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The Return of Sherlock Holmes is a collection of 13 Sherlock Holmes stories, originally published in 1903-1904, by Arthur Conan Doyle. The stories were published in the Strand Magazine in Great Britain, and Collier's in the United States. The book was first published in February 1905 by McClure, Phillips & Co. (New York) then on March 7, 1905 by Georges Newnes, Ltd. (London The Return of Sherlock Holmes is a collection of 13 Sherlock Holmes stories, originally published in 1903-1904, by Arthur Conan Doyle. The stories were published in the Strand Magazine in Great Britain, and Collier's in the United States. The book was first published in February 1905 by McClure, Phillips & Co. (New York) then on March 7, 1905 by Georges Newnes, Ltd. (London) and was the first Holmes collection since 1893, when Holmes had "died" in "The Final Problem". Having published The Hound of the Baskervilles in 1901–1902 (setting it before Holmes' death) Doyle came under intense pressure to revive his famous character. The first story is set in 1894 and has Holmes returning in London and explaining the period from 1891–94, a period called “The Great Hiatus” by Sherlockian enthusiasts. Also of note is Watson's statement in the last story of the cycle that Holmes has retired, and forbids him to publish any more stories. This edition by Wisehouse Classics includes all of the stories with the original illustrations by Sidney Paget. (more on www.wisehouse-classics.com)


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The Return of Sherlock Holmes is a collection of 13 Sherlock Holmes stories, originally published in 1903-1904, by Arthur Conan Doyle. The stories were published in the Strand Magazine in Great Britain, and Collier's in the United States. The book was first published in February 1905 by McClure, Phillips & Co. (New York) then on March 7, 1905 by Georges Newnes, Ltd. (London The Return of Sherlock Holmes is a collection of 13 Sherlock Holmes stories, originally published in 1903-1904, by Arthur Conan Doyle. The stories were published in the Strand Magazine in Great Britain, and Collier's in the United States. The book was first published in February 1905 by McClure, Phillips & Co. (New York) then on March 7, 1905 by Georges Newnes, Ltd. (London) and was the first Holmes collection since 1893, when Holmes had "died" in "The Final Problem". Having published The Hound of the Baskervilles in 1901–1902 (setting it before Holmes' death) Doyle came under intense pressure to revive his famous character. The first story is set in 1894 and has Holmes returning in London and explaining the period from 1891–94, a period called “The Great Hiatus” by Sherlockian enthusiasts. Also of note is Watson's statement in the last story of the cycle that Holmes has retired, and forbids him to publish any more stories. This edition by Wisehouse Classics includes all of the stories with the original illustrations by Sidney Paget. (more on www.wisehouse-classics.com)

30 review for The Return of Sherlock Holmes

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jayson

    (A) 85% | Extraordinary Notes: All in all, a volume without a real stand-out story, but the most consistently good of the short story collections so far.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    The Return of Sherlock Holmes (Sherlock Holmes, #6), Arthur Conan Doyle The Return of Sherlock Holmes is a collection of 13 Sherlock Holmes stories, originally published in 1903-1904, by Arthur Conan Doyle. Missing, presumed dead, for three years, Sherlock Holmes returns triumphantly to his dear companion Dr Watson. And not before time! London has never been in more need of his extraordinary services: a murderous individual with an air gun stalks the city. Among thirteen further brilliant tales The Return of Sherlock Holmes (Sherlock Holmes, #6), Arthur Conan Doyle The Return of Sherlock Holmes is a collection of 13 Sherlock Holmes stories, originally published in 1903-1904, by Arthur Conan Doyle. Missing, presumed dead, for three years, Sherlock Holmes returns triumphantly to his dear companion Dr Watson. And not before time! London has never been in more need of his extraordinary services: a murderous individual with an air gun stalks the city. Among thirteen further brilliant tales of mystery, detection and deduction, Sherlock Holmes investigates the problem of the Norwood Builder, deciphers the message of the Dancing Men, and cracks the case of the Six Napoleons. The Adventure of the Empty House (the return of Holmes) The Adventure of the Norwood Builder The Adventure of the Dancing Men The Adventure of the Solitary Cyclist The Adventure of the Priory School The Adventure of Black Peter The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton The Adventure of the Six Napoleons The Adventure of the Three Students The Adventure of the Golden Pince-Nez The Adventure of the Missing Three-Quarter The Adventure of the Abbey Grange The Adventure of the Second Stain تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز بیستم ماه آوریل سال 2011 میلادی عنوانهای داستانها: «ماجرای خانه خالی (بازگشت هولمز)»؛ «ماجرای معمار نوروود»؛ «ماجرای مردان رقصان»؛ «ماجرای دوچرخه سوار تنها»؛ «ماجرای مدرسه پریوری»؛ «ماجرای پیتر سیاه»؛ «ماجرای چارلز آگوستوس میلورتن»؛ «ماجرای شش ناپلئون»؛ «ماجرای سه دانشجو»؛ «ماجرای عینک طلایی»؛ «ماجرای سه-چهارم گمشده»؛ «ماجرای اَبِی گرانج»؛ «ماجرای دومین لکه»؛ بازگشت شرلوک هولمز؛ عنوان مجموعه ای از سیزده داستان، از ماجراهای شرلوک هولمز است، که نخستین بار در سال‌های 1903 میلادی، تا سال 1904 میلادی، توسط «آرتور کانن دویل» منتشر شد؛ این نخستین مجموعه، از ماجراهای «هولمز» است، که پس از درگذشت ایشان، در «ماجرای مشکل نهایی» منتشر شد؛ ا. شربیانی

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lori

    It would probably have been better if I had spaced these out instead of reading one right after the other. That bit at the crater, had me shaking my head at Preston and Child. Must be a kind of complement or loving homage.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Steven Walle

    This is a great collection of thirteen Sherlock Holmes detective stories. These occur after Sherlock supposibley dies in the last collection. The author was under a lot of pressure to revive Sherlock Holmes and masterfully does in this volume. Enjoy and Be Blessed. Diamond

  5. 5 out of 5

    Werner

    June 29, 2019 Collecting 13 Sherlock Holmes tales which originally appeared in The Strand magazine from Oct. 1903 to Jan. 1905, and published in book form in 1905, this is the third of Doyle's five story collections featuring Holmes, the second one being the one I recently reviewed, The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes. Indeed, the lead story here, "The Adventure of the Empty House," is essentially a sequel to the last story in the previous collection, "The Adventure of the Final Problem." (In all of t June 29, 2019 Collecting 13 Sherlock Holmes tales which originally appeared in The Strand magazine from Oct. 1903 to Jan. 1905, and published in book form in 1905, this is the third of Doyle's five story collections featuring Holmes, the second one being the one I recently reviewed, The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes. Indeed, the lead story here, "The Adventure of the Empty House," is essentially a sequel to the last story in the previous collection, "The Adventure of the Final Problem." (In all of these collections, the arrangement of the stories is apparently in the order they were written.) The former story is one of two here that I'd already read; the other is "The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton," which is one of my favorite stories in the Holmes canon, though hard to discuss without a spoiler. (It was adapted for the PBS Mystery! TV series, starring Jeremy Brett, as "The Master Blackmailer;" I can recommend that version, but it does flesh out the original with significant added material.) From what I've read so far, I would say that stylistically, the stories here are typical of the Holmes corpus --which is to say, very readable, flowing well, with appropriate levels of description and character development, posing challenging intellectual puzzles that call forth satisfying displays of deduction, often with atmospheric and Gothic touches, and with inherent emotional impact and sometimes thought-provoking situations. Holmes' character dominates the book, and he's definitely one of the genre's most individual and memorable sleuths. (One reviewer did mention a "a heavy reliance on 'someone's past comes back to haunt them'" and I'd agree that this is a theme that crops up in several Holmes stories, here and elsewhere.) While waiting for a common read in one of my groups, I read five of the stories here. I guessed the main outlines of the solution in both "The Adventure of the Norwood Builder" and "The Adventure of the Solitary Cyclist," but it was still fun to see Holmes demonstrate and prove it, and both stories held some definite surprises nonetheless. Similarly, "The Adventure of the Priory School" was another story where I'd seen the PBS adaptation, so again I knew the basic solution; but the story differed from the adaptation in some particulars, and I'd forgotten others, so it wasn't a spoiled read on that account. "The Adventure of the Dancing Men" allowed Holmes to demonstrate his code-breaking skills to advantage. Finally, "The Adventure of Black Peter," provided one of Holmes' grislier murder cases, with the demise of a generally despised retired sea captain, his body found pinned to a wall with one of his own harpoons. Will read more later! Aug. 24, 2019 Yesterday, I finished reading the final six of these stories; and I'm increasingly suspecting I've read this collection, and at least some of the other later Holmes collections as well, as a kid, since I had the experience (not for the first time, in reading these books!) of recognizing a passage of dialogue I'd read before. I definitely recall that my reading of The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, back in the mists of childhood, set me to hunting up and reading every Sherlock Holmes book I could find. Only the titles of the first collection and the four novels stayed in my memory; but given my tendency to forget title information for books I read in those days, it's quite likely I read all, or at least much more, of the canon at that age than I specifically remembered! However, I'd forgotten all of the other details of that missing-person story, "The Adventure of the Missing Three Quarter" (the title comes from the terminology of the British sport of cricket --a world as new to Holmes as to me), so it and all of the other stories were as good as new reads. (I'd seen a TV adaptation of "The Adventure of the Golden Pince-Nez," on Mystery! years ago, which has two of Doyle's more memorable characters, and I recalled those two individuals, but not the details of the mystery and its solution.) My favorite story in this batch was "The Adventure of the Abbey Grange," which is also one of Holmes' grislier murder cases --though its grisliness wasn't the reason I liked it! That one is marred in one place by a character's use of "white man" as a complimentary term synonymous with "man of personal integrity," which is obviously racist; but Doyle is simply reproducing there the kind of speech that a character with these characteristics and background might well have used in that era. (The same usage rears its head, for instance, in John Buchan's The 39 Steps, which dates from the same period.) One story in The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes actually makes a very good statement about racial issues and is refreshingly free of the usual British racism of that day; to avoid a "spoiler," I won't identify the story, but it probably reflects the author's own attitudes more reliably than a casual comment put in the mouth of a character who appears once. In reading "The Adventure of the Six Napoleons," I deduced the basic premise behind the solution almost immediately, but again it was still fun watching Holmes work it out and fill in the details. The other mysteries were more difficult to resolve until the denouement, though in a couple of cases I'd formed a basic theory along the way which was correct as far as it went. "The Adventure of the Second Stain" takes Holmes and Watson, once again, into the world of high stakes international espionage. My main take-away from "The Adventure of the Three Students" is that it reflects a mind-set of English (and probably American as well) college students in an era that still saw academic cheating as something beneath an honorable person --and indeed, still felt that a person could be honorable, and that this would actually be a good thing. (Attitudes have changed today, and not for the better; but having read this soon after being present for the signing, at the start of another school year, of the Bluefield College Honor Code by the incoming freshmen, I'm glad that I'm serving an institution that chooses to go against the grain in that respect!) Like The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes, which I reviewed earlier, I read this collection (this time, at least) as part of the omnibus volume The Original Illustrated Sherlock Holmes, which reproduces all of the illustrations of the stories done by Sidney Paget when they were first published in The Strand. These enhance the read, IMO (kids aren't the only readers who can enjoy illustrations; we adults do, too! :-) )

  6. 5 out of 5

    Piyangie

    Sherlock Holmes has not died after all! :) That was a very happy development. I was hoping he would somehow return (from the dead) given the title of this collection. At the same time I also entertained the idea that perhaps this collection refers to the cases before his supposed death. All was cleared in The Adventure of the Empty House , when Holmes makes a dramatic re-entry scaring the poor Doctor Watson out of his wits. With his return, Sherlock Holmes brings to us (through Dr. Watson's chr Sherlock Holmes has not died after all! :) That was a very happy development. I was hoping he would somehow return (from the dead) given the title of this collection. At the same time I also entertained the idea that perhaps this collection refers to the cases before his supposed death. All was cleared in The Adventure of the Empty House , when Holmes makes a dramatic re-entry scaring the poor Doctor Watson out of his wits. With his return, Sherlock Holmes brings to us (through Dr. Watson's chronicles of course) thirteen interesting adventures of his where, as always, his brilliant, analytical mind and somewhat supernatural faculties as well as his power of deduction is demonstrated to his great advantage. This is the third collection of short stories that I read of the adventures of Sherlock Holmes and I found it to be the most interesting to me. Except for a couple, all the others were generously rated between four and five stars: The Adventure of the Empty House *****, The Adventure of the Norwood Builder *****, The Adventure of the Dancing Men *****, The Adventure of the Solitary Cyclist *****, The Adventure of the Six Napoleons *****, The Adventure of the Missing Three-Quarter *****, The Adventure of the Abbey Grange *****, The Adventure of the Priory School ****, The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton ****, The Adventure of the Three Students ****, The Adventure of the Golden Pince-Nez ****, The Adventure of the Second Stain *** and The Adventure of Black Peter ***. The eccentricity and arrogance were two marked characteristics of Sherlock Holmes. They were all the more marked in these stories, especially his arrogance. Although I was annoyed at times when his arrogance was directed towards Doctor Watson, I was able to overlook this weakness enough to respect and admire the eccentric detective. The only other complain I have is the fact that Conan Doyle has reduced Doctor Watson to a mere chronicler and a secretary. I wished the author had assigned a more useful role to the worthy doctor. With this read, I have completed the major works of Sherlock Holmes series. I'm really glad that Conan Doyle bowed down to the popular opinion and decided to continue the series long after his erroneous decision to mark the end of the series with The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes . We readers would otherwise have been deprived of some of the best adventures of Sherlock Holmes - the best fictitious detective ever to grace the literary world.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Saadia B. || CritiConscience

    The most interesting part of the book is when Sherlock Holmes returns; the emotional connection shared by Dr. Watson is not only moving but also praiseworthy. Shows how their friendship and value for one another have grown enormously throughout the years. Coming back to the stories, I found them less suspicious and attention-grabbing in nature this time. Though Holmes was as always the best in solving them. But I strongly believe that the collection could have been better. Hence I have given it The most interesting part of the book is when Sherlock Holmes returns; the emotional connection shared by Dr. Watson is not only moving but also praiseworthy. Shows how their friendship and value for one another have grown enormously throughout the years. Coming back to the stories, I found them less suspicious and attention-grabbing in nature this time. Though Holmes was as always the best in solving them. But I strongly believe that the collection could have been better. Hence I have given it four stars rather than the usual five stars. Best line: "Every problem becomes childish when explained" - Sherlock Holmes

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kenchiin

    Quality varies among the different short stories, but overall... a pleasure to read.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Aishu Rehman

    The Return of Sherlock Holmes collects thirteen short stories featuring the famous detective, all supposedly written and published by John Watson, his best friend, roommate, and confidante. (With a disappearing wife.) After the events of “The Adventure of the Final Problem”, Holmes returns, in dramatic fashion, and the two set out to solve crimes all over London, from theft to blackmail to international espionage. While I have plenty more to say about the “I Believe in Sherlock” movement (I may h The Return of Sherlock Holmes collects thirteen short stories featuring the famous detective, all supposedly written and published by John Watson, his best friend, roommate, and confidante. (With a disappearing wife.) After the events of “The Adventure of the Final Problem”, Holmes returns, in dramatic fashion, and the two set out to solve crimes all over London, from theft to blackmail to international espionage. While I have plenty more to say about the “I Believe in Sherlock” movement (I may have participated?), I’ll just say here that it amazes and humbles me that Holmes’ “death” has always affected fans to the point of action. And I was wondering how Doyle would actually bring him back. “The Adventure of the Empty House” does not disappoint. While the stories are ultimately adventure pieces, Holmes and Watson’s reunion is actually touching and the two do communicate how much they mean to each other—in fact, Holmes underestimated the affect his disappearance would have on Watson. They fall back into their familiar rhythm over the course of the story; they’re even a little handsy with each other as they readjust. I mean, more than usual. And at the end, all returns to status quo. (Holmes buys Watson’s practice in a roundabout manner and Mary seems to have vanished into thin air, so now they’re just living solely on Holmes’ paycheck, I assume. Oh, boys.)

  10. 4 out of 5

    K.D. Absolutely

    I know now why this collection of 13 short stories is called “The Return..” In the last story of “Memoirs” entitled The Final Problem, Watson says that Holmes has retired and will no longer publish new stories. Now in real life, between that story which was published in 1893 and 1903, the period called by Sherlock fans as “The Great Hiatus,” Sir Arthur Conan Doyle only wrote his third novel, The Hound of the Baskervilles (said to be his greatest novel). So, while writing the first story of the c I know now why this collection of 13 short stories is called “The Return..” In the last story of “Memoirs” entitled The Final Problem, Watson says that Holmes has retired and will no longer publish new stories. Now in real life, between that story which was published in 1893 and 1903, the period called by Sherlock fans as “The Great Hiatus,” Sir Arthur Conan Doyle only wrote his third novel, The Hound of the Baskervilles (said to be his greatest novel). So, while writing the first story of the collection, Doyle was in full hope that the interest in his characters, Holmes and Watson, would be revived. I actually rested for few days in between reading the two collections and I would say that on the 6th day, I felt that I was missing Sherlock Holmes so I returned to my daily reading and finished this book in 4 days including two heavy weekend reading days: The Adventure of the Empty House tells that Holmes has survived the fall from the Reinchenbach Falls with his archenemy Professor Mortiary. However, one of Mortiary’s confederates, Moran, knows about this so Holmes hides for three years and comes back in disguise. Watson, now a widower, recognizes him and so they are both back to resolving crimes in London. Their first assignment is the murder of Ronald Adair in Park Lane and the culprit is no other than his card playmate, who is but Moran. Very enjoyable after almost a week of not reading Sherlock Holmes. My friend is correct in advising me of not reading this canon without letup. Holmes almost convinced me went abroad to see the Dalai Lama! – 4 STARS The Adventure of the Norwood Builder is about Oldacre who wants to start a new life so he fakes his murder and sets up the son of the woman who has ditched him. Holmes does the unorthodox solution: fakes a fire and let the 3 cohorts to shout “Fire!” Oldacre comes out from the hiding. Also enjoyable but I could not believe that Oldacre did not know that the fire was staged. - 3 STARS The Adventure of the Dancing Men is about the death of a couple, American lady called Elsie and the British guy called Cubitt. Prior to their deaths, the images of the 15 Dancing Men mysteriously appear in their house. Although I loved the idea, I just can’t imagine how the ditched American lover was able to draw them on the wall without being caught. Oh, also what happened to the fingerprints on the guns used? - 2 STARS The Adventure of the Solitary Cyclist Violet is seeing a man on a bicycle following her. It seems to have something to do with the uncle who contacts Carruthers and Woodley to ensure the well-being of Violet and her mother. Quite ordinary. I thought it would have been more interesting if the love story is highlighted more. But then this is Sherlock Holmes and not Nicholas Sparks. - 2 STARS The Adventure of the Priory School Lord Saltire is missing from Priory School. Apparently, he leaves the school and is chased by Heidegger, the school’s master. The boy is reported to be unhappy at home and it is assumed to be the reason. Holmes and Watson deduced by first looking at the cow’s tracks and noticing that one of the bicycles has a patch. I liked this one because it has a second set of characters that come out during the deduction part that I did not expect coming. - 3 STARS The Adventure of Black Peter A whaler father is found dead, murdered in his store. His family is happy because he, abusive to them, is finally out of their lives. Investigator Hopkins asks for help from Holmes and Watson. Holmes sees the initial on the cover of the diary in the crime scene and it leads him to the culprit. Seems ordinary to me. - 2 STARS The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton The character of Charles Augustus Milverton is based on the life of Charles Augustus Howell (1840-1890) who persuaded the poet Dante Gabriel Rossetti to dig the up the poems he buried with his wife Elizabeth Siddal. He was said to have used those letters to bribe well-known personalities. Sir Conan Doyle used this true-to-life situation as a backdrop of this story. Here, Holmes is hired by a debutante Lady Eva Blackwell to retrieve compromising letters from a blackmailer, Milverton. Holmes disguises as a plumber, applies in the Blackwell mansion and get engaged with one of the maids. Conan Doyle has limitless imagination and can make Holmes do everything especially all these almost unbelievable disguises. - 4 STARS The Adventure of the Six Napoleons The busts of Napoleon are being shattered night after night by an unknown person. Through the power of Holmes’ deduction he found out why. Direct storytelling. I thought it had something to do with British hating Napoleon, a French military commander and conquerer. Until the revelation. - 3 STARS The Adventure of the Three Students Three students are suspected to have “prototype” of the exams that would qualify them for a big scholarship. The incident happens when the professor is out from his office. Holmes is consulted to do a mini-mini-minimo. I liked this because it is simple and brought back memories of classmates who were caught cheating during exams in school. Not that I did not think of committing similar acts! - 4 STARS The Adventure of the Golden Pince-Nez The Golden Pince-Nez is a pair of eyeglasses that gets lost during an accident killing of Willoughby Smith, secretary to Professor Coram. Check the back of the bookcase. This story is short and quite uncomplicated compared to the other stories but I enjoyed it! - 3 STARS The Adventure of the Missing Three-Quarter Very sad discovery where Staunton is. I thought that this story is sport-related until the ending. Quite surprisingly, I am liking the Holmes stories with light straightforward resolutions. - 3 STARS The Adventure of the Abbey Grange An abusive husband, Sir Eustace Brackenstall is murdered while his wife for 18 months, Lady Brackenstall is tied on a post. The lady and her maid say that the culprit is a group of 3 burglars. The answer is obvious. I knew it! I was able to predict this one! - 2 STARS The Adventure of the Second Stain A missing document from the dispatch box of the Secretary of State, Lord Bellinger. He believes that no one knows the importance of that document even his wife, Lady Bellinger. Then one of the spies hired by Holmes is killed. Tight plot. I did not see the ending coming but I again anticipated the marital problem. - 3 STARS Now my reading of the short stories about Sherlock Holmes is becoming interesting. There is a formula: crime  initial investigation  seems lame/untrue  investigate  first clues  deduction  new characters/setting/real events  conclusion. So, while reading, I can tell where I am. Then if I can predict what happens in the last two stages, it makes me happy. The only thing that I should improve on is how to do deductions! I have not been able to think the way Holmes does! He is just too smart!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Wanda

    ***The Summer of Sherlock 2019*** Sir Arthur Conan Doyle may have been reluctant to raise Sherlock Holmes from the dead, but he certainly provided some entertaining stories after his sudden return. I confess that I was quite chuffed when I had figured out what was going on in The Adventure of the Six Napoleons before the great detective was ready to reveal the motivation of the criminal. And I still have some nagging memories concerning The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton, as I am sure ***The Summer of Sherlock 2019*** Sir Arthur Conan Doyle may have been reluctant to raise Sherlock Holmes from the dead, but he certainly provided some entertaining stories after his sudden return. I confess that I was quite chuffed when I had figured out what was going on in The Adventure of the Six Napoleons before the great detective was ready to reveal the motivation of the criminal. And I still have some nagging memories concerning The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton, as I am sure that I have previously encountered this plotline and I cannot remember where! Most likely in a more recent book in which someone has borrowed from the master, but I am being driven mad because I cannot recall the source. I am so glad that Doyle brought Holmes back if only because we got The Adventure of the Dancing Men out of the deal. What an excellent story of code-breaking and villain-catching! I hold the author to blame, however, for the idea that men should be cold, intellectual, and detached from society. I think that our society would be much better if more men aspired to be John Watson, rather than Sherlock Holmes!

  12. 4 out of 5

    RJ from the LBC

    NOTE: Original review magically deleted by nefarious internet forces The sixth installment of the Holmes series, and the third collection of short stories, tells of Holmes' survival from his apparent fate in The Adventure of the Final Problem. Doyle's writing style has noticably improved since the prior short story collection, and the plot ideas, which had grown quite stale, are generally more creative although there is still a heavy reliance on "someone's past comes back to haunt them." The Adv NOTE: Original review magically deleted by nefarious internet forces The sixth installment of the Holmes series, and the third collection of short stories, tells of Holmes' survival from his apparent fate in The Adventure of the Final Problem. Doyle's writing style has noticably improved since the prior short story collection, and the plot ideas, which had grown quite stale, are generally more creative although there is still a heavy reliance on "someone's past comes back to haunt them." The Adventure of the Empty House - 3/5 - explains Holmes' return but not much of a mystery to solve The Adventure of the Norwood Builder - 3/5 - surprising twist to this murder The Adventure of the Dancing Men - 4/5 - past comes back to haunt someone, but the code is fun and makes the old plot more tolerable The Adventure of the Solitary Cyclist - 4/5 - So look out for those beauties oh yeah The Adventure of the Priory School - 4/5 - longer Holmes story with lots of work for Holmes and Watson to do The Adventure of Black Peter - 3/5 - what's that you say? Someone's past has come back to haunt them? The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton - 4/5 - Holmes and Watson on the other side of the law! Sherlock Holmes and the Adventure of the Six Napoleons - 4/5 - Not hard to figure out but fun nevertheless The Adventure Of The Three Students - 4/5 - Holmes and Watson back to school The Adventure of the Golden Pince-Nez - 3/5 - Someone's past comes back to...aw, you know the rest The Adventure of the Missing Three-Quarter - 3/5 - *sigh*...would you believe it? Someone's past comes back to haunt them... Adventure of the Abbey Grange - 4/5 - Case solved! Or is it...? The Adventure of the Second Stain - 4/5 - there must have been a second stain, over there on the grassy knoll!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Hari Hara

    Fantastic collection. Surely 5 out of 5

  14. 5 out of 5

    Teresa

    After Doyle said he would no longer write about his famous consulting detective, one might reasonably expect the quality of his stories to go down after he returned to them (due to popular demand), but I didn’t find that the case (pun unintended). Yes, some of the elements are a bit overfamiliar by now, but fans expected those, and without them Holmes and Watson are not themselves. The murders seem more violent (give the people what they want?), but the humorous dialogue (“…so you can put that in After Doyle said he would no longer write about his famous consulting detective, one might reasonably expect the quality of his stories to go down after he returned to them (due to popular demand), but I didn’t find that the case (pun unintended). Yes, some of the elements are a bit overfamiliar by now, but fans expected those, and without them Holmes and Watson are not themselves. The murders seem more violent (give the people what they want?), but the humorous dialogue (“…so you can put that in your pipe and smoke it, Mr. Busybody Holmes!” and “What did you do, Hopkins, after you made certain that you had made certain of nothing?”); and the nice descriptive writing (…ten miles of man’s handiwork on every side of us, to feel the iron grip of Nature…to the huge elemental forces all London was no more than the molehills that dot the fields.) are still present, along with something new—graphics (drawings mostly) provided to the readers so they can see what Sherlock sees. At the end of this collection, Watson says Sherlock no longer wants his stories to be published now that he has retired to the country. He wants no more publicity and to be left in peace. Poor Doyle.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Tristram Shandy

    Never Say Die, Watson! In 1901 Arthur Conan Doyle heard about the legend of a ghostly hound haunting the marshes of Dartmoor, and he was so fascinated by this tale that he decided to turn it into a story about an old family curse. Originally, there was no talk of Sherlock Holmes in this context at first, but since it occurred to the writer that he would need the character of a detective in his tale to have the family mystery unravelled, Doyle made up his mind to reactivate Sherlock Holmes, a conc Never Say Die, Watson! In 1901 Arthur Conan Doyle heard about the legend of a ghostly hound haunting the marshes of Dartmoor, and he was so fascinated by this tale that he decided to turn it into a story about an old family curse. Originally, there was no talk of Sherlock Holmes in this context at first, but since it occurred to the writer that he would need the character of a detective in his tale to have the family mystery unravelled, Doyle made up his mind to reactivate Sherlock Holmes, a conclusion in which the prospect of increasing his royalty from the Strand Magazine might have had some little momentum. However, as readers knew – to their chagrin – Holmes had met the Grim Reaper in his final struggle with Professor Moriarty, and therefore Doyle set the story told in The Hound of the Baskervilles before the fatal duel between the master detective and the master scoundrel. Some time later, though, Doyle gave in to further public demand for new Sherlock Holmes adventures, although before killing off his popular creation in the Reichenbach Falls he was sure that unless he killed Holmes, Holmes would sooner or later kill him. This time, however, it seemed impossible to have all the new cases take place before 1891, and so Doyle did something that is very familiar to watchers of modern soap operas: He undid the death of a character by retrospectively rewriting part of the story. As can be expected of Doyle, he was a little bit more imaginative than simply to claim that Watson had just dreamed Holmes’s death – a solution that would have laid itself open to troubling psychoanalytical interpretations, by the way –; instead, in the first story, The Empty House, we learn what really happened on that fateful day in Switzerland, and also why Holmes had chosen to pass for dead from 1891-94. Giving a credible account of how Holmes could have made his escape from the annoying scrape into which he was put by Moriarty, Doyle had to cheat a little bit by retrospectively altering decisive details given in Watson’s original account of the demise of Sherlock Holmes. All the same, he does it in a way that rather wrests an indulgent smile from his readers than make them bristle, for example here: ”’I stood up and examined the rocky wall behind me. In your picturesque account of the matter, which I read with great interest some months later, you assert that the wall was sheer. That was not literally true. A few small footholds presented themselves, and there was some indication of a ledge. […]’” Probably, Watson, who might have used his years with Sherlock Holmes to hone his powers of observation, also overlooked the canopied moving stairs that lead from the ledge directly to a smokers’ lounge from which the detective was able to follow the aftermath of the Reichenbach Fall events? Be that as it may, Holmes and Watson are once again reunited and, since Watson’s wife Mary has deplorably died, or conveniently been abducted by aliens, or simply vanished into thin air – our narrator hardly thinks it worthwhile to let us in on that secret –, the two men take up lodgings once again at 221b Baker Street and embark on a series of adventures the first one of which is laying Moriarty’s right hand, Colonel Sebastian Moran, by the heels. ”’[…] We will see if my three years of absence have entirely taken away my power to surprise you.’” Thus Holmes to Watson in the course of their emotion-laden first encounter after such a long spell of time, and yes! most of the new cases collected in The Return of Sherlock Holmes are highly entertaining and may well surprise the first-time reader, and it is from this collection, as well as from its two predecessors, that most film adaptations draw their material. There are some sparkling highlights among them, such as The Adventure of the Solitary Cyclist or The Adventure of the Priory School, which are well-known to any one even slightly familiar with Sherlock Holmes. At times, however, Doyle also practises the art of recycling his old tricks as when, in The Adventure of the Norwood Builder, Holmes uses a controlled fire to solve his case, and what is good enough to baffle an extraordinary woman like Irene Adler will most certainly do its service to bring down a lesser criminal. The only thing that I found strange about this adventure is how the police could take charred rabbit bones for the remains of a human body – but if I remember correctly, Lestrade was on the case, and so again, it makes perfect sense. In one instance, namely The Adventure of the Six Napoleons, the parallel to an older case is so obvious – you surely remember the Christmas geese, don’t you? – that one may begin to fear that Doyle’s inventiveness was beginning to slacken, but these doubts are soon dispelled. All in all, there are some very effective murder mysteries in this collection, my favourite being The Adventure of the Golden Pince-Nez, where Holmes gets a wonderful opportunity to show his skills of observation, deduction and, above all, setting traps. Other stories, like the one about Holmes’s encounter with the ruthless blackmailer Charles Augustus Milverton, an evil Mr. Pickwick, on the whole put our sleuth into the role of an observer. This story is remarkable nevertheless because it gives us a glimpse on the darker side of Sherlock Holmes – when, seeing the affair as ”a sporting duel between this fellow Milverton and [himself]”, he ruthlessly engages himself to Milverton’s maid in order to win her confidence and gain access into her master’s well-guarded house. Watson utters his qualms about Holmes’s procedure but is rebuffed in this way: ”’You can’t help it, my dear Watson. You must play your cards as best you can when such a stake is on the table. […]’” Surely, such a degree of callous indifference to the feelings of a housemaid displays an unsettling streak of misogyny in Holmes’s character that should incur more censure from Watson. As usual, we also get a lot of hints at cases that didn’t find their way into Watson’s published collection but nevertheless have such an appetizing ring of mystery and oddness about them that we ardently wish someone would spread them before the public eye: ”In this memorable year ‘95, a curious and incongruous succession of cases had engaged his attention, ranging from his famous investigation of the sudden death of Cardinal Tosca — an inquiry which was carried out by him at the express desire of His Holiness the Pope — down to his arrest of Wilson, the notorious canary-trainer, which removed a plague-spot from the East End of London.” Just imagine what kind of man Wilson, the notorious canary-trainer, might have been, and what the canaries could have been trained at – theft, burglary, impersonation of bigger birds like Christmas geese? Interestingly, Doyle seems to have thought that The Return of Sherlock Holmes should have been his very last foray into the exciting professional life of Sherlock Holmes, because at the beginning of the last story, The Adventure of the Second Stain, Watson tells us that Holmes has by now retired from his work and become a beekeeper on the Sussex Downs and that at his express wish, Watson is to abstain from publishing further cases from his career. Still, we need not despair because, as history would show, Holmes had not done with Doyle yet.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Irena

    The men and women of victorian England went about wearing black armbands in mourning the death of fictional Sherlock Holmes after ACD's last story collection, which was meant to be the last. The following Hound of the Baskervilles was not a true SH story insomuch as it was Watson's story. The world needed another collection, apparently. If you read all the Sherlock Homles story collections in order and in a quick succession like I did, you'll tire out somewhat and distinguishing them all becomes The men and women of victorian England went about wearing black armbands in mourning the death of fictional Sherlock Holmes after ACD's last story collection, which was meant to be the last. The following Hound of the Baskervilles was not a true SH story insomuch as it was Watson's story. The world needed another collection, apparently. If you read all the Sherlock Homles story collections in order and in a quick succession like I did, you'll tire out somewhat and distinguishing them all becomes hard. However, this collection is consistently good, but the different stories are indistinguishable and forgetable (to me). So read this if you simply enjoy SH.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    Sherlock Holmes is back! The first story in this collection, The Adventure of the Empty House, was one of my favorites because it's how Arthur Conan Doyle brought the great detective back from the dead. Doyle had previously killed the character because he was tired of writing about him, but fans were so upset (and publishers offered him more money!) that the author finally relented and wrote more stories. My other favorite stories in this collection were The Adventure of the Norwood Builder, The Sherlock Holmes is back! The first story in this collection, The Adventure of the Empty House, was one of my favorites because it's how Arthur Conan Doyle brought the great detective back from the dead. Doyle had previously killed the character because he was tired of writing about him, but fans were so upset (and publishers offered him more money!) that the author finally relented and wrote more stories. My other favorite stories in this collection were The Adventure of the Norwood Builder, The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton, and The Adventure of the Abbey Grange. I especially liked how Sherlock occasionally acts as judge and jury, and his reasons for allowing certain perpetrators to escape because he thinks their actions were justified. After making my way through six books of Sherlock, I have come to appreciate how important the character of Dr. Watson is. He must always be simple-minded and astonished by Holmes' fantastic deductions. Without that friendly reaction, I don't think these stories would have been as endearing. Next up: The Valley of Fear. As Sherlock famously said, "The game is afoot!" Note: I've been listening to all of these Sherlock stories on audio CD read by the marvelous British actor Derek Jacobi. I cannot say enough good things about his narration. I highly recommend them.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Katie Lumsden

    A very enjoyable collection, as I always find with Sherlock Holmes short stories.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ilana

    It was good to spend time with rogues from another century. And this mastermind who has such incredible analytic powers but somehow also has a soft heart for desperate cases. Humanity doesn't change much, but civility sure has. Sherlock Holmes... took me decades to finally read about the illustrious detective, and I saw Benedict Cumberbatch play the role before I came to the original stories, which evidently influenced how I picture the famous sleuth. But regardless, the original cases in their It was good to spend time with rogues from another century. And this mastermind who has such incredible analytic powers but somehow also has a soft heart for desperate cases. Humanity doesn't change much, but civility sure has. Sherlock Holmes... took me decades to finally read about the illustrious detective, and I saw Benedict Cumberbatch play the role before I came to the original stories, which evidently influenced how I picture the famous sleuth. But regardless, the original cases in their now historical settings somehow remain fresh. I can see now what the fuss is all about, and why there are so many fans and Sherlock Holmes clubs and devotees around the world. I might have become one too had I, like Stephen Fry—who narrates this audiobook to perfection, with little introductions to every volume—discovered him as a wee young thing, filled with curiosity and eager to put my intelligence and obsessive attention to detail to good use.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Norah Una Sumner

    Really enjoyed reading this! This is a really interesting,mysterious,fun collection of 13 Sherlock Holmes stories."The Adventure of the Norwood Builder" is my favourite one,it's really spellbinding and funny.Dr.Watson is awesome as always.The only thing that I didn't like is the fact that the bad guys always look like the bad guys-their eyes are narrow and evil,their chins are weak.No one is destined to be something based on how he looks-no one is actually born to be a murderer,a thief etc.I like Really enjoyed reading this! This is a really interesting,mysterious,fun collection of 13 Sherlock Holmes stories."The Adventure of the Norwood Builder" is my favourite one,it's really spellbinding and funny.Dr.Watson is awesome as always.The only thing that I didn't like is the fact that the bad guys always look like the bad guys-their eyes are narrow and evil,their chins are weak.No one is destined to be something based on how he looks-no one is actually born to be a murderer,a thief etc.I liked everything else,though. Favourite quotes: "You would not call me a marrying man, Watson?" "No, indeed!" "You'll be interested to hear that I'm engaged." "My dear fellow! I congrat-" "To Milverton's housemaid." "My dear Holmes!" "I wanted information, Watson."

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jim Ef

    He's back!!! How could i give anything but 5 stars? I can only imagine how people in the early years of the 20th century, how much joy they had in their hearts when the beloved character came back from the dead to solve another mystery. You know what he is still alive. Characters like Sherlock Holmes never die.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Stinky Girl

    I just love the Sherlock Holmes adventures.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Anze

    "I have heard your name, Mr. Sherlock Holmes, and I am aware of your profession- one of which I by no means approve." "In that, Doctor, you will find yourself in agreement with every criminal in the country," said my friend, quietly. Its been three years since Sherlock Holmes died, or so thought his companion, Dr. Watson. One day Watson notices a rather unusual individual who reveals himself to be the famed detective. Sherlock explains how he could not come back until now for certain individuals a "I have heard your name, Mr. Sherlock Holmes, and I am aware of your profession- one of which I by no means approve." "In that, Doctor, you will find yourself in agreement with every criminal in the country," said my friend, quietly. Its been three years since Sherlock Holmes died, or so thought his companion, Dr. Watson. One day Watson notices a rather unusual individual who reveals himself to be the famed detective. Sherlock explains how he could not come back until now for certain individuals after him needed to believe he was dead. And Holmes returns in the nick of time as London and its surroundings need him to put criminals away. In a volume of thirteen short stories, Watson chronicles some of the detective's most impressive feats. This has been a most enjoyable and impressive collection of short stories. I have to say, its one of my favorite Holmes collection that I have read so far. Sherlock Holmes has been presumed dead for the past three years. In reality, the detective survived but stayed away for some time for some members of Moriarty's criminal organization were after him. But now he is back and ready to take on the cases that baffle Scotland Yard and other individuals and institutions. This is a good mix of stories as there s variety of crimes, characters, motives, red herrings and impressive reveals. And the interactions between Sherlock and Watson never dissapoint.The quality of the prose is exquisite and each story is fantatically crafted. I wish there had been more. Needless to say, I thorougly enjoyed this book. The Return of Sherlock Holmes was first published as separate short stories in The Strand Magazine from 1903-1904. This volume follows right after Holmes' "death" in The Final Problem, published in 1893. Arthur Conan Doyle found himself under pressure to bring back the famed detective by the public after the unexpected death and I, for one, am glad he did. Its sad that there is a finite amount of Sherlock Holmes books and I myself, is reaching the end (I am reading the Sherlock Holmes books in sequence). What a treat it is to read these books.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Marlene

    'There were no footmarks.' 'Meaning that you saw none?' 'I assure you, sir, that there were none.' 'My good Hopkins, I have investigated many crimes, but I have never yet seen one which was committed by a flying creature. As long as the criminal remains upon two legs so long must there be some indentation, some abrasion, some trifling displacement which can be detected by the scientific searcher.' The Return of Sherlock Holmes (1905, McClure, Phillips & Co.) by Arthur Conan Doyle, is a collection 'There were no footmarks.' 'Meaning that you saw none?' 'I assure you, sir, that there were none.' 'My good Hopkins, I have investigated many crimes, but I have never yet seen one which was committed by a flying creature. As long as the criminal remains upon two legs so long must there be some indentation, some abrasion, some trifling displacement which can be detected by the scientific searcher.' The Return of Sherlock Holmes (1905, McClure, Phillips & Co.) by Arthur Conan Doyle, is a collection of mysteries in short story form, which were originally published serially in The Strand magazine. I wanted to read this book because I've always enjoyed Sherlock Holmes stories, and at some point, my husband purchased an Audible version of all the Sherlock Holmes stories published by Doyle. I've been intermittently enjoying them since I found the gem in our Audible collection. (My husband read them all front to back!) Rating: 4.5 stars Narration: 5 stars I've included a spoiler-free summary of each story's premise (courtesy of Wikipedia), so if you don't want to read those, skip to the end of my review. The Adventure of the Empty House -- 5 stars Premise (from Wikipedia): "...an apparently unsolvable locked-room murder takes place in London: … the killing of the Honourable Ronald Adair... He was in his sitting room, working on accounts of some kind... nothing has been stolen, and it seems that Adair had not an enemy in the world… Ronald's door was locked from the inside. The only other way out was the open window, and there was a 20-foot (about 6 m) drop below it onto a flower bed, which now shows no sign of being disturbed." The Adventure of the Norwood Builder - 5 stars Premise (from Wikipedia): " '...the unhappy John Hector McFarlane' ... has been accused of murdering one of his clients, a builder called Jonas Oldacre. McFarlane explains to Holmes that Oldacre had come to his office… and asked him to draw up his will… McFarlane saw… that Oldacre was making him the sole beneficiary… to a considerable bequest, and McFarlane cannot imagine why Oldacre would do so. That business took McFarlane to Oldacre's house in Lower Norwood.... McFarlane left quite late... He claims to have read about the murder in the newspaper the next morning... The paper said... that the police were looking for him." The Adventure of the Dancing Men - 4 stars (I disliked the end of this story.) Premise (from Wikipedia): "Hilton Cubitt… visits Sherlock Holmes and gives him a piece of paper with a mysterious sequence of stick figures. Cubitt explains… that he has recently married an American woman named Elsie Patrick. Before the wedding, she had asked her husband-to-be never to ask about her past… Their marriage had been a happy one until the messages began to arrive, first mailed from the United States and then appearing in the garden. The messages had made Elsie very afraid but she did not explain the reasons for her fear, and Cubitt insisted on honoring his promise not to ask about Elsie's life in the United States." But he felt justified in asking Holmes for assistance. (view spoiler)[ This one has an unhappy ending. (hide spoiler)] The Adventure of the Solitary Cyclist - 4.5 stars Premise (from Wikipedia): "Holmes is contacted by Miss Violet Smith…[who, along with her mother] met Mr. Carruthers and Mr. Woodley... Carruthers and Woodley explained that before dying, [Violet's Uncle] Ralph had heard of his brother's death and felt responsible for his survivors' welfare. Carruthers began by offering Violet a job as a live-in music teacher for his ten-year-old daughter at £100 a year, about twice the going rate. She accepted after Carruthers said that she could visit her mother on weekends… The specific thing that has brought Violet to seek Holmes's services, however, is the strange man who follows her on his bicycle as she cycles to and from the railway station for her weekend visits to her mother. The strange man always keeps his distance behind her and disappears without a trace, never letting her near him, and always along the same lonely stretch of road." The Adventure of the Priory School - 5 stars (This might be my favorite!) Premise (from Wikipedia): "Holmes receives a visit from Dr. Thorneycroft Huxtable, the founder and principal of a preparatory school called Priory School in Northern England. He beseeches Holmes to come back to Mackleton with him to look into the disappearance of one of his pupils, the ten-year-old Lord Saltire, whose father is the very rich and famous Duke of Holdernesse. Huxtable explains that not only the boy has disappeared, but also the German master, Heidegger, along with his bicycle." The Adventure of Black Peter - 4.5 stars Premise (from Wikipedia): "Forest Row in the Weald is the scene of a harpoon murder… Peter Carey, the 50-year-old victim and former master of the Sea Unicorn of Dundee... had a reputation for being violent. Carey did not sleep in the family house, but in a small cottage that he built some distance from the house, ...[which] look[ed] like a sailor's cabin on a ship. This is where he was found harpooned. [The investigator] could find no footprints or other physical evidence. However, a tobacco pouch made of sealskin and with the initials "P.C." was found at the scene, which was full of strong ship's tobacco. This is rather unusual, as Peter Carey—or "Black Peter" as people called him—seldom smoked… Carey was found fully dressed, suggesting that he was expecting a visitor, and there was some rum laid out along with two dirty glasses… There was also a knife in its sheath at Carey's feet; Mrs. Carey has identified it as her husband's." (view spoiler)[I took off .5 stars because there is a very unlikely coincidence which complicates the case. (hide spoiler)] The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton - 4.5 stars Premise (from Wikipedia): "Holmes is hired by the débutante Lady Eva Blackwell to retrieve compromising letters from a blackmailer… Milverton is "the king of blackmailers". He demands £7,000… for the letters, which would cause a scandal that would end Lady Eva's marriage engagement. Holmes offers £2,000, all Lady Eva can pay, but Milverton insists on £7,000... Holmes resolves to recover the letters by whatever means necessary, as Milverton has placed himself outside the bounds of morality." Sherlock Holmes: "If ever he blackmailed an innocent person, then, indeed, we should have him; but he is as cunning as the Evil One. No, no; we must find other ways to fight him.” I'd say that "adventure" is a good term for this story. It doesn't seem to be quite a mystery, but it's still a good story. I don't love the moral code of the protagonists here, and so I don't want to give it more than 4.5 stars. The Adventure of the Six Napoleons - 4.5 stars Premise (from Wikipedia): "Inspector Lestrade of Scotland Yard brings Holmes a mysterious problem about a man who shatters plaster busts of Napoleon. One was shattered in Morse Hudson's shop, and two others, sold by Hudson to a Dr. Barnicot, were smashed after the doctor's house and branch office had been burgled. Nothing else was taken… The busts in question all came from the same mould, when there are thousands of images of Napoleon all over London. The next day, Lestrade calls Holmes to a house where there has been yet another bust-shattering, but there has also been a murder." I am entirely perplexed as to why there are busts of Napoleon all over the place. That would be like having paintings of Hitler all over the place. I don't get it. Any theories, readers??? Minus .5 star for Doyle reusing a concept from an earlier Holmes mystery. The Adventure of the Three Students - 5 stars Premise (from Wikipedia): "Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson find themselves in a university town when a tutor and lecturer of St Luke's College, Mr. Hilton Soames, brings him an interesting problem. Soames had been reviewing the galley proofs of an exam he was going to give when he left his office for an hour. When he returned, he found that his servant, Bannister, had entered the room but accidentally left his key in the lock when he left, and someone had disturbed the exam papers on his desk and left traces that show it had been partially copied. Bannister is devastated and collapses on a chair, but swears that he did not touch the papers… [The exam is] for a sizeable scholarship." The Adventure of the Golden Pince-Nez - 4 stars Premise (from Wikipedia): "Inspector Stanley Hopkins visits Holmes at 221B Baker Street to discuss the violent death of Willoughby Smith, secretary to aged invalid Professor Coram… The murder happened…. with a sealing-wax knife of the professor's.... Hopkins can identify no motive for the killing... Smith was found by Coram's maid, who recounts his last words as "The professor; it was she… A lone piece of evidence was found in Willoughby Smith's hand: a pair of golden pince-nez glasses. Holmes examines these and from them alone deduces" an astounding number of things about its owner. Minus one star because I'm still confused on one point, and even after reading online summaries of the story, I still don't feel enlightened. I don't understand why -- a huge spoiler here -- (view spoiler)[ the professor hides her. Under the circumstances, it really doesn't make sense at all to me. (hide spoiler)] The Adventure of the Missing Three-Quarter - 4.5 stars Premise (from Wikipedia): "Mr. Cyril Overton of Trinity College, Cambridge, comes to Holmes seeking his help in Godfrey Staunton's disappearance. Staunton is the key man on Overton's rugby union team (who plays at the three-quarters position, hence the story's title) and they will not win the important match tomorrow against Oxford if Staunton cannot be found… Staunton had seemed a bit pale and bothered earlier in the day, but late in the evening, according to a hotel porter, a rough-looking, bearded man came to the hotel with a note for Staunton which, judging from his reaction, contained rather devastating news. He then left the hotel with the bearded stranger… No one has seen them since." I enjoy missing person stories. This one was (view spoiler)[ rather depressing. (hide spoiler)] Minus .5 because I really feel that there should have been a little bit of an epilogue to let the reader know what happens next! The Adventure of the Abbey Grange - 5 stars Premise (from Wikpedia): "Sir Eustace Brackenstall has been killed, apparently by burglars… Lady Brackenstall tells Holmes that her marriage was not happy… She then tells that about 11 o'clock, ...she encountered an elderly man coming in the French window, followed by two younger men. The older man struck her in the face, knocking her out. When she came to, she was tied ...and gagged. Then Sir Eustace came into the room, and rushed at the intruders. One of them struck and killed him with a poker. Lady Brackenstall fainted again for a minute or two. She saw the intruders … [leaving], taking some silver plate." The Adventure of the Second Stain - 5 stars Premise (from Wikpedia): "Lord Bellinger, the Prime Minister, and the Right Honourable Trelawney Hope, the Secretary of State for European Affairs, come to Holmes in the matter of a document stolen from Hope's dispatch box, which he kept at home in Whitehall Terrace when not at work. If divulged, this document could bring about very dire consequences for all Europe, even war." I like this one a lot. It's just FUN! ********** Audiobook: The narration by Simon Vance was very good. The bottom line: I'm again finding that I love the Sherlock Holmes short stories. I'd recommend to anyone, older teens and up.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Darinda

    Sherlock Holmes is resurrected! He's back, and solving mysteries, in this collection of thirteen short stories. An enjoyable collection, and a must-read for fans of Sherlock Holmes. The stories: 1. The Adventure of the Empty House 2. The Adventure of the Norwood Builder 3. The Adventure of the Dancing Men 4. The Adventure of the Solitary Cyclist 5. The Adventure of the Priory School 6. The Adventure of Black Peter 7. The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton 8. The Adventure of the Six Napoleons 9. The Sherlock Holmes is resurrected! He's back, and solving mysteries, in this collection of thirteen short stories. An enjoyable collection, and a must-read for fans of Sherlock Holmes. The stories: 1. The Adventure of the Empty House 2. The Adventure of the Norwood Builder 3. The Adventure of the Dancing Men 4. The Adventure of the Solitary Cyclist 5. The Adventure of the Priory School 6. The Adventure of Black Peter 7. The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton 8. The Adventure of the Six Napoleons 9. The Adventure of the Three Students 10. The Adventure of the Golden Pince-Nez 11. The Adventure of the Missing Three-Quarter 12. The Adventure of the Abbey Grange 13. The Adventure of the Second Stain

  26. 5 out of 5

    Pink

    More Holmes. He's back and doing his usual of belittling everyone around and solving cases using the barest evidence while Watson is still gushing over every female he comes into contact with. If this was my first experience of Sherlock I might rate it higher, but it didn't live up to previous short story collections for me. Plus I'm starting to get irritated by the class/race/sex stereotypes of the day, I know I shouldn't judge on these things as that's just how life was, but reading so many of More Holmes. He's back and doing his usual of belittling everyone around and solving cases using the barest evidence while Watson is still gushing over every female he comes into contact with. If this was my first experience of Sherlock I might rate it higher, but it didn't live up to previous short story collections for me. Plus I'm starting to get irritated by the class/race/sex stereotypes of the day, I know I shouldn't judge on these things as that's just how life was, but reading so many of the same themes one after another starts to irritate a bit. Obviously I still think this is good stuff, it's Holmes!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Barnabas Piper

    I love all things Sherlock Holmes. He might be my favorite fictional character. This particular collection of stories has some that I wasn't as familiar with and it was fun to run across them.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jaro

    Read in The Complete Sherlock Holmes.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Well, he’s back. After being presumed dead for three years, Sherlock dramatically reappears. And it IS very dramatic: there’s enough of a narcissist in Sherlock to want to stage his entrance properly. This collection is my dad’s favorite; he says that this book features several years’ worth of ideas that percolated during Doyle’s Sherlock hiatus. It certainly has some memorable stories. “The Norwood Builder,” “The Solitary Cyclist,” “The Dancing Men,” “The Priory School,” “The Six Napoleons,” an Well, he’s back. After being presumed dead for three years, Sherlock dramatically reappears. And it IS very dramatic: there’s enough of a narcissist in Sherlock to want to stage his entrance properly. This collection is my dad’s favorite; he says that this book features several years’ worth of ideas that percolated during Doyle’s Sherlock hiatus. It certainly has some memorable stories. “The Norwood Builder,” “The Solitary Cyclist,” “The Dancing Men,” “The Priory School,” “The Six Napoleons,” and “The Golden Pince-Nez” are all top-notch. “The Abbey Grange” is one of my all-time favorites, probably in my top 3, definitely top 5. The writing is solid, and Doyle uses humorous touches to great effect. And this collection is bookended by two drastic life events for Sherlock: “The Empty House” is Sherlock’s triumphant return from exile, and “The Second Stain” opens with Watson informing readers that Sherlock has retired to study bees on the Sussex Downs. So no more stories! Yeah, right. ;) But it’s not all fun and games—this collection also exemplifies what is, for me, the single most frustrating element of these stories: the endings that get dropped. I’m going to make a Shakespeare analogy here, so hang tight. Spoilers for Romeo and Juliet. (view spoiler)[Okay, here goes: You know how Romeo and Juliet fall in love pretty early on in the story, and you spend the whole play rooting for them to be all right? And in Act IV, they have this scheme with Friar Lawrence, and you kind of let yourself think, just for a moment, that it will end happily, even though you know it won’t? You keep hoping that they’ll get their HEA? And then Act V happens, and it’s so sad, and you understand how and why they die, and despite the tragedy, you at least feel like you’ve followed them on their star-crossed journey? (hide spoiler)] Well, Doyle’s story is the opposite of that. Spoilers for something that happens between “Memoirs” and “Return.” (view spoiler)[The Sign of Four was the great love story, with John and Mary falling in love and getting married. Now, in this collection, Mary has already died of something, and we don’t see it or know what it was, and we don’t see Watson’s reaction (or anyone else’s, for that matter). She’s dead when it opens, and she’s mentioned ONCE. And not even by name. So this is like Romeo and Juliet, if R&J ended with Act IV, and then the chorus came out with an epilogue in which they said, “Oops! They died, not sure how, too bad you missed it!!” This is THAT level of frustrating, for me. Here’s Mary’s great death scene from “Empty House”: “In some manner he had learned of my own sad bereavement, and his sympathy was shown in his manner rather than in his words. ‘Work is the best antidote to sorrow, my dear Watson,’ said he.” And that’s IT. “Norwood Builder” opens with Watson selling his practice and moving back in with Sherlock, and he finds out afterward that Sherlock had arranged for Watson to get a good price, so Sherlock is looking out for his widowed friend. So that was nice to see. And I know that Mary was more of a side character, so probably my Shakespeare comparison isn’t fair; these stories are not supposed to be about Watson’s marriage. They’re about Watson’s friendship with Holmes. But we, as readers, got to witness their courtship. We had the chance to root for Watson when he felt so unworthy of Mary’s hand. We had the chance to cheer when it looked like things would work out. And then, hey, guess what, she’s been dead for a while already. I’m sure it was done to make it easer for Sherlock and John to have their adventures, and by having it happen in the in-between time, Doyle can have a very sad and lonely Watson who is at his most vulnerable when Sherlock comes back. Even so, I feel cheated. (hide spoiler)] Despite all this, still a very strong collection of stories, with much to recommend it.

  30. 4 out of 5

    JK

    This collection of short mysteries takes place three years after Holmes’ catastrophic and monumental ‘death’. It’s fascinating to read of the public’s reaction to this at the time, which no doubt led to Doyle’s resurrection of the great detective. Despite my gratitude at his death being nothing but a clever ruse (what else could it be?) these short stories left me longing for another full length adventure with Holmes and Watson. There’s definitely a formula being followed here, and although it’s This collection of short mysteries takes place three years after Holmes’ catastrophic and monumental ‘death’. It’s fascinating to read of the public’s reaction to this at the time, which no doubt led to Doyle’s resurrection of the great detective. Despite my gratitude at his death being nothing but a clever ruse (what else could it be?) these short stories left me longing for another full length adventure with Holmes and Watson. There’s definitely a formula being followed here, and although it’s noticeable, it isn’t particularly tiresome. Each case brings its own suspicious characters, inconsequential clues, and mind-blowing solutions. There’s a clever way of weaving which makes part of the outcome easy to predict, and yet the final deduction is something our own minds can never parallel. It really is no wonder these stories can stand the test of time, and I’ll never cease to be amazed at how impressive they still are all these years later. Although not the best of the collection – perhaps Doyle lost a bit of his mojo after only bringing Holmes back on the basis of demand – it still holds everything we already know and love about this pair. As stated above, I am more than ready for a longer mystery, and my next foray with Holmes will be in The Valley of Fear.

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