web site hit counter The Poet - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Poet

Availability: Ready to download

Denver crime-beat reporter Jack McEvoy specializes in violent death. So when his homicide detective brother kills himself, McEvoy copes in the only way he knows how--he decides to write the story. But his research leads him to suspect a serial killer is at work--a devious murderer who's killing cops and leaving a trail of poetic clues. It's the news story of a lifetime, if Denver crime-beat reporter Jack McEvoy specializes in violent death. So when his homicide detective brother kills himself, McEvoy copes in the only way he knows how--he decides to write the story. But his research leads him to suspect a serial killer is at work--a devious murderer who's killing cops and leaving a trail of poetic clues. It's the news story of a lifetime, if he can get the story without losing his life.


Compare

Denver crime-beat reporter Jack McEvoy specializes in violent death. So when his homicide detective brother kills himself, McEvoy copes in the only way he knows how--he decides to write the story. But his research leads him to suspect a serial killer is at work--a devious murderer who's killing cops and leaving a trail of poetic clues. It's the news story of a lifetime, if Denver crime-beat reporter Jack McEvoy specializes in violent death. So when his homicide detective brother kills himself, McEvoy copes in the only way he knows how--he decides to write the story. But his research leads him to suspect a serial killer is at work--a devious murderer who's killing cops and leaving a trail of poetic clues. It's the news story of a lifetime, if he can get the story without losing his life.

30 review for The Poet

  1. 5 out of 5

    James Thane

    Measured against the standard set by most crime fiction writers, this is a pretty good book, but based against the standard set by Michael Connelly it's sort of average, somewhere in the middle of the pack of the large number of books he has now produced. This seems a bit odd, because the protagonist in this book is a newspaper reporter and Connelly was himself a reporter for a good number of years before he became a novelist. One would think that Connelly would have this character nailed. In tr Measured against the standard set by most crime fiction writers, this is a pretty good book, but based against the standard set by Michael Connelly it's sort of average, somewhere in the middle of the pack of the large number of books he has now produced. This seems a bit odd, because the protagonist in this book is a newspaper reporter and Connelly was himself a reporter for a good number of years before he became a novelist. One would think that Connelly would have this character nailed. In truth, though, the author doesn't begin to inhabit the character of Jack McEvoy in the same way and to the same depth as he does the character of his more noted series protagonist, homicide detective Harry Bosch. McEvoy is well drawn, but he's not nearly as compelling or as interesting as Bosch. The book opens with the apparent suicide of McEvoy's twin brother, Sean, a Denver homicide detective. Sean had been severely depressed, agonizing over his failure to solve a particularly brutal homicide. Everyone assumes that Sean was unable to live with his failure and so decided to take his own life. Jack is reluctant to believe that his brother would do such a thing, but the evidence seems overwhelming, and McEvoy ultimately accepts it. As a reporter, Jack specializes in writing about homicide cases and he decides to do an article on his brother's death. In researching the subject, he discovers that a number of other homicide detective across the country have apparently committed suicide in ways similar to his brother, Sean. Jack now begins to have second thoughts and ultimately concludes that Sean did not kill himself but was, in fact, the victim of a serial killer who has been targeting homicide detectives. Jack ultimately convinces several departments to reopen these cases and when it becomes clear that Jack is right, the FBI comes on board. Jack forces his way into the investigation and so has a close up view of the investigation and the hunt for the perpetrator who becomes known as The Poet. Along the way, Jack will become involved with a beautiful FBI agent named Rachel Walling and before all is said and done, Jack winds up putting himself in the sights of the deadly Poet. This is a tense, well-written book that is especially illuminating about the methods that the FBI uses for profiling and chasing serial killers. It should appeal to large numbers of crime fiction readers, and even if it is not quite as good as several of Connelly's other novels, that's only because Connelly himself has set the bar so high.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kemper

    Oh, mid-‘90s, how quaint you seem in this book published in ‘96 with your dial-up internet connections, faxes, pagers, landline phones, and new-fangled digital cameras. Perhaps the thing dating this the most is the idea that The Rocky Mountain News editors’ biggest concern is that they’ll get scooped by another newspaper in the fast paced world of print journalism, and not that their entire industry will collapse and they’ll be out of business by 2009. Of course, if all their reporters acted lik Oh, mid-‘90s, how quaint you seem in this book published in ‘96 with your dial-up internet connections, faxes, pagers, landline phones, and new-fangled digital cameras. Perhaps the thing dating this the most is the idea that The Rocky Mountain News editors’ biggest concern is that they’ll get scooped by another newspaper in the fast paced world of print journalism, and not that their entire industry will collapse and they’ll be out of business by 2009. Of course, if all their reporters acted like Jack McEvoy, it’s no wonder they went broke. Jack’s twin brother was a cop who apparently shot himself, but when Jack decides to exploit his tragic death by writing a story about police suicides, the research indicates that a serial killer has been stalking cops across the country and making it look like they killed themselves. Soon Jack has blackmailed his way onto an FBI task force chasing the killer by ruthlessly threatening to expose the hunt and maybe spooking the guy, but letting his brother’s murderer potentially go free is a small price to pay to get a really righteous scoop. He runs up a huge expense account bill by tagging along as the FBI tracks the killer across the country, and he never really does give the Denver paper the juicy exclusives they’re expecting. So it seems like the old Rocky Mountain News had some pretty sloppy business practices going on when it came to covering stories. You can probably tell that I wasn’t overly fond of Jack as a character. I found him self-absorbed and incredibly stupid at times. It’s too bad, because this was a better than average serial killer story with new take on the premise and lots of good twists and turns to keep it interesting. If I would have found Jack more sympathetic, I probably would have liked it more.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jonetta

    Jack McEvoy is a newspaper reporter in Denver. When his twin brother, Sean, a homicide detective, is found dead in his car by what's ruled a self-inflicted gunshot, Jack decides he wants to write his story. But, the more he probes, his suspicions grow about it possibly being a murder. As he continues his research, Jack lands himself into an FBI investigation that points to a diabolical serial killer. While this case is referenced in early Harry Bosch stories, Harry doesn't make an appearance her Jack McEvoy is a newspaper reporter in Denver. When his twin brother, Sean, a homicide detective, is found dead in his car by what's ruled a self-inflicted gunshot, Jack decides he wants to write his story. But, the more he probes, his suspicions grow about it possibly being a murder. As he continues his research, Jack lands himself into an FBI investigation that points to a diabolical serial killer. While this case is referenced in early Harry Bosch stories, Harry doesn't make an appearance here. But, it's important to get the background on the case origins before Harry does get involved so that's why it is part of the Harry Bosch Universe. Now, regarding the story. This one is really different because Jack's a reporter, not a detective or private investigator so he doesn't have cop instincts. I had to check myself on occasion when Jack didn't react the way I thought he should have, like a cop. That's a tribute to Connelly because I think he got it right as a journalist. In addition to Jack's first person narrative, we also get the voice of the suspect, which was pretty awful due to the subject matter but quite essential to the story. I enjoyed this twisting and turning, around-the-bend-and-back case. I must admit to being a bit shocked at the ending, even though I had growing suspicions. The narrator was fine but I associate Buck Schirner with the Monkeewrench series so that was a distraction. And, he sounds older than Jack. Otherwise, it was a very interesting story with lots of tangents.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Georg

    I really liked this book. It has a strong beginning and a lot of credible characters. What I liked most was the fact that it seemed to end on page 450. I thought: Ok, not a bad solution, but a bit obvious. But then I noticed there were still 100 pages to go. Finally I realized the end was not the end, but only a fake end, and then the "real story" was about to begin. Very strong and surprising until the very last page. I really liked this book. It has a strong beginning and a lot of credible characters. What I liked most was the fact that it seemed to end on page 450. I thought: Ok, not a bad solution, but a bit obvious. But then I noticed there were still 100 pages to go. Finally I realized the end was not the end, but only a fake end, and then the "real story" was about to begin. Very strong and surprising until the very last page.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Scott Rhee

    Some things are better left unsaid, so the saying goes. I personally disagree with that sentiment. While very few topics are considered “taboo” anymore, a few cultural taboos still linger; subjects upon which many writers still fear to tread due to its general unpleasantness. Cancer used to be taboo. So did adultery and homosexuality. Taboos succeed in creating an atmosphere in which feelings never get expressed and problems never get solved. Taboos generally make things worse. Pedophilia is, in s Some things are better left unsaid, so the saying goes. I personally disagree with that sentiment. While very few topics are considered “taboo” anymore, a few cultural taboos still linger; subjects upon which many writers still fear to tread due to its general unpleasantness. Cancer used to be taboo. So did adultery and homosexuality. Taboos succeed in creating an atmosphere in which feelings never get expressed and problems never get solved. Taboos generally make things worse. Pedophilia is, in some ways, still a taboo subject. It’s probably taboo for a good reason, as the word itself is cringe-worthy. It stops conversations dead, makes everyone feel uncomfortable, and brings to mind nothing but disturbing thoughts and images. It’s understandable why pedophilia is a taboo subject, but it’s also important to note that it’s an issue that needs to be addressed. Keeping quiet and turning a blind eye is what got the Catholic church in trouble regarding this issue, so it’s not an issue that can simply be swept under the rug anymore. Of course, tactfulness and discretion is always in order. Outside of memoirs and other nonfiction, pedophilia is not an issue many fiction writers are willing to tackle. The few writers willing to confront the subject matter often find ways of doing it subtly; bringing it up without actually having to bring it up. Those few writers who don’t tiptoe around the subject are often accused of being too “in your face” or “graphic”. It’s a tough subject to deal with in writing. Michael Connelly, in his riveting but disturbing novel “The Poet”, attempts to write about pedophilia without walking on eggshells. It’s graphic and horrifying and makes the reader naturally uncomfortable, which are the book’s strengths AND weaknesses. I consider “The Poet” a successful failure of a novel. To explain: Connelly uses the subject matter of pedophilia to create a taut, edge-of-the-seat crime thriller, something which he succeeds in doing. He also succeeds in creating a thoroughly unpleasant read, precisely because of the subject matter. “The Poet” is an excellent thriller, but it is not a fun read. Of course, I may be coming at this reading with a unique perspective, one that I did not have a year ago. Indeed, if I had read this book a year ago, i’m sure that may appreciation for this book would have been much different. What’s changed? Well, for one, I’m now a father. Prior to having a child, I never fully appreciated or understood how truly life-changing it was to become a parent, nor how completely in love one person can be with another. In my child’s face I see a perfect genetic blend of my wife and me. I see my past and my future, and I see a hope for the human race. I also now understand the intense feelings of protectiveness that inherently comes with parenthood. I would do anything to shelter and protect my little girl from the evils of the world. Pedophiles are the natural enemies of parents. They are a parent’s polar opposites: Whereas parents want to nurture and see grow, pedophiles want to defile and destroy. Whereas parents want to keep pure, pedophiles want to sully and contaminate. Prior to having my child, I was, perhaps, somewhat of a “bleeding heart” liberal and a Christian in my views toward pedophiles: maybe they CAN be rehabilitated and cured of their sickness, and it is the judicial system’s and the church’s duty to try. Pedophiles aren’t monsters, after all. They are still human beings, albeit flawed, and, most likely, victims themselves. Nowadays, to that I say: Bullshit. Pedophiles are evil and incomprehensibly so. Whatever possesses a human being to do something so ugly and inhuman to a child is beyond comprehension and beyond my sympathetic and empathetic capabilities. I don’t care if they were victims themselves. I no longer care or believe that they can be rehabilitated, because I would never allow a known pedophile---rehabilitated or otherwise---anywhere near my child. And, despite my Judeo-Christian upbringing and belief in tolerance and nonviolence, I would have no hesitation or guilt in defending my daughter, even if it includes killing a pedophile. It frightens me to say that, but it is true. In “The Poet”, one of Connelly’s characters, a seasoned FBI agent named Rachel Walling, expresses similar views to the protagonist, Jack McEvoy. He and the reader are, I suppose, expected to feel shocked and appalled by her statement. She is, after all, an agent of the Law. She is beholden to upholding the Law and supporting the basic moral tenet that murder is wrong and unforgivable, and yet she admits to having no problems wanting to put a bullet in the brains of a pedophile. I found myself surprised to feel no shock or disgust at what she was saying. I whole-heartedly agreed with her. There is a certain genius in Connelly’s writing talent that one is never sure how one is “supposed” to feel about anything in the book. There is no manipulation of emotions. He leaves it up to us, the readers, to bring our own sense of morality to the reading. Take the protagonist, Jack McEvoy, for example: He is a Denver journalist who, after the very controversial and publicized suicide of his older brother (the lead homicide detective of an investigation into the brutal murder of a young schoolteacher), stumbles upon evidence that the police originally missed that confirms that his brother’s suicide was actually a murder. McEvoy quickly does more research that reveals a serial killer’s trail across the country. While his investigative skills carry the investigation, the reader is never fully convinced that he is doing it for the right reasons. Is he doing all this to avenge his brother, or is he simply hoping to find that Big Story, the one that may finally get him a Pullitzer Prize and a higher-paying job as a staff reporter for a newspaper like the Chicago Tribune or the Los Angeles Times? At times, McAvoy seems like a good guy, just trying to clear his brother’s reputation. At other times, he looks like a self-aggrandizing asshole. Connelly refrains from making any editorial judgment. The killer himself is an interesting character study in duality. At once perverted and vicious, the killer’s life is gradually revealed in bits and pieces that are meant to help us understand, if not necessarily sympathize, with why he does what he does. From an objective standpoint, the killer’s life is a sad one, and he appears (like almost all pedophiles) to have been a victim of gross sexual abuse as a child himself. From a subjective standpoint, I didn’t give a shit. I hated him, and my hatred made me uncomfortable. It is not a side of myself that I liked seeing. Sadly, this discomfort carried over to the rest of the novel, tainting what I would have otherwise considered an excellent thriller. Through no fault of Connelly’s. I respect Connelly for not walking on eggshells and for telling it like it is. I admire the fact that he was not afraid to be graphic when necessary because turning a blind eye to this kind of inhumanity is, in my opinion, just as dangerous as those who perpetrate this type of inhumanity. While some things may very well be better left unsaid, continued physical and sexual abuse of children should never be one of those things that are swept under the rug or dismissed or simply ignored because it’s “too uncomfortable” a subject matter.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Arah-Lynda

    Wow, from the opening line Death is my beat. to the chilling conclusion, this haunting tale grabs you by the scuff of your neck and never lets go. Meet Jack McEvoy a reporter who makes his way covering murder stories. Little does he know that the next story he will write involves the death of his own brother, an apparent suicide. Jack has a difficult time accepting that his brother Sean, a homicide detective, would take his own life, further still he does not understand his brother's last words, Wow, from the opening line Death is my beat. to the chilling conclusion, this haunting tale grabs you by the scuff of your neck and never lets go. Meet Jack McEvoy a reporter who makes his way covering murder stories. Little does he know that the next story he will write involves the death of his own brother, an apparent suicide. Jack has a difficult time accepting that his brother Sean, a homicide detective, would take his own life, further still he does not understand his brother's last words, written by his hand just before death " Out of space. Out of time" He begins to investigate the possible meaning in that message and in the process uncovers other deaths and other quotes, left by a suicidal hand. It would seem that other detectives also quoted Edgar Allan Poe in their final dying moments. As Jack's investigation continues it becomes clear that he is on the path of a serial killer of unprecedented savagery. On more than one occasion as I followed Jack on his hunt for the killer I was sure I had it figured out. Not! This one keeps you guessing, delivering unexpected twists and turns as you navigate the final chapters, most likely white knuckling each page at break neck speed. A haunting and irresistable thriller!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Obsidian

    Not too much to say here except this was kind of middling. This was one of the earlier Connelly books and he ended up inserting these characters into the larger Bosch world novels later on. They definitely worked better in a Bosch book than a Jack McEvoy book. I think it's because I honestly did not care for Jack. Some of his insights as we find are incorrect. He ends up doubting everything and everyone and is focused on not getting pushed out of the investigation. I also have to call BS that a Not too much to say here except this was kind of middling. This was one of the earlier Connelly books and he ended up inserting these characters into the larger Bosch world novels later on. They definitely worked better in a Bosch book than a Jack McEvoy book. I think it's because I honestly did not care for Jack. Some of his insights as we find are incorrect. He ends up doubting everything and everyone and is focused on not getting pushed out of the investigation. I also have to call BS that a reporter would even be allowed into a FBI manhunt for a serial killer but of course it makes sense when you get to the ending. "The Poet" follows Jack McEvoy who is left reeling after his twin brother's suicide. When Jack starts digging though, he ties his brother's investigation into a cold case to links to other suicides of police with cases they could not solve. When Jack stumbles upon a probable serial killer, he is pulled into the FBI investigation. He meets Special Agent Rachel Walling and her boss/supervisor Robert Backus along with some other FBI agents. Connelly also explores another point of view in this story, we follow William Gladden who is a pedophile that a link to the cases that Jack and the FBI is trying to solve. The character of Jack, eh. I really didn't care for him. Comparing him to Bosch he was definitely just okay. Having an entire book about him and his hunt for the truth was kind of boring. I think mostly because Jack's reasons for staying involved with the case were not really noble. He says it's for his brother, but really it's for the story and glory of what he is getting involved with. His "insights" into things was laughable too. He goes and pesters people and starts notes, but when he is working with Rachel and others, they are the ones who are putting things together. I also didn't like the relationship with Rachel, probably because Jack was questioning it and her almost immediately about what did it mean and were they together. He seemed to be written in a way to fit whatever Connelly was trying to do and not really as a developed character. The Jack we meet at the beginning of the book didn't really seem the relationship type. The other characters are so-so with regards to development. Gladden was developed very well and his sections were hard to read. I think the book would have worked better if we didn't see inside his head though. Just make the focus be on Jack like it usually is on Bosch for the Bosch books. The writing was all over the place. I have to say certain things didn't make sense and the flow didn't help things. Jumping from Jack to Gladden was a lot to wade through (this book was 528 page) and I was glad to be done. The setting of the book jumps all over and I can't even recall the cities/states right now. The ending didn't really work. Things get resolved with regards to the Poet in "The Narrows" though and I liked that one much better, I gave it 4 stars. I will read the next book in the McEvoy series soon, that's called "The Scarecrow."

  8. 5 out of 5

    William

    2.5-stars perhaps. Alternately exciting and absurd, full of outrageous plot holes, with a protagonist who seems lost much of the time.... I really struggled with this book, and almost put it down for good several times. - However, I was told that it is important for my next Harry Bosch The Narrows And to be fair, about half of the book is superbly paced, but with the unsympathetic protagonist dragged along. The extremely repulsive villain, and again the subject of (view spoiler)[the abuse, mutilat 2.5-stars perhaps. Alternately exciting and absurd, full of outrageous plot holes, with a protagonist who seems lost much of the time.... I really struggled with this book, and almost put it down for good several times. - However, I was told that it is important for my next Harry Bosch The Narrows And to be fair, about half of the book is superbly paced, but with the unsympathetic protagonist dragged along. The extremely repulsive villain, and again the subject of (view spoiler)[the abuse, mutilation and murder of children (hide spoiler)] (which I tried mostly to skip over), left me ill. I did enjoy Rachel Walling, most of the time, but what she sees in McEvoy is completely beyond me.... Some supporting characters were good while others were laughable - right out of high school *facepalm* The first climax of this book was acceptable, but then, as Connelly often writes, there is a twist. Then another, then another, with the final resolution not being a resolution at all. (And then more short chapters after that *Godzilla Facepalm*) A roller-coaster of a mess. Ugh.

  9. 4 out of 5

    ✨Susan✨

    Loved this one and now starting on the second. Hope it is as good. Great story great characters.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mike (the Paladin)

    I read The Lincoln Lawyer about a week ago and have been on a sort of "Michael Connelly marathon" ever since. I like the writer and I like his books. I think I still like The Micky Haller character best of his creations but this is my favorite book "outside that series" so far. The Poet is a psychopathic killer who has been killing for a fairly long time. Not sure how long because see, his victims have so far been mistaken for suicides. That is they were until one of them was Jack McEvoy's broth I read The Lincoln Lawyer about a week ago and have been on a sort of "Michael Connelly marathon" ever since. I like the writer and I like his books. I think I still like The Micky Haller character best of his creations but this is my favorite book "outside that series" so far. The Poet is a psychopathic killer who has been killing for a fairly long time. Not sure how long because see, his victims have so far been mistaken for suicides. That is they were until one of them was Jack McEvoy's brother. Jack is a reporter and as such the cops (nor the FBI) wants to listen to him, that is until he comes up with irrefutable proof that not only was his brother not a suicide but that his death is tied in with other deaths. The story is very well constructed and the book is what is usually termed a "page turner". I like it greatly and highly recommend it. So...why then do i give it a 4 instead of a 5? Well, as some of you (who've read many of my reviews) may knew I'm really not into emotional stories. A romance will get the ole "heave-ho" form me on a heartbeat and if a romance or emotionally loaded character line takes over a book I'm still prone to "move on". Well, the romance doesn't actually "take over" here but it does "weigh heavily". Mr. Connelly has a couple of flaws (at least to me) that tend to show up in his books. Now and then the character do something totally illogical...well, or fail to do the common sense thing. Also they have emotional baggage, I mean BIG emotional baggage. If these people take a plane cross country they probably have to pay extra for all that baggage...it does get old. Still that aside it's a good book and I really can recommend it, I like it greatly. Enjoy.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sue

    I received a recommendation from a Goodreads member to read "The Poet" by Michael Connelly. I am so glad I listened to their recommendation.This was an amazing novel...the best I have ever read by this talented author. Jack McEvoy was a reporter for the Rocky newspaper, who wrote about murder stories."Death was his Beat." Sean,his twin brother,a veteran Denver Police detective was in charge into the slaying of a University student, Theresa Lofton, found dead of an apparent self-inflicted gunshot I received a recommendation from a Goodreads member to read "The Poet" by Michael Connelly. I am so glad I listened to their recommendation.This was an amazing novel...the best I have ever read by this talented author. Jack McEvoy was a reporter for the Rocky newspaper, who wrote about murder stories."Death was his Beat." Sean,his twin brother,a veteran Denver Police detective was in charge into the slaying of a University student, Theresa Lofton, found dead of an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound.Sean McEvoy was found in his unmarked car...an apparent suicide. There was a note written on the windshield that said, "Out of Space. Out of Time." But both Jack and Sean's wife, Riley, didn't believe that he would commit suicide.It didn't add up! Then Jack decides to dig deeper...and find out what really happened to his brother. He joins forces with the FBI to solve the mystery. The FBI began a manhunt for a serial killer who had claimed as many as seven homicide detectives as his victory.He was named "The Poet" because he left notes containing lines of poetry from the work of Edgar Allan Poe, at each murder scene, disguising the deaths as suicides. This was an amazing psychological thriller, a serial killer on the loose...It was so well written, and I was glued to the book from the beginning.If you enjoy reading mystery suspense thrillers with a twist...get this book. You won't be disappointed.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mandy White (mandylovestoread)

    Review to come

  13. 5 out of 5

    Paul O'Neill

    Wow, what a book. Excellent story, great attention to detail and fantastic characters. Connelly has confirmed himself (in my mind) as the best in the game. Everyone else pales in comparison.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Richard

    8/10 Michael Connelly is pretty much my go to guy at the minute for a solid crime thriller. The amount of books this guy has churned out is quite impressive but more so is the fact that there haven’t really been any duds (or none of which I have read to date) and it looks like soon he will be having his own TV series for his most prominent character “Bosch” airing on Amazon (the trailer looks good and I believe the first episode is free to air). This book is a standalone and introduces new charac 8/10 Michael Connelly is pretty much my go to guy at the minute for a solid crime thriller. The amount of books this guy has churned out is quite impressive but more so is the fact that there haven’t really been any duds (or none of which I have read to date) and it looks like soon he will be having his own TV series for his most prominent character “Bosch” airing on Amazon (the trailer looks good and I believe the first episode is free to air). This book is a standalone and introduces new characters and locations. Crime reporter Jack McEvoy is the lead and is left unsatisfied with the verdict that his brother has committed suicide and decides to do what he knows best, start researching and putting strands together to find out the truth. Not long into the story those strands turn to webs and lead to things getting pretty hectic. Before you know it, Jack Mac is in with the FBI globetrotting around being the main guy in the investigation and on the hunt for the elusive “Poet” with several potential enemies. Instantly you can tell that Michael Connelly used to be a crime reporter with the way he writes like a man who knows what he’s talking about. The plot zips by as usual and before you know it you’ve read the majority of the book and are deep into the investigation. It’s not his most impressive work but for a quick read and a look into the world of media in the 90’s/early 00’s then it’s pretty interesting and enjoyable. The tech (which was probably top notch back then) is quite laughable but forget about that and get into the story and go with it. Dial up modem, ha. How I laughed. There are a few red herrings and some plot twists but that is expected with this sort of book and leads to a solid conclusion if not a totally unpredictable one. Highly enjoyable and another top rated read. I look forward to getting back into the Bosch series. If you like this try: “The Bone Detective” by Jeffery Deaver.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mara

    This is less of a review than it is a sort of caveat to my rating—the caveat being that I listened to this book. I don't know if there are multiple audio versions of The Poet out there, or if they just love to re-copyright things every few years, but the 1996 audible edition felt like it undermined the story's natural suspense. Don't get me wrong, Michael Connelly's brand of mystery/thriller writing isn't exactly subtle, but echo-chamber effects made moments of tension feel do This is less of a review than it is a sort of caveat to my rating—the caveat being that I listened to this book. I don't know if there are multiple audio versions of The Poet out there, or if they just love to re-copyright things every few years, but the 1996 audible edition felt like it undermined the story's natural suspense. Don't get me wrong, Michael Connelly's brand of mystery/thriller writing isn't exactly subtle, but echo-chamber effects made moments of tension feel downright hokey. That being said, the many twists and turns made it a worthwhile experience (and I definitely still trust Richard's recommendations*). Jack McEvoy's role as a reporter makes him into a different sort of leading man. McEvoy is a storyteller by trade, so it feels natural that his narrative voice frames the tension so well. “Most homicides are little murders. That’s what we call them in the newspaper business. Their effect on others is limited, their grasp on the imagination is short-lived. They get a few paragraph on the inside pages. Buried in the paper the way victims are buried in the ground…Theresa Lofton’s was no little murder. It was a magnet that pulled at reporters from across the country. Theresa Lofton was the girl in two pieces.” There were moments at which I had to make a concerted effort to suspend disbelief, but in the end, it was an enjoyable read, just not a recommended listen. ____________________________________ *I take full responsibility for going “off-piste” by listening to the audio version.

  16. 4 out of 5

    kartik narayanan

    I loved this book. Why? New character. Great serial killer mystery. Twist at the end. What's not to like about this combination. Unfortunately, I came to this book knowing the ending as I had read its spiritual successor first. So the twist was sort of ruined for me. But, I enjoyed the book in spite of this since the journey is excellent. There is some great detective work involved - which is to be expected since this is written by Michael Connelly. Another trademark of his writing is that most I loved this book. Why? New character. Great serial killer mystery. Twist at the end. What's not to like about this combination. Unfortunately, I came to this book knowing the ending as I had read its spiritual successor first. So the twist was sort of ruined for me. But, I enjoyed the book in spite of this since the journey is excellent. There is some great detective work involved - which is to be expected since this is written by Michael Connelly. Another trademark of his writing is that most characters are "broken" in a sense.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Fred

    In Denver, crime reporter Jack McEvoy’s (Rocky Mountain News) finds his twin brother, Det. Sean M. (Denver police) was found dead - killed/suicide by shotgun? His car with a “fogged” windshield message had – "Out of space, out of time" – audit trails of Edgar Allan Poe’s poems leading to other police murders/suicides? The Murderer is becoming known as The Poet. Det. Sean McEvoy was under extreme stress investigating a University of Denver student, Theresa Lofton, found in 2 pieces by gunshot woun In Denver, crime reporter Jack McEvoy’s (Rocky Mountain News) finds his twin brother, Det. Sean M. (Denver police) was found dead - killed/suicide by shotgun? His car with a “fogged” windshield message had – "Out of space, out of time" – audit trails of Edgar Allan Poe’s poems leading to other police murders/suicides? The Murderer is becoming known as The Poet. Det. Sean McEvoy was under extreme stress investigating a University of Denver student, Theresa Lofton, found in 2 pieces by gunshot wounds in the Rocky Mountain National Park. Jack & Racheal Walling(FBI) help find police murders/suicides across many cities .....Chicago, California, etc. Jack & Racheal develop some love during their crime investigations. They find murder(s) are sexually attracted & leave naked pictures of victims behind. The suspect(s) are stupid, seem different, separate schemes? But suspects murder together? Good end. YouTube - Audiobook-part 1 YouTube - Audiobook-part 2

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    My first non Harry Bosch by Connelly & I'm impressed. Jack is a great character & the plot was fantastic, especially twisty. Great characters, very realistic. I loved the way so many cases were handled & how easily other interpretations could come of the results. Good could be bad or maybe not. Connelly really knows how to walk the gray lines & made this quite a unique mystery thriller. I'm definitely looking forward to continuing his books. Next up is Harry Bosch #5, Trunk Music. My first non Harry Bosch by Connelly & I'm impressed. Jack is a great character & the plot was fantastic, especially twisty. Great characters, very realistic. I loved the way so many cases were handled & how easily other interpretations could come of the results. Good could be bad or maybe not. Connelly really knows how to walk the gray lines & made this quite a unique mystery thriller. I'm definitely looking forward to continuing his books. Next up is Harry Bosch #5, Trunk Music.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    While there are lots to like in this story, there are a few issues that leave this listener unfulfilled. The main protagonist is whiny, weak and dense at times. Overall, a solid if not completely satisfying novel. 7 of 10 stars

  20. 5 out of 5

    Abbas Fardil

    Plot selection of Connelly for this book surprised me. That was totally unpredictable conclusion for me. There were not a rainfall of plot twist, but the whole story was a great TWIST!!!! Um, Connelly bro needs to avoid excessive and irrelevant adult scenes.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    It's been a long time since I've read a straight-up police procedural style thriller... and I've missed it. I love the fast paced style, the clues, trying to figure things out along with the characters, seeing inside the system, all of it. I don't know why I don't read more of these, but I think this book has just reminded me how much I enjoy them, and why I should read more of them. I really, really enjoyed this one. I can't give it a full 5 star rating, because I had just a few issues with it, It's been a long time since I've read a straight-up police procedural style thriller... and I've missed it. I love the fast paced style, the clues, trying to figure things out along with the characters, seeing inside the system, all of it. I don't know why I don't read more of these, but I think this book has just reminded me how much I enjoy them, and why I should read more of them. I really, really enjoyed this one. I can't give it a full 5 star rating, because I had just a few issues with it, but I will definitely be reading the next book in the series, and I'll be looking into Connelly's other books, too. The beginning of the book definitely got my attention and sucked me in. I love an emotional hook -- if it's done well -- and I think that for a thriller, this was done pretty well. Jack's homicide detective brother was found in his car dead of an apparent suicide. There was no warning, no signs that this might happen... just the note, a single line of poetry, written on the foggy windshield. The emotional aspect was almost perfect, maybe a tiny bit wooden on the part of the grieving new widow, ("Oh... No. Oh, God... No!") but honestly, that's nit-picky, because it could very well be attributed to shock. But mostly my emotional link here was Jack, and Connelly nailed him. He perfectly captured the disbelief, the shock, the hurt, the grief, the anger, the detachment... all of it. I love that this was a twin-brothers-but-not-twin-people situation too... They were twins, and shared a kind of closeness you'd expect of brothers, but they weren't twins in the overplayed "I can feel your thoughts" kind of way. They were their own people, in addition to being two halves of a whole. I appreciated that. I thought that the investigation was well done, well paced, and well thought out. I enjoyed every stage of it, and even though I knew that this was only the first book of a series, I was still worried about what might happen. Each new piece of the puzzle fascinated me, and I wanted to know more and more. I was kept on my toes the entire time, and every prediction I made was wrong. Close... plausible... but wrong. That makes me happy. I hate when I figure out the answer before the characters do, although I guess that means I'll never be FBI. *sigh* One thing that did bother me just a bit (and this is one of the issues that made me drop a star), was that I felt that the relationship with Jack and Rachel Walling was a little off, and that it was more a plot point than a realistic budding relationship. For someone so awkward with women, and for someone so seemingly focused on her work, they made things happen very quickly after a very rocky introduction. I would have enjoyed more angry sexual tension before the "My place or yours?" question came up. I also thought that the dual point of view narration was very well handled. First person from Jack's perspective, and 3rd person limited from a 3rd party. It actually threw me off initially, because most books pick one style and stay with it throughout the book. I actually worried a little that the book had strayed into a kind of supernatural bent, and that Jack was catching glimpses of things pertaining to the investigation, but didn't know how they fit yet. That wasn't the case, and I'm glad, because I really did appreciate that this was just a straight-up investigative thriller. I really don't read enough of those... but I plan on rectifying that.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Becky C. Hennessy

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This is a reasonably well-written book and, in places, a true page-turner with a solid premise. That said, ultimately I couldn't get past the book's weaknesses. For one, it's simply implausible that the victims -- homicide detectives, no less -- could be rendered helpless by such innocuous substances as cough syrup (seriously?) combined with hypnosis (of all things)? I had a problem with this, as I did with key character McEvoy's unrealistic involvement with the FBI investigation. Was anyone else This is a reasonably well-written book and, in places, a true page-turner with a solid premise. That said, ultimately I couldn't get past the book's weaknesses. For one, it's simply implausible that the victims -- homicide detectives, no less -- could be rendered helpless by such innocuous substances as cough syrup (seriously?) combined with hypnosis (of all things)? I had a problem with this, as I did with key character McEvoy's unrealistic involvement with the FBI investigation. Was anyone else bothered that McEvoy's character felt inconsistent and underdeveloped, that his astute insights didn't match his seeming passivity? For much of the book the guy was shoved around and bland, a dud with little to say -- to the point where I felt ticked off, and never "got" Rachel's interest in him, not remotely. Also: I was nodding off over the trifling details in the conversations among the various characters; the book easily could have been pared back by a third, or so. This is my first Michael Connelly book, but it doesn't seem like his best effort; sorry, but he didn't care enough (or his editor didn't) and that's unacceptable to me. He writes better than many authors and, as such, I'd read another of his books, but not without consulting with a good number of reviews first.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Dave

    The Poet is a pretty hefty novel, weighing in at 501 pages. Don't let that dissuade you from reading it. It's one of Connelly's best novels. It is well written and fast paced. Read this one before Reading The Scarecrow which picks up Jack and Rachel's story many years later. Also. Read this before reading the Narrows where Bosch and Rachel chase a serial killer. The story begins in Denver with Jack McEvoy, a reporter, whose brother, a pice officer, placed a gun in his mouth and pulled the trigge The Poet is a pretty hefty novel, weighing in at 501 pages. Don't let that dissuade you from reading it. It's one of Connelly's best novels. It is well written and fast paced. Read this one before Reading The Scarecrow which picks up Jack and Rachel's story many years later. Also. Read this before reading the Narrows where Bosch and Rachel chase a serial killer. The story begins in Denver with Jack McEvoy, a reporter, whose brother, a pice officer, placed a gun in his mouth and pulled the trigger. Jack hasn't been close to his brother lately, but he doesn't buy the suicide and starts looking into the case, particularly the Edgar Allen Poe verse scrawled on the windshield. When he finds a similar cop suicide in Chicago, Jake heads to DC to view an FBI study on cop suicides and runs into Rachel Walling, the toughest and most beautiful special agent ever. From there, the race is on to get the Poet before he kills again. Few other authors could make a novel of such length read so easily. A great crime novel with good character development.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Richard Derus

    Rating: 3.5 very pleased stars of five Connelly's Harry Bosch series will either make you want to read this book, or run from it. I liked the Harry Bosch mysteries well enough, but I really respond more to Jack McEvoy, Denver journalist and crusader for the rights of victims of crime. This is the first appearance by McEvoy. He's hot on the trail of a cop-killer, one whose talent for murder makes him able to turn a crime scene into a suicide scene. Jack's brother, a homicide cop, is dead...and natu Rating: 3.5 very pleased stars of five Connelly's Harry Bosch series will either make you want to read this book, or run from it. I liked the Harry Bosch mysteries well enough, but I really respond more to Jack McEvoy, Denver journalist and crusader for the rights of victims of crime. This is the first appearance by McEvoy. He's hot on the trail of a cop-killer, one whose talent for murder makes him able to turn a crime scene into a suicide scene. Jack's brother, a homicide cop, is dead...and naturally Jack wants to know how the current spate of killings relate to the Poet, as this serial killer is known. What happens next is everything! Connelly uses the now-mundane Internet and email (how quaint!) to give the story immediacy and scary new dimensions, and those tropes don't stand up well as stand-alones. Connelly, however, didn't graft them onto the story he told, he made them part and parcel of the case from the get-go. It's very well-built stuff, as one would expect from this capable author. What's not so exciting is the plot resolution, but hey...at least it's not *bad*, just *expected*. I for one felt no sense of "...wha...where...HUH?" that marks out the very best of thrillers. But it's streets away from being blah! Just not...all the way, if you know what I mean. Read and enjoy. Just don't expect to need to do sock patrol after you're done, they won't be blown right off.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Robin

    Newspaper Reporter Jack McEvoy is having a hard time coping with the suicide of his twin brother, Detective Sean McEvoy. Sean was found in his police vehicle, dead from a gunshot wound. A short note was scrawled on the windshield. Jack tries to deal with the situations by writing his brother's story. But research into police suicides leads Jack to believe that his brother may have been murdered. Jack begins to see a pattern between a series of homicide detective deaths. They were all working on Newspaper Reporter Jack McEvoy is having a hard time coping with the suicide of his twin brother, Detective Sean McEvoy. Sean was found in his police vehicle, dead from a gunshot wound. A short note was scrawled on the windshield. Jack tries to deal with the situations by writing his brother's story. But research into police suicides leads Jack to believe that his brother may have been murdered. Jack begins to see a pattern between a series of homicide detective deaths. They were all working on unsolved homicides involving children. All were declared suicides, and all left a short note that contained a line of poetry written by Edgar Allen Poe. When Jack gives the FBI the information he has dug up, he makes a deal that he will be part of their investigation and write the exclusive story when they arrest the Poet. This gives the reader first-hand information about the case from a character who is not a cop. I thought that gave the mystery a very different feel. Michael Connelly has written an excellent mystery. I latched onto the person I thought was the killer early in the book, but I was wrong. I highly recommend this story. My rating: 4.5 Stars.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    Michael Connelly can write and make the world take notice. His Bosch and Heller series are, by all accounts, some of his best work. He is also known to weave characters in from his different series and make it a real party. He did some of that here, though, truth be told; both major characters originate here and turn up with Bosch and Heller in their books later on. Some interesting work in this, a quasi-first person perspective of a journalist chasing a killer while a great many things pan out Michael Connelly can write and make the world take notice. His Bosch and Heller series are, by all accounts, some of his best work. He is also known to weave characters in from his different series and make it a real party. He did some of that here, though, truth be told; both major characters originate here and turn up with Bosch and Heller in their books later on. Some interesting work in this, a quasi-first person perspective of a journalist chasing a killer while a great many things pan out (or fail). This is not some of Connelly’s strongest work, but it does take us away from the direct law enforcement genre of characters. That said, the crime beat reporter is put in the middle of a highly contentious investigation as his twin has been murdered. We learn a lot of interesting facts and see how things are not always as they seem, in the end of an investigation. While I have said it before, one may be best to read Connelly in chronological order and not series by series (because of the character spill-overs) I did enjoy the book and the early years of Jake McEvoy. I am now into his latter book, THE SCARECROW, which has some promise. Well done, Mr. Connelly. I know you seem to be sticking to your two favourite characters of late, but these oldies tell interesting stories too.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Toni Osborne

    Book #1 in the Jack McEvoy series Not surprising Mr. Connelly is a bestselling author. “The Poet” is an intense and captivating mystery of a reporter’s single-minded pursuit of the serial killer who murdered his twin. This was his first departure from his crime novels featuring Harry Bosch, we all came to know very well. This novel was published in 1996 and won the Anthony Award and the Dilys Award the following year. Why did I take so long to read it? (Too many books on my TBR list). The story is Book #1 in the Jack McEvoy series Not surprising Mr. Connelly is a bestselling author. “The Poet” is an intense and captivating mystery of a reporter’s single-minded pursuit of the serial killer who murdered his twin. This was his first departure from his crime novels featuring Harry Bosch, we all came to know very well. This novel was published in 1996 and won the Anthony Award and the Dilys Award the following year. Why did I take so long to read it? (Too many books on my TBR list). The story is told mainly in the first person narrative from the perspective of reporter Jack McEvoy and his nemesis the mysterious character named “Eidolon”, Mr. Connelly switches to the third person when the story is told from the view point of Gladden, the pedophile. The transition from one character to the other is professionally done and very smooth. I really like how Michael Connelly takes us into the world of reporting. His experience as a former writer for a newspaper makes the reporter stuff such as deadlines and chasing down leads sound so authentic. Being written a long time ago makes some of the technology outdated but if you were around then you will definitely remember the phone booth, the sound of a modem dialing…a bit of nostalgia…does no harm… Of course death is at the heart of this novel. A serial killer is at large, his target: homicide cops and the killer’s calling card is a quotation from the woks of Edgar Poe. When Jack decides that the best way to exorcise his grief is by writing a feature on police suicides he soon finds himself involved in an FBI investigation of a serial killer referred to as the Poet….Jack meets Rachael Walling, the lead investigator. This is a page-turner I had a hard time to put down so captivated I was to see how Jack would manage to pull through the intricate web of conspiracy he found himself in. The mystery has great characterization, a plot line that moves along at a steady pace, rich and colourful narration and strong dialogue. No wonder this was and still is a winner.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Cathy DuPont

    “For her passivity in these horizontal moments was diametrically opposed to her demeanor in our vertical moments.” Quote from Jack McEvoy from The Poet. Sentences like that just capture my heart. It could be easily said to be trite or ordinary, maybe, but sometimes I like ordinary, at times, anyway. And I always, always love Michael Connelly’s writing. He’s the best contemporary writer today, in my opinion. The Narrows was next on my list, and it was Tay, Anthony or Tiftoboy…one of them suggested “For her passivity in these horizontal moments was diametrically opposed to her demeanor in our vertical moments.” Quote from Jack McEvoy from The Poet. Sentences like that just capture my heart. It could be easily said to be trite or ordinary, maybe, but sometimes I like ordinary, at times, anyway. And I always, always love Michael Connelly’s writing. He’s the best contemporary writer today, in my opinion. The Narrows was next on my list, and it was Tay, Anthony or Tiftoboy…one of them suggested I read The Poet first. I can now check this one off of my Connelly list of books read. What I call my “yuk factor” was about a nine on a scale one to 10. A few too many “yuks” for my liking. Although it was a good book, Jack McEvoy, a journalist with the Rocky Mountain News, wasn’t all that impressive to me as the main character. He didn’t seem to be very confident although I give him high grade on persistence. And he was definitely not very confident with women. My real thought here I thought he was a wuss. The guys, of course, may disagree with me on that but of course, theirs is from a man’s perspective. It was a pretty good story with the usual for Connelly, surprises throughout. It just didn’t seem up to par with Connelly’s other books. Otherwise, a pretty good read which I’m glad I did because Harry Bosch has grown on me and I want to get to the next in the series. I'm a fan of Raymond Chandler and according to Connelly’s Goodreads bio, he is also fan. Further Connelly went to the University of Florida and took a class from noted southern writer, Harry Crews. The Goodreads bio on Michael Connelly was excellent by the way. As is MC.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jennie Veazey

    Entertaining! I loved this book and Jack McEvoy is my new favorite character. Next, The Scarecrow. Book two in the series. Waiting for the next installment from Michael Connelly. Jack McEvoy is a Rocky Mountain news reporter who writes the crime-beat. News comes through to him that his twin brother a Denver homicide detective has committed suicide. Upon further investigation Jack begins to look at this differently and begins investigating other supposed cop suicides. I listened to the audible ve Entertaining! I loved this book and Jack McEvoy is my new favorite character. Next, The Scarecrow. Book two in the series. Waiting for the next installment from Michael Connelly. Jack McEvoy is a Rocky Mountain news reporter who writes the crime-beat. News comes through to him that his twin brother a Denver homicide detective has committed suicide. Upon further investigation Jack begins to look at this differently and begins investigating other supposed cop suicides. I listened to the audible version and was completely engrossed in the book. It was awesome and I highly recommend this book!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Donna

    There were things I liked about this book, and on the other hand, there were things I didn't care for. And on top of that, this felt so dated with the technology. That is always a risk that doesn't seem to payoff in the long run. I'll settle for 3 stars, even though in some ways, that seems extremely generous. First, I like Michael Connelly. He is my third most read author. His Harry Bosch series is one of my favorites. I also like the way his stories are always in constant motion, and they are n There were things I liked about this book, and on the other hand, there were things I didn't care for. And on top of that, this felt so dated with the technology. That is always a risk that doesn't seem to payoff in the long run. I'll settle for 3 stars, even though in some ways, that seems extremely generous. First, I like Michael Connelly. He is my third most read author. His Harry Bosch series is one of my favorites. I also like the way his stories are always in constant motion, and they are never boring (even when I'm rolling my eyes). In this book, Jack is the MC and I liked him, but I'm not going to lie....there were problems with this. Many of the other characters were stereotypical....no quirks...no individuality. I didn't like them. I didn't hate them. Also some of dialogue and actions seemed not only dated as well, but they didn't go with what I was being asked to believe (especially with Rachel, and the FBI bigwig). I wanted to love this like I have loved his other books, but that didn't happen. So 3 stars.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.