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The Isles of Los Angles 2089 - Humanity is addicted to technology. Getting a virtual buzz is the only thing left to live for, and gangsters run it all. And who do these gangsters turn to when they need their rule enforced? Constables Led Dent and Debbie Decay are about to be given a job that will force them out of the familiar squalor of LA and into the last tech-less coun The Isles of Los Angles 2089 - Humanity is addicted to technology. Getting a virtual buzz is the only thing left to live for, and gangsters run it all. And who do these gangsters turn to when they need their rule enforced? Constables Led Dent and Debbie Decay are about to be given a job that will force them out of the familiar squalor of LA and into the last tech-less country on Earth: The Garden Nation of Tokyo. Presenting the full run of the smash hit Tokyo Ghost by Rick Remender and Sean Murphy in this oversized hardcover, packed with extra content, variants, designs, sketches and bonus materials! Collecting: Tokyo Ghost 1-10


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The Isles of Los Angles 2089 - Humanity is addicted to technology. Getting a virtual buzz is the only thing left to live for, and gangsters run it all. And who do these gangsters turn to when they need their rule enforced? Constables Led Dent and Debbie Decay are about to be given a job that will force them out of the familiar squalor of LA and into the last tech-less coun The Isles of Los Angles 2089 - Humanity is addicted to technology. Getting a virtual buzz is the only thing left to live for, and gangsters run it all. And who do these gangsters turn to when they need their rule enforced? Constables Led Dent and Debbie Decay are about to be given a job that will force them out of the familiar squalor of LA and into the last tech-less country on Earth: The Garden Nation of Tokyo. Presenting the full run of the smash hit Tokyo Ghost by Rick Remender and Sean Murphy in this oversized hardcover, packed with extra content, variants, designs, sketches and bonus materials! Collecting: Tokyo Ghost 1-10

30 review for Tokyo Ghost: Complete Edition

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jayson

    (A-) 82% | Very Good Notes: A stirring satire, it shines in sketchy sublimity, but sadly stoops to schlock for shock’s sake in its so-so second section.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    Lovely art but the story was somewhat repetitive and the characters never really grew or changed. Or maybe just not enough for me? You have an idealistic young woman, Debbie, who refuses to leave the love of her life, even though he's a (tech) junkie. She's special and she becomes even more special because she's a cutie who flips through the air and believes in mother nature & her man and because I SAID SO. The young man, Led/Teddy, couldn't cope with what he thought were his shortcomings, started Lovely art but the story was somewhat repetitive and the characters never really grew or changed. Or maybe just not enough for me? You have an idealistic young woman, Debbie, who refuses to leave the love of her life, even though he's a (tech) junkie. She's special and she becomes even more special because she's a cutie who flips through the air and believes in mother nature & her man and because I SAID SO. The young man, Led/Teddy, couldn't cope with what he thought were his shortcomings, started using, and became an enforcer for the government - or technically what appears to be the corporation that took the place of the government. Why did he become such a sought-after badass when it was the drugs and nanobots that made him strong and fast? And I'm sure he wasn't the only one who took those drugs or got those enhancements. Seemed like another big BECAUSE I SAID SO plot hole to me. And even with repeated chances to get clean, he always chooses to take the easy way out and go back to his drug of choice when life throws hard things his way. I had very little sympathy for his character because...no. Stand up and dust yourself off, pussy. There are two bad guys. A narcissistic, idiotic, Trumpesque overlord who walks around with his dick literally hanging out, spouting nonsense that the populace eats up, all while catering to the 1%. And an abandoned experiment named Davey, who is basically a serial killer mashed up with a human version of a computer virus whose goal is to kill everything because he likes chaos. Tokyo is the last tech-free place on Earth and Debbie's big plan is to get her and Teddy there so they can live happily ever after. Spoilery shit happens and that plan blows up in her face. Ok, this is one of those books that everyone else absolutely loved and I thought was just sort of ok. There's nothing wrong with it, but it didn't go anywhere surprising for me. I also found the tone too depressing with the idea that everyone has given up and is just being led around by their own most disgusting desires. Listening to Debbie, as the main character & heroine, made me want to crawl out of my skin. Which was probably what Remender was going for. The way she enabled Led's addiction, and then made excuses because of his bad childhood, and then kept giving him one. more. chance. All of this in the name of love. It almost seemed toward the end to glorify her sacrifices, as though it made her somehow a better person than someone who would have said, enough already, and that kind of skeeved me out. Also, where the fuck did the unexplained ninja raccoon that suddenly lives on her shoulder come from? This was one of those stories that everyone else fell in love with, so take my opinion on it with a grain of salt.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Donovan

    Tokyo Ghost is dark romantic cyberpunk. And most importantly, satirical social commentary on contemporary (primarily) Western civilization—our obsession with artificiality through media, capitalism, and self-image. So Tokyo Ghost, while making deep points about love, culture, and humanitarianism, is also extremely crass, which I think can be off-putting for some. But I find this intentional to the narrative as satire. Look at America: we are crass. Rich, fat, hurried, and obnoxious. Obsessed wit Tokyo Ghost is dark romantic cyberpunk. And most importantly, satirical social commentary on contemporary (primarily) Western civilization—our obsession with artificiality through media, capitalism, and self-image. So Tokyo Ghost, while making deep points about love, culture, and humanitarianism, is also extremely crass, which I think can be off-putting for some. But I find this intentional to the narrative as satire. Look at America: we are crass. Rich, fat, hurried, and obnoxious. Obsessed with sex, guns, and materialism. It's self-reflective! It's self-critical! It's supposed to be funny! I truly believe Remender is reminding us how awful we really are, but we should also laugh about it and try to be better human beings. That's what I get from the crassness. I really just enjoyed the story itself, too. I deeply cared about Debbie and her codependency, and I could relate to Led and his constant inferiority and rage. These are real human issues that gave these characters credibility. And while the story and ending isn't what you'd expect, it's satisfying. But seriously, Sean Murphy and Matt Hollingsworth led the charge on this book. This artwork is fucking spectacular! I flat out stopped reading to soak in the details in this oversized format. Murphy's style is sketchy yet intricate, dramatic yet humble. And his tech design is phenomenal. Hollingsworth puts a bow on it with his glowing colors: dreamlike and otherworldly. The combination of illustration and color brings this bizarre and terrible future world to life. A Short Note on the Deluxe Edition... Rating: A+ Image is the definition of “deluxe.” The DCBS Variant has a beautifully designed jacket-less BLACK hardcover, perfect sewn binding, and semi-gloss pages of an uncanny thickness. Like stupid crazy thick. Image pulled out all the stops for this one.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Donovan

    This is now my second favorite Remender comic. Science-fiction. Romance. And most importantly, a satirical social commentary on contemporary Western civilization, primarily our obsession with artificiality through media, capitalism, and self-image. So Tokyo Ghost, while making deep points about love, culture, and humanitarianism, is also extremely crass, which I think can be off-putting. But I don't find this to be a shortcoming as much as intentional to the narrative. Look at America: we are cr This is now my second favorite Remender comic. Science-fiction. Romance. And most importantly, a satirical social commentary on contemporary Western civilization, primarily our obsession with artificiality through media, capitalism, and self-image. So Tokyo Ghost, while making deep points about love, culture, and humanitarianism, is also extremely crass, which I think can be off-putting. But I don't find this to be a shortcoming as much as intentional to the narrative. Look at America: we are crass. Rich, fat, hurried, and obnoxious. Obsessed with sex, guns, and materialism. It's self-reflective! It's self-critical! It's supposed to be funny! I truly believe Remender is reminding us how awful we really are, but we should also laugh about it and try to be better human beings. That's what I get from the crassness. I really just enjoyed the story itself, too. I deeply cared about Debbie and her codependency, and I could relate to Led and his constant inferiority and rage. These are real human issues that gave these characters credibility. And while the story and ending isn't what you'd expect, it's satisfying. But seriously, Sean Murphy and Matt Hollingsworth led the charge on this book. This artwork is fucking spectacular! I just flat out stopped reading to soak in the details in this oversized format. Murphy's style is sketchy yet intricate, dramatic yet humble. And his tech design is phenomenal. Hollingsworth puts a bow on it with his glowing colors: dreamlike and otherworldly. The combination of illustration and color brings this bizarre and terrible future world to life. So definitely check this out! A Preposterously Short Note on the Deluxe Edition... Hell yes. Image is AMAZING. THIS is what "deluxe" is supposed to be. The DCBS Variant has a beautifully designed jacket-less BLACK hardcover, perfect sewn binding, and semi-gloss pages of an uncanny thickness. Like stupid crazy thick. Image pulled out all the stops for this one, so pick it up!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rory Wilding

    2089. Set in the Isles of Los Angeles, where humanity is constantly plugged into technology that is a thrill-seeking drug to distract themselves from reality, law constables Led Dent and Debbie Decay chase down hacker criminals. Upon failing their last assignment, the two lovers-turned-constables are assigned to the mysterious garden nation of Tokyo, where their love is put to the test as they fight against the toxic addiction they’ve grown up with. Please click here for my full review. 2089. Set in the Isles of Los Angeles, where humanity is constantly plugged into technology that is a thrill-seeking drug to distract themselves from reality, law constables Led Dent and Debbie Decay chase down hacker criminals. Upon failing their last assignment, the two lovers-turned-constables are assigned to the mysterious garden nation of Tokyo, where their love is put to the test as they fight against the toxic addiction they’ve grown up with. Please click here for my full review.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Blindzider

    Impressive. What this lacks in depth it makes up for in style. It carries many themes and messages: a romance, environmental and social commentary, and the way to personal happiness. The story packs quite a punch, delivering its messages sometimes a little too bluntly, but with a panache brought on by Murphy's incredibly unique visual storytelling. There's a lot to look at in each panel, accentuated by Hollingsworth's colors, who chose to still give some color despite the story taking place in a Impressive. What this lacks in depth it makes up for in style. It carries many themes and messages: a romance, environmental and social commentary, and the way to personal happiness. The story packs quite a punch, delivering its messages sometimes a little too bluntly, but with a panache brought on by Murphy's incredibly unique visual storytelling. There's a lot to look at in each panel, accentuated by Hollingsworth's colors, who chose to still give some color despite the story taking place in a future dystopian world. Having said all that the characters are a little shallow, with the main characters sharing an emotional bond and is the driving force which carries through to the end. It's relatively short, but the high-octane quick fix is enough to want more.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Max's Comic Reviews and Lists

    Dick shot Central For 2 years I’ve been anticipating this story. And what better way to finally read it than in the beautiful Complete Edition. Having wanting to read this for over 730 days, I am surprised I have not researched or even read the synopsis. I just knew it was by the guy who wrote Low and Deadly Class and it was Sean Murphy’s art. And you gotta love Sean Murphy’s art. I’d say this was a fairly well written story with a concept we have seen before, and some amazing artwork. Everyt Dick shot Central For 2 years I’ve been anticipating this story. And what better way to finally read it than in the beautiful Complete Edition. Having wanting to read this for over 730 days, I am surprised I have not researched or even read the synopsis. I just knew it was by the guy who wrote Low and Deadly Class and it was Sean Murphy’s art. And you gotta love Sean Murphy’s art. I’d say this was a fairly well written story with a concept we have seen before, and some amazing artwork. Everything to do with the 2 main characters, Debbie and Teddy is by far the best part of the entire story. Flashbacks are weaved through the story to truly create impact whenever the relationship between these 2 characters is being focused on. Cause there relationship is NOT workin out. But not in the way you are thinking. The book manages to make the concept feel slightly more original than it actually is, and that is a big plus. Near the end I was feelin it. I was gettin the feels and was turning pages like crazy. That’s due to Remender putting extra emphasis on character. And that’s my favourite part of the book. There are 2 villains here. One of them is a spoiler and the other is Davey. Fuckin Davey was insane. I enjoyed him as a villain. He was a cybertronic, networking, body snatching, quirky, mass-murdering, suit and hat wearing ass-hole. His writing is serviceable and he seems like an unstoppable force at one point. The whole story in fact, if you think about it is veeeeeeerrry simply structured. Remender has just found a way to make it feel less familiar. Aight I of course have problems and nitpicks with the book sooooooo let’s get into it. This book has a lot of tonal shifts. I know the book wasn’t supposed to be taken too seriously. You can tell from the very beginning. BUUUUT I really wish this was taken more seriously. Especially near the end. The ending battle is kick-ass and heavy. If only I could get the residual silliness out of my head. But Rick writes craziness so obviously, that the scene didn’t reach its full emotional potential. So ya tonal inconsistency is my biggest issue with this book. On one page, a main character will blow up a city in a really sad and shocking way, and on the next, a reporter will be graphically sucking off an old dude and commenting about how sweet it tasted. WHat tHe FUCK? There are SO MANY DICKS in this book. There is a guy named Fredrick Von Laserdick who flashes his dick to an entire crowd. I’m sure Mr. Murphy had fun drawing all that meat. The villains final plan makes sense for his character, but the scene where the plan was told had Osama Bin Laden riding in a gokart made to look like a plane and Hitler also racing in it. You can see why that would pretty distracting and the take all the seriousness out of the scene. It also affected the ending. My second biggest problem with the book is that it sometimes doesn’t put the most focus on the very very important stuff. Like Nature vs Technology. Which plays a huuuge part in the end. Or The Tokyo Ghost. The nature stuff was part of the story up until that but not enough man. It kind of came outta nowhere by the end. The Tokyo Ghost aspect of the book was disappointing. I wish an entire issue went into why the Tokyo Ghost became what they became, the thought processes, and the reign of terror on the villains. If you had made the Tokyo Ghost’s time in the book longer then when they finally “give in” to their emotions it would have been more of an “OOH SHIT!” moment. And finally, (this is a nitpick) I never got addicted to the book like I thought I would. I wanted to really badly but for the week it took me to read this, I think that’s too long. I had a shit ton of homework some nights so I couldn’t read it. And to be honest I didn’t care all that much. If I was binging Hellblazer azer or something like that I would be dying to finish by homework bullshit and jump back into the book. As it stands that was never the case which is disappointing. Sean frickin Murphy. I think most people love his art, and its not hard to see why. The two most incredible aspects of the art that Sean Murphy perfects here is Locations and Combat. The frickin locations Murphy draws here are PHANTASMAGORICAL! (Word of the day kids) I stopped and stared in awe at how beautiful and cool the backgrounds and locations were in the book. I could NEVER and I mean NEVER draw such amazing nature and futuristic city shots. And the combat. HOOO! This ain’t no Frank Miller drawn combat but its damn good. Especially in a fight scene in issue 4. It goes on for the entire fucking issue. It’s awesome. Murphy makes the combat fluid and bloody as hell. In the end, I didn’t love this story but I definitely enjoyed it. Especially the last 2 issues. Debbie, Teddy, and Davey are the driving force of the comics and provide for light compelling characters. The story has an original yet familiar feel to it and is overall very stylish. Sean Murphy’s art is to die for. The tone is eehhhh, a couple aspects of the book don’t have quite enough focus on them, there is SOO much nudity, and I was just never completely hooked. The good does outweigh the bad though. As for the way The Complete Edition is constructed, its a 9.5. The 2nd most beautiful book I own. (besides Absolute Preacher) There is no dust jacket, sewn binding, huge pages, glossy paper, and a lot of extras. Slight gutter loss is the .5 off the 10. Letter Grade: (B+)

  8. 4 out of 5

    Chris Greensmith

    "Some irony. The girl who couldn't face her own bullshit....suddenly forcing everyone else to." "Some irony. The girl who couldn't face her own bullshit....suddenly forcing everyone else to."

  9. 4 out of 5

    Stewart Tame

    This was fun. The setting is the Isles of Los Angeles. The year is 2089. The masses are addicted to entertainment, anything to distract from the toxic squalor in which they live. The wealthiest 1% control the media and law enforcement. Two of the top law enforcers around are Debbie Decay and her partner, Led Dent. Debbie is a rarity: a tech-free human. Most of the population have media feeds implanted, but not her. Led, however, more than makes up the difference, constantly binging multiple feed This was fun. The setting is the Isles of Los Angeles. The year is 2089. The masses are addicted to entertainment, anything to distract from the toxic squalor in which they live. The wealthiest 1% control the media and law enforcement. Two of the top law enforcers around are Debbie Decay and her partner, Led Dent. Debbie is a rarity: a tech-free human. Most of the population have media feeds implanted, but not her. Led, however, more than makes up the difference, constantly binging multiple feeds at all times. And of course, there needs to be an antagonist. That would be Davey Trauma--demented, amoral, and possessing the ability to control anyone with tech enhancements, which is pretty much everybody. Like all memorable villains, he steals just about every scene he’s in. Debbie’s dream is to wean Led off his tech addiction so the two of them can live somewhere off the grid in peace and happiness. But her boss,--THE Boss--Mr. Flak, wants them to do one more job: investigate rumors of a tech-free paradise, the mysterious garden nation of Tokyo … The whole thing is gloriously over the top. Yes, there's sex. Yes, there's violence. Yes, there are satirical elements clearly inspired by our present day. Does any of it go too far? Personally, I’m inclined to say no, but your mileage may vary. Do I love it unreservedly? Eh … not completely. There's this annoying cliche aspect to the end that … well, you’ll see. The artwork is lovely! The story reminds me a bit of Frank Miller's Ronin by way of Judge Dredd. As the front cover says, this is the Complete Edition, with all of the extra script pages, alternate covers, sketches, &c. that that implies. Recommended!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Pete Apple

    I've really enjoyed Mr. Remender's previous works. Low is one of my favorite favorites, both in style and writing. Because of that, I gave this a read. I didn't find it as well done. The story seemed fairly simple and clearly laid out from the start. I found the protagonist somewhat derivative of his other works both in styling and co-dependency traits (and platinum blonde... again?) More frustrating was the fairly one note villain who started out in #1 and essentially ended unchanged in issue # I've really enjoyed Mr. Remender's previous works. Low is one of my favorite favorites, both in style and writing. Because of that, I gave this a read. I didn't find it as well done. The story seemed fairly simple and clearly laid out from the start. I found the protagonist somewhat derivative of his other works both in styling and co-dependency traits (and platinum blonde... again?) More frustrating was the fairly one note villain who started out in #1 and essentially ended unchanged in issue #10. One note, repeated over and over made me start skimming through his dialogue a bit. Saying that, I'm giving this two stars as the artwork, coloring, lettering, et al are just lovely. The juxtaposition between the LA techno-horror and the garden of Tokyo was so well done.

  11. 4 out of 5

    John Funderburg

    Let's put this out there first - Sean Murphy's art is a 5/5 any day of the week. The story is engaging and interesting, but some of the content is a bit over the top, which is why I can't give a full recommendation. That being said, this oversized hardcover showcases Murphy's art and is of excellent quality. 4 1/2 stars Let's put this out there first - Sean Murphy's art is a 5/5 any day of the week. The story is engaging and interesting, but some of the content is a bit over the top, which is why I can't give a full recommendation. That being said, this oversized hardcover showcases Murphy's art and is of excellent quality. 4 1/2 stars

  12. 4 out of 5

    Cris

    Great allegory for our modern times.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jon

    This is a pretty damn good cyberpunk story dealing with issues like codependency, addiction, and fragile masculinity. Some of the dialogue, particularly from the main villain, is a little irritating, but overall it is really enjoyable.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Beth Braun

    This is an unoriginal story... technology is bad and nature is good and almost non-existent. That being said it is still a good/quick read that has amazing art. (A lot of male genitals watch out haha) I enjoyed reading this although I don't know if it is something I would read again. This is an unoriginal story... technology is bad and nature is good and almost non-existent. That being said it is still a good/quick read that has amazing art. (A lot of male genitals watch out haha) I enjoyed reading this although I don't know if it is something I would read again.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Online Eccentric Librarian

    More reviews (and no fluff) on the blog http://surrealtalvi.wordpress.com/ Tokyo Ghost takes many modern inspirations and combines them into one fairly seamless story. From A Clockwork Orange to Princess Mononoke, Nineteen Eighty Four to Idiocracy, author Remender takes us to a dystopian hell where technology has run rampant and the masses are drugged with inanity. Our codependent main characters navigate this brave new world while seeking their own paradise. The storyline is hard hitting an More reviews (and no fluff) on the blog http://surrealtalvi.wordpress.com/ Tokyo Ghost takes many modern inspirations and combines them into one fairly seamless story. From A Clockwork Orange to Princess Mononoke, Nineteen Eighty Four to Idiocracy, author Remender takes us to a dystopian hell where technology has run rampant and the masses are drugged with inanity. Our codependent main characters navigate this brave new world while seeking their own paradise. The storyline is hard hitting and doesn't pull any punches - graphic sex, violence, and debauchery is offset by beautiful illustration work and a very alarming view of the future. Story: Debbie has a strong moral code and followed her upstanding father by remaining unplugged - thereby avoiding the despised addiction that ruined her mother and most of society. As a young girl she friends neighbor Teddy - a boy nearly abandoned by his disaffected parents. Together they grow up and grow in love - until the day Teddy is unable to protect Debbie from anarchists and she must protect him. Thus Teddy spirals into self loathing over his weakness and he enlists in a program to make him nearly invincible so he can protect Debbie. But he loses himself in the process - and that's where our story begins, with Debbie and Teddy (now called Led) working as constables for the City. When they are given an opportunity to infiltrate a luddite city in old Tokyo, Debbie grabs at the chance to finally detox Teddy and get him back from Led. But what they find is what neither expected - nor can they escape bringing their own poison to the paradise. The story has three main settings: first in a Los Angeles of 2089, a city drugged by mindless programs that ease people into an oblivion of escape. Then to Japan where they find a culture grown up around Bushido and honor. Then back to Los Angeles. Each of these arcs is distinct and have their own story but of course are part of the large picture. Most of the book is Debbie's struggle to bring Teddy back from Led while also separating him from the technology and those who manipulate him through it. Remender does not pull any punches. From a "Hentai" amusement park where women 'ride' the octopus tentacles to Led completely destroying his foes in very violent methods. This is coupled with a very dark, hopeless, and fatalistic storyline; much as with a horrific car crash that one cannot turn away from while driving by, Tokyo Ghost sucks you in while also making you feel more than a bit sick from it all. There are many statements being made throughout the story. One theme that came up the most, though, was A Clockwork Orange (the main villain bore more than a striking resemblance to Alex the Droog). From the sex to the ultra violence, masses drugged into stupidity by broadcasts/shows rather than chemicals, where sex and nudity is as casual as mass destruction. Each panel is a statement and worth exploring for all that is being said, and not said, about modern society. Not just American - but many societies around the world. The artwork conveys the story perfectly. Debbie is beautifully drawn and Led is, if perhaps a bit too Judge Dredd Square jawed, captured neatly in his addiction. Imagine kids in front of a TV or YouTube screen for hours and you get the idea - it's impossible to drag them away and they have tuned out the world. The art is truly top notch - everything is very well done from character designs, to locations, to the panels themselves. It's hard not to appreciate just how much artistry went into the book and how well the artist and the author worked to create the final story. This deluxe edition is a large book - I set aside a large block of time to read it because quite a lot happens. It's a book that greatly rewards on rereads, especially if one takes the time to really analyze and appreciate the statements being made in the art and the dialogue. There's a lot being said or shown and a lot to think about afterwards. Tokyo Ghost is, in every regard, the very modern graphic novel - a story of its time though set in the future. I couldn't help but think of the movie Idiocracy and how this is a prescient and all too believable future, especially considering our modern politics. History tells that societies always love their dictators. Reviewed from an advance reader copy provided by the publisher.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Adam Spanos

    A intriguing, dystopian future of technology vs nature. Rick does a great job in making us realise how tech is dominating how we socialise, act, think, learn. He highlights so much and it's so clear to see the message he is trying to put out there. The artwork is also so detailed, on point. I highly recommend buying this gorgeous hardcover. I'm sure once you have it you will keep revisiting it. A intriguing, dystopian future of technology vs nature. Rick does a great job in making us realise how tech is dominating how we socialise, act, think, learn. He highlights so much and it's so clear to see the message he is trying to put out there. The artwork is also so detailed, on point. I highly recommend buying this gorgeous hardcover. I'm sure once you have it you will keep revisiting it.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jonas Salonen

    This is again Remender at his best. The story is highly interesting. It's quite sick at the same time as being very current in the modern world. The themes are quite straight forward dealing with modern world, entertainment, individuality and technology. The art is superb, the characters great and the story interesting. What more could you want from a comic? Go buy this stuff already. This is again Remender at his best. The story is highly interesting. It's quite sick at the same time as being very current in the modern world. The themes are quite straight forward dealing with modern world, entertainment, individuality and technology. The art is superb, the characters great and the story interesting. What more could you want from a comic? Go buy this stuff already.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Justin Datka

    Juvenile, overly preachy, with the subtlety of a sledgehammer. I lost track of how many times my eyes rolled. Rick Remender is starting to have more misses than hits. Art is out of this world though and keeps this from being a 1 star.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    Sean Murphy is an effortlessly cool illustrator (see also Batman: White Knight).

  20. 4 out of 5

    Reg Rivett

    Rick Remender and Sean Gordon Murphy have created a distant, but not unfamiliar, world when the Isles of Los Angles is the only home for humanity. But what kind of humanity is it when all the citizens are plugged in, hopped up on technology and nanobot drugs? What kind of world would that be? What kind of relationships could you have? For Debbie Decay, Los Angles isn’t a home of humanity. It’s a prison. And she is the only one that isn’t plugged in or hopped up. Too bad that can’t be said for her Rick Remender and Sean Gordon Murphy have created a distant, but not unfamiliar, world when the Isles of Los Angles is the only home for humanity. But what kind of humanity is it when all the citizens are plugged in, hopped up on technology and nanobot drugs? What kind of world would that be? What kind of relationships could you have? For Debbie Decay, Los Angles isn’t a home of humanity. It’s a prison. And she is the only one that isn’t plugged in or hopped up. Too bad that can’t be said for her husband/lover. When rumours of Tokyo, a land untouched by technology, and overflowing with resources reaches Los Angles, Debbie and her hubby/lover are hired to go and bring back the precious goods for the people of Los Angles. If they make it there, will they be able to secure the goods? Will they be able to make it when an giant EMP threatens to destroy all technology in its way, including that which is sustaining Debbie’s husband? In a brilliantly written, gorgeously drawn comic book, Remender and Murphy take readers on an adventure of love, addiction, technology, nature, and the struggle between them all. THE GOOD Murphy has an artistic style that is his own. You know who the artist is without looking at the creator names. What makes his artwork amazing is how it is grounded in reality and yet still feels so otherworldly. The technology, the cars, the people, they feel like they were lifted right out of my world, and dropped into another time and place. That kind of artwork helps draw you in and keep you for the truly crazy parts of Tokyo Ghost. Remender has a great way of playing with larger than life ideas. This isn’t just about a girl and a boy, and them being hired to do a job. It is about philosophical and economical problems that our world is currently battling. With great wit and powerful story telling, Remender crafts a tale that will leave you thinking about the big issues, but also leave you with a smile. This is a comic book after all. All the snappy dialogue, bombastic events and thrilling cliffhangers make Tokyo Ghost a one of a kind story. THE BAD It’s the same problem that I have with most mature comics, the language and the sexuality. There are times where swearing makes sense, and other times it is grossly overused and seems like sloppy writing. But when the overarching story is about technology versus nature, true intimacy and ‘connectiveness”, there is bound to be some visualization of that. Readers, be aware that this is mature material. If sex, language, and nudity bother you that much, do not read this. While I have a personal limit on how much mature material I like in my comics, Tokyo Ghost finds a balance (?) and does not come across as grotesque. THE VERDICT As much as I dislike excessive language and sexuality in my comics, this is a book for mature audiences. So, be prepared. But that does not mean that they take away from a good story. The fight between nature and technology, whether there is a balance that can be struck or not, is compelling. With stunning art and fantastic writing, Tokyo Ghost is a though provoking and enjoyable ride for the older comic book readers. I give Tokyo Ghost 5 out of 5 stars.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Dakota Morgan

    Classic Rick Remender paired with classic Sean Murphy. The story is largely insane with a headspinning number of twists. The art is jaw-droppingly gorgeous, crisp and detailed, the kind of thing you'd want to put up on your wall as a poster. It's ultimately a tale of nature vs technology, but on an extremely heightened scale. Technology is so prevalent and powerful that millions simply drift into the digital world and die. Nature is so abandoned that the one green spot on the planet, Tokyo, is i Classic Rick Remender paired with classic Sean Murphy. The story is largely insane with a headspinning number of twists. The art is jaw-droppingly gorgeous, crisp and detailed, the kind of thing you'd want to put up on your wall as a poster. It's ultimately a tale of nature vs technology, but on an extremely heightened scale. Technology is so prevalent and powerful that millions simply drift into the digital world and die. Nature is so abandoned that the one green spot on the planet, Tokyo, is intensely, impossibly green - and gene-hacking has somehow given one of Tokyo's inhabitants the ability to not only control nature, but also disrupt technology through an EMP. Oh, and that same gene-hacking gave another person the power to control any humans who have ingested nanotech (so, all humans). You can see then where the conflict lies - how does the villainous techno-titan disable this EMP and conquer the last green space? It's basically Fern Gully. The collection features a strong pair of leading characters in Debbie and Led Dent. Debbie is a techno-phobe, Led is a techno-addict, but they stay together due to a shared history of trauma. Each character has a nice arc, perhaps moreso for Led since he's the tragic addict. The villains are a little less identifiable. It seems like Remender dumped all of his insane ideas on Frak and Davey - Frak is the techno-titan who rules the internet and marches around with his dick out pretty much the entire time. Davey is the gene-hacked controller of humans who has the same psychotic sensibilities as The Joker. He also speaks almost entirely in already-dated internet jargon (does any say "on fleek" anymore?) It's hard to figure either of these villains out since they have no backstory. That's probably the collection's only real drawback - the villains seemed silly and not particularly important to Debbie and Led's stories, but they kept coming back from issue to issue. I was tired of them by the end. Remender's other work usually has villains with at least a shred of humanity, so I was bit disappointed here. Overall, though, it's a spectacular collection. The art alone is worth the price of admission. I spent several minutes pouring over some of Murphy's two-page spreads. The level of detail is staggering. While I don't necessarily want to live in a polluted, technology-addicted future, I wouldn't mind it if it turns out to be as beautiful and awe-inspiring as Murphy's art.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jinji

    Tokyo Ghost!!! In a world, where technology rules everything, and addiction to it is the norm (sound familiar?), pleasure is everything. You want 24 hours shows, you got it. You want 24 hours porn, you got it. You want stamina that would make watch for 24 hours, you got it. You want to see people kill each other, you got it! In this story’s America, everyone is wired, and logged in, except for Debbie Decay. She was brought up the right way, learning to fear people, getting hit, and being cast ou Tokyo Ghost!!! In a world, where technology rules everything, and addiction to it is the norm (sound familiar?), pleasure is everything. You want 24 hours shows, you got it. You want 24 hours porn, you got it. You want stamina that would make watch for 24 hours, you got it. You want to see people kill each other, you got it! In this story’s America, everyone is wired, and logged in, except for Debbie Decay. She was brought up the right way, learning to fear people, getting hit, and being cast out, she knows to stay away from the addiction. Her partner, however, can’t shake off the addiction. Led Dent, is one of the most brutal constables there is, even if he is constantly watching his “shows” filled with pornographic ads. You may ask, who could be a villain, in a world where almost everything is legal? We have Davey Trauma, who has a special body modification that allows him to hijack the nanites within everyone within a certain radius around him. Debbie is the ideal match for Davey, however, she is tired. She wants to get away from it all, get Led cleaned up, and live off the grid. Rumors are that Tokyo is surrounded by an EMP field, rendering all form of electronics useless, and serves as the last haven on earth with a surviving environment. This story is about the search for a haven, to balance things between liberation and responsibility, and sacrifices to get what you want. I don’t want to spoil much, but it’s easy to say that things surely never go the way you want it (or at the very least, the way I want it). Rick Remender did a great feat of his writing skills with this one, weaving action, morality, and social satirical points. Of course, Sean Murphy’s art is gorgeous as ever and matches the story here perfectly. I hope these 2 team up again soon!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Aliamad

    I'm not a frequent comic reader, but was very impressed by the amazing art and vision of a dystopian future in Tokyo Ghost. First of all, the artwork and coloring in this comic is superb, I would actually frame some of the panels in the comic like a painting on my wall. As for the narrative: At heart a love story between tech-phobe Debbie Decay and tech-addict Teddy, aka Led Dent, Tokyo Ghost is simple and easy to follow, relying on repetition almost to a fault, but its simplicity is deceptive: wit I'm not a frequent comic reader, but was very impressed by the amazing art and vision of a dystopian future in Tokyo Ghost. First of all, the artwork and coloring in this comic is superb, I would actually frame some of the panels in the comic like a painting on my wall. As for the narrative: At heart a love story between tech-phobe Debbie Decay and tech-addict Teddy, aka Led Dent, Tokyo Ghost is simple and easy to follow, relying on repetition almost to a fault, but its simplicity is deceptive: within the 10 issues is an interesting exploration on themes of environmentalism, our overreliance on technology, identity, love and the mutually opposing balance that is the essence of life. It's fascinating to see how often the idea of opposing forces working in concerted harmony to create a balance is such a frequent notion that shows up in fiction (I'm also currently reading The Satanic Verses, for example) and here, we see it in the balancing act humanity faces between nature and technology, between the real world and the artificial digital world. Where does the future of humanity lie? How far would we collectively and individually be willing to compromise ourselves for love, for happiness? You'll ruminate on this and more with Tokyo Ghost.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Chris Thompson

    Rick Remender shows a lot of anger in Tokyo Ghost. Anger at human apathy - our apathy in electing the wrong leaders, our apathy in destroying the environment, our apathy in allowing technology to hijack our brains (literally, the story’s villain, Davey Trauma, hacks into people’s brains). Certainly not subtle, but I don’t think a story always needs subtlety to be effective. But Remender could do with more control and focus in his anger. Tokyo Ghost is at its strongest when it slows down and allo Rick Remender shows a lot of anger in Tokyo Ghost. Anger at human apathy - our apathy in electing the wrong leaders, our apathy in destroying the environment, our apathy in allowing technology to hijack our brains (literally, the story’s villain, Davey Trauma, hacks into people’s brains). Certainly not subtle, but I don’t think a story always needs subtlety to be effective. But Remender could do with more control and focus in his anger. Tokyo Ghost is at its strongest when it slows down and allows characters and themes to develop. He’s at his weakest when he shoves his message down our throat (yes, I’m referring to one of the story’s grossest scenes with a pants-less President Flak). The writing is uneven, but the art is gorgeous. Many times I just stopped and stared, marveling at the stylish images. Despite the unevenness, Remender provides some useful concerns on where society is heading. He likens technology addictions to drug addicts, with people going through withdrawal periods when they’re disconnected. The story’s world could have been better developed and the ending is definitely rushed. Remender may have been able to do something more interesting with a longer story, but the artistic achievements will stick with me for years to come.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ifan

    Tokyo Ghost is especially impactful on the first reading. The shocking elements effectively evoke a range of disgust, cringe, and discomfort. There's still plenty to enjoy on the second read, but some of the thinner story elements are more glaring. The political satire ("Make LA great again") is under-explored. And the cyberpunk future portrayed here feels indistinguishable from other versions in the genre. Otherwise, I like the loop of vengeance and revenge that haunts each act of violence. I c Tokyo Ghost is especially impactful on the first reading. The shocking elements effectively evoke a range of disgust, cringe, and discomfort. There's still plenty to enjoy on the second read, but some of the thinner story elements are more glaring. The political satire ("Make LA great again") is under-explored. And the cyberpunk future portrayed here feels indistinguishable from other versions in the genre. Otherwise, I like the loop of vengeance and revenge that haunts each act of violence. I can't help but root for Debbie and Teddy as they try to carve out their own slice of sanctuary even as both go through a major transformation at different points of the story. Because one of the villains is so talkative, his share of the speech bubbles can make the writing seem juvenile in a way that can be jarring (things like YOLO, fleek, etc.). In contrast, Debbie and especially Led (Teddy) are more reserved so it can make the writing feel more immature as a whole. The art by Sean Murphy and Matt Hollingsworth is consistently exceptional. The constant changing of scope from intimate interactions between characters to car chases and fights surrounded by buildings or waterfalls that span the height of the page gives the world depth. I'm satisfied with the way it ended but would eagerly jump back in if Remender, Murphy, and Hollingsworth revive the series.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    Excellent one and done story hardcover from writer Rick Remender, artist Sean Murphy and colorist Matt Hollingsworth. Murphy crafts some truly breathtaking full page spreads that effectively demonstrate the unique futeristic world world of Tokyo Ghost. Set in a future where the majority of the world has been taken over and consumed by media technology a select few exist 'outside'. The story movies at a quick pace with plenty of action and striking imagery. A scene depicting Genghis Khan, Adolf H Excellent one and done story hardcover from writer Rick Remender, artist Sean Murphy and colorist Matt Hollingsworth. Murphy crafts some truly breathtaking full page spreads that effectively demonstrate the unique futeristic world world of Tokyo Ghost. Set in a future where the majority of the world has been taken over and consumed by media technology a select few exist 'outside'. The story movies at a quick pace with plenty of action and striking imagery. A scene depicting Genghis Khan, Adolf Hitler, Mao and Osama Bin Laden riding go-karts stands out in particular. The constantly exposed genitalia of one of the villains is another moment that combines humor with a surreal atmosphere of power runamuck. Great to see a vision completed so successfully. Should any future storylines be produced I would welcome opportunities to return to this universe if only for more of Murphy's art.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mohammad Al Ayoubi

    Just how many people out there think the future may hold a better life? Obviously the writer isn't one of them. Addresssing the rightly depicted "Opium den" problem with anything but that tedious groan of old people. A strange love story in our fully screwed-to-be world featuring a hot (and platinum blonde lady as the last tech-free preson, sticking to her absentee love. I gotta admit that such a noble massage kinda apalled me when combined with nudity, strong language and gore... But I am not a Just how many people out there think the future may hold a better life? Obviously the writer isn't one of them. Addresssing the rightly depicted "Opium den" problem with anything but that tedious groan of old people. A strange love story in our fully screwed-to-be world featuring a hot (and platinum blonde lady as the last tech-free preson, sticking to her absentee love. I gotta admit that such a noble massage kinda apalled me when combined with nudity, strong language and gore... But I am not an antagonist of that. Drama, fight scenes, that pure love and those sick evildoers plus a few haunting sins of the past all in the perfect portions to make every issue leave a lasting impression, and drive you to tears.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    The artwork was gorgeous, and it's a well constructed story with memorable (if not necessarily nuanced) characters. The origin story/childhood flashbacks were expertly woven into the narrative. There's a surprising amount of sex and nudity without any of it feeling creepy/exploitative/fan service. Definitely worth a read. With that said... there's nothing all that exciting about the overarching plot. It's the same old "nature vs technology" battle, living in the same old "people are inherently wo The artwork was gorgeous, and it's a well constructed story with memorable (if not necessarily nuanced) characters. The origin story/childhood flashbacks were expertly woven into the narrative. There's a surprising amount of sex and nudity without any of it feeling creepy/exploitative/fan service. Definitely worth a read. With that said... there's nothing all that exciting about the overarching plot. It's the same old "nature vs technology" battle, living in the same old "people are inherently worthless sacks of tech-addicted dopamine-seeking shit" dystopia. No nuance. Oh, and a hint of "Asians in tune with nature" fetishism.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Rafael Morillo

    This story takes is set in 2089 in the Isles of Los Angeles and follows two peacekeepers named Led Dent and his lover Debbie Decay. The story is dystopian with most of the population addicted to technology. Led Dent is heavily addicted to technology and Debbie Decay attempts wean Led Dent from his addictions. Led Dent and Debbie soon are tasked to travel to the last tech-free country on Earth: the garden nation of Tokyo. Tokyo Ghost was a fun read and I liked the ending. It is a tale about love This story takes is set in 2089 in the Isles of Los Angeles and follows two peacekeepers named Led Dent and his lover Debbie Decay. The story is dystopian with most of the population addicted to technology. Led Dent is heavily addicted to technology and Debbie Decay attempts wean Led Dent from his addictions. Led Dent and Debbie soon are tasked to travel to the last tech-free country on Earth: the garden nation of Tokyo. Tokyo Ghost was a fun read and I liked the ending. It is a tale about love and the dangers of addiction to technology and entertainment. The story was interesting and the pictures were beautifully drawn. I am looking forward to reading more comics by Rick Remender.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    A dystopian future where the gap between rich and poor is larger than ever and technology has taken over the minds of the masses is a world worth visiting in Rick Remender's Tokyo Ghost. With gorgeous art, memorable characters and a well rendered take on the distant future this series is well worth a read. Seemingly contained to a single volume the ending can't help leave you wondering if Remender with revisit this world down the road. A dystopian future where the gap between rich and poor is larger than ever and technology has taken over the minds of the masses is a world worth visiting in Rick Remender's Tokyo Ghost. With gorgeous art, memorable characters and a well rendered take on the distant future this series is well worth a read. Seemingly contained to a single volume the ending can't help leave you wondering if Remender with revisit this world down the road.

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