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The New Ocean: The Fate of Life in a Changing Sea

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A fascinating look at the future of our oceans and how human actions may change them. The Earth our home is covered mostly with water: the wide, deep, salty, and very blue ocean. It regulates our climate in a way that makes life as we know it possible. This huge ocean is full of an amazing amount of life, most of which is too small to see. But life in the ocean is in trou A fascinating look at the future of our oceans and how human actions may change them. The Earth our home is covered mostly with water: the wide, deep, salty, and very blue ocean. It regulates our climate in a way that makes life as we know it possible. This huge ocean is full of an amazing amount of life, most of which is too small to see. But life in the ocean is in trouble. The ocean is becoming hotter, more polluted, and, in places, empty of life. The right amount of warming is good for us, but too much warming is causing shifts that are not good for life in the ocean. Global warming, pollution, and overfishing are creating a New Ocean, in which life is changing drastically. This book tells the stories of the probable fates of six sea dwellers: jellyfish, orcas, sea turtles, tuna, corals, and blue-green algae. What becomes of them may help you understand what becomes of us. Praise for Bryn Barnard s Outbreak! and Dangerous Planet: "An absorbing narrative that includes touches of humor. . . . Teachers will find many uses for this, but the book is so engaging it will also attract browsers and hold them. Booklist, Starred An engrossing introduction for young adult readers to the chillingly topical subject of man vs. microbe. The Wall Street Journal"


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A fascinating look at the future of our oceans and how human actions may change them. The Earth our home is covered mostly with water: the wide, deep, salty, and very blue ocean. It regulates our climate in a way that makes life as we know it possible. This huge ocean is full of an amazing amount of life, most of which is too small to see. But life in the ocean is in trou A fascinating look at the future of our oceans and how human actions may change them. The Earth our home is covered mostly with water: the wide, deep, salty, and very blue ocean. It regulates our climate in a way that makes life as we know it possible. This huge ocean is full of an amazing amount of life, most of which is too small to see. But life in the ocean is in trouble. The ocean is becoming hotter, more polluted, and, in places, empty of life. The right amount of warming is good for us, but too much warming is causing shifts that are not good for life in the ocean. Global warming, pollution, and overfishing are creating a New Ocean, in which life is changing drastically. This book tells the stories of the probable fates of six sea dwellers: jellyfish, orcas, sea turtles, tuna, corals, and blue-green algae. What becomes of them may help you understand what becomes of us. Praise for Bryn Barnard s Outbreak! and Dangerous Planet: "An absorbing narrative that includes touches of humor. . . . Teachers will find many uses for this, but the book is so engaging it will also attract browsers and hold them. Booklist, Starred An engrossing introduction for young adult readers to the chillingly topical subject of man vs. microbe. The Wall Street Journal"

30 review for The New Ocean: The Fate of Life in a Changing Sea

  1. 5 out of 5

    Manybooks

    Bryn Barnard's absolute brilliant The New Ocean: The Fate of Life in a Changing Sea is definitely both massively depressing and indeed also to and for me on a personal and emotional level angrily infuriating, but it is nevertheless an essential and most important non fiction book that really and truly does need to be be required reading for not only ALL school aged children, period (actually more children above the age of nine or so, as while the text of The New Ocean: The Fate of Life in a Chan Bryn Barnard's absolute brilliant The New Ocean: The Fate of Life in a Changing Sea is definitely both massively depressing and indeed also to and for me on a personal and emotional level angrily infuriating, but it is nevertheless an essential and most important non fiction book that really and truly does need to be be required reading for not only ALL school aged children, period (actually more children above the age of nine or so, as while the text of The New Ocean: The Fate of Life in a Changing Sea is not penned in an overly difficult to understand manner, it is nevertheless narrationally dense and replete with much scientific and ecologic information) but indeed and in fact equally so for ALL adults (but especially true with regard to politicians and those naive and annoying ignoramuses who still and yes annoyingly blinkeredly choose to deny and refuse to consider the real and present, even if uncomfortable truth that human caused climate change, as well as massive littering with especially plastics, not to mention rampant over-fishing have caused the world's oceans to become increasingly warmer and stagnant, more and more polluted, and sadly therefore ever more devoid of much of the ocean life that used to proliferate and thrive in the waters). Highly recommended, with the bibliography and glossary at the back of The New Ocean: The Fate of Life in a Changing Sea an appreciated and important added bonus (with especially the list of sources, the above mentioned bibliography, greatly increasing both the teaching and learning as well as the supplemental research value of The New Ocean: The Fate of Life in a Changing Sea). And while I do to a point understand that some readers have indeed found the New Ocean: The Fate of Life in a Changing Sea and in particular Bryn Barnard's featured text somewhat preachy, considering how much in danger and how increasingly stagnant of life the oceans are continuously becoming (with the scary scenario of in the future having seas in which mostly only a select few animal and plant species such as jellyfish and blue green algae will be able to survive and thrive a real and dangerous possibility if not even a probability), sorry, but that very preachiness is most definitely and perhaps a bit sadly very much required, as something absolutely needs to be done before it is too late (and you know, it might already be too late to completely save our oceans, but if we collectively start now, perhaps some of the damage might at be least somewhat mitigated).

  2. 4 out of 5

    Peacegal

    The ocean is changing, the changes are serious, and it matters. THE NEW OCEAN doesn't sugarcoat the effects of pollution, overfishing, and climate change, but it isn't all doom and gloom either. Instead, the author harnesses kids' natural energy and optimism and strives to inform and empower them, something all eco-awareness literature needs to do. While most authors talk about energy use and littering, I am so glad the author was brave enough to "go there" and talk dietary issues, too. The huge The ocean is changing, the changes are serious, and it matters. THE NEW OCEAN doesn't sugarcoat the effects of pollution, overfishing, and climate change, but it isn't all doom and gloom either. Instead, the author harnesses kids' natural energy and optimism and strives to inform and empower them, something all eco-awareness literature needs to do. While most authors talk about energy use and littering, I am so glad the author was brave enough to "go there" and talk dietary issues, too. The huge factory trawlers and longline fisheries exist because the human population demands immense amounts of fish, and the oceans just can't keep up. Tuna are especially affected. Not only is insatiable demand destroying their populations, but mercury and other hazardous chemicals are concentrating in their flesh. Choosing to replace fish--especially tuna--in our meals is an ocean-saving step nearly anyone can choose to do.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    Striking oil on canvas illustrations complement informative text that is shocking and eye-opening in many ways. While many experts talk about global warming and the effects it is likely to have on coastlines and coastal cities, few have actually imagined the changes that may occur in the oceans and how that change--warmer temperatures, more pollution, and empty of life in some areas--may affect six marine species. By looking ahead at the fate of jellyfish, orcas, sea turtles, tuna, corals, and b Striking oil on canvas illustrations complement informative text that is shocking and eye-opening in many ways. While many experts talk about global warming and the effects it is likely to have on coastlines and coastal cities, few have actually imagined the changes that may occur in the oceans and how that change--warmer temperatures, more pollution, and empty of life in some areas--may affect six marine species. By looking ahead at the fate of jellyfish, orcas, sea turtles, tuna, corals, and blue-green algae, the author imagines what life in the future might be like. Apparently, species such as the jellyfish and blue-green algae will be the ones that survive and even thrive as the ocean as we know it changes. In the concluding section of this important book, the author discusses how these changes in the ocean may affect humans and other living things and makes a plea for readers to become interested in science, which offers our best chance at stopping some of these changes. Being informed is the best way to identify and then tackle the problem. I loved how he provided the example of sixteen-year-old Boyan Slat who devised a clean to collect garbage in the ocean. The end papers are also worth examining too since one set features all the garbage patches swirling through our planet's waters and the other shows how coral reefs are being damaged by too much acidification, which will clearly have an impact on anything living in the ocean waters. While some may find the book to be text heavy, I found the writing and descriptions gripping and heartbreaking in some respects. This book should serve as a wake-up call for those who deny that global matters exists or that it matters or will have any impact on us. Clearly, it might not affect some of us who are living today, but those who are being born right now will have to contend with these challenges, a sobering thought indeed. This would be an excellent addition to a classroom science library.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Cara

    Although this text includes a wealth of valuable information, its inability to appeal to its intended audience may ensure that it does not get the attention it deserves. The picture book size and format will cause many students in grades 4-6 to shy away from considering the book as a serious resource. Unlike many current nonfiction texts, this book features paragraph after paragraph of unbroken text, with no additional text boxes to divide the information so that it is more easily digested. The Although this text includes a wealth of valuable information, its inability to appeal to its intended audience may ensure that it does not get the attention it deserves. The picture book size and format will cause many students in grades 4-6 to shy away from considering the book as a serious resource. Unlike many current nonfiction texts, this book features paragraph after paragraph of unbroken text, with no additional text boxes to divide the information so that it is more easily digested. The oil on canvas illustrations are detailed and realistic, but any nonfiction text can benefit from photographs that show reality to the reader. The book’s structure provides an introduction, sections on the six featured animals, a conclusion, bibliography, and glossary. Each species’ section is four pages long. The first spread provides an introduction to the animal, often accompanied by bulleted facts, plus an illustration. The second spread explores how humans’ actions are impacting the species, speculating whether they are likely to survive or not, plus another illustration. The endpapers each offer a map of the world showing the impact of human actions on the ocean, specifically looking at pollution and acidification. Though the conclusion offers some very doom-and-gloom possibilities, it ends on the hopeful note that readers who study and employ science can have a positive effect on the environment. Teachers in grades 4-6 can share this book with their science classes as a case study or encourage students to use its information for research projects.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Donalyn

    Barnard's research is always spot on, and the book is visually interesting. Glossary of terms and additional resources in the back matter. Barnard's research is always spot on, and the book is visually interesting. Glossary of terms and additional resources in the back matter.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Edward Sullivan

    A disturbing look at how global warming, over fishing, and pollution are dramatically altering life in the sea. Great information and visually compelling.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mehmet Kır

    In the book you can find out how the world's greatest environmental problems have affected the lives of ocean biota. My rating is 4 stars **** In the book you can find out how the world's greatest environmental problems have affected the lives of ocean biota. My rating is 4 stars ****

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kristen Thorp

    Informative and interesting. Mother Earth is f*cked.

  9. 5 out of 5

    LauraW

    I thought at first that this book had an unfortunate layout. There are LOTS of words on the pages, and the pages are large. The pictures are good, but I was afraid that the text would overwhelm them. To my surprise, the text was quite readable and interesting. The choices of living things to discuss were good: some are flourishing because of pollution, warming, and acidification, while others are suffering. The book gives a good perspective on change, in that it may throw off a delicate balance I thought at first that this book had an unfortunate layout. There are LOTS of words on the pages, and the pages are large. The pictures are good, but I was afraid that the text would overwhelm them. To my surprise, the text was quite readable and interesting. The choices of living things to discuss were good: some are flourishing because of pollution, warming, and acidification, while others are suffering. The book gives a good perspective on change, in that it may throw off a delicate balance in different ways for different animals/plants. Enjoyable and valuable, though saddening in many ways. We are such poor stewards of our Earth.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Chang

    I admit to being a tad ignorant on most political issues, and world events, but when it comes to the environment...I can get really passionate about how we have careless, callous, and corrupt people making huge decisions for the planet...and it....really, REALLY gets me upset. Always makes me wish I could DO something...and not just the little things like donating money...or...writing letters that will never get read....but a significant and unmistakable action that can't be avoided...something I admit to being a tad ignorant on most political issues, and world events, but when it comes to the environment...I can get really passionate about how we have careless, callous, and corrupt people making huge decisions for the planet...and it....really, REALLY gets me upset. Always makes me wish I could DO something...and not just the little things like donating money...or...writing letters that will never get read....but a significant and unmistakable action that can't be avoided...something that will get the RIGHT people to finally UNDERSTAND how this planet is our home....and we've only got one of it. How it has so many wonderful and mysterious things...such colourful diversity and just....so, so...many things we haven't even been able to truly comprehend yet. And so much of it...is all being destroyed...taken away...torn apart...damaged...beyond repair...it saddens me. This book didn't exactly tell me anything I didn't already know, but it did renew my passion and anger for all the terrible decisions being made in the world with seemingly no consideration for other non-human species of this planet. This New Ocean that this book describes....is not a very pleasant one...and definitely not one that I'd like to live in. But I suppose all things work in cycles...and we have merely reached the climax of this generation....and it's time for other species to rule. After all...we haven't taken the best care of it. Anyways....I truly hope that more people will read this book and be motivated to take action, or at least make small changes to their lives in effort to....save this lovely planet....

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mrs.Melaugh Melaugh

    Using six species as examples, this slim volume sounds the alarm about changes in the ocean and makes an urgent call for action. There are several pages about each of these species: the rise of jellyfish, the endangering of orcas, the declining numbers of turtles, the decline of tuna and the high levels of mercury in the ones that are left, the warming and acidification of the ocean and consequent bleaching of coral reefs, and the rise in levels of blue-green algae. The graphics are lovely even Using six species as examples, this slim volume sounds the alarm about changes in the ocean and makes an urgent call for action. There are several pages about each of these species: the rise of jellyfish, the endangering of orcas, the declining numbers of turtles, the decline of tuna and the high levels of mercury in the ones that are left, the warming and acidification of the ocean and consequent bleaching of coral reefs, and the rise in levels of blue-green algae. The graphics are lovely even as they display disturbing events. The most dramatic painting shows a turtle whose warped shell has grown around a plastic six-pack ring in which it is stuck. Two maps on the end pages show the location of huge garbage patches (there is one in every major ocean now!) and the current state of coral bleaching with projections to 2095. Bleak passages like this one verge on hopelessness, “It may be that the human extinction event may actually have begun ten thousand years ago, when people invented agriculture, began clearing forests and jungles for fields, and thus began loading extra carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.” Thankfully, the author finishes on a positive note by citing the example of Boyan Slat, a sixteen-year-old Dutch engineering student who invented a passive ocean cleaner that has begun removing plastic garbage from the ocean. Young people are encouraged to study nature and science and work toward solutions.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Enora

    A very quick read packed with valuable informations: Introduction - There are approximately 200 millions tons of plastic littering the ocean. - By 2050, there will be more plastic in the ocean than fish. - We've counted 230,000 species of plants and animals in the ocean, including phytoplankton (tiny plants), zooplankton (tiny animals), bacteria, viruses, molds and fungi. - The currents mix the oxygen-rich water from the surface to the water deep below thanks to currents. Some of this oxygen turns A very quick read packed with valuable informations: Introduction - There are approximately 200 millions tons of plastic littering the ocean. - By 2050, there will be more plastic in the ocean than fish. - We've counted 230,000 species of plants and animals in the ocean, including phytoplankton (tiny plants), zooplankton (tiny animals), bacteria, viruses, molds and fungi. - The currents mix the oxygen-rich water from the surface to the water deep below thanks to currents. Some of this oxygen turns into the ozone layer. - Because of the global warming, ocean currents and winds may simply stop. - The ocean is absorbing a lot of the extra carbon dioxide in the air and turning it into acid, which melts the shells of some sea creature, like plankton, and destroys the coral reef. - Ancient, primitive sea creatures are moving into these highly acidic spaces (like jellyfish and green alguea) - Taken together, global warming, pollution, acidification and overfishing are creating a New Ocean. Jellyfish - 600 millions years old. - They have a mouth but no brain, heart, spine or blood. - Their mouth is surrounded by tentacles and studded with thousands of stinging nematocysts - poisons needles to kill prey. - The Lion's mane jellyfish can reach 120 feet long. - The Irukandji and the Sea Wasp are some of the most venomous marine creatures known. - The Immortal jellyfish, which lives in the Sea of Japan and the Mediterranean, can turn from adult to baby and back again. - Jellyfish first evolved in ancient oceans that had little oxygens, and so they can survive today in the ocean's growing dead zones, caused by pollution, acidification, change in temperature or curents. - Jellyfish have perfected a survival strategy that has allowed them to wait for the ideal time to reproduce. Eggs sink to the bottom of the sea and grow into polyps, attaching themselves in vast fields. There they wait - for years if need be - for salinity, temperature, and food to be just right. Then they bud, becoming young jellyfishes named medusas. They rise through the water, eating as they go: plankton, eggs, baby fish... This is a jellyfish bloom, which can be hundreds of miles wide and consists of millions of jellyfish. Orcas - They communicate in long, complex songs of whistles and clicks that mother teach to their children. - They live in tribes called pods, which each sing with different accents. - They have unique dorsal-fin shape and white or gray saddle patch. - They live in close-knit family groups their entire lives. - Orcas in the Puget Sound (Seattle) are considered some of the most contaminated animals on the planet, as they are at the top of the food chain. - Wild orcas can live up to 100 year ; captured in parks up to 6 years. Turtles - 215 millions years old - Most land turtles disappeared in the extinction that wiped out the dinosaurs; aquatic turtles survived. - Their spine and ribs are external and have spread and fused together into a shell (except for the leatherback). - The baby turtles peck their way out of their eggs with a special tooth on the end of their beaks. Only 1/1000 will survive to adulthood. - They live for 150 years and more. - They mistake plastic bags for jellyfish - their favorite food -, which then accumulates into their stomach, blocking digestion and space for food, so that the turtle gradually starve to death. - They can also be caught in shrimp fishing net and drawn. Tuna - Tuna comes from the ancient Greek verb thyno, meaning "to rush". - They have a network of tiny blood vessels under their skin that helps bring oxygen to their muscles so that, uniquely among fish, they have a body temperature that is higher than that of the water around them, allowing them to swim faster, up to 50 miles/h - They have to swim continuously their entire lives, even when asleep, or else they would suffocate. - 1/40 million tuna eggs survives into adulthood, and then can live for up to 50 years. - They are full of mercury, a poison that kills brain cells and makes you unable to control your muscles. Corals - They are a group of tiny animals called polyps. - They are hollow, cylindrical creatures with a mouth at one end and tentacles used to sting and capture food at the other. - They host a special kind of algae that lives inside the polyp. The algae is protected from predators by living inside the corals; in exchange, the algae process energy from the sun and turn it into food the coral can eat. - Together, the polyps and the algae pull calcium out of the seawater and turn it into a mineral called limestone. This is what a coral reef is - a limestone skeleton covered by a thin layer of living coral. - They host 25% of all creatures in the ocean. Blue-green algae - 3 billion years old - They are not a plant but a bacteria. Some are toxic, some are harmless. - They use photosynthesis like plants, and where the first to do so. - Because of blue-green algae, the ancient Earth's atmosphere changed from one filled with carbon dioxide and other gases to one that is mostly oxygen. - We are filling the ocean with fertilizer runoff, which blue-green algae like to eat, and we are emptying the ocean of fish that eat that algae. - Along with jellyfish, they are becoming the dominant life-form in parts of the ocean, just as they were 3 billions years ago. Scientists call this "the rise of the slime", a kind of reverse evolution in which the ocean becomes less complex and more like it was in the deep past. - Fireweed, a stringy blue-green algae found in Australia and Hawaii, contains powerful toxin that kills sea creatures. When it dies and dries on the beach, it can turn into a poisonous, burning powder that can blow far inland, hurting people and animals that eat or breathe it. Conclusion - If the climates continues to get hotter, the ice caps will melt, the sea levels will rise, and the oceans will become warm from pole to pole. Most ocean currents will probably stop. The sea may then slowly change in a Canfield Ocean. - In an oxygen-poor Canfield Ocean, ancient bacteria from before the evolution of blue-green algae will take over the sea. Instead of making oxygen, these purple bacteria will photosynthesize rotten-egg-smelling hydrogen sulfide gas, which will tinge the sky green and destroy the atmosphere's protective ozone layer, allowing the sun's deadly ultraviolet rays to penetrate and kill most life. Innovative example - Boyan Slat invented a passive ocean cleaner to collect plastic garbage

  13. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    Very thoughtful book that speculates on the eventual fate of six sea creatures, from microscopic blue-green algae to giant tuna and orca whales. The detailed writing makes this a book for older elementary or middle-school students, although the illustrations would interest younger readers. Interested readers will learn about ocean acidification, the destruction of the coral reefs, the garbage patches that float in each of our oceans, and the mercury and other toxins that fish and mammals up the Very thoughtful book that speculates on the eventual fate of six sea creatures, from microscopic blue-green algae to giant tuna and orca whales. The detailed writing makes this a book for older elementary or middle-school students, although the illustrations would interest younger readers. Interested readers will learn about ocean acidification, the destruction of the coral reefs, the garbage patches that float in each of our oceans, and the mercury and other toxins that fish and mammals up the food chain consume. Not for the faint of heart, it might seem to depict a desperate situation because the ocean is definitely in trouble. But author/illustrator Bryn Barnard ends on a hopeful note, celebrating nature and science and the way science can help our clever species solve problems, saying, "Science is our best hope of survival." He cites the example of one particular engineering student, Boylan Slat, who invented a passive ocean cleaner in 2012 and hopes to eliminate the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. He also describes simpler steps that individuals can take to improve the Earth's chances. Beautiful oil-on-canvas illustrations, but more importantly, valuable examples and lessons.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth S

    Frightening. Which is what it is meant to be, I'm sure. Most of the time when we read about climate change and how it affects the animals of the world, we worry about endangered animals, species we may never know about, or other declining populations. This book also mentions two types of sea creatures that are growing--overwhelming the oceans and causing other problems. Frightening. Which is what it is meant to be, I'm sure. Most of the time when we read about climate change and how it affects the animals of the world, we worry about endangered animals, species we may never know about, or other declining populations. This book also mentions two types of sea creatures that are growing--overwhelming the oceans and causing other problems.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    Bryn Barnard both tells this tale of alarm and illustrates it. With an introduction that shares an overview of the dangers to our ocean, he focuses on what he calls "the probable fates of six sea dwellers" which are jellyfish, orcas, sea turtles, tuna, corals, and blue-green algae, "some of the losers and winners in the New Ocean". It is an alarming story, with the opening endpapers showing our "ocean of plastic" and the final endpapers showing "projected ocean acidification". Added backmatter Bryn Barnard both tells this tale of alarm and illustrates it. With an introduction that shares an overview of the dangers to our ocean, he focuses on what he calls "the probable fates of six sea dwellers" which are jellyfish, orcas, sea turtles, tuna, corals, and blue-green algae, "some of the losers and winners in the New Ocean". It is an alarming story, with the opening endpapers showing our "ocean of plastic" and the final endpapers showing "projected ocean acidification". Added backmatter includes Sources, a glossary, and acknowledgments. For what might be thought as a short picture book, there is a lot of information given and explained. Each area covered will serve as a terrific beginning to further research. Illustrations are beautiful paintings that show one aspect of danger to the topics, like a sea turtle's body caught in a plastic six-pack ring, or coral reef bleaching.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Read Ribbet

    Barnard looks at critical environmental concerns using six forms of ocean life. He takes on issues like the impact of climate change and plastic pollution to heighten the concerns about jellyfish, orcas, sea turtles, tuna, coral and blue-green algae. Sources for additional exploration are identified. A glossary is provided to support the learning of more scientific terms. The book could be jigsaw easily as teams or individuals look at each of the six forms a of sea life. The book is text heavy w Barnard looks at critical environmental concerns using six forms of ocean life. He takes on issues like the impact of climate change and plastic pollution to heighten the concerns about jellyfish, orcas, sea turtles, tuna, coral and blue-green algae. Sources for additional exploration are identified. A glossary is provided to support the learning of more scientific terms. The book could be jigsaw easily as teams or individuals look at each of the six forms a of sea life. The book is text heavy with some illustrative support but less other nonfiction features. It seems like a good book to include in a classroom collection that focuses on this content.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mandy

    Willow and I read this book together and took the time to really discuss the reasons why our oceans are in trouble. We both loved this book - Willow loved it because she has a deep love for ocean creatures (and the illustrations were beautiful), and I loved it because it shed light on real issues at hand and why it is so important to be aware and have compassion. Incredibly educational and insightful - it's a book I recommend for everyone. While I already knew the dangers of global warming, poll Willow and I read this book together and took the time to really discuss the reasons why our oceans are in trouble. We both loved this book - Willow loved it because she has a deep love for ocean creatures (and the illustrations were beautiful), and I loved it because it shed light on real issues at hand and why it is so important to be aware and have compassion. Incredibly educational and insightful - it's a book I recommend for everyone. While I already knew the dangers of global warming, pollution and overfishing, I learned just how much those three things can impact ocean life and oceans in general. We borrowed this book from our library, but I think it's one we'll end up purchasing.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    For such a short and simple book, it packs a pretty big horrifying punch. Through the stories of six ocean creatures, Bryn Barnard tells the larger tale of the changing ocean and in so doing makes it abundantly clear that the entire planet lies in the balance. Of course, it's not all doom and gloom. The jellyfish and blue algae will win out. Too bad for the rest of us, though. The final, most chilling thought that the reader is left with is that it may already be too late. Hundreds or thousands For such a short and simple book, it packs a pretty big horrifying punch. Through the stories of six ocean creatures, Bryn Barnard tells the larger tale of the changing ocean and in so doing makes it abundantly clear that the entire planet lies in the balance. Of course, it's not all doom and gloom. The jellyfish and blue algae will win out. Too bad for the rest of us, though. The final, most chilling thought that the reader is left with is that it may already be too late. Hundreds or thousands of years too late. Yikes. Beautiful and chilling. Awful and amazing.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Grace

    This beautifully illustrated depiction of the new ocean is both magical and deeply sad. It's kind of an odd format, as others have commented on - it's picture book-sized with large chunks of text - but as an adult, I didn't find it too simple, and I think middleschoolers will eat up the surprising facts about six ocean inhabitants. The large, lovely illustrations add appeal. I appreciated the concise and clear approach to such a large scary topic. This beautifully illustrated depiction of the new ocean is both magical and deeply sad. It's kind of an odd format, as others have commented on - it's picture book-sized with large chunks of text - but as an adult, I didn't find it too simple, and I think middleschoolers will eat up the surprising facts about six ocean inhabitants. The large, lovely illustrations add appeal. I appreciated the concise and clear approach to such a large scary topic.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    We're recommending for grades 3-6 as a textbook replacement. This is a beautiful and terrifying look at the changes taking place in the sea. An important book for schools and libraries. We're recommending for grades 3-6 as a textbook replacement. This is a beautiful and terrifying look at the changes taking place in the sea. An important book for schools and libraries.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Maggie Ignasiak

    Alarming and a total wake up call, perfect for conservationists and middle reader classrooms. A great read for any time of year, but especially Earth Day and summer.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Risinger

    good info but parts are a smidge preachy.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ilse O'Brien

    An important read for older kids. The infographics on the endpapers are impressively frightening.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    At first glance this looks like a super cool picture book about ocean life. But it is defiantly one words then pictures. It's super educational. It does talk about some ocean life (like jellyfish, orcas, turtles, tuna, coral, blue- green algae). But it goes much more deep than I thought it would! After each life form, it talks about how it's evolved and changed (due to humans). This is a very deep and thought provoking book. Too many words for probably 2nd and below grades. Maybe 3rd too... Defin At first glance this looks like a super cool picture book about ocean life. But it is defiantly one words then pictures. It's super educational. It does talk about some ocean life (like jellyfish, orcas, turtles, tuna, coral, blue- green algae). But it goes much more deep than I thought it would! After each life form, it talks about how it's evolved and changed (due to humans). This is a very deep and thought provoking book. Too many words for probably 2nd and below grades. Maybe 3rd too... Definitely a good resource for an ocean project?!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Noel

    This is a fantastic book about what our actions and choices are doing to our oceans and how the changes there affect the entire Earth. I read this to my kids (9 & 10) and they stayed engaged, though I think it did frighten them a little. But we loved the facts in the book, and it encouraged lots of discussion about what we can do to help. We need more (sometimes brutally) honest children’s books like this!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Monique

    Interesting book for children focusing on the effect that pollution, garbage and other harmful conditions are having on the oceans and her creatures. The author spends a few pages each on jellyfish, orcas, turtles, tuna, corals, and blue-green algae, and the troubles they face from the increasing man-made issue.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lynn

    An importance ecological message might be lost in the text-heavy pages. No headings, captions, or other helpful access features for young readers. Backmatter consists of Sources, Glossary, and Acknowledgments. World maps presented on the end pages: the back one shows bleaching which is discussed in the book, but the front one shows the garbage patches, which are not discussed.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

    [3.5 stars] I’m left still thinking about this book days after I’ve finished it. This is a very important topic that definitely needs to be discussed, but I’m not sure it’s the proper resource if kids are trying to get involved. I think I would’ve liked this better if it hadn’t been written as a “children’s” book. It’s a strange in-between of being boring for kids and not juicy enough for grown ups. But it’s a really good effort and definitely worth the read!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Felt as though it barely scratched the surface. Could've been far more in-depth and still concise. Felt as though it barely scratched the surface. Could've been far more in-depth and still concise.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bridget Neace

    Hard to rate this...it's set up as a children's book, but it definitely doesn't read as a children's book. Illustrations are beautiful. Comes off a bit preachy a times. Hard to rate this...it's set up as a children's book, but it definitely doesn't read as a children's book. Illustrations are beautiful. Comes off a bit preachy a times.

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