of Gibraltar and build gun and canon emplacements was staggering to my mind. Reading this book increased my appreciation for what I saw firsthand. Gibraltar was a fascinating blend of ethnic cultures under British governance, with a vibrant market and tourist industry, a colorful natural setting with Morocco visible across the water in the far distance on sunny days. The Barbary Apes were as entertaining as advertised. It was a highlight of a European trip and a place I would enjoy returning to explore in more depth. Gibraltar has been of tremendous strategic importance for centuries. The nation that controlled the Rock could keep free shipping open from the Atlantic into the Mediterranean, or close it and isolate a number of empires, kingdoms, and nations throughout history. As the author of this book reminds us, we would live in a very different world today had the Great Siege of Gibraltar ended quickly, or in British defeat. From 1779 to 1783, the British were fighting the rebellious American colonies bent on independence. The British fleet was far superior to the rag-tag American force and had the capacity to blockade American ports and wreak havoc with gun barrages on highly populated coastal cities. The Americans were not likely to prevail without something happening to divide or distract the British forces, and the Great Siege of Gibraltar was just the event needed. The Spanish and French saw an opportunity to strike the British while waging war against the American colonists, and the two nations joined forces, amassing an armada of over 104 vessels carrying forces of up to 65,000 men to lay siege to Gibraltar. The British force was approximately 12 boats and never more than 7500 men. If you've ever wondered what it would be like to be blockaded by sea and nearly surrounded by enemies on land, all blasting at you with canons day and night, cutting off your food and water supplies, and witnessing carnage from enemy fire tearing up your town, this book will put you right into that situation, using descriptions from journals of those who were there. Imagine experiencing this terror for 3 years 7 months and 2 weeks...arguably the longest siege in history, certainly of what we consider modern history. The brave citizens and soldiers of Gibraltar endured incredible hardships and tragedies, but also remained determined not to give up that critical piece of rock. The long drawn-out siege forced the British to re-direct resources from the war against the American colonies to hold onto Gibraltar. Had the French and Spanish failed to mount a sustained siege and abandoned their quest to take the fortress and control of the Mediterranean, the British would have been free to focus all of its might and resources on the Americans and perhaps the War for Independence would have ended differently. However, on the other hand, had the British capitulated under siege at Gibraltar, France and Spain would have controlled the Mediterranean and it is likely that the British would not have been in position to defeat Napoleon. Europe would look vastly different today had that happened. In reality, the courageous fight to hold onto Gibraltar helped determine the outcome of two world-altering wars that secured America's independence in one hemisphere, and Europe's future deliverance from Napoleon in the other. Gibraltar also played a critical role in WWII keeping the Mediterranean open for allied ships to bring the invasion forces to Italy and North Africa. Those who fought and died on Gibraltar from 1779-1783 fought out of some national pride, of course, but theirs was also a desperate battle to survive. This book gives vivid details of what they experienced, in some sequences canon ball by canon ball. The Great Siege also led to many innovations in weapons technology on both sides of the conflict, mostly born of necessity, including the introduction of shrapnel, red hot shot (super-heated canon balls that could burn through hulls of ships or set fire to buildings easily), the depressing gun carriage that allowed the British to fire guns (canons of various sizes) at ridiculously steep angles up or down while mounted on cliff ledges carved into the rock. The angles and innovations in gunpowder eventually allowed the British to fire shells up to 5,000 yards, easily putting the Spanish and French warships in the harbor in range. There really is no word for a siege of this magnitude enduring 1,323 days, other than the overused "epic." The book tells stories of the human cost of such a siege, and at the end tells the reader what happens later in life for the main figures and their families after peace ends the siege in 1783. The book is NOT a highly detailed history of Gibraltar. There are other notable books that describe its long history of settlement and control over many centuries, and if that is what a reader is looking for, the reader might find this book too narrowly focused and detailed. This book tells a little of that history to set the stage, but this book is a single-volume treatment of the Great Siege. times I thought it went into too much finite detail. In some chapters there is a canon ball by canon ball accounting, telling who was killed by each, and what body parts they lost in the shelling, limb by limb, or heads in some cases. Ultimately it seemed to me the author's point was to tell the WHOLE story of the siege from start to finish, and to demonstrate that no one on Gibraltar was fully safe at any point for 3 years and 7.5 months. Living under constant worry about food, water, and being exploded by enemy fire day after day for that long was traumatic and the firsthand accounts quoted in this book make that clear. Peace and normalcy eventually return after the treaty in 1783, but Gibraltar and its famous rock was altered permanently physically by the Siege, as tourists flock to witness for themselves. It stands as a reminder of stalwart people determined to hold on in the face of overwhelming odds. Gibraltar is synonymous with strength and uprightness against an enemy, and this book gives you the whole story of what happened there over nearly 4 critical years.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ian Racey

    This is simply a great read. The four-year Great Siege is itself a topic ridiculously rife with drama: the tension of not knowing how long the garrison can hold out, the discovery of merchants hoarding food leading to the sack of the town by its own British defenders, a surprise midnight raid against the Spanish lines producing dramatic explosions that destroy the Spanish gun emplacements, a public feud between two of the garrison's commanding officers because an aristocrat resents serving under This is simply a great read. The four-year Great Siege is itself a topic ridiculously rife with drama: the tension of not knowing how long the garrison can hold out, the discovery of merchants hoarding food leading to the sack of the town by its own British defenders, a surprise midnight raid against the Spanish lines producing dramatic explosions that destroy the Spanish gun emplacements, a public feud between two of the garrison's commanding officers because an aristocrat resents serving under a general from the middle class, a Royal Engineer rappelling alone down the sheer cliff face over the Mediterranean Sea only to discover he can hear the Spanish army inside the rock attempting to tunnel their way into the fortress, the pride of the Royal Navy freakishly sinking in Portsmouth harbour a few days before it was due to lead the relief fleet on a voyage to Gibraltar, the French inventing brand new, indestructible floating gun platforms with which to pound the desperate British garrison into submission, hurricanes sweeping the blockading fleet from the sea the night before the relief convoy arrives with the supplies the garrison desperately needed. Honestly it's an amazing tale. Nowadays the Great Siege, as a part of the American Revolutionary War, is utterly anonymous, but at the time of the war it was one of its central theatres and its fate was as important to leaders on both sides of the Atlantic as that of New York or Yorktown, as the Adkinses demonstrate through quotations from Abigail Adams's letters to her husband John. Quotations are plentifully on offer, mostly from the comprehensive diaries that were kept throughout the siege, by British military personnel, their wives, and the men of the besieging Franco-Spanish army. They provide an authenticity and an immediacy to the events being detailed. The authors' own text is lively and engaging, intelligent while remaining accessible to readers unfamiliar with the topic. They've picked a dramatic, under-chronicled topic and really done it justice.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    Given that the mean review of this book on Goodreads is close to 4 stars and I only gave it 2, I feel compelled to explain why. Unlike for other books I have "panned" in this way, I agree completely with the cover blurb that this is a well researched book. In fact, for me that is precisely the problem. The author has clearly done his homework, but the problem is in how he presents the material. Specifically, the text relies much too much on extensive quotations both in passim and as stand alone p Given that the mean review of this book on Goodreads is close to 4 stars and I only gave it 2, I feel compelled to explain why. Unlike for other books I have "panned" in this way, I agree completely with the cover blurb that this is a well researched book. In fact, for me that is precisely the problem. The author has clearly done his homework, but the problem is in how he presents the material. Specifically, the text relies much too much on extensive quotations both in passim and as stand alone paragraphs. Indeed, page after page is dominated by quote after quote, switching from one speaker to another. While this is to some extent an antidote to accounts that do not bring enough primary material to the table, *over* quoting falls into another trap. The problem is that the overall sense of the story is lost. I found it extremely difficult to keep up with the many switches of speaker - perhaps as much as a dozen in a single page - as well as to keep track of the overall story. In other words the author tried to tell this story as much as he could specifically through the words of those who were there. This is, to use the Oxford Dictionary definition, a chronicle:" a factual written account of important or historical events in the order of their occurrence." Indeed, this book is an almost pure chronicle with very little developed thematically - that is, as the "god's eye" or "birds' eye" view. Frankly, I don't much care for chronicles. My reaction to such accounts is in keeping with the Nobel Prize winning physicist Hans Bethe's response to the "Borubaki School" of mathematics where papers consist entirely of formulae "unsullied" with prose of any kind. Bethe found such efforts tiresome, bad to the discipline, and ultimately worthless. In this kind of work, I would like to see much more discretion in the use of primary materials and much stronger thematic/overview development. Don't just tell me what people of the time thought - tell me what *you the author* think. What happened, how does it compare to other actions (other sieges and other actions in the war, etc). Otherwise, such an account can be hard to follow and dull, just as I found this one.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Alaric

    The arrival of a new book from the Adkins partnership is always good news, their writing being a rare combination of detail and authority which is always delivered in such a way that the reader is easily captivated. However, after the excellent War for all the Oceans, Jack Tar and Eavesdropping on Jane Austen's England, books that centred on my own specific period of interest, I was concerned that an account of Gibraltar's famous siege would not be so absorbing. Yes, it was the longest such conf The arrival of a new book from the Adkins partnership is always good news, their writing being a rare combination of detail and authority which is always delivered in such a way that the reader is easily captivated. However, after the excellent War for all the Oceans, Jack Tar and Eavesdropping on Jane Austen's England, books that centred on my own specific period of interest, I was concerned that an account of Gibraltar's famous siege would not be so absorbing. Yes, it was the longest such conflict in British history and I was vaguely aware of the many events that allowed the garrison and civil population to survive; but the entire campaign ended nearly ten years before the start of the major French wars, so from my point of view this could only be for peripheral curiosity. I was wrong of course: such a tale of human endeavour should never be judged so lightly and, as this is the first time the full story has been told, how good it is that two masters of their craft have done what is an excellent job. From a full account of every major decision made by Governor Eliott and his staff to fascinating insights into the more minor figures, be they officers and their wives, enlisted men, civilians or servants: all are related here and with a degree of sensitivity that makes the conflict real once more. Following the pattern of former Adkins' books, the narrative is interspersed with first-hand accounts that give an accurate flavour of the times, while both colour and mono photographs, together with prints and specifically drawn maps and diagrams, clarify every point and offer a true understanding of the situation. A comprehensive bibliography and index also make research easy, although this is not a reference book in the accepted sense: Gibraltar: the Greatest Siege in British History might be an historian's dream, but it also tells a proper story, and a magnificent one, with style.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Neil

    This is the story of the 'great siege' of Gibraltar, waged by France and Spain from 1779 to 1783. The book gives a good background of the events up to the siege, and a fascinating account primarily of the lives of the besieged - the famine, the illnesses and the horrors of combat. Following several characters and using first-hand diaries and accounts, the book gives a thorough and well-written tale of an event that few could find dull. This book fits firmly into the formula I find most compelli This is the story of the 'great siege' of Gibraltar, waged by France and Spain from 1779 to 1783. The book gives a good background of the events up to the siege, and a fascinating account primarily of the lives of the besieged - the famine, the illnesses and the horrors of combat. Following several characters and using first-hand diaries and accounts, the book gives a thorough and well-written tale of an event that few could find dull. This book fits firmly into the formula I find most compelling for historical non-fiction: it gives a thorough, in-depth and above all truthful series of events, but focuses primarily on the human elements of the moment: the lives and sufferings of the individuals living in Gibraltar, their thoughts and feelings, and how they overcame every obstacle they faced. Overall this is a fascinating account of a great moment in history, and a good recommendation for anyone interested in the Napoleonic era.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ankit Sharma

    Gibraltar: The Greatest Siege in British History A Great Book On Great Historic Event happen in our Planet in Past. If You Really Interested to Know The British History This is A kind of Book Must Be Read under The Subject Line, Through This Book I identify The Struggles and Survivals of Gibraltar peoples. Through Turning the pages book impress me to evaluate and elaborate The Correct events for Gibraltar. Book Covers Each And Entire Events Details About Gibraltar formation And Struggle .A Very acc Gibraltar: The Greatest Siege in British History A Great Book On Great Historic Event happen in our Planet in Past. If You Really Interested to Know The British History This is A kind of Book Must Be Read under The Subject Line, Through This Book I identify The Struggles and Survivals of Gibraltar peoples. Through Turning the pages book impress me to evaluate and elaborate The Correct events for Gibraltar. Book Covers Each And Entire Events Details About Gibraltar formation And Struggle .A Very accurate And Depth research By author presents In This Book. My opinion About This Book Is Read if You Want to read The History or If Your interest Area Is British History. Book covers detailed Study of the siege of British-held Gibraltar by the Spanish and French from 1779-1783 With In Depth Analysis. So Must Be A Part of Bookshelf and Go ahead for Reading purpose.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Norman Smith

    This is a very well-written history of the Siege, based primarily on diaries and other records from the period. The authors do a very good job of keeping the story straight; despite the large number of participants whose work is cited, I did not find difficult to keep track of who was who. The only quibble I have with this book is that it presents little information from the Spanish side of the lines. It might have been good to have some more insight into what was happening there, and why. Unlike This is a very well-written history of the Siege, based primarily on diaries and other records from the period. The authors do a very good job of keeping the story straight; despite the large number of participants whose work is cited, I did not find difficult to keep track of who was who. The only quibble I have with this book is that it presents little information from the Spanish side of the lines. It might have been good to have some more insight into what was happening there, and why. Unlike on the Gibraltarian side, there are no sources quoted on the opposing side. But, just a quibble... This is a worth-while book to read on a little-known topic.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ken

    Extremely interesting ,well written, worthy of saving as a reference book , Would be especially of interest to the people of Gibraltar and British history enthusiasts. I found myself in the picture as the street names , buildings , churches ,batteries , cannons of all sizes were all familiar to me , many still to be seen around town, upper rock , inces gallery and botanical gardens . This book shows why Gibraltar will Forever remain British.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Belinda Turner

    Gibraltar: The Greatest Siege in British History was most well researched. The siege involved several countries: Britain, Spain, France, and The Netherlands. It had a definite effect on the conduct and outcome of the British effort to prevent the loss of the American colonies.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Simon Bradley

    A very interesting and detailed account of a very little known part of the american revolutionary war with lots of interesting details on 18th century warfare - it also sets out the general siginificance of Gibraltar for those less familiar with it.

  17. 5 out of 5

    jedioffsidetrap

    Skimmed at B&N...

  18. 4 out of 5

    Stan

    Encyclopedic, compelling in fits and starts, but digressive.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Michael Samerdyke

    Did not finish. The authors went down too many different rabbit holes, telling the biography of everyone whose letters or diaries they quoted. Lost track of the main thrust of the narrative.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Stuart B

    Excellent book, my favourite epoch. Never understood how we got the place.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Wan Peter

    Though well research history, the only problem the reading is dull.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Tom

    3.5

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ian

    Longer than it needs to be but interesting.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Ligon

    Gibraltar is an interesting and detailed account of the siege of British-held Gibraltar by the Spanish and French from 1779-1783. The authors give plenty of historical background on Gibraltar and the events leading up to the siege, and then devote the bulk of the book to a chronological account of the siege itself. The book quotes and otherwise references a number of diaries, letters, and period accounts. Through these, the reader is able to get a good idea of what it felt like for people of tha Gibraltar is an interesting and detailed account of the siege of British-held Gibraltar by the Spanish and French from 1779-1783. The authors give plenty of historical background on Gibraltar and the events leading up to the siege, and then devote the bulk of the book to a chronological account of the siege itself. The book quotes and otherwise references a number of diaries, letters, and period accounts. Through these, the reader is able to get a good idea of what it felt like for people of that time to go through these events. The historical narrative was well done also. Most of these historical events were new to me, so I was quite interested throughout the book. If you enjoy history, Gibraltar is worth your time. I received a digital copy of this book for free from the publisher and was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I express in this review are entirely my own.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Helen Hollick

    This book has received a Discovering Diamonds Review: Helen Hollick founder #DDRevs "Would a book about a siege of a small rocky promontory of land, of little more than a handful of habitable acres, really be interesting? Quick, simple answer: yes." This book has received a Discovering Diamonds Review: Helen Hollick founder #DDRevs "Would a book about a siege of a small rocky promontory of land, of little more than a handful of habitable acres, really be interesting? Quick, simple answer: yes."

  26. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Stormo

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ron Hartman

  28. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Saunders

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Schobeloch

  30. 4 out of 5

    Grant

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