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An eclectic collection of 80 achievable yet spectacular recipes from famed San Francisco Bay Area Burmese restaurant, Burma Superstar. For years, Bay Area residents and out-of-towners have packed the house--and lined up out the door--for the salads, curries, rice, and stir-fries served at Burma Superstar, a beloved Burmese restaurant with four locations in the San Francisco Ba An eclectic collection of 80 achievable yet spectacular recipes from famed San Francisco Bay Area Burmese restaurant, Burma Superstar. For years, Bay Area residents and out-of-towners have packed the house--and lined up out the door--for the salads, curries, rice, and stir-fries served at Burma Superstar, a beloved Burmese restaurant with four locations in the San Francisco Bay Area. This collection of recipes includes favorites like Tea Leaf Salad, Samosa Soup, Pumpkin Pork Stew, Garlic Noodles, and Black Rice Pudding that have made the group of restaurants one of the most recognizable in the Bay Area but it also takes readers into the kitchens of Burmese home cooks, whose style of cooking drives menu inspiration. As Burma--now called Myanmar--opens up to the world after a half century of seclusion, there has never been a more exciting time to share the multi-ethnic flavors of Burma Superstar.


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An eclectic collection of 80 achievable yet spectacular recipes from famed San Francisco Bay Area Burmese restaurant, Burma Superstar. For years, Bay Area residents and out-of-towners have packed the house--and lined up out the door--for the salads, curries, rice, and stir-fries served at Burma Superstar, a beloved Burmese restaurant with four locations in the San Francisco Ba An eclectic collection of 80 achievable yet spectacular recipes from famed San Francisco Bay Area Burmese restaurant, Burma Superstar. For years, Bay Area residents and out-of-towners have packed the house--and lined up out the door--for the salads, curries, rice, and stir-fries served at Burma Superstar, a beloved Burmese restaurant with four locations in the San Francisco Bay Area. This collection of recipes includes favorites like Tea Leaf Salad, Samosa Soup, Pumpkin Pork Stew, Garlic Noodles, and Black Rice Pudding that have made the group of restaurants one of the most recognizable in the Bay Area but it also takes readers into the kitchens of Burmese home cooks, whose style of cooking drives menu inspiration. As Burma--now called Myanmar--opens up to the world after a half century of seclusion, there has never been a more exciting time to share the multi-ethnic flavors of Burma Superstar.

30 review for Burma Superstar: Addictive Recipes from a Beloved San Francisco Bay Area Restaurant

  1. 4 out of 5

    Brittany

    This cookbook by Desmond Tan had a lot of bold and delicious recipes. I would love to own a copy of the physical book to be able to cook from multiple times. The format of the book is easy to follow and Tan is able to weave in biography and location without overwhelming the recipes. My biggest complaint is living in an area where some ingredients were not readily available, but I'm sure they are needed to stay true to the integrity of the recipes. I just wished there would have been a substitute This cookbook by Desmond Tan had a lot of bold and delicious recipes. I would love to own a copy of the physical book to be able to cook from multiple times. The format of the book is easy to follow and Tan is able to weave in biography and location without overwhelming the recipes. My biggest complaint is living in an area where some ingredients were not readily available, but I'm sure they are needed to stay true to the integrity of the recipes. I just wished there would have been a substitute or alternate ingredient list for harder to find things. Solid 4 stars.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    When we lived in the SF Bay area, Burma Superstar was our favorite Friday night takeout. Now that we live in Maine, Burmese food is but a distant memory, so I was super-psyched to get this book. I enjoyed that this book made Burmese cooking feel really accessible, even to someone now living where the nearest Asian market is a 2.5 hour drive. While some of the recipes require specialty ingredients, many of them are down-to-earth enough that I can even find the ingredients in rural Maine. The Rain When we lived in the SF Bay area, Burma Superstar was our favorite Friday night takeout. Now that we live in Maine, Burmese food is but a distant memory, so I was super-psyched to get this book. I enjoyed that this book made Burmese cooking feel really accessible, even to someone now living where the nearest Asian market is a 2.5 hour drive. While some of the recipes require specialty ingredients, many of them are down-to-earth enough that I can even find the ingredients in rural Maine. The Rainbow Salad was one of our go-tos off the menu when we lived near the restaurant, so it was the first recipe I tried from this book. It didn't disappoint, although be forewarned -- it's fiddly because it has so many ingredients and they all need chopping/frying/boiling. I did a bit of substituting here, like using pre-fried shallots from our last trip to the Asian market rather than frying onions myself, and not using all the different kinds of noodles. It was still delicious, though, and I appreciated that the authors gave me "permission" to tweak as needed. I was also excited to see that the book included recipes for some of the drinks the restaurant serves, because they are delicious! On the rare occasion we did eat in the restaurant instead of doing take-away, I always enjoyed the Burma Cooler, and now I can have it at home! Just a couple of quibbles: First, I really, really hate cookbooks where the list of ingredients goes onto the second page. I don't mind if the recipe instructions cross pages, but when the ingredients do, it's really easy to miss the ones on the second page and only realize when it's far too late to do anything about it. Oh, and I was really sad that there was no recipe for my favorite noodle dish from the restaurant, Bun Tay Kauser. :-) Disclaimer: I received an e-book advance of this cookbook from the publisher. But I loved it so much I went out and bought a copy when it came out!

  3. 5 out of 5

    January Gray

    Well organized, easy to follow. Easy to find ingredients.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Heather Brown

    Wow, why did I read this when I was hungry? It all looks so amazing! I love that the culture and history of the area is interspersed with the delicious recipes. The Egg and Okra Curry really started the book off right, looking so fantastic that I had to show my coworkers right away. Even though I've never eaten at Burma Superstar, I feel confident that with these recipes, I could create pure foodie heaven! All of the ingredients are available at my local Asian market, and some at the regular gro Wow, why did I read this when I was hungry? It all looks so amazing! I love that the culture and history of the area is interspersed with the delicious recipes. The Egg and Okra Curry really started the book off right, looking so fantastic that I had to show my coworkers right away. Even though I've never eaten at Burma Superstar, I feel confident that with these recipes, I could create pure foodie heaven! All of the ingredients are available at my local Asian market, and some at the regular grocery store. I only wish there were more pictures of the amazingness; I just can't get enough.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ilana

    Burmese cuisine is hard to find in Europe. Personally, altough considering myself both well-travelled and well-feed, with experience in various diverse kitchen from around the world, I can't remember one single Burmese restaurant. Otherwise, I would have know a little bit about this cuisine, before starting to read Burma Superstar. Therefore, I've read this book as a non-fiction one, more than as an account about the menu served in Oakland's restaurant with the same name. A foodie fix in the area Burmese cuisine is hard to find in Europe. Personally, altough considering myself both well-travelled and well-feed, with experience in various diverse kitchen from around the world, I can't remember one single Burmese restaurant. Otherwise, I would have know a little bit about this cuisine, before starting to read Burma Superstar. Therefore, I've read this book as a non-fiction one, more than as an account about the menu served in Oakland's restaurant with the same name. A foodie fix in the area for decades, with affiliates inaugurated in other destinations across the USA, Burma Superstar mixes the gourmet inspiration with the basic ingredients of the meals - most of them street food - served in this part of the world. A popular neighbourhood restaurant is able to reflect in its menu the culinary Asian melting pot. Which is a good news, especially for those aiming at reproducing those recipes at home, as you can easily find ingredients in the various Asian/Indian stores from across the world. You can easily find the spices and the sauces - oyster or Sriracha - the oils and the specific oils and the rice, the special spinach. The only thing I am not sure I can find is the laphet - the tea, used not only for the brewed drink, but usually in salads or as a dried snack. Something I might be interested to find and try out more about soon. But besides the laphet, there are many more recipes to try, like various curries and salads, dish and dried lentils or samosas. The list of the ingredients is long and it might take a time until getting used to the flavors but adding them to the recipe is easier than expected. You only have to add them to the pan and learn how much time you need to mix them until you obtain a completely new taste out of all the diverse flavors. Beware, the Burmese cuisine is using generous amounts of oil. The book introduces Burma/Myanmar not only as a food destination but also scatters various political and historical references - mostly Wikipedia style, neutral and not necessarily critical, but for someone finding out about this country it can be a steady beginning. What I've found a bit under my usual visual standards was the photography, but when it comes to visual representations, everything at a great extent is relative. I love the kind of photography which completes and beautifies the writing and makes the wording attractive which was not the case here. Personally, I would not hurry up to prepare any recipe at home until I will eventually have a taste of the professionally prepared one. For the sake of the authenticity, I need to figure out first how my personal creation should taste like. But I am so looking forward to it. Disclaimer: Book offered by the publisher in exchange for an honest review

  6. 5 out of 5

    MD

    I picked this up because I used to frequent Burma Superstar in the 90s. I was in love with their samusa soup. I’ve only been back a couple of times in recent years and even that seems to have been before it became famous because I don’t remember any lines or crowds, just that the prices had gone up a lot and that the samusa soup didn’t seem to be as good as I remembered. So I was surprised to see that it had a cookbook since it seemed like Mandalay was more popular for Burmese food. I expected t I picked this up because I used to frequent Burma Superstar in the 90s. I was in love with their samusa soup. I’ve only been back a couple of times in recent years and even that seems to have been before it became famous because I don’t remember any lines or crowds, just that the prices had gone up a lot and that the samusa soup didn’t seem to be as good as I remembered. So I was surprised to see that it had a cookbook since it seemed like Mandalay was more popular for Burmese food. I expected the cookbook to be like other restaurant cookbooks I’ve read - mostly recipes. The book does include many recipes, but it also includes a LOT of information about Burmese cuisine, the history of the restaurant, and its staff. I really don’t know how to rate this. It was interesting to me to learn why the restaurant had changed so much from when I used to go there regularly, but I wasn’t all that interested in all the details about the current operations and staff. I doubt I will ever make any of the recipes in this book, but it’s kind of interesting to see what’s in them. And if anyone does try the recipes I’m sure they will be delicious. Reading it mostly makes me miss living in San Francisco and want to find a Burmese restaurant.

  7. 4 out of 5

    E

    Great gift for anyone who lived in SF at a certain time (or even now) and used to frequent this place. I gave this to my sister in law - she suggested we each make recipes and have a dinner party to pretend we are back at this great restaurant. The recipes do seem true to form from the restaurant (Rainbow Salad, etc.) - the only tricky part might be securing the ingredients but the book is colorful, great photos and recipes and does not disappoint.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jennie

    I really liked this book. Not quite ready for the fifth star until I cook a few more recipes, but the coconut chicken curry; pork and pumpkin stew; samosas and samusa salad; egg and okra curry; garlic noodles; and tamarind ginger dressing are all good to great. It's not exactly like my local Burmese restaurant, but they have decades of experience on me! Definitely recommended if you enjoy Indian or Southeast Asian food at all. I really liked this book. Not quite ready for the fifth star until I cook a few more recipes, but the coconut chicken curry; pork and pumpkin stew; samosas and samusa salad; egg and okra curry; garlic noodles; and tamarind ginger dressing are all good to great. It's not exactly like my local Burmese restaurant, but they have decades of experience on me! Definitely recommended if you enjoy Indian or Southeast Asian food at all.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Deutz

    Really enjoyed the recipes in this book. Tried the Coconut Rice, Basil Chicken, and Sesame Chicken. The Basil Chicken was super easy to make and very tasty. The Sesame Chicken was good, but I feel like I might have underseasoned it at one point or another. Coconut Rice is super easy to make and is now one of my go-to recipes. 5/5

  10. 5 out of 5

    Deke

    If you haven't had Burmese food, you are missing out, as it's a wonderful melange of Thai, Indian and Chinese. Although I prefer the nearby restaurant Mandalay to the more popular Burma Superstar, this book raises their stock in my opinion, as it shows a depth beyond their menu. If you haven't had Burmese food, you are missing out, as it's a wonderful melange of Thai, Indian and Chinese. Although I prefer the nearby restaurant Mandalay to the more popular Burma Superstar, this book raises their stock in my opinion, as it shows a depth beyond their menu.

  11. 4 out of 5

    DowdyGUMP

    These are recipes that are INSPIRED by Burmese flavors, from a restaurant in CA (?) These are not Burmese recipes. SOME worked out okay; mostly condiments. But I wouldnt recommend this book to anyone interested in Burmese cuisine.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Beka

    Everything in here looks amazingly flavorful and tasty. Now someone needs to make it all for me. ;)

  13. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    This is well written and interesting as well as delicious. Oh Burma Superstar, you are soooo delicious.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    It's not just recipes (which are definitely more approachable than I feared); it's also the history of the restaurant and a view into Myanmar. It's not just recipes (which are definitely more approachable than I feared); it's also the history of the restaurant and a view into Myanmar.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Critterbee❇

    Burmese cooking is something completely new to me, and I enjoyed this book. The cuisine has some similarities to Indian, Chinese, Cambodian, Laotian and Thai cuisine, yet still is distinctive. Inside are recipes for curries, stir fried and 'fast-cooked' dishes, noodles, soups, salads, sweets and drinks. Some of the dishes I have not seen before are a chickpea flour-based 'Shan Tofu,' Mohinga, the national soup/dish of Myanmar, and dishes with Kebat spice mix. Some of the ingredients will probably Burmese cooking is something completely new to me, and I enjoyed this book. The cuisine has some similarities to Indian, Chinese, Cambodian, Laotian and Thai cuisine, yet still is distinctive. Inside are recipes for curries, stir fried and 'fast-cooked' dishes, noodles, soups, salads, sweets and drinks. Some of the dishes I have not seen before are a chickpea flour-based 'Shan Tofu,' Mohinga, the national soup/dish of Myanmar, and dishes with Kebat spice mix. Some of the ingredients will probably only be found at an international or Asian market. If you can find the ingredients, the cooking methods are pretty straightforward; I would say that all home cooks could turn out something quite easily. **eARC Netgalley**

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kristine

    Burma Superstar by Desmond Tan is a free NetGalley ebook that I read in late February. The author presents a curious, yet original cuisine from Burma/Myamar, which fuses Southeast Asian curries, noodle dishes, flavorful soups, giant salads, and stir-frys at his San Francisco chain of restaurants called Burma Superstar. After a personal introduction, a prologue in the style of a restaurant review, chef biographies, the history of the recipes' and ingredients' Burmese origin, and a lengthy intro fo Burma Superstar by Desmond Tan is a free NetGalley ebook that I read in late February. The author presents a curious, yet original cuisine from Burma/Myamar, which fuses Southeast Asian curries, noodle dishes, flavorful soups, giant salads, and stir-frys at his San Francisco chain of restaurants called Burma Superstar. After a personal introduction, a prologue in the style of a restaurant review, chef biographies, the history of the recipes' and ingredients' Burmese origin, and a lengthy intro for each chapter (all of which are written in slightly interconflicting styles, i.e. sometimes friendly and familiar, first and third-person, then informative, then aloof, then recipe-ese), some of my favorite recipes include Burmese chicken biryani, mohinga, garlic chile shrimp, kebat seasoning, platha, and hibiscus punch.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lara

    I have had students from Myanmar, but haven't tried the food and knew little about it. This book is by the owners of two Burmese restaurants in California. They traveled to and around Myanmar and collected recipes along the way. The book is full of photos from the trip, as well as anecdotes about the recipes and the restaurants. There are short sections that describe cultural and historical issues interspersed throughout the book along with full-page photos of people, city scenes, and landscapes I have had students from Myanmar, but haven't tried the food and knew little about it. This book is by the owners of two Burmese restaurants in California. They traveled to and around Myanmar and collected recipes along the way. The book is full of photos from the trip, as well as anecdotes about the recipes and the restaurants. There are short sections that describe cultural and historical issues interspersed throughout the book along with full-page photos of people, city scenes, and landscapes. Each recipe is well-written and clear. There are a number of curry recipes, vegetarian recipes, and snacks and sides. I made the Egg and okra curry, which I thought was an unusual combination. It turned out that the mildness of the hardboiled egg was a lovely counterpoint to the tangy tomato-based curry. I also made the Cauliflower and tomato recipe, which is a simple vegetarian side which is made special due to the amount of shallots used in the recipe (yum). When I served leftovers along with some hamburgers, my husband commented on how much he liked the cauliflower. Like many Asian dishes, the recipes often have a long ingredient list to make the sauce from scratch. However, the cooking is generally straightforward and simple, tending to use stewing (for curries) or stir frying. I found that few ingredients were so specialized they couldn't be found in a supermarket, so the recipes are pretty accessible for a Western cook.

  18. 4 out of 5

    roxi Net

    An absolutely gorgeous book about a country/culture that I'm not familiar with. The photos are beautiful, the recipes mouthwatering and my knowledge about Burmese culture and history has increased so much (especially since I started from not even knowing where it's located). I'm excited to try (first to locate) and use unusual ingredients such as bitter melon, sour leaf, bagan butter beans, and the like. I think this book is really for anyone who enjoys trying and cooking different foods (an adv An absolutely gorgeous book about a country/culture that I'm not familiar with. The photos are beautiful, the recipes mouthwatering and my knowledge about Burmese culture and history has increased so much (especially since I started from not even knowing where it's located). I'm excited to try (first to locate) and use unusual ingredients such as bitter melon, sour leaf, bagan butter beans, and the like. I think this book is really for anyone who enjoys trying and cooking different foods (an adventurous eater). I think it'll make a great gift (to myself) to others.

  19. 5 out of 5

    KayW4

    I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This is a lovely cook book of Burmese recipes. I'm not enough of an expert on Asian cuisine to differentiate this strongly from Thai cook books, but I'm sure there are plenty of differences to be enjoyed for those who know more than I do about Burmese culture and food. One aspect I loved was the detail on how to make really good stir-fried vegetables - might seem like something that's too basic to qualify as a se I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This is a lovely cook book of Burmese recipes. I'm not enough of an expert on Asian cuisine to differentiate this strongly from Thai cook books, but I'm sure there are plenty of differences to be enjoyed for those who know more than I do about Burmese culture and food. One aspect I loved was the detail on how to make really good stir-fried vegetables - might seem like something that's too basic to qualify as a separate recipe page, but I for one really welcomed the broccoli wok and sauteed spinach recipes.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    I'm checking a cookbook out from the library each month and trying a few things from it. This was January's pick. The standout recipes I made were Burmese Chicken Biryani and the Spicy Eggplant. I made a handful of others that were good, but not ones I need to make again and again. The pictures, both of recipes and of Burma, were really lovely. I enjoyed reading about the history of the restaurants and the section on laphet (fermented tea leaves) as food. I did not have the chance to make any of t I'm checking a cookbook out from the library each month and trying a few things from it. This was January's pick. The standout recipes I made were Burmese Chicken Biryani and the Spicy Eggplant. I made a handful of others that were good, but not ones I need to make again and again. The pictures, both of recipes and of Burma, were really lovely. I enjoyed reading about the history of the restaurants and the section on laphet (fermented tea leaves) as food. I did not have the chance to make any of the recipes featuring this ingredient. Overall, definitely worth a read/cook through.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Suddenly, all I want to eat is curry and sour leaf. I know little to nothing about Burmese culture or cuisine, so was fascinated to learn about a few new ingredients (laphet, sour leaf) and how to use them. I have so many bookmarked recipes here, mostly for tofu dishes and curries. There is one lamb dish I hope to add to the meal plan next week. A great book! I received a copy of this cookbook from NetGalley in exchange for a fair review.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sarah McLean

    We have a much loved Burmese restaurant in our city and more are popping up around town. For those who are not lucky enough to have a relatively large Burmese population, you should purchase this book and get a sample of what you have been missing! If you like Thai and Indian cuisine do not miss out in the delights Burma Superstar. This review was made possible through an advance copy I received through Netgalley

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lynne

    I really enjoyed reading this combination cookbook and history/social exploration of the famous restaurant, the food, and the country from which the food originates. I didn't feel compelled to cook anything from the book but it was definitely an enjoyable read. I really enjoyed reading this combination cookbook and history/social exploration of the famous restaurant, the food, and the country from which the food originates. I didn't feel compelled to cook anything from the book but it was definitely an enjoyable read.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rosemary Standeven

    Before reading this book, I knew next to nothing about Burma or Burmese cuisine – now I am utterly hooked. The food has flavours of India, Thailand, China …. But is completely unique and wonderful: “the food of Myanmar has its own distinctions. It is savory, occasionally salty, sometimes sour often unapologetically funky. Slow-cooked onions and garlic, ground chiles and turmeric, and shrimp paste are the building blocks of countless dishes. Tamarind water is just as important as lime juice for a Before reading this book, I knew next to nothing about Burma or Burmese cuisine – now I am utterly hooked. The food has flavours of India, Thailand, China …. But is completely unique and wonderful: “the food of Myanmar has its own distinctions. It is savory, occasionally salty, sometimes sour often unapologetically funky. Slow-cooked onions and garlic, ground chiles and turmeric, and shrimp paste are the building blocks of countless dishes. Tamarind water is just as important as lime juice for adding acidity to a salad or soup. And breaking up all of those flavors is crunch: fried garlic, crushed peanuts, and toasted chick pea flour are mixed into just about everything”. The first recipe I tried was the “Coconut Chicken Curry”, which was simply outstanding, as was the “Pork Curry with green mango pickle”, and the “Pumpkin Pork Stew”, and the “Yellow Split Pea falafel” and …. In fact it was a bit of a disappointment when a recipe turned out to be merely excellent. The worst I could possibly say about any of the recipes that I tried (and I have tried at least half of them!) was that they were ‘very nice’. The recipes are all easy to follow, and the spice mixes and quantities have been judged to perfection. I usually find I have to double the garlic used – but not here. Most of the recipes advise you to leave the flavours to rest for 20 minutes before serving – but we were always in such a hurry to eat, so seldom did. However, we often had the leftovers the following day, and they were even better for the wait. So, my message is to not ignore excellent advice. The book is written by the owner of the Burma Superstar restaurant. He gives a short history of how he found it, loved it and bought it when it threatened to go out of business and so saved it for the Burmese ex-pat community, and for all lovers of exquisite food. If only it were in London! This is not just a book of Burmese recipes – it is a glorious celebration of Burma, the country and its people. Each recipe comes with a story about which member of staff introduced it to the restaurant – where in Burma they came from, and what their story is. There are sections on particular ingredients and why / how they are important to Burmese cuisine, and how to prepare them. For hard to source ingredients there are alternatives given. The photos are of the finished recipes, of the people in the restaurant and in Burma, of the stunning countryside and cities in Burma, of the ingredients …. There is quite a bit about the recent history of the country, and by the end of the book you feel that you have had an excellent introduction to everything that Burma can be. If I could, I would go there now – or at least fly to San Francisco to visit Burma Superstar – unfortunately neither is possible. So, I have to settle for buying the cookbook – and making as many of the recipes as I can – over and over again. Outstanding book - my top cookbook of 2016 I received this copy from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review

  25. 4 out of 5

    Polly Krize

    I received an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review. I really enjoyed this book, and look at it as much more than just giving recipes. Burmese home cooks give insight and inspiration. I would very much like to visit one of the Burma Superstar restaurants in San Francisco one day. Recommended.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    Very pretty and all, but kind of impractical!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lynne

    Lots of delicious curries, but also laphet thoke [Burmese tea leaf salad], one of the first salads I ever straight-up loved. It really is the tea leaves; haven't made it yet because still trying to source laphet. Also intrigued by the shan tofu, made from chickpea flour instead of soybeans. Lots of delicious curries, but also laphet thoke [Burmese tea leaf salad], one of the first salads I ever straight-up loved. It really is the tea leaves; haven't made it yet because still trying to source laphet. Also intrigued by the shan tofu, made from chickpea flour instead of soybeans.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Phil

    Disclaimer: I received a free ecopy via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. If you're like me, you probably wouldn't think you know anything about Burmese cooking. There are a lot of familiar elements to these recipes though. It draws on elements from Indian, Chinese, and other Southeast Asian cuisines. There is a lot of flavor packed into these recipes. I've only had a chance to make one of them so far (the Coconut Chicken Curry, which is featured on the Amazon page for the book), and it Disclaimer: I received a free ecopy via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. If you're like me, you probably wouldn't think you know anything about Burmese cooking. There are a lot of familiar elements to these recipes though. It draws on elements from Indian, Chinese, and other Southeast Asian cuisines. There is a lot of flavor packed into these recipes. I've only had a chance to make one of them so far (the Coconut Chicken Curry, which is featured on the Amazon page for the book), and it was delicious. I marked so many recipes in this book that I wanted to try that I will have to pick up a physical copy to add to my bookshelves. Beyond the recipes, this book has a lot to offer. It begins with the story behind the restaurant, Burma Superstar, in San Francisco. Added to this is some Burmese history and culture. The writers go beyond the culinary history of the region, while remaining true to the spirit. The photos are gorgeous. Every single picture of the food looks delicious. The pictures of the people and the locations add to the feeling of the book. I also loved the way it is laid out. It felt a little backward at first, but after a brief introduction, they jump right into the recipes. Information on hardware and ingredients is included at the back of the book. I think this is a good move because having it up front might seem intimidating, especially if you don't have many of the items. There are enough recommendations for substitutes on certain ingredients throughout the book that its easy to get comfortable with things first. This book hooked me and I'm looking forward to getting an opportunity to explore it in more detail.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Faryal M

    I had a great meal at the restaurant with my brother some years ago, so I was eager to get this book. There are so many enticing recipes that it's hard to know where to start. A great introduction to cooking Burmese cuisine at home. I had a great meal at the restaurant with my brother some years ago, so I was eager to get this book. There are so many enticing recipes that it's hard to know where to start. A great introduction to cooking Burmese cuisine at home.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bobby

    Loved it - hard to even know where to start. The pictures are so tempting and the recipes clear and easy to follow . really enjoy all the back story too.

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