web site hit counter Invasion Diary: A Dramatic Firsthand Account of the Allied Invasion of Italy - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Invasion Diary: A Dramatic Firsthand Account of the Allied Invasion of Italy

Availability: Ready to download

A dramatic and richly detailed chronicle of the Allied invasions of Sicily and Italy from one of America’s greatest war correspondents. Following the defeat of Axis forces in North Africa, Allied military strategists turned their attention to southern Italy. Winston Churchill famously described the region as the “soft underbelly of Europe,” and claimed that an invasion wou A dramatic and richly detailed chronicle of the Allied invasions of Sicily and Italy from one of America’s greatest war correspondents. Following the defeat of Axis forces in North Africa, Allied military strategists turned their attention to southern Italy. Winston Churchill famously described the region as the “soft underbelly of Europe,” and claimed that an invasion would pull German troops from the Eastern Front and help bring a swift end to the war.   On July 10, 1943, American and British forces invaded Sicily. Operation Husky brought the island under Allied control and hastened the downfall of Benito Mussolini, but more than one hundred thousand German and Italian troops managed to escape across the Strait of Medina. The “soft underbelly” of mainland Italy became, in the words of US Fifth Army commander Lt. Gen. Mark Clark, “a tough old gut.”   Less than a year after landing with the US Marines on Guadalcanal Island, journalist Richard Tregaskis joined the Allied forces in Sicily and Italy. Invasion Diary documents some of the fiercest fighting of World War II, from bombing runs over Rome to the defense of the Salerno beachhead against heavy artillery fire to the fall of Naples. In compelling and evocative prose, Tregaskis depicts the terror and excitement of life on the front lines and recounts his own harrowing brush with death when a chunk of German shrapnel pierced his helmet and shattered his skull.   An invaluable eyewitness account of two of the most crucial campaigns of the Second World War and a stirring tribute to the soldiers, pilots, surgeons, nurses, and ambulance drivers whose skill and courage carried the Allies to victory, Invasion Diary is a classic of war reportage and “required reading for all who want to know how armies fight” (Library Journal).   This ebook features an illustrated biography of Richard Tregaskis including rare images from the American Heritage Center at the University of Wyoming.  


Compare

A dramatic and richly detailed chronicle of the Allied invasions of Sicily and Italy from one of America’s greatest war correspondents. Following the defeat of Axis forces in North Africa, Allied military strategists turned their attention to southern Italy. Winston Churchill famously described the region as the “soft underbelly of Europe,” and claimed that an invasion wou A dramatic and richly detailed chronicle of the Allied invasions of Sicily and Italy from one of America’s greatest war correspondents. Following the defeat of Axis forces in North Africa, Allied military strategists turned their attention to southern Italy. Winston Churchill famously described the region as the “soft underbelly of Europe,” and claimed that an invasion would pull German troops from the Eastern Front and help bring a swift end to the war.   On July 10, 1943, American and British forces invaded Sicily. Operation Husky brought the island under Allied control and hastened the downfall of Benito Mussolini, but more than one hundred thousand German and Italian troops managed to escape across the Strait of Medina. The “soft underbelly” of mainland Italy became, in the words of US Fifth Army commander Lt. Gen. Mark Clark, “a tough old gut.”   Less than a year after landing with the US Marines on Guadalcanal Island, journalist Richard Tregaskis joined the Allied forces in Sicily and Italy. Invasion Diary documents some of the fiercest fighting of World War II, from bombing runs over Rome to the defense of the Salerno beachhead against heavy artillery fire to the fall of Naples. In compelling and evocative prose, Tregaskis depicts the terror and excitement of life on the front lines and recounts his own harrowing brush with death when a chunk of German shrapnel pierced his helmet and shattered his skull.   An invaluable eyewitness account of two of the most crucial campaigns of the Second World War and a stirring tribute to the soldiers, pilots, surgeons, nurses, and ambulance drivers whose skill and courage carried the Allies to victory, Invasion Diary is a classic of war reportage and “required reading for all who want to know how armies fight” (Library Journal).   This ebook features an illustrated biography of Richard Tregaskis including rare images from the American Heritage Center at the University of Wyoming.  

30 review for Invasion Diary: A Dramatic Firsthand Account of the Allied Invasion of Italy

  1. 4 out of 5

    JD

    After writing "Guadalcanal Diary", war correspondent Richard Tregaskis went over to the Mediterranean to cover the invasions of Sicily and mainland Italy. Even though both these books are written in the same diary form, they really bring the realities of the difference of fighting the Japanese and Germans forward as no other authors has. The book was first published in 1944 when there was still a war to be won, and as in "GD" there is not much about politics or strategy and is focused on life on After writing "Guadalcanal Diary", war correspondent Richard Tregaskis went over to the Mediterranean to cover the invasions of Sicily and mainland Italy. Even though both these books are written in the same diary form, they really bring the realities of the difference of fighting the Japanese and Germans forward as no other authors has. The book was first published in 1944 when there was still a war to be won, and as in "GD" there is not much about politics or strategy and is focused on life on the front line with the troops, both American and British. Another interesting thing in this book, is his dealings with civilians and his relationships with other well known war correspondents of the era, which there was not in "GD". Tregaskis is probably one of the bravest men not serving in the forces ever, and I am sure if it was not for his horrendous head wound in Italy, he would have been in one of the first waves on Omaha Beach alongside his friend Robert Capa on D-Day. Highly recommended to read along with "Guadalcanal Diary".

  2. 5 out of 5

    Arthur

    Having read and enjoyed Guadalcanal Diaries I felt it fair to give the author another try. I give much respect to a war correspondent who really gets into the thick of things, rather than staying in the relatively safe rear areas and conducting interviews with troops coming back from the front. In this book the author hitches rides on bombing missions, and travels with both American and British troops in Sicily and mainland Italy. One of the most interesting portions were the authors own experien Having read and enjoyed Guadalcanal Diaries I felt it fair to give the author another try. I give much respect to a war correspondent who really gets into the thick of things, rather than staying in the relatively safe rear areas and conducting interviews with troops coming back from the front. In this book the author hitches rides on bombing missions, and travels with both American and British troops in Sicily and mainland Italy. One of the most interesting portions were the authors own experiences in the hospital. Enjoyable read which I have rated a 4.4 (rounded 4).

  3. 5 out of 5

    Cindy

    Flowing with grace for his own survival, the author pens an intelligent view of his WWII press coverage before and during the Europe campaign. Gently and clearly narrated by Pat Grimes.

  4. 5 out of 5

    DanielL

    I knew nothing about Richard Tregaskis before reading the Invasion Diary: A Dramatic Firsthand Account of the Allied Invasion of Italy. I recalled hearing good things about his book Guadalcanal Diary: 2nd Edition, but I did not know it was written by Richard Tregaskis. I grew up in a military family and served in the USAF. My dad was a WW2 veteran and he always spoke highly of Ernie Pyle who died in the Battle of Okinawa. Like my dad, I’ve always had great respect and admiration for all war corr I knew nothing about Richard Tregaskis before reading the Invasion Diary: A Dramatic Firsthand Account of the Allied Invasion of Italy. I recalled hearing good things about his book Guadalcanal Diary: 2nd Edition, but I did not know it was written by Richard Tregaskis. I grew up in a military family and served in the USAF. My dad was a WW2 veteran and he always spoke highly of Ernie Pyle who died in the Battle of Okinawa. Like my dad, I’ve always had great respect and admiration for all war correspondents so reading the Invasion Diary: A Dramatic Firsthand Account of the Allied Invasion of Italy was on my to-read-list. The Invasion Diary: A Dramatic Firsthand Account of the Allied Invasion of Italy is a superbly written first-hand account of Richard Tregaskis experience in the invasion of Sicily and Italy. His writing style reminded me of those by W. Somerset Maugham. For those back home who read his account of the war, Richard Tregaskis ability to write about what was happening on the battlefield was important for morale at home and on the battlefield. I especially liked the fact that whenever he mentioned a soldier, an airman, or a sailor’s name, he mentioned their hometown which gave it a personal touch and authenticity to his writing. The only thing that I wished the book (Kindle) had were battle maps of Sicily and Italy. Since Richard Tregaskis had experience in battles with the Japanese and the Germans, he had a unique insight on the difference between fighting enemies in the Pacific and Europe / North Africa. This was something that I was curious about and he answered that question. He also answered what motivated him to be a frontline war correspondent and risk his life. The Invasion Diary: A Dramatic Firsthand Account of the Allied Invasion of Italy is impressive, but what I found even more impressive was Richard Tregaskis biography at the end of the book. After his near fatal brain injury in Italy, he returned to join Allied forces in Normandy as they swept toward Berlin. He was on the USS Missouri for the surrender by the Japanese. I was amazed that he was also a war correspondent during the Korean and Vietnam Wars. Richard Tregaskis achievements are simply astounding to me. The Guadalcanal Diary is now on my short list of books to read.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kamas Kirian

    A wonderful biography of the daily activities of a WWII war correspondent. I picked this up because my grandfather was a paratrooper with the 460th Parachute Field Artillery Battalion that served in Italy, France and Germany. As Tregaskis went in the the 82nd Airborne I thought it would be interesting to see what it would be like for the paratroopers over there. Other than complaining about the Red Cross and having frozen feet from serving time in the mountains I don't remember him talking much A wonderful biography of the daily activities of a WWII war correspondent. I picked this up because my grandfather was a paratrooper with the 460th Parachute Field Artillery Battalion that served in Italy, France and Germany. As Tregaskis went in the the 82nd Airborne I thought it would be interesting to see what it would be like for the paratroopers over there. Other than complaining about the Red Cross and having frozen feet from serving time in the mountains I don't remember him talking much about his WWII service. The writing was clear and at a brisk pace. The descriptions were well done, giving a sense of the place and circumstances. Following along with satellite photos of the area, and digitized photos from the participants gave a nice perspective. Given the man's height, 6'7", it's hard to believe he wasn't an obvious target for snipers in the various battles he reported on. He must have stuck out in a crowd. And he repeatedly went directly into battle zones in the Pacific, Europe, Korea, Vietnam, etc. The man deserves credit for the brass balls he walked with. The eBook was formatted well with only a couple of minor spelling/grammar errors, likely from a bad OCR that the proofreader didn't catch. The end of the book has photos of the author and places reported on.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Noble

    I've read a lot of books about this campaign as my dear old Dad was mixed up in this with his personal crescendo at Monte Cassino - with the Queens Own Royal West Kents. This account by American war correspondent Richard Tregaskis is particularly helpful in understanding the experience of an infantryman and was a real page turner. Beginning in Sicily we follow Richard towards Naples with endless first hand accounts from soldiers of their war experience. Sometimes funny and often full of pathos a I've read a lot of books about this campaign as my dear old Dad was mixed up in this with his personal crescendo at Monte Cassino - with the Queens Own Royal West Kents. This account by American war correspondent Richard Tregaskis is particularly helpful in understanding the experience of an infantryman and was a real page turner. Beginning in Sicily we follow Richard towards Naples with endless first hand accounts from soldiers of their war experience. Sometimes funny and often full of pathos and fearful anticipation we get a real picture of the lived world of these guys. From wider reading I he was one of the first - if not the first of the 'embedded' journalists and this is reflected in his stature both during the campaign and for the rest of his career which included Korea and Vietnam. Spoiler alert: according to Wikipedia "A shrapnel-gouged helmet worn by Tregaskis during World War II is on display at the National Museum of the Marine Corps. Tregaskis was wearing the helmet in Italy in 1943 when a shell fragment pierced the helmet and his skull, nearly killing him." This is a real page turner - with some unique images at the end of the book a bonus. Highly recommended.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Joseph W.

    Not what I expected, much better. I purchased the book because my father fought in the Sicily and southern Italy campaigns. Like so many veterans he never talked about it. I had hoped thay Mr Ttegaskis would mention my dad's artillery unit for this or that. While he did not, he gave us a personal view of the actions of the GIs from Privates to Generals. I found the last part of the book where the writer was recovering from his head wound most enlightening. Seldom do we see the toll of war on the Not what I expected, much better. I purchased the book because my father fought in the Sicily and southern Italy campaigns. Like so many veterans he never talked about it. I had hoped thay Mr Ttegaskis would mention my dad's artillery unit for this or that. While he did not, he gave us a personal view of the actions of the GIs from Privates to Generals. I found the last part of the book where the writer was recovering from his head wound most enlightening. Seldom do we see the toll of war on the human body.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Pam

    Interesting journalism from 1943-44. Tregaskis followed the troops as they repulsed German troops from Sicily and into Italy until his own serious wounds temporarily put a halt to his being imbedded with the troops. Great for showing authentically what it was like. It could be compared with parts of Bob Dole’s “One Soldiers Life” when dole was leading troops a little further north in Italy in 1945. His soldiering came to an abrupt end as well.

  9. 5 out of 5

    William F. Ridgley

    Good newspaper style narrative of World War II Italian campaign, with personal insights and experiences. I read the author's "Guadalcanal Diary" 50 something years ago and enjoyed it; it was due to a conversation with a Guadalcanal U.S. Army combat vet sometime previously that I checked it out from the local library and read it, so when I saw this, I wanted to read it also. Good newspaper style narrative of World War II Italian campaign, with personal insights and experiences. I read the author's "Guadalcanal Diary" 50 something years ago and enjoyed it; it was due to a conversation with a Guadalcanal U.S. Army combat vet sometime previously that I checked it out from the local library and read it, so when I saw this, I wanted to read it also.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Meg Rice

    The war correspondent-author lived the events retold in the book and therefore, places the reader into the action, battles, and struggles in Sicily and Italy during WWII. An audiobook I found gripping. It needed to be heard, start to finish.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Eric Aubin

    Good account of a key period in winning the battle over control of Sicily and the assault on Italy.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mark Taurone

    enjoyed the account

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ray Savarda

    Excellent first-hand reporting of the invasions of Sicily and the Italian Mainland, up until his injury from Artillery shelling.

  14. 4 out of 5

    John E. Wilson

    Tremendous Read A truly remarkable and amazing account of the war on the European front that puts you on the battlefield midst all the rigors and trials of combat.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Wendell H Howell

    On Scene History Bravery by a guy who could have stayed home. Served history by readable prose of so many important"little" details. Great read. On Scene History Bravery by a guy who could have stayed home. Served history by readable prose of so many important"little" details. Great read.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Joanne Williams

    And they were unarmed Very good story. Hard to believe that was almost 77 years ago. The author really tells us what it was like in Sicily and the Italian campaigns.

  17. 4 out of 5

    7$MartyQ

    Exceptional Story Richard Ttegaskis had more courage than most. He insisted that the war was best covered by being on the front lines with the troops. His was one of the best books to come out of the struggle for Guadalcanal; made into a movie, and required reading for all officer candidates in America. He had an incredible amount of literature which was attributed to him, and he packed more adventure into his short life than many. This book is must reading for all students of WWII.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Bruce

    Young INS reporter accompanying the Allied invasion of Italy in 1943. He gets all sorts of places, and reports what he can in a lively and engaging way, before he himself becomes part of the story, receiving a head wound from a shell. His recall of detail from a long and difficult recovery is remarkable. Written for public consumption (so not particularly revealing or critical), it was published in 1944.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Madaline

    My father lived in Italy around this time. I can't remember ever discussing this with him. He died several years ago. The book was interesting as the author is at the front and has many experiences. Worth reading! My father lived in Italy around this time. I can't remember ever discussing this with him. He died several years ago. The book was interesting as the author is at the front and has many experiences. Worth reading!

  20. 5 out of 5

    James g vago

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mark T..Ewing

  22. 4 out of 5

    Charles A. Belisle

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tony Adamo

  24. 5 out of 5

    Donna Nagely

  25. 4 out of 5

    Marianne Adinolfi

  26. 5 out of 5

    Tim Margheim

  27. 4 out of 5

    mick pennington

  28. 4 out of 5

    jim vowell

  29. 4 out of 5

    Paul

  30. 4 out of 5

    Dennis Koers

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.